Dugas, Jeanne National Historic Person

Cheticamp, Nova Scotia
Estampe print and watercolour representing a view of Louisbourg in North America, taken from the Light House when the city was beseiged in 1758 (© Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, Collection of Canadiana, Peter Winkworth, R9266-1520.)
Louisbourg
(© Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, Collection of Canadiana, Peter Winkworth, R9266-1520.)
Address : Cheticamp, Nova Scotia

Recognition Statute: Historic Sites and Monuments Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. H-4)
Designation Date: 2014-09-30
Life Date: 1731 to 1817

Other Name(s):
  • Jeanne Dugas (1731-1817)  (Designation Name)
Research Report Number: 2012-06(P); 2012-06-A(P)

Importance: Her life illustrates the experiences of Acadians in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, before, during and after the Grand Dérangement (the Deportation).

Plaque(s)


Existing plaque:  Chéticamp, Nova Scotia

The life story of Jeanne Dugas illustrates the experiences of Acadians in the second half of the 18th century. She and her family fled Ile-Royale (Cape Breton Island) to escape the deportation of 1758, but were later captured by the British and imprisoned in Halifax. Freed sometime after the end of the war in 1763, they returned home to Ile Royale. Midwife, keeper of Acadian stories, and co-founder of Chéticamp around 1785, she helped create a flourishing community. Dugas, who lived through eight dislocations in all, embodies the resourcefulness and resilience of Acadian women who survived through 50 years of upheaval and war.