The Vuntut Gwitchin have an ancient history marked by a continued connection to the land and the animals. Vuntut National Park protects the northern part of the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation Traditional Territory, and is valued as a place where Gwich’in teachings are passed from generation to generation.

Indigenous culture

Vuntut Gwitchin translates to “people of the lakes” – Gwitchin meaning people; Vuntut referring to Van Tat, the Old Crow Flats, a network of two thousand plus shallow lakes. For countless generations, the Vuntut Gwitchin have lived in the Old Crow Flats and Porcupine River areas in the northern Yukon. 

History

Vuntut National Park was established in 1995 as part of the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation Final Agreement, to conserve, protect and present to Canadians a portion of the North Yukon Natural Region, to recognize Vuntut Gwitchin history and culture and to protect the traditional and current use of the park by the Vuntut Gwitchin.

Photos and video

Immerse yourself in the world of the Vuntut Gwitchin and see for yourself how caribou fences were used -- try a 3D fly through, listen to elders’ stories, learn Gwich'in words for caribou, and see photos of the remains of caribou fences.