Monitoring

Parks Canada’s monitoring work is the voice of flora, fauna and the processes necessary for a healthy functioning ecosystem. The information that we collect from insects, trees, fish and wildlife tells us their story. We work hard to get their stories right! In Ivvavik we use two key indicators to measure and report on how healthy our park ecosystems are: freshwater and tundra. Each indicator has five specific ecological measures used to assess the health of the indicator ecosystem. We regularly monitor and assess these measures to get a clear picture of whether we are successfully maintaining and restoring the park ecosystems. This helps us to plan and make decisions that will keep Ivvavik National Park ecosystems healthy for the present and the future.

Research

When questions come up from monitoring or from communities, research can answer them. We begin by collecting data that gives us a detailed picture of the issue. We use this picture to come up with and test out solutions. We use the results to make improvements and solve problems.

Parks Canada encourages research and monitoring projects in the protected areas we manage. As national parks in the western Arctic are co-managed with the Inuvialuit under the Inuvialuit Final Agreement (IFA), our research permitting process has additional steps and complexity. In general, plan for a minimum of three to four months to complete all of the necessary steps.

All research activities in national parks or historic sites must take place under the authority of a Parks Canada Research/Collecting Permit for natural and physical sciences or a Parks Canada Archaeological Research Permit. Contact Parks Canada early and build your proposal based on our guidelines and suggestions.

You must send a copy of all permits and licenses to Parks Canada, at the contact given below, before a Parks Canada Research/Collecting Permit or Archaeological Permit can be issued.

    Research Guides

    To obtain a good overview of the Northwest Territories (NWT) research permitting process, go to the Aurora Research Institute's (ARI) website or write/phone them for a copy of their guide, Doing Research in the Western Northwest Territories: a guide for researchers. To obtain a good overview of the Yukon North Slope's process, read the Wildlife Management Advisory Council’s (North Slope) Yukon North Slope Research Guide.

    Both of these guides are excellent resource documents covering topics such as: which permits, licenses and review processes apply, where to find funding, how to involve communities in research and monitoring, how to consult with the communities, how to access traditional and local knowledge, how to communicate information to the communities, and ethical conduct.

    Environmental Assessment

    All research conducted on Crown Lands within the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, which our parks and Landmark fall within, must be screened by the Environmental Impact Screening Committee (EISC), the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board (YESAB), the Aurora Research Institute (ARI) or the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre (PWNHC) before it can be licensed by Parks Canada. For information on how to make a submission to the EISC, download their Operating Guidelines and Procedures. Proposals must be received by the Environmental Impact Screening Committee at least one month prior to the meeting at which they will be screened. Call (867) 777-2828 to find out the dates of scheduled meetings.

    Other federal permits and licenses

    If research is to be conducted on migratory birds, a Migratory Birds Scientific Permit is required. Within the Yukon, apply to Wildlife Enforcement, Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada, R.R. 1, 5421 Robertson Rd., Delta, BC, V4K 3N2. Tel: 604-940-4710. Within the NWT apply to Wildlife Enforcement Coordinator, Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada, Box 637, Yellowknife, NT, X1A 2N5. Tel: 867-920-6060, Fax: 867-873-8185.

    Yukon Territory permits and licenses

    All archaeological or anthropological research within the Inuvialuit Settlement Region requires approval from the Inuvialuit Social Development Program of the Inuvialuit Regional Corporation. Contact them through the Joint Secretariat at adminjs@jointsec.nt.ca.

    If you are conducting archaeological or paleontological research in the Yukon, a Yukon Archaeological Sites Regulation Permit is required from the Heritage Branch, Dept. of Tourism, Government of the Yukon, Box 2703, Whitehorse, YT, Y1A 2C6. Tel: 867-667-5363, Fax: 867-667-8844.

    For all non-archaeological or non-paleontological research that may extend beyond the boundaries of Ivvavik National Park a Yukon Scientists and Explorers License is required, from the department listed above.

    Conditions of Approval

    Please read the conditions of approval before submitting your research proposal to the western Arctic Research Collection Permit Coordinator.

    Conditions of approval PDF 487 KB

    Issuing of Parks Canada Research/Collection Permit

    Once the research proposal has been approved, the issuing of a permit will depend upon receipt of all approvals from the Environmental Screening Committee and other required licensing agencies. It is the responsibility of the research project leader to ensure that these approvals are transmitted to the western Arctic Research Collection Permit Coordinator.

    Once these approvals have been received, a Parks Canada Research/Collection Permit will be issued upon the agreement that the researcher adheres to the conditions identified above and any others that may be attached to the permit.

    The permit may be picked up at the Parks Canada office in Inuvik (81 Kingmingya Road) or arrangements can be made to have it sent via mail or email. One copy must be signed and returned to the Parks Canada office. Researchers are strongly encouraged to check in with the Parks Canada office to check on recent conditions and any closures that may have come into effect prior to entering Parks Canada sites.

    This permit is valid until December 31 of the issuing year, unless the project has been approved for multiple years, in which case the permit will state the expiry date on it.

    Checklist of Permits, Licenses and Approvals Required

    Non-archaeological research entirely within a national park or site:

    • Parks Canada Research/Collecting Permit
    • Environmental Impact Screening Committee Approval
    • Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board Approval
    • Migratory Birds Scientific Permit (for migratory bird projects only)
    • Approval of the appropriate community organization

     

    In addition, if your research extends beyond the park or site boundaries, you require:

    • Yukon Scientists and Explorers License

     

    Archaeological research entirely within a national park or site:

    • Parks Canada Archaeological Research Permit
    • Environmental Impact Screening Committee Approval
    • Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board Approval
    • Approval for Archaeological Research from the Inuvialuit Regional Corp.
    • Yukon Archaeological Sites Regulation Permit
    • Approval of the appropriate community organization

     

    Remember, it is the proponent's responsibility to ensure that copies of all required permits, licenses and approvals are forwarded to the Parks Canada western Arctic Research Collection Permit Coordinator. Parks Canada will not issue research permits until these external approvals are received.

For more information about research and monitoring in Ivvavik National Park, contact the Parks Canada office in Inuvik at infoinuvik-inuvikinfo@pc.gc.ca.