With over 3800km2 of mixed wood boreal forest, fescue meadows, wetlands and lakes for you to discover, Prince Albert National Park offers visitors a true wilderness experience. Exploring wild places like Prince Albert National Park can be both rewarding and challenging. Make your trip into the backcountry a safe and memorable one. Remember to take the essential items with you, file a trip plan and be familiar with your equipment.

Hiking

Whether going for an hour or for several days, a hiking or backpacking excursion can be a great way to see new country or revisit favorite areas. While we never plan for things to go wrong, it is important to be prepared for the inconveniences that sometimes arise. Having the essential items in your pack, filing a trip plan, checking current weather forecasts and making sure your gear is in good condition before heading out can keep a minor issue from becoming an emergency.

Cellular telephone coverage varies by carrier and may not be available in remote areas of Prince Albert National Park. It is important to be prepared for any emergency or delay that may arise.

To learn more about backcountry safety talk to a Parks Canada staff member or visit AdventureSmart.

Paddling

A day kayak trip on the Hanging Heart Lakes or an overnight canoe adventure on the Kingsmere Lake can be a vacation highlight. To make the most of your paddling adventure it is important to plan ahead. Carrying the essential safety items, filing a trip plan and being familiar with your equipment will help prevent minor issues from becoming a life threatening situation.

Remember, always wear an approved personal flotation device and use caution while on the water. Even during the summer months many Saskatchewan lakes have water temperatures that can lead to hypothermia in a short time. Plan your routes close to shore to minimize your time in the water should you capsize.

Saskatchewan weather can change quickly. Be alert to changes in wind and weather conditions. Know your limitations, wait on shore for weather conditions to improve if you are struggling on the water.

Using the Kingsmere Lake Rail Portage
The access to Kingsmere Lake with your vessel is via a rail portage system. Use caution when using the winch system to load and unload your vessel. Ensure your vessel is properly and firmly secured to the rail car. Know your limits and exercise caution when pushing the cart. With a vessel loaded and tied down, the cart is extremely heavy. Do not attempt to portage on your own. Never ride on top of the rail cart.

Information on paddling safety can be obtained at the Visitor Center or visit AdventureSmart.

Backcountry Camping

Backcountry camping is available throughout Prince Albert National Park. There is no potable water supply located in the backcountry. Be prepared to purify your own water or bring a supply with you. For your safety and the safety of others, keep all fires within the designated fire pits (where available) and check local fire conditions before heading out.

A clean campsite, free of animal attractants is the best way to prevent wildlife conflicts in campgrounds. An animal attractant is any item that has an odour or may be visually associated with food. Food items, personal hygiene products, dirty dishes, pet food, garbage, even an empty cooler are all examples of an animal attractant. When not being used, these items should be stored in a secure location such as your RV, vehicle or designated storage facility provided by Parks Canada. Leaving these items unattended in your campsite, even for only a few minutes, puts yourself and other campers at risk.

Remember, cooking in or near your tent is dangerous and can leave odours that may attract wildlife!

Other ways of ensuring your backcountry safety include, filing a trip plan and bringing the ten essential items with you on your trip.

For more information on traveling in the back country visit AdventureSmart.

Power Boating

Crean and Kingsmere lakes offer a unique opportunity to bring your motorised vessel into the backcountry of Prince Albert National Park. Because of the remoteness and isolation of these lakes it is important that you are prepared for the unexpected. Knowing how your equipment works, watching out for paddlers and having the proper safety equipment will all help ensure that everyone safely enjoys their time on the lake.

Saskatchewan weather can change quickly. Be alert to changes in wind and weather conditions. Conditions can often become too dangerous for small vessels. Know your limitations and be prepared to wait on shore for weather conditions to improve.

Always wear an approved personal flotation device and use caution while on the water. Ensure that your vessel has the required safety equipment on board and that you are familiar with its operation. Please operate your motorized vessel in a manner that complies with Transport Canada’s pleasure craft legislation. As in other motor vehicles, it is unlawful to consume beverage alcohol in a motor vessel or operate a motor vessel while impaired.

Cellular telephone coverage varies by carrier and may not be available in remote areas of Prince Albert National Park. It is important to be prepared for any emergency or delay that may arise.

Using the Kingsmere Lake Rail Portage
The access to Kingsmere Lake with your vessel is via a rail portage system. Use caution when using the winch system to load and unload your vessel. Ensure your vessel is properly and firmly secured to the rail car. Know your limits and exercise caution when pushing the cart. With a vessel loaded and tied down, the cart is extremely heavy. Do not attempt to portage on your own. Never ride on top of the rail cart.

Carrying the essential safety items and filling a trip plan are also steps that you can take to ensure your safety while on the water. To learn more about water safety talk to a Parks Canada Employee or visit AdventureSmart.

Skiing and Snowshoeing

The Crean Lake ski trail is maintained by the Waskesiu Lake Ski Club Inc. all other back country trails are not regularly maintained during the winter months.

Fewer visitors use backcountry trails during the winter months. As a result backcountry trails may not be clearly visible under the snow. Exercise caution and watch for icy sections, deep snow and fallen trees.

Plan your routes carefully and file a trip plan before setting out.

Saskatchewan weather can change quickly. Plan for the weather and be alert to changes in weather conditions.

Use caution when skiing / snowshoeing on lakes or ponds. Areas of thin ice exist on water bodies throughout the park.

For tips on preparing for a winter adventure visit AdventureSmart.


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