Sunshine, swimming and sand castles

A day at the beach is a tradition for many park visitors. Whether you enjoy the buzz of activity at the Waskesiu Main Beach or the quiet calm of a more secluded beach, with 10 vehicle-accessible beaches in Prince Albert National Park, visitors are sure to find a place in the sun.

Most of the beaches in Prince Albert National Park are also a great place for a picnic! With picnic tables, fire pits, fire wood and pit toilets nearby you have everything to make you picnic comfortable and convenient.

These beaches also make a great home base for on-the-water activities. Have a paddling adventure in a canoe, kayak or on a stand-up paddleboard. On Waskesiu Lake you can fuel up a powerboat (or rent one in the park’s marina) for a day of fishing, waterskiing, wakeboarding and other motorized fun. 

A motorboat is parked on the beach and there are many people enjoying various beach activities on the Waskesiu main beach.

Waskesiu Lake beaches

Waskesiu Main Beach

In the heart of Waskesiu is the 600-meter-long Waskesiu Main Beach. This sandy beach is a hub of activity, conveniently located next to a number of picnic shelters and across the street from restaurants and shopping. Beach house change rooms offer an accessible deck, bathroom facilities and hot water showers.

Beaver Glen Beach

Beaver Glen Beach is located adjacent to Beaver Glen Campground. This large sandy beach offers campers easy access to Waskesiu Lake. Although there are no picnic facilities at Beaver Glen Beach, there is a pit toilet for convenience and downtown Waskesiu is only a short hike from the beach.

Point View

Located on the Kingsmere Road just past the Waskesiu Marina, Point View offers visitors a quiet place for a picnic and a refreshing dip in the lake. Point View features a covered picnic shelter, fire pits and a pebble beach swimming area.

Birch Bay

Birch Bay is a great place to spend a day at the beach! Located on the north shore of Waskesiu Lake, Birch Bay offers great protection from north and westerly winds, making it an ideal location for water activates such as wakeboarding and waterskiing Birch Bay offers a covered picnic shelter and a large number of fire pits and tables. The mix of sand and pebbles makes the beach great for swimming and skipping stones.

South Bay/Mud Creek

South Bay is another excellent beach for the whole family. Located on the south shore of Waskesiu Lake on the Narrows Road, the beach offers protection from any south winds making it another great location to spend your day on and off the lake. South Bay offers a covered picnic shelter, numerous picnic tables nad fire pits, a long sandy beach and access to the Mud Creek hiking trail.

Trippes Beach

Located on the Narrows Road, Trippes Beach makes a great launching point for paddlers who wish to visit King Island on Waskesiu Lake. Launching from sandy Trippes Beach, King Island is only a short 2km paddle away. Trippes Beach features fire pits and tables for a convenient picnic setting.

Paignton Beach

A long white sand beach ending in a small, sandy peninsula makes Paignton Beach one of the most beautiful beaches in Saskatchewan. Paignton Beach offers breathtaking views of Waskesiu Lake and is a popular destination for picnickers and boaters alike. Paignton Beach offers two covered picnic shelters and a number of lakeside fire pits and tables.

Narrows Beach

The Narrows on Waskesiu Lake is a location of unique natural and cultural heritage. Amazing bird and wildlife sightings are frequent at The Narrows. Located at the end of the Narrows Road, the beach offers a covered picnic shelter and easy access to the Narrows Campground and marina facilities.

Beaches on other lakes

Beaches ranging from tiny spots of sand, gravel or organic matter with varying slopes to long, wide stretches of fine sand with gentle slope can be found on other park lakes. Some of the more popular include Namekus Lake, Sandy (Halkett) Lake and the Southend Beach on Kingsmere Lake. Kingsmere Lake and Crean Lake also offer a number of secluded backcountry beaches for those interested in exploring.

Swimming safety

The large lakes in Prince Albert National Park become ice-free about the middle to end of May. Water temperatures suitable for swimming are usually reached by end of June and continue until early September.

Remember, beaches are unsupervised and swimming in these areas is at your own risk. For the safety of swimmers, the use of boats and canoes is not allowed in buoyed swimming areas. Swimmer's Itch is a rare occurrence in large lakes but can be found in park waters. Contact the Visitor Centre staff for up-to-date reports or to learn more about visitor safety.