Though remote, Auyuittuq is the most accessible of the Nunavut parks; fiords allow boat and snowmobile travel from nearby Inuit communities and its wild interior is reachable via Akshayuk Pass. While it is a place of moderate to extreme adventure for hikers, skiers and mountain climbers tackling vertical walls like Thor Peak, its raw beauty can also be experienced on a spring snowmobile day-trip to the Arctic Circle or short summer hike to Ulu Peak.

The hamlet of Qikiqtarjuaq makes a nice jumping off point for a variety of other excursions (starting by boat or by snow machine and depending on the season) - including trips to the Narpaing-Maktak Valley, seeing an iceberg calve into the ocean at Coronation Fjord, fishing, as well as polar bear and iceberg watching.

Activites and experiences

  • A person on the summit of a mountain. 
    Climbing and mountaineering

    The park is part of the northeastern edge of the Canadian Shield, and mountain peaks within the park are among the highest on Baffin Island and the Canadian Shield.


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    Hiking

    Akshayuk Pass is the most popular hiking destination in Auyuittuq. A traditional Inuit travel corridor through spectacular mountain scenery, the 97 km pass connects Pangnirtung Fiord in Cumberland Sound with North Pangnirtung Fiord off Davis Strait.


  • A person at the summit of a mountain - arms are outstretched. 
    Skiing

    The park’s spring ski season is April and May, and ski travel in Akshayuk Pass is usually best accomplished along the Weasel River and Owl River valleys.


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    Inuit cultural experiences

    Archaeological sites reveal past stories of the people who used the park’s fiords and valleys through time, and this land still remains a special place for Inuit today. Inuit continue to carry out cultural and harvesting activities with their community and family and share stories, cultures and traditions with visitors.