Rivers Awareness

Two of Canada’s biggest rivers by volume meet at Wood Buffalo National Park: the Peace and the Athabasca Rivers. These rivers are iconic and historic in Canada’s history. From time to time, significant flooding events occur. For current river conditions at Peace Point, AB, please check the webcam below:

Peace Point Web Cam --  Image is current. UTC time stamp -6hrs from Mountain Standard Time.

 

Ice jams and floods are naturally occurring events which are powerful and dynamic.
For your own safety:
  • Be aware of fast moving water and unstable river banks at all times
  • Stay well back of river edges during the height of ice jam and flooding events.
  • In the spring, river conditions and ice conditions can change quickly and without warning.
  • Monitor weather and check river flow forecasts regularly. Be prepared if you need to be out for extra days due to rapidly changing conditions.
  • When heading out on the land, leave behind a complete trip plan with friends and family. Make sure whoever holds the trip plan knows who to call in the event that your group doesn’t return on time. (Parks Canada dispatch: 780-852-3100)
  • Bring a reliable means of communication with you, such as a satellite phone or SPOT device.
  • Monitoring and Emergency Information

    For additional information

    Monitoring the flow of major rivers and streams throughout Alberta, including high water advisories: Rivers.alberta.ca

    Information about the dangers posed by river break-up flood events on the Athabasca River:

    https://www.rmwb.ca/Municipal-Government/municipal_departments/Emergency-Services---Law-Enforcement/Emergency-Management/Preparing-for-an-Emergency/River-Breakup.htm

    During any emergencies in the province of Alberta, including floods:
    Alberta Emergency Alert System: http://www.emergencyalert.alberta.ca/

    The Natural Role of Flooding in the Peace-Athabasca Delta

    The delta that these rivers form is the largest inland freshwater delta in North America and one of the key reasons for the park’s designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The delta supports traditional activities and values for the local Dene, Cree and Metis people who live there. Its continued health and vibrancy as an ecosystem is dependent on large-scale floods, which replenish its extensive wetlands with nutrient-rich water. More information about the role of floods in the delta can be found here.