UPDATE: Starting June 1, some Parks Canada places will begin to offer limited access and services while maintaining physical distancing measures. Openings will differ across the country. Information will be updated regularly. Find details here.

NWT Health and Social Services.

Nááts'įhch'oh National Park Reserve is named after Nááts'įhch'oh the mountain – a powerful place for the people of the Sahtu. Near the Yukon-Northwest Territories border, the park is in the traditional lands of the Shúhtaot'ine (Mountain Dene), and home to grizzly bear, Dall’s sheep, mountain goats, and woodland caribou.

Featured things to do

Hours of operation

Open year-round
Visitor services are available 9:00 am to 12:00 pm, 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm, Monday to Friday. Closed statutory holidays. 

Fees

Free admission

Contact us

Telephone: 1-867-588-4884
Email:
pc.tulitainfo-infotulita.pc
@canada.ca

Sites nearby

  • Nahanni National Park Reserve

    Remote granite pinnacles lure top alpinists, wilderness river tripping opportunities attract paddlers, interpreters share cultural and natural history with river trippers, campers and day flight visitors.   

  • Saoyú-ʔehdacho National Historic Site

    Saoyú-Ɂehdacho National Historic Site celebrates the traditional lifestyles of the Sahtúgot’įnę – “the people of the Sahtú.” Visitors to Canada’s largest National Historic Site learn about the teaching, healing and spiritual places as conveyed through oral history.

  • Wood Buffalo National Park

    Wood Buffalo National Park is our country's largest national park and one of the largest in the world. It protects an outstanding and representative example of Canada's Northern Boreal Plains.

  • A backcountry landscape displaying blue sky, forest and fireweed.
    Thaidene Nene National Park Reserve

    Located at the eastern end of Great Slave Lake in the Northwest Territories, Thaidene Nene National Park Reserve is part of a larger group of protected areas around the East Arm and Artillery Lake regions. Thaidene Nene means ‘Land of the Ancestors’ in the Dënesųłiné—or Chipewyan—language.