Nááts'įhch'oh National Park Reserve is named after Nááts'įhch'oh the mountain – a powerful place for the people of the Sahtu. Near the Yukon-Northwest Territories border, the park is in the traditional lands of the Shúhtaot'ine (Mountain Dene), and home to grizzly bear, Dall’s sheep, mountain goats, and woodland caribou.

Featured things to do

Canotage
Canoeing

This 21-day, 600-kilometre paddling expedition takes rafters, kayakers and canoeists down the entire South Nahanni River, with plenty of whitewater and wildlife along the way.  The trip is for experienced paddlers only; in fact, only a handful of groups tackle the run each year. Guided tours are available from multiple outfitters. 

Randonnée pédestre
Hiking

As one of Canada’s newest national parks, Nááts’ihch’oh has no blazed trails. For experienced hikers, this means a rare opportunity to explore remote terrain and map routes that may one day become part of the park’s established trail network.

C’est facile de planifier une excursion
Planning a Trip

Nááts'įhch'oh National Park Reserve is located in the southwest portion of the Northwest Territories. Most visitors access the park via floatplane from surrounding communities in the Northwest Territories and Yukon

Getting here

38 Bear Rock Drive
Tulita NT X0E 0K0

Hours of operation

Open year-round
Visitor services are available 9:00 am to 12:00 pm, 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm, Monday to Friday. Closed statutory holidays. 

Fees

Free admission

Contact us

Telephone: 1-867-588-4884
Email: naats'ihch'oh.info@pc.gc.ca

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Parks Canada invites families to explore Canada’s most amazing destinations. Youth admission will be free starting January 2018. Save 20% on Family/Group passes until December 31, 2017.

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Sites nearby

  • Nahanni National Park Reserve

    Remote granite pinnacles lure top alpinists, wilderness river tripping opportunities attract paddlers, interpreters share cultural and natural history with river trippers, campers and day flight visitors.   

  • Saoyú-ʔehdacho National Historic Site

    Saoyú-Ɂehdacho National Historic Site celebrates the traditional lifestyles of the Sahtúgot’įnę – “the people of the Sahtú.” Visitors to Canada’s largest National Historic Site learn about the teaching, healing and spiritual places as conveyed through oral history.

  • Wood Buffalo National Park

    Wood Buffalo National Park is our country's largest national park and one of the largest in the world. It protects an outstanding and representative example of Canada's Northern Boreal Plains.

  • Ivvavik National Park

    Rafters from around the world meet up in Ivvavik National Park. The Firth River slices through canyons and mountain valleys to the Arctic Ocean.  A fly-in base camp offers hikers access to an Arctic landscape of tors, peaks and rolling hills untouched by the last Ice Age.