Report any wildfires, illegal campfires, or suspicious smoke to Dispatch 877-852-3100.

Safety is Parks Canada’s number one priority. Fire crews monitor Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks, and surrounding areas, for wildfire starts and are ready to respond. Do your part and stay informed on current fire danger status and park regulations.

Check this page regularly for updates on wildfire preparedness, response and risk reduction activities in the parks. Or sign up for updates delivered right to your inbox.


Fire status map

This map shows the locations of fires of note within Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks during wildfire season. Click on the fire icons to learn more about individual fires.


Current information updates

July 4, 2022

What's happening?

Parks Canada fire crews continue to focus on wildfire risk reduction activities and hazard tree removal in both Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks. This may include temporary area closures for public safety and brush pile burning. If conditions allow, prescribed fire will be used to burn off the surface fuels on the lower slopes of Mount Revelstoke.

Why?

Through safe and effective fire management, we are reducing the risk of wildfire to the public, infrastructure, and neighbouring lands while improving the ecological health of our forests.

Mount Revelstoke National Park

Reducing forest fuels in this area of Mount Revelstoke National Park contributes to wildfire risk reduction in and around the City of Revelstoke.

Glacier National Park

A spruce beetle outbreak in Glacier National Park over the last seven years has left thousands of trees dead or dying in the Rogers Pass corridor of the park. Insect outbreaks are the main source of natural disturbance in the interior rainforest. By attacking older, less healthy trees, they open up the forest canopy, encouraging new growth and improving forest health. In this case, the number of trees affected and location of the outbreak in Rogers Pass poses a public safety risk, and significant hazard tree removal work continues in Glacier National Park to mitigate the risk.

Most of the felled trees are being removed as leaving them could contribute to ongoing insect outbreak issues and/or increased wildfire risk. Woody debris from hazard tree removal is being piled up and burned.

What to expect:

Mount Revelstoke National Park

Smoke may be visible along the lower slopes of Mount Revelstoke over the next few weeks when weather conditions allow for brush pile burning. Visitor safety is of the utmost importance for Parks Canada. The Meadows in the Sky Parkway will remain open. Watch for crews working along the road.

Glacier National Park

Smoke may be visible throughout Glacier National Park and specifically along the Trans-Canada Highway. For public safety, a closure is in place at Hemlock Grove Day Use Area until crews and equipment can be brought in to take down very large danger trees. Temporary closures may be put in place in other areas while crews and equipment are working.

For more information:

Fire updates including a new interactive map can be found here: fire information under visitor safety on the Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks webpages.

Fire update: June 7, 2022

May 3, 2022

What's happening?

Parks Canada fire crews continue wildfire risk reduction activities along the lower slopes of Mount Revelstoke including brush pile burning near the Meadows in the Sky Parkway. If conditions allow, prescribed fire will be used to burn off the surface fuels within the fireguard area.

Why?

Through safe and effective fire management, we are reducing the risk of wildfire to the public, infrastructure, and neighbouring lands while improving the ecological health of our forests. Reducing forest fuels in this area in Mount Revelstoke National Park contributes to wildfire risk reduction actions in and around the City of Revelstoke by completing a section of the community fire guard surrounding the city.

What to expect:

Smoke may be visible along the lower slopes of Mount Revelstoke over the next few weeks when weather conditions allow for brush pile burning. Visitor safety is of the utmost importance for Parks Canada. The Meadows in the Sky Parkway will remain open. Watch for crews working along the road.

For more information:

Fire updates including a new interactive map can be found here: fire information under visitor safety on the Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks webpages.

Fire update: May 3, 2022

May 3, 2022

What's happening?

While most of Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks remain snowbound, fire season is upon us in the valley. Parks Canada’s fire management team works closely with BC Wildfire Service and the neighbouring communities of Revelstoke and Golden, on wildfire preparedness, response and risk reduction in and around the national parks.

Want to know more? Visit us at the Revelstoke LFI Farmers’ Market on May 7 between 8:00 AM – 1:00 PM. (First Street East between Mackenzie Ave and Orton Ave).

Wildfire preparedness

Based on weather data and fire danger ratings, the fire management team monitors for wildfire starts and is prepared to respond. Parks Canada has two four-person Initial Attack crews stationed in Revelstoke, as part of the Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks fire management team, ready to respond to in-park and regional wildfire starts.

Highly trained fire management personnel, from within the Mount Revelstoke and Glacier fire program and in other park functions, contribute to local wildfire preparedness. Whether as wildland fire fighters or members of a Parks Canada National Incident Management Team, they also support wildfire response within other national parks across Canada, or provincial/territorial wildfire response in partnership with the Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Centre.

Prescribed fire and wildfire risk reduction

The fire management team is working on a number of wildfire risk reduction projects in Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks. This includes preparations for several potential prescribed fires in both parks. Prescribed fires are only conducted under specific conditions (e.g. weather, moisture, wind direction, supporting resources, etc.) and will only go forward when the safety of the public, our crews, infrastructure and neighbouring lands can be assured.

What to expect in 2022:

Lower slopes, Mount Revelstoke National Park: Work will continue on the lower slopes of Mount Revelstoke to strengthen a section of the Revelstoke Community fire guard that runs through the park. Brush pile burning will begin once the area has dried out. If conditions allow this spring, prescribed fire will be used to burn off the surface fuels within the fireguard area.

Hazard tree removal, Glacier National Park: Parks Canada continues to address the public safety and wildfire risk in the Rogers Pass corridor from an ongoing spruce beetle outbreak.

  • Hazard tree removal will take place in Illecillewaet Campground this spring once snow recedes and there is no longer an avalanche risk in the area.
  • In late May or early June, brush pile burning will take place in the Rogers Pass area to manage the remaining woody debris from tree removal.

Other potential prescribed fires: planning and preparations are complete for several prescribed fires in Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks to reduce wildfire risk, restore wildlife habitat and/or improve forest health.

It can take years to get the right “prescription” to light a prescribed fire. The specific conditions needed include: current and forecasted weather; wind speed and direction; moisture content in the trees, soil and air; natural or man-made barriers (fire guards) in place to limit fire spread; availability of resources; and consideration of the impacts on visitors and neighbouring communities.

Having plans in place and maintaining on the ground preparations ensures that if the right conditions are achieved, Parks Canada fire management teams are ready to proceed at short notice. Any one of the following prescribed fires could proceed this year should conditions allow.

  • Glacier National Park: 20-Mile prescribed fire in the Beaver Valley area and Flat Creek prescribed fire at the west end of the park.
  • Mount Revelstoke National Park: Parkway Bend prescribed fire, a continuation of work completed in 2020, and Lindmark prescribed fire near the Parkway Bend site to support completion of a fire break on the front face of the mountain.

For more information:

Join the fire mailing list

Shelley Bird, Fire Information Officer
Email: fireinfo-mrg-infofeu@pc.gc.ca
Tel: 250-683-8201


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