September 23, 2021

What's happening?

Fall is officially here and snow is beginning to stay on the peaks. Before winter sets in, Parks Canada continues to focus on wildfire risk reduction activities in both Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks. The recent rain was good news for wildfire activity across the province but it also meant that we did not get the conditions needed to safely conduct planned prescribed fire operations in the parks this year.

Parks Canada fire crews are clearing vegetation around buildings and infrastructure and brush pile burning in areas including:

Glacier National Park

  • Sir Donald Campground and Day Use Area
  • East Gate landslide area
  • Loop Brook Campground

Mount Revelstoke National Park

  • Lower slopes of Mount Revelstoke near Inspiration Woods
  • Along the Meadows in the Sky Parkway above Inspiration Woods and around the Caribou Weather Station (clearing only).

Why?

Through safe and effective fire management, Parks Canada is reducing the risk of wildfire to the public, critical infrastructure, property and neighbouring lands.

What to expect

Mount Revelstoke National Park

Smoke from brush pile burning will continue to be visible along the lower slopes of Mount Revelstoke over the next few weeks. Reducing forest fuels in this area contributes to wildfire risk reduction actions in and around the City of Revelstoke by completing a section of the community fire guard surrounding the city.

Glacier National Park

Smoke from brush pile burning may be visible along the Trans-Canada Highway near the Loop Brook and Sir Donald campgrounds, as well as near the east park boundary.

For more information:

Report any wildfires, illegal campfires, or suspicious smoke to Dispatch 877-852-3100.

Fire update: September 13, 2021

September 13, 2021

What's happening?

Parks Canada recognizes that it has been an incredibly difficult year in British Columbia with wildfires impacting individuals, communities and businesses across the province. Our thoughts are with all those who have been affected.

As the end of the 2021 fire season is in sight, Parks Canada continues to focus on wildfire risk reduction activities in preparation for future seasons. Prescribed fire is an important tool in long-term strategies to reduce wildfire risk and contribute to landscape resilience. In Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks, the best conditions to safely conduct planned prescribed fire operations are often in late summer or early fall.

For September and October, Parks Canada fire crews in Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks will continue working on wildfire risk reduction projects including:

  • Clearing vegetation around buildings and infrastructure
  • Burning debris piles left from hazard tree removal and fire guard clearing; and
  • If conditions allow, continuing prescribed fire work in the 20-Mile area of Glacier National Park and on the front face of Mount Revelstoke.

Why?

Through safe and effective fire management, Parks Canada is reducing the risk of wildfire to the public, critical infrastructure, property and neighbouring lands. Mimicking natural forest disturbances through prescribed fire and other fire management tools, helps reduce the risk of large-scale wildfires by creating breaks in the forest canopy. Fire guards, such as the one on the lower slopes of Mount Revelstoke, can help stop or slow potential wildfire spread.

What to expect

Mount Revelstoke National Park

September 13, fire crews will begin burning piles of woody debris along the lower slopes of Mount Revelstoke. Reducing forest fuels in this area contributes to wildfire risk reduction actions in and around the City of Revelstoke by completing a section of the community fire guard surrounding the city. Smoke may be visible along the lower slopes of Mount Revelstoke over the next few weeks.

If conditions allow, Parks Canada fire crews will conduct prescribed fire work on the front face of Mount Revelstoke in late September or early October. This work is a continuation of planned wildfire risk reduction measures that include the lower slopes fire guard and last year’s Parkway Bend Prescribed Fire in Mount Revelstoke National Park.

Glacier National Park

Last week, woody debris from hazard tree removal was piled up and burned in the Loop Brook and Sir Donald campgrounds. Additional brush pile burning in the Rogers Pass area may occur as required.

If conditions are favourable this fall, Parks Canada fire crews plan to ignite a section of the 20-Mile Prescribed Fire area in the Bald Hills of Glacier National Park. Safety is Parks Canada’s top priority. Prescribed fires are only conducted under exacting conditions (e.g. weather, moisture, wind direction, supporting resources, etc.) to ensure the safety of the public, our crews, infrastructure and neighbouring lands. This prescribed fire is a continuation of work completed in this area over the last five years.

Fire update: September 1, 2021

September 1, 2021

What's happening?

The fire ban for Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks was lifted on August 30, 2021 at 12 pm. Recent rainfall and cooler temperatures have reduced the fire danger in these parks.

Campfires are permitted only in campgrounds and public areas in the parks that have designated metal fire pits. Campfires are not permitted in the backcountry.

Starting in September, Parks Canada fire crews will continue working on ongoing wildfire risk reduction projects, including:

  • Clearing vegetation around buildings and infrastructure
  • Burning debris in multiple locations across the park

What to expect

Wildfire Risk Reduction

Smoke from burn piles may be visible along the highway and nearby the following areas:

Glacier National Park
  • Loop Brook Campground (closed)
  • Sir Donald Campground (closed)
  • Beaver Valley (multiple locations)
Mount Revelstoke National Park
  • Inspiration Woods Trail
  • Lower slopes along Meadows in the Sky Parkway
Smoke

The smoke from wildfires across the province continues to affect local air quality. It can also have an impact on physical and mental health. Visit: Wildfire smoke, air quality and your health for more information.

Fire update: August 5, 2021

August 5, 2021

What's happening?

From August 6 – 13, Parks Canada fire management crews and a helicopter will be working in the Rogers Pass area to prepare and remove previously felled hazard trees. Temporary closures will be in place while crews are working at the Mount Sir Donald pull out (chain-up), the Rock Garden Trail, and near the Rogers Pass Discovery Centre in Glacier National Park.

Recent weather patterns have reduced fire danger in both Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national park. Given current smoke and the provincial State of Emergency due to wildfire activity, a fire ban remains in effect for both parks and a backcountry closure is in effect in Mount Revelstoke.

What to expect:

Tree removal

Public safety is a top priority for Parks Canada. As the spruce beetle infestation represents a risk to public safety, removal of the dead trees is considered the most appropriate action. Work this week includes slinging logs out of the forest by helicopter. For safety, short, temporary closures will be in place at visitor facilities and day use areas while crews are working.

Smoke

The smoke from wildfires across the province continues to affect local air quality. It can also have an impact on physical and mental health. Visit: Wildfire smoke, air quality and your health for more information.

Fire ban

A fire ban remains in effect for Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks. Lighting or maintaining fires in the parks is strictly prohibited. If you have a reservation for Snowforest or Illecillewaet (moved from Loop Brook) campgrounds during the fire ban, your fire permit will be refunded.

Mount Revelstoke National Park backcountry restriction

To ensure public safety, backcountry access and camping is prohibited in Mount Revelstoke National Park effective July 21, 2021 until further notice.

Background:

Hazard tree removal

In fall of 2020, hazard tree removal work took place in and around a number of visitor facilities and day use areas in Glacier National Park. Most of the felled trees are being removed to reduce wildfire risk. In some areas it is not possible to use heavy equipment while minimizing impacts to the remaining trees and ground vegetation. Some trees will, therefore, be slung out by helicopter to the closest road accessible staging area.

Many large spruce trees along the Trans-Canada Highway corridor in Glacier National Park are dead or dying from a spruce beetle infestation. Spruce beetles are bark beetles native to British Columbia that typically infest downed or weakened trees. In large infestations, they can also infect healthy trees, particularly in more mature forests. For the interior rainforest, insects, like spruce beetle, are the primary source of natural disturbance creating diversity in the age and types of trees in the forest canopy.

Under circumstances such as the outbreak in Glacier National Park, where there exists a potential public safety risk, Parks Canada's policy allows for intervention in natural processes. Beetle-killed trees can increase the risk of natural blow-down in public use areas affecting visitor safety. Large outbreaks can also increase the risk of wildfire in affected areas.

Fire update: July 22, 2021

July 22, 2021

What's happening?

Although this shouldn't be news to anyone, hot and dry weather continues and Fire Danger in Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks is Extreme. Fire bans are in effect in both parks and a backcountry restriction has been implemented for Mount Revelstoke National Park. We urge everyone to exercise the utmost caution when travelling and recreating in the parks.

The safety of the public, our crews, infrastructure and neighbouring lands is Parks Canada's top priority. Mount Revelstoke and Glacier fire crews continue to monitor for new wildfires in and around the parks, and are ready with the resources to respond quickly.

Parks Canada works closely with BC Wildfire Service to coordinate wildfire risk reduction and response in the area. Parks Canada is also a member of the Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Centre, supporting wildfire response across Canada.

  • Three fires were discovered on Frisby Ridge on July 20, all suspected lightning strikes. To support local fire management capacity, the Mount Revelstoke and Glacier fire crew conducted fire suppression on one of the three.
  • Currently, two Parks Canada National Incident Management Teams are supporting wildfire response in BC, including several personnel from Mount Revelstoke and Glacier. Most recently, a team has been deployed to support response on the Nk'Mip wildfire near Osoyoos.

What to expect

With extremely dry conditions, it takes very little to inadvertently start a fire. Ensure all cigarette butts are FULLY extinguished and disposed of in a waste bin. Be aware of your vehicle's temperature gauge and pull over immediately if it shows signs that it may overheat. Stay extra vigilant, it takes very little heat to start a fire in these conditions.

The smoke from wildfires across the province can also have an impact on physical and mental health. Visit: Wildfire smoke, air quality and your health for more information.

Fire Ban

The fire ban has been reinstated in Glacier National Park effective July 22, 2021. The fire ban remains in effect for Mount Revelstoke National Park. Lighting or maintaining fires in the parks is strictly prohibited. If you have a reservation for Snowforest Campground during the fire ban, visit the campground center for a refund of your fire permit.

Mount Revelstoke National Park backcountry restriction

Due to Extreme Fire Danger and to ensure public safety, backcountry access and camping is prohibited in Mount Revelstoke National Park effective July 21, 2021 until further notice.

Fire update: July 8, 2021

July 8, 2021

What's happening?

Recent rain and cooler temperatures have reduced the fire danger in Glacier National Park. Fire Danger in Mount Revelstoke National Park remains elevated.

Fire ban

The fire ban in Glacier National Park will be lifted as of noon, Friday, July 9, 2021. The fire ban may be reinstated at any time, should conditions change. The fire ban remains in effect for Mount Revelstoke National Park.

Spruce beetle and hazard tree removal

Please note: a partial closure is in place in the Rogers Pass Discovery Centre parking lot due to hazard trees.

What to expect

The safety of the public, our crews, infrastructure and neighbouring lands is Parks Canada's top priority. Crews continue to monitor the parks for new wildfires and are ready with the resources to respond quickly. Parks Canada works closely with the BC Wildfire Service to monitor and manage wildfire risk in and around Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks.

Mount Revelstoke National Park

Lighting or maintaining fires in Mount Revelstoke National Park is strictly prohibited effective June 30, 2021. If you have a reservation for Snowforest Campground during the fire ban, your fire permit will be refunded.

Glacier National Park

Illegal campfires pose a serious threat to the park. Fires are ONLY permitted in a proper Park-approved fire box. Random fires are prohibited. Do not collect deadfall or cut trees or branches for fires. Never leave a fire unattended and put it out before you leave. In campgrounds the purchase of a fire permit is required (which includes firewood for use on site). Wood burning stoves are provided at some day use sites and can be used without a permit.

Spruce beetle

Parks Canada continues to monitor, assess and remove hazard trees from a spruce beetle infestation in the Rogers Pass area of Glacier National Park. Temporary closures will be in place at visitor facilities and day use areas where hazards have been identified and while crews and equipment are working.

A spruce beetle outbreak in Glacier National Park over the last six years has left thousands of trees dead or dying in the Rogers Pass corridor of the park. Insect outbreaks are the main source of natural disturbance in the interior rainforest. By attacking older, less healthy trees, they open up the forest canopy, encouraging new growth and improving forest health. In this case, the number of trees affected and location of the outbreak in Rogers Pass poses a public safety risk, and significant hazard tree removal work is currently taking place in Glacier National Park to mitigate the risk.

Fire update: July 5, 2021

July 5, 2021

What's happening?

On Thursday, July 1, lightning strikes in Glacier National Park resulted in four fire starts: one on Mount Green, one in the Beaver Valley and two in the Incommapleux area. The rain that followed helped slow fire activity. Parks Canada fire crews are actively managing and/or monitoring these wildfires as required. The fires do not currently pose a risk to people or assets.

Parks Canada works closely with the BC Wildfire Service to monitor and manage wildfire risk in and around Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks. On July 2 and 3, Parks Canada fire crews also responded to a wildfire between the two parks, in the Fang Creek area.

The safety of the public, our crews, infrastructure and neighbouring lands is Parks Canada's top priority. Crews continue to monitor the parks for new wildfires and are ready with the resources to respond quickly.

A fire ban has been issued for Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks due to elevated fire danger. This fire ban covers the entire national parks including all front and backcountry campgrounds and day use areas in both Glacier and Mount Revelstoke national parks.

What to expect

Smoke may be visible on Mount Green from the Trans-Canada Highway. Smoke in area signs are in place.

Lighting or maintaining fires in this area is now strictly prohibited effective June 30, 2021. If you have a reservation for Snowforest Campground during the fire ban, your fire permit will be refunded.

Fire update: June 29, 2021

June 29, 2021

What's happening?

A fire ban has been issued for Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks due to elevated fire danger.

This fire ban covers the entire national parks including all front and backcountry campgrounds and day use areas in both Glacier and Mount Revelstoke national parks.

What to expect

Lighting or maintaining fires in this area is now strictly prohibited effective June 30, 2021.

Prohibited: This fire ban includes ALL wood or briquette fires as well as Tiki torches, turkey fryers and Chimeneas.

Exempt: Provided they are under direct supervision and CSA approved or UL certified:

  • Propane or gas fuelled stoves and BBQs exclusively designed for cooking
  • Portable propane fire pits
  • Propane or gas fuelled lanterns (enclosed flame)
  • Catalytic or infrared style heaters.

The fire ban restriction will be lifted as soon as conditions permit.

Background

British Columbia issued a province-wide fire ban effective June 30 at noon. While provincial and municipal fire bans do not apply to federal lands, Parks Canada fire management teams in national parks always collaborate and consult with local authorities on potential fire threats.

Under Parks Canada Fire Regulations, in national parks, fires are only allowed in designated fire pits in select campgrounds and day use areas. This minimizes risk and is easier to monitor than the range of fire-related activities taking place outside of national parks.

Taking into account the current heat wave and anticipated forecast, the decision was made to implement a fire ban in both Mount Revelstoke and Glacier until further notice. Fire Danger is elevated in both parks up to mid-mountain or higher, while snow still lingers at high elevation.

For more information:

If you would like to be added to the fire mailing list visit join our mailing list.

Shelley Bird, Fire Information Officer
Email: pc.fireinfo-mrg-infofeu.pc@canada.ca
Tel: 250-683-8201