Sulphur Mountain Cosmic Ray Station National Historic Site of Canada is the site of a former laboratory located near the summit of Sulphur Mountain, in Banff National Park of Canada. The remaining concrete foundation is accessible only by foot. Official recognition refers to the building on its footprint, visible today by its remaining concrete foundation, as well as the level platform cut into the rock that surrounds it, and the upper switchback of the former access road.

Hike to the iconic Sulphur Mountain Cosmic Ray Station

History

The Sulphur Mountain Cosmic Ray Station was declared a national historic site of Canada in 1982 because of: its role in the Canadian contribution to the International Geophysical Year 1957-58.

The heritage value of Sulphur Mountain Cosmic Ray Station lies in its location, the legibility of its remains, and their association with an important worldwide scientific phenomenon. The Sulphur Mountain Cosmic Ray Station was one of nine Canadian monitoring stations built in 1956-57 to meet Canada’s commitment to the International Geophysical Year of 1957-58 organized by the International Council of Scientific Unions. At 2283 m, this station was the highest and most important Canadian station, operating until 1978. It was designated a national historic site in 1982. Cosmic ray research offered the opportunity to learn about supernovae, the origin of stars, the relationship between energy and matter, and the nature of our own solar system.