There are five different environmental assessment processes that apply in northern Canada:

Nunavut Impact Review Board

The impact assessment process that applies in Nunavut is outlined in the Nunavut Planning and Project Assessment Act (2015) and associated Parks Canada guidance. The Act governs Nunavut Impact Review Board (NIRB), which is responsible for assessing all projects in Nunavut.

Inuvialuit Final Agreement

In the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR), projects are assessed following the Inuvialuit Final Agreement (IFA, 1987). The IFA established the Environmental Impact Screening Committee, which screens projects in Ivvavik, Aulavik, the ISR portion of Tuktut Nogait national parks, and in the Pingo Canadian Landmark. IAA also applies in the ISR though, where IAA and IFA requirements are duplicated, processes under the IFA are used to fulfill requirements of both legislations.

Yukon Environmental Socio-economic Assessment Board

In the Yukon, projects are assessed following the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act (YESAA, 2003). Under this Act, the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board is responsible for assessing all projects in the Yukon. Projects in Ivvavik National Park on the Yukon North Slope, which is part of the ISR, are also assessed by the Environmental Impact Screening Committee.

Mackenzie Valley Environmental Impact Review Board

In the Mackenzie Valley, projects are assessed following the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act (MVRMA, 1998). Under this Act, the Mackenzie Valley Review Board is responsible for conducting environmental assessments of projects that are referred to it following preliminary screenings. Parks Canada conducts the preliminary screenings for projects in its protected areas in the Mackenzie Valley.

Projects in Labrador

Projects in Labrador (depending on location), including proposals for new parks and sites, will be assessed according to processes outlined in The Nunavik Inuit Land Claims Agreements (2007), the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement (2005), the IAA, and associated Parks Canada guidance.