In 2018, a management plan review was undertaken of the 2000 Batoche National Historic Site Management Plan, and found to remain applicable for the management of the site with no revisions required. The 2000 Batoche National Historic Site Management Plan will continue to provide strategic management direction for the site until the next management plan review, in ten years’ time or sooner as required.

Table of contents

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Chief Executive Officer of Parks Canada, 2000.

Cette publication est aussi disponible en français.

Batoche National Historic Site of Canada management plan, 2000.

  • Catalogue No: R64-23112000
  • ISBN: 0-662-65089-1

For more information about the management plan or about Batoche National Historic Site:


Mailing address:
   Location: Batoche National Historic Site
     RR#1 Box 1040, Wakaw, Saskatchewan, Canada, S0K 4P0

Telephone:
   Phone number: 306-423-6227

Fax:
   Fax number: 306-423-5400



Foreword

Sheila Copps, Minister of Canadian Heritage

The Government of Canada is committed to the protection and presentation of our human heritage. As Minister of Canadian Heritage responsible for Parks Canada, it is my responsibility to safeguard the integrity of our national historic sites. It is in the spirit of this mandate, which was entrusted to me by the people of Canada, that I approve the Batoche National Historic Site of Canada Management Plan, an example of our commitment to the protection of our historic places for the enjoyment of present and future generations.

Batoche was declared a national historic site in 1923, on the recommendation of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada. Comprising 955 hectares on the South Saskatchewan River between Saskatoon and Prince Albert, the site bears the cultural resources and landscape of the Métis community of Batoche and the final battle of the 1885 Northwest Rebellion/Resistance. Batoche commemorates the history and events of the rebellion which culminated in significant changes to the Métis, the political and social development of Western Canada, and Canada's view of itself. The commemoration has been broadened to include the Métis community of Batoche and the river lot land use pattern of agricultural practice, still evident at Batoche, which were once characteristic of this region. Batoche is also the place where the Fort Garry-Fort Edmonton Trail (Carlton Trail) is commemorated through a plaque.

This plan helps set the direction for Batoche in the 21st century and emphasizes two major developments in how Parks Canada will manage national historic sites in the future. First, the plan is designed to implement the new Parks Canada policy concept of commemorative integrity at Batoche. One of the key features of commemorative integrity recognizes that there are different and often conflicting viewpoints of history to be imparted to the public. The management plan identifies this requirement for Batoche.

Second, the plan was developed with the participation of the Métis Nation of Saskatchewan, and, on November 8, 1998, the Government of Canada and the Métis Nation of Saskatchewan signed an agreement for the shared management of Batoche National Historic Site of Canada. The establishment of a shared management board for a national historic site administered by Parks Canada will be a relatively new approach to site management.

National historic sites represent a means for Canadians to learn and share the story of our country. As places where we can commemorate our history and our diverse heritage, they contribute to an understanding and collective sense of Canada's national identity.

Sheila Copps
Minister of Canadian Heritage

Recommendations

This plan has been recommended for approval and signed by:

Tom Lee

Chief Executive Officer
Parks Canada Agency

Christina Cameron

Director General, National Historic Sites
Parks Canada

Gaby Fortin

Acting Director General, Western Canada
Parks Canada

Jim Masyk

Field Unit Superintendent, Saskatchewan South
Parks Canada Agency

Jim Durocher

President
Métis Society of Saskatchewan, Inc.


Executive summary

Batoche National Historic Site of Canada (NHSC) is located midway between Saskatoon and Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. It was initially designated a national historic site in 1923, although the lands making up the present site were acquired by the Government of Canada at various times from the 1950s to the 1980s. Batoche NHSC commemorates: a site of armed conflict between the Canadian Government and the Métis Provisional Government in May 1885; the Métis community of Batoche; and, Métis river lot land use pattern of Prairies settlement. The Fort Garry-Fort Edmonton Trail is also commemorated here by a Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada plaque. Batoche NHSC is one of the better known heritage tourism attractions in Saskatchewan. The site receives more than 24,000 visitors annually.

Batoche NHSC is an impressive cultural landscape in a natural setting of aspen forest, remnant fescue prairie, marsh, and abandoned farm properties. The landscape bears evidence of the Métis river lot system on the South Saskatchewan River, the cellars and foundations of buildings in the village of Batoche, historic trails, and the 1885 military entrenchments and rifle pits of the Métis and the Canadian North-West Field Force. Historic buildings at Batoche NHSC include the restored and period furnished St. Antoine de Padoue Church and Rectory, and several 19th and early 20th century Métis houses.

This management plan replaces the first management plan for Batoche NHSC which was approved in 1982. That plan directed the development of the facilities, services, and programs which we see today. This new plan, however, is necessary for three fundamental reasons:

  • to incorporate the new shared management role of the Métis Nation of Saskatchewan at Batoche NHSC;
  • to ensure that the objectives for commemorative integrity at Batoche NHSC, confirmed in the site's 1996 Commemorative Integrity Statement, are represented in the site management plan; and
  • to ensure that site management direction is consistent with the principles and practice in the Parks Canada Cultural Resource Management Policy, approved by the Minister of Canadian Heritage in 1994.

This revised management plan has been prepared so that future activities and decision-making at Batoche NHSC are based on guidance herein to ensure proper protection, presentation, and use of the site as a place of national significance, while offering a quality visitor experience. Among other things, this management plan provides strategic direction concerning historic buildings, heritage message delivery and outreach, management of the west side lands, and shared management at Batoche NHSC.


1.0 Introduction

Batoche, located in central Saskatchewan between Saskatoon and Prince Albert, was declared a national historic site in 1923 and a plaque was first placed there by the Government of Canada in 1925 (Figure 1). The initial focus of commemoration was the armed conflict between the Canadian Government and the Métis Provisional Government in 1885. In the early 1950s, members of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada (HSMBC), an advisory board to the Minister responsible for Parks Canada, began to broaden the commemorative intent to encompass the history of the Métis community of Batoche, an initiative which the HSMBC eventually recognized formally in its approved plaque inscription for Batoche in 1985.

A number of other HSMBC recommendations relate to Batoche National Historic Site of Canada (NHSC). In 1972, the HSMBC recommended the designation of the Carlton (Fort Garry - Fort Edmonton) Trail, of which significant portions survive at Batoche NHSC. Parks Canada erected a plaque commemorating the trail on the site. In 1989, as part of a separate initiative to commemorate Canada's prairie agricultural settlement patterns, the HSMBC further recommended that the Métis river lot pattern is of national historic significance and should also be commemorated at Batoche NHSC. A further initiative was the request of the HSMBC in 1970 that Parks Canada examine the interpretive program at Batoche to see whether adequate reference to the role of First Nations in the North West Rebellion/ Resistance had been made. Accordingly, Batoche National Historic Site of Canada commemorates:

  • a site of the armed conflict between the Métis Provisional Government and the Canadian Government in 1885;
  • the Métis community of Batoche;
  • Métis river lot land use patterns; and
  • the national significance of this place to the history of Canada.

It should be noted that the HSMBC recommendations to commemorate the Carlton Trail and to interpret aspects of the First Nations involvement in the armed conflict of 1885 will also be addressed at Batoche National Historic Site of Canada.

Figure 1. Regional Setting of Batoche NHSC

Map 1: Regional setting

Figure 1. Regional Setting of Batoche NHSC - Text version

This map shows the regional setting of Batoche National Historic Site in Saskatchewan, Canada. Map listings include:

  • Prince Albert
  • MacDowall
  • Ft. Carlton
  • Duck Lake
  • St. Isdore de Bellevue
  • St. Louis
  • North Saskatchewan River
  • Rostern
  • Domremy
  • Petite Ville
  • South Saskatchewan River
  • Butter Lake
  • Wanuskewin
  • Saskatoon
  • Batoche NHS
  • Fish Creek NHS

Management plans establish the long range direction for national historic site activities and are commitments to the public of Canada from the Minister responsible for Parks Canada regarding the use, protection, and presentation of these special places. A management plan constitutes the local expression of the general policies of Parks Canada and incorporates public knowledge, expertise, and suggestions. The direction established in a management plan responds to Parks Canada's fundamental responsibilities to ensure the commemorative integrity of the national historic site, to provide quality service to visitors, and to utilize public funds in a wise and efficient manner. As such, it is through the implementation of the management plan that Parks Canada meets its obligations to the people of Canada.

Batoche's first and only management plan dates from 1982. Implementation of that plan proceeded from 1982 through to 1986. In 1992, Parks Canada initiated a management plan review for two reasons:

  • the 1982 management plan identified a two-phased approach to the historic site's development. Although Phase I projects have been largely implemented, most of the Phase II projects, focussed mainly on reconstruction of the East Village, have been put on hold. The plan review was to assess if the Phase II projects are still appropriate in light of new program policy, and
  • the Métis Society of Saskatchewan (MSS) expressed a desire to have a 'stronger' role at Batoche. The plan review was identified as an appropriate forum to discuss the future relationship of the Métis community with the development and operation of Batoche.

The primary considerations for managing a national historic site have changed considerably since 1982. Changes to the protection, presentation and operation of Batoche NHSC are proposed herein to make this a revision of the 1982 management plan. Key documents which have had a major impact upon the direction established in this revised management plan are the Parks Canada Guiding Principles and Operational Policies and the Batoche National Historic Site of Canada Commemorative Integrity Statement. This management plan illustrates the strategic direction and management approaches which will take Batoche NHSC into the 21st century. Key elements in the management plan include:

  • commitment to ensure the commemorative integrity of Batoche NHSC and to make Canadians more aware of the significance of this place;
  • formal agreement between Parks Canada and the Métis Society of Saskatchewan for the shared management of Batoche NHSC. Shared management entails active involvement of both parties in the operations of the site. Fundamental to this agreement is the shared commitment to ensure the commemorative integrity of Batoche;
  • provisions for researching and presenting alternative viewpoints on the history and events of Batoche, in keeping with the principles and practice of Parks Canada's Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Policy;
  • broadened use of the cultural landscape and in situ cultural resources of Batoche NHSC as well as the Visitor Reception Centre (VRC) to communicate messages of national significance;
  • definition of the decision-making process for the appropriateness and viability of reconstructions identified in the 1982 management plan;
  • definition of decision-making process for future use of the west side lands which have been closed to public access (as per the 1982 plan); and
  • a cultural landscape I ecosystem conservation plan for the east and west sides in place of an historic landscape restoration program identified in the 1982 plan.

Commemorative integrity forms the primary accountability framework for evaluating how well Batoche NHSC is being managed. It is a term used to describe the "health and wholeness" of a national historic site. A national historic site possesses commemorative integrity when:

  • the resources that symbolize or represent the site's importance are not impaired or under threat;
  • the reasons for the site's national historic significance are effectively communicated to the public; and
  • the heritage values of the site are respected by all whose decisions or actions affect it.

The statement of commemorative intent determines the resources and messages for consideration in defining commemorative integrity. Parks Canada's Cultural Resource Management Policy provides the principles and practice of cultural resource management to achieve commemorative integrity.

Commemorative integrity is not necessarily a fixed state that once attained is held constant. A site's "health and wholeness" are subject to external pressures (physical, biological, economic, social) and internal actions (policy and management). It is imperative that not only the threats which may impair or threaten integrity of the site are monitored on an ongoing basis, but also those management actions — as identified in this management plan — are monitored to ensure that desired results are being achieved and, if not, are adapted, modified, or discontinued. The management plan acknowledges that monitoring and evaluation of presentation and protection practices by Parks Canada and its partners are an integral part of site management.


2.0 Current situation and needs

The Batoche NHSC management plan approved by the Minister in 1982 has provided the framework for the development and operation of Batoche for the past decade and a half. The goal of that management plan was "to establish a policy framework for the conservation and interpretation of the historical resources of Batoche and to outline visitor use and operational requirements for this major national historic park for the next ten years". Objectives of that management plan were to: provide for a full range of historical resource protection projects ranging from simple preservation to full period reconstruction; outline the interpretive means by which the stated objectives of orientation, integration, and provision of a period atmosphere will be met; and outline visitor service programs necessary to support the improved level of site development and commemoration at Batoche. Results from the 1982 planning program are provided in Appendix A.

In light of current Parks Canada program policy and government direction, the following specific issues were identified through the course of the management plan review.

Commemorative integrity

  • Are Phase II projects still appropriate and in keeping with the principles and practice of Parks Canada's Cultural Resource Management Policy? One specific item in this regard is the reconstruction of one or more buildings at the East Village. This issue was raised several times at the public participation meetings.
  • What roles do partners, in particular the Métis Society of Saskatchewan, play in the protection and presentation of Batoche?
  • Does heritage presentation convey the national significance of Batoche NHSC and does it reflect the "many voices of history"? The Commemorative Integrity Statement directs that the history of Batoche is presented with integrity, including the presentation of differing contemporary views, perspectives informed by traditional knowledge, and later interpretations. The use in this management plan of the words 'Rebellion' and 'Resistance' in conjunction with one another, for example, is intended to convey the complex and differing views related to the armed conflict in the Canadian Northwest in 1885. To the Government of Canada, the taking up of arms against the government and the declaration of the provisional government by the Métis were acts of rebellion; to the Métis, these actions were acts of last-resort to obtain title to lands, respect for their cultural traditions and economic security.
  • Can Parks Canada influence others in the appropriate management of cultural resources on lands adjacent to and in the area of Batoche? The lands surrounding Batoche NHSC bear heritage resources which relate to the commemoration of Batoche, especially the river lot land use patterns and remnants of the Carlton Trail.
  • Are the lands on the west side integral to Batoche's commemorative integrity or can they be surplused?
  • How is vegetation succession managed on both the east and west side to ensure that the historic landscape is not lost to the understanding of the history and events of Batoche?

Meeting client needs

  • How does Batoche NHSC identify, meet, and remain sensitive to its market needs? There is currently no baseline information on visitors to Batoche. This need will be addressed through market research and visitor surveys.
  • What interpretive programs and visitor services are fundamental, or core, to the site experience? The strategy will identify program components and services which are necessary for ensuring commemorative integrity and those which will augment the visitor experience.

These issues and others are addressed in this revised management plan for Batoche NHSC.


3.0 Management strategy for Batoche

3.1 Key objectives of the management plan

The overall objective of this plan is to provide direction for the next decade to ensure the commemorative integrity of Batoche NHSC through the application of the principles and practice of cultural resource management as set forth in the Parks Canada Guiding Principles and Operational Policies. Key objectives of this management plan are:

  • to determine the appropriateness of unimplemented proposals identified in Phase II of the 1982 site management plan;

  • to make the public more aware of the legacy of what took place here and its impact on our national identity;

  • to present the public with the "many voices of history". History will be presented with integrity. This will include the presentation of differing contemporary views. Parks Canada will not play the role of arbiter of Canada's human history. Through participation of partners, programming will provide various perspectives on the history and events of national significance at Batoche;

  • to present the site as a whole and integrate more of the cultural resources and landscape of Batoche NHSC into the site's presentation. The VRC will continue to serve the role of orientation while programming on the site will vary according to length of tours of different cultural resources;

  • to make Batoche NHSC a significant place for all Canadians, and provide the local community with a place at Batoche (supporting the World Heritage Convention to give heritage a function in the life of a community); and

  • to communicate the family of national historic sites.

In attaining these objectives, Parks Canada must remain accountable for providing good service to its clients, and the wise and efficient management of public funds.


3.2 Heritage presentation

Interpretation objectives in the 1982 management plan were largely focussed on the VRC's audio-visual program and exhibit hall, and the provision of period furnishings, animation, and demonstration programs at locations selected for period restoration and reconstruction. While the VRC was constructed and has played a central role in site interpretation, programs of animation, restoration and reconstruction have been limited to the church and rectory, with some programming recently developed for the zareba. Visitation is limited largely to the VRC, church and rectory. The interpretive potential of other cultural resources, such as the Caron Sr. House, have not been fully realized.

The direction provided in this management plan is to use the site as a whole, its cultural landscape, and nodes of all Level 1 cultural resources, to facilitate communication of the variety of messages to be delivered at Batoche NHSC (Figure 2). Components of heritage programming and services on the site will be evaluated to determine whether they are a core provision of Parks Canada (included in the basic entry fee), subject to full or partial cost recovery, provided through partnership initiatives, or discontinued. Core services of the audio-visual program and exhibit hall will be provided to the visitor at the VRC. Before refining and adding to heritage presentation, market research will be completed for Batoche NHSC to ensure that communication products are geared toward existing and potential audience needs while meeting objectives of commemorative intent. The "Standard Heritage Presentation Messages" will provide a framework for heritage presentation at Batoche:

Messages of national significance:
Visitors will know why Batoche NHSC was designated and set aside as nationally significant. They will obtain "a sense of place", and they will receive an overview of why Batoche is important and relevant to the visitor and to Canada;
Parks Canada messages:
Visitors will know this is a Parks Canada heritage place, that Batoche NHSC is one part of a system of national (and international) protected heritage areas, and that the cultural and natural heritage represented is our legacy as Canadians. It is a very significant element of Canadian identity; and
Reception/orientation messages:
Visitors will receive a welcome and orientation to the serv ices and facilities of Batoche NHSC and a response to their basic requests for information. They will be made aware of opportunities for a heritage experience, relevant public safety information, and basic information essential to the commemorative integrity of Batoche. A key element to the reception at Batoche is a clear explanation to visitors that they have an opportunity to explore different messages at various venues on the site, and that one or more perspectives to the site's histories and events may be told at those venues. Which perspective is being presented will be explicitly stated as will alternative explanations.

The following messages of national historic significance will form the nucleus of communication and programming for Batoche:


The importance of Batoche in the history of Canada

  • the armed conflict of 1885, including the establishment of the Northwest Field Force encampment east of the church, the headquarters of the Métis Provisional Government at the East Village, and the progress of the battle of Batoche between these opposing forces;
  • the importance of the corrununity of Batoche, especially its role as a centre of Métis social, religious, and corrunercial activity from the late 19th century to the 20th century, including associated landscape, patterns of land use and transportation;
  • impacts of the events of the Rebellion/ Resistance on the history of the community, the region and Canadian history.

The following messages are key to conveying the national significance of Batoche:

  • the reasons for the establishment of the community, and the reasons for the armed conflict of 1885, and their importance to the history of Canada;
  • the consequences of the armed conflict, i.e., its impact on the history of the country, and the history of the community, including its social fabric;
  • the history, evolution, and continuity of the Métis community of Batoche;
  • the origins, realization, use, and evolution of the Métis river lot land use pattern on the prairies;
  • the complexity of perspectives, both historical and contemporary, regarding the historical events which are commemorated at Batoche, including the pre sen ta tion of differing contemporary views, perspectives informed by traditional knowledge, and later interpretations;
  • the symbolic/ associative values (such as Métis art form, spiritual beliefs, sovereignty and language) which give cultural resources their historic value;
  • the evolution of the cultural landscape over time and its identity; and
  • the site as a place of significance to the entire country, as well as a place of local or regional significance.

Commemorative integrity will be achieved when the general public is aware of the commemorative intent of Batoche NHSC and its historic values and when all visitors to the site have the opportunity to understand its messages of national significance. "Awareness" on the part of the general public indicates basic knowledge that includes the principal facts. "Understanding" on the part of site visitors means an in-depth knowledge. It is not anticipated that every visitor will achieve this degree of knowledge from having visited Batoche. The responsibility of the site is, however, to offer the opportunity to do so. All interpretive messages will be evaluated, and changed accordingly, to ensure that messages of national significance have been developed in accordance with the principles of value, public benefit, understanding, respect, and integrity, and are effectively communicated to the public. Other messages of importance which are identified in the Commemorative Integrity Statement and can be communicated at Batoche include:

  • the history which dates before the community of Batoche including the pre-contact history which is evident from the archaeological sites found at Batoche;
  • the rare fescue grasslands which are still present on the west side of the site;
  • the evolution of the natural landscape at Batoche; and
  • the history and role of the Carlton Trail and its evidence at Batoche.

The reasons for Batoche's national historic significance are effectively communicated to the public when:

  • the importance of the site as a whole is communicated; that is, when the individually significant components are integrated in the presentation of the larger story of the site;

  • the public understands the complexity of perspectives, both historical and contemporary, regarding the historical events which are being commemorated at Batoche;

  • the history of the site is presented with integrity, including the presentation of differing contemporary views, perspectives informed by traditional knowledge, and later interpretations. Parks Canada will not play the role of arbiter of Canada's human history;

  • the evolution of the site over time and its identity, which includes the re-established historic spatial relationships, is acknowledged;

  • the site is presented as a place of significance to the entire country, rather than a place of local or regional significance;

  • Batoche's membership in the larger family of national historic sites is effectively communicated, along with the larger context of national historic sites within Canada; and

  • community support for and participation in events and activities related to the messages of national significance is encouraged, in keeping with the current cooperative management discussions I negotiations.

Excerpt from the Batoche NHSC Commemorative Integrity Statement

Figure 2. Batoche NHSC site plan

Map 1: Regional setting

Figure 2. Batoche NHSC site plan - Text version

This map shows the site plan of Batoche National Historic Site. Listings on include:

  • Legend
  • Highway
  • Service Road
  • Trail
  • Access trail
  • Historic trail
  • Visitor reception area
  • Resources
  • Structures
  • Exhibits
  • Picnic area
  • Viewpoint
  • Administration
  • Information
  • Areas
  • Visitor reception area
  • Church-Rectory
  • Caron House-Zareba
  • East Village
  • West Side

3.2.1 Visitor experience

Heritage presentation at Batoche NHSC will be a program of informed choices for the visitor. Upon arrival at the VRC, and through the audio-visual program, all visitors to Batoche will be made aware of all messages identified in the site Commemorative Integrity Statement that make Batoche NHSC a significant heritage place. The exhibit hall will provide further information on these messages for those who cannot or do not wish to go on-site. The primary opportunity, however, for understanding the various messages of Batoche will be gained largely through personal and non-personal means of communication along trails of varying length located in different areas of the site, connecting various interpretive nodes, and providing different messages. Use of the cultural landscape and in situ cultural resources will be integral to the heritage presentation. All Level 1 cultural resources on the east side of Batoche NHSC should eventually be incorporated in heritage presentation at the site. Appendix B relates historic values of the cultural resources to commemorative intent. These historic values will be used in developing the heritage presentation. Through a heritage presentation program involving partners and based on extensive research, visitors will receive varying and sometimes opposing perspectives to the history and events associated with Batoche.


3.2.2 On-site audiences

Based on analysis in the Parks Canada Saskatchewan Operations Marketing Strategy and Tactical Plan (1997), four target groups comprise the visitors to Batoche NHSC:

These four segments are distinguished because the forms of programming and services offered to them are different.

Consumers

A consumer is someone who travels from home to a single destination and returns home that same day. The site visit, including driving time, may range from three hours to a full day. Other than a possible stopover, the visit accounts for the full trip experience. Consumers have different needs and expectations than tourists. They have limited disposable time, competing interests, are looking to use their time effectively, and require immediate gratification. This underlies the importance of social, activity and entertainment values in their heritage experience. Because of the proximity between home and site, consumers have probably visited the site before and will seek new programs and activities to attract them back.

In addition to receiving the messages of national significance, it will be important for this audience to recognize or support:

  • Batoche NHSC as a "must see" experience to share with visiting friends and relatives;
  • Batoche NHSC as part of Canada's system of protected heritage areas which belong to present and future generations of Canadians. It is a place worth protecting and presenting with respect and integrity;
  • Parks Canada's commitment to ensuring the commemorative integrity of Batoche, including the measures necessary to protect the site;
  • the shared management approach to Batoche NHSC involving the Métis Society of Saskatchewan;
  • opportunities to use the site for community events, especially those which enhance the commemorative intent of Batoche; and
  • opportunities to return to the site and take in different interpretive programs and venues.

Tourists

A tourist is an individual who travels from home to multiple destinations or to a single destination that includes an overnight stay away from home. Tourists at Batoche are largely residents of Saskatchewan (but not consumers), or from Manitoba, Alberta, or the northern states of Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Tourists' needs and expectations are formed within a different mind set than those of consumers. They are on vacation, have more disposable time, and are travelling for the purpose of doing things such as visiting national parks and historic sites. In this respect, tourists are more easily gratified than consumers as they have fewer competing interests, i.e., the social, activity, and entertainment values are part of the larger travel experience.

In addition to receiving the messages of national significance, it will be important for this audience to be informed:

  • of other regional heritage and Parks Canada attractions en route to their destination;
  • of Parks Canada's commitment to ensuring the commemorative integrity of Batoche, including the measures necessary to protect the site; and
  • that Batoche NHSC is part of Canada's system of protected heritage areas which belong to present and future generations of Canadians. It is a place worth protecting and presenting with respect and integrity.

Charter bus tourists

Although tourists by the above-mentioned definition, this segment does not have the disposable time given that their schedule is predetermined by a tour company. Usually the site visit is part of a one to two hour stopover which includes use of food concession and washroom facilities. Senior citizens comprise the main portion of this segment. Mobility and limited time available on the site usually restricts this group to the VRC.

In addition to receiving the messages of national significance, it will be important for this audience to be informed:

  • that Batoche NHSC is a large cultural landscape and more than a reception centre;
  • that Batoche NHSC is part of Canada's system of protected heritage areas which belong to present and future generations of Canadians. It is a place worth protecting and presenting with respect and integrity; and
  • of Parks Canada's commitment to ensuring the commemorative integrity of Batoche, including the measures necessary to protect the site.

School groups

School groups are believed to make up 30 percent of Batoche's visitation. School tours are normally three hours long and include the VRC, church and rectory. This segment expects learning activities and recreation activities as part of the heritage experience. In many respects, the learning objectives of this group are similar to consumers' since students are coming from local and regional schools. However, the programs and services are designed for different age groups. Schools as audiences are also addressed under Outreach Audiences.


3.2.3 Outreach audiences

In addition to the messages to be communicated to the site visitor, there are program messages (both commemorative and promotional) to be communicated to off-site audiences who may have a direct or indirect interest in Batoche. Many programs and activities for off-site presentation have been or will be developed at the national program level as part of the Parks Canada External Relations Strategy and the Parks Canada Saskatchewan Operations Marketing Strategy and Tactical Plan. The objective of outreach programming is to provide learning opportunities for Canadians beyond the physical boundaries of the site in order to build a greater understanding, appreciation and support of Canada's cultural and natural heritage - and a greater sense of national identity and pride. The following outreach target audiences and their learning objectives are identified for Batoche.

The Canadian public

The learning objectives for this audience are:

  • the public recognizes and supports Batoche NHSC as providing a unique, educational and entertaining window on Canada's history;
  • the public identifies Batoche as part of Canada's system of protected heritage areas which belong to present and future generations of Canadians. It is a place worth protecting and presenting with respect and integrity; and
  • the public is aware of the reasons for Batoche' s national significance, including the historic values and resources which give the place importance.

Methods of informing the Canadian public may include the Internet, advertising provided at the Parks Canada program level, and promotion of Saskatchewan heritage experiences through cooperative efforts.

The local community of Batoche

The learning objectives for this audience are:

  • community members consider Batoche NHSC a "must see" experience to share with visiting friends and relatives;
  • community members identify Batoche NHSC as part of Canada's system of protected heritage areas which belong to present and future generations of Canadians. It is a place worth protecting and presenting with respect and integrity;
  • the community understands and supports Parks Canada's commitment to ensuring the commemorative integrity of Batoche, including the measures necessary to protect the site;
  • community members understand and support the shared management approach to Batoche; and
  • community members are aware of the opportunities to use the site for community events, especially those which enhance the commemorative intent of Batoche.

Methods of communicating with the local community can include community events such as Parks Day, Canada Day, and "Back to Batoche Days", and newspaper articles and public service announcements on site-related work.

Community and regional schools

The learning objectives for this audience are:

  • educators and students identify Batoche NHSC as part of Canada's system of protected heritage areas which belongs to present and future generations of Canadians. It is a place worth protecting and presenting with respect and integrity. Students are the future stewards of heritage conservation;
  • educators and students are aware of the reasons for Batoche 's national significance, including the historic values and resources which give the place importance; and
  • educators and students recognize that history has many perspectives and the challenge is to be informed, understanding , and appreciative of these varying and sometimes conflicting perspectives.

Parks Canada staff will use the "multiplier effect" when providing outreach school programs. Essentially, this entails placing the teaching tools into the hands of teachers, and providing them with the lesson plan and information/resources for pres entation.

Outreach will not only provide programming to the grade school level, but will seek opportunities with college and university levels. Batoche warrants this involvement given its continued importance and meaning to the Métis and the site's place in the nation building of Canada.

Partners and stakeholders

Including, but not necessarily limited to:

  • the site board established through the shared management agreement
  • the Métis Society of Saskatchewan
  • One Arrow First Nation
  • Tourism Saskatchewan
  • regional heritage and heritage tourism organizations

The learning objectives for this audience group are:

  • partners and stakeholders recognize the many shared opportunities for marketing and messaging available at Batoche. Batoche NHSC can act as a hub for regional heritage tourism, especially focused on Métis history and the North West Rebellion/Resistance;
  • partners and stakeholders are aware of the reasons for Batoche's national significance, including the historic values and the resources which give the place importance;
  • partners and stakeholders recognize "the many voices of history" as integral to the commemoration and understanding of Batoche;
  • partners and stakeholders recognize Parks Canada as a significant player in heritage tourism; and
  • partners and stakeholders understand and support Parks Canada's mandate and commitment to ensuring the commemorative integrity of Batoche, including the measures necessary to protect the site.

The Batoche NHSC Management Plan will be an important introductory tool in communicating with partners and stakeholders. In addition to the partnering arrangements identified in this plan, the Parks Canada Saskatchewan Operations Marketing Strategy and Tactical Plan identifies additional partnering initiatives concerning cooperative efforts in marketing.


3.2.4 Interpretation of First Nations role in 1885

In 1970, the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada recommended "that an examination of the interpretive material at Batoche National Historic Park be undertaken with a view to determining whether adequate references to the role of the Indians have been made". Traditional knowledge and history provide a number of perspectives to First Nations involvement in the 1885 Rebellion/Resistance and at the battle of Batoche. It is essential that these perspectives be brought together and researched by First Nations and Parks Canada alike. Therefore, a forum involving First Nations, Métis, Parks Canada, and researchers from learning institutions will be assembled early in the plan implementation to address this topic. Results of this forum will provide the basis for agreement on what and how to interpret the First Nations role at the battle of Batoche specifically and the 1885 Rebellion/Resistance in general.


3.2.5 Monitoring and evaluation

Heritage pre sen ta tion will be monitored and evaluated on an ongoing basis to ensure that Parks Canada and its partners are effectively communicating the reasons for Batoche's importance to the public. Parks Canada will also ensure that the messages and information are developed and provided in accordance with the principles of value, public benefit, understanding, respect, and integrity (Parks Canada's Cultural Resource Management Policy). The visitor survey is one means already available for monitoring and evaluating heritage presentation. Other means of evaluation (e.g., focus groups, peer review I auditing) will be developed and carried out on an ongoing basis by Parks Canada and its partners who are involved in heritage presentation.


3.3 Heritage protection

Among the primary historical resource protection objectives in the 1982 management plan were:

  • to restore those historical resources which conform to the periods of Batoche's commemoration (ca. 1860- 1900);
  • to restore selected portions of the historical environment of Batoche, bearing in mind the need for caution by reason of Parks Canada's inexperience in this type of resource treatment; and
  • to reconstruct selected structures in the village of Batoche and selected landscape features associated with the battle of Batoche, May 9 -12, 1885.

It should be noted that the restoration and reconstruction identified in the 1982 management plan are, according to the CRM Policy, an interpretation rather than a protection activity. Restoration and reconstruction of built heritage have been largely restricted to the church and rectory while other cultural resources, such as the foundation remains in the East Village, have been stabilized. Although period landscape studies have been undertaken for Batoche, no groundwork has been undertaken in this regard.

Any future decisions and approaches to restore or reconstruct buildings at Batoche NHSC will be based upon guidelines in the CRM Policy. Any further restoration of the Caron Sr. House will be for presentation purposes since the house has been stabilized.

Rather than restoring the Batoche landscape to an 1880s period, evidence on evolution of the landscape will be inventoried, recorded, and communicated to enable the visitor to better understand and relate the current environment and setting to what the cultural landscape may have looked like in the late 19th century. Finally, the time period of commemoration has been revised (no longer 1860 to 1900, see section 3.3.6).


3.3.1 Cultural landscape management

A cultural landscape is any geographical area that has been modified, influenced, or given special cultural meaning by people. Batoche NHSC is a cultural landscape with features illustrative of the Métis river lot system along the South Saskatchewan River. It was the setting of a battlefield where terrain played a significant role in the military tactics of the Métis and the North West Field Force (NWFF), and was a Métis community place. Evidence of this cultural landscape can be seen beyond the boundaries of Batoche, especially evidence of the river lots. Managing Batoche's cultural landscape for protection and presentation will be accomplished by:

  • maintaining important sight lines through controlling and/ or removing vegetation;
  • maintaining vestiges of the river lots through controlling and/ or removing vegetation; and
  • maintaining a record of vegetation change, both human-induced and natural succession.

The sight lines of importance to the historic place of Batoche NHSC are:

  • from the zareba to coulee bluffs beyond the Caron Sr. House, from which positions the Métis and NWFF exchanged gunfire on the first two days of the battle;
  • from the Jolie Prairie (adjacent to the VRC) to the church, rectory, and cemetery, where on the third day of battle the Métis stopped a feint by the NWFF, but were overtaken on the fourth day;
  • from Mission Ridge to the East Village, following the route of attack by the NWFF on the fourth day;
  • from vantage points of the bluff by Caron Sr. House, Mission Ridge, and from the East Village to the river and the west side. These views are important to placing both the battle and the Métis community within their environmental contexts;
  • from various vantage points in the East Village to the Carlton Trail. These views are integral to visualizing the transportation links and such aspects of the community's economy as commerce and freighting;
  • from Mission Ridge and the East Village to the surviving traces of the river lot patterns. These views are key to communicating the historical river lot land use pattern and the associated land disputes which were integral to the armed conflict (this includes screening the maintenance compound from visitors' view by using vegetation); and
  • from the area of the church to the East Village, associated with the historical interrelationships of spiritual, commercial, and other aspects of community life.

Excerpt from the Batoche NHSC Commemorative Integrity Statement

The historic place is safeguarded when important sightlines, essential to communicating the landscape elements of national historic significance, are respected and revealed to the visiting public.

In keeping with the principles of value and understanding in the management of cultural resources, the changes reflecting the evolution of the cultural landscape will be documented, respected, and revealed to the visitor. Essentially, this will be the basis for heritage presentation where the visitor will be provided the information and tools to relate the current landscape to previous eras. This programming approach will support the following objectives of site commemorative integrity:

  • the evolution of the natural landscape and ecosystem components, and land use over time (i.e., ca. 1850 to present) are studied and defined, to serve as a basis for decision-making;
  • the public understands the changes in the landscape in the context of the history of Batoche; and
  • the importance of the natural environment to the history of the site is effectively communicated.

Aerial photographs, a current landscape inventory, and follow-up evaluation of landscape changes will be fundamental to this program.

A cultural landscape plan will be compiled to ensure the sight lines and river lot patterns are safeguarded and that current landscape features — important to understanding the landscape evolution — are protected. Any addition of buildings or facilities at Batoche NHSC will have to be evaluated against this cultural landscape plan. This cultural landscape plan will be part of the conservation plan for ecosystem features (see 3.3.5 Ecosystems feature management) and will also address fire management and the management of noxious weeds.


3.3.2 Management of archaeological resources

There are both Level 1 and Level 2 archaeological resources at Batoche. Regardless of designation, they will be managed in accordance with the principles and practice of cultural resource management. There is a need to maintain the inventory of archaeological resources at Batoche. While there has been an extensive surface survey for archaeological sites which covered the entire site area, our knowledge of the extent of these sites (i.e., below ground) is minimal. Thus there is a need, as opportunity permits, to evaluate the nature and extent of these archaeological remains. The following commemorative integrity objectives will guide the management of archaeological resources:

The physical values of the archeological resources are safeguarded when:

  • vestigial in situ subsurface Level 1 cultural resources are respected and protected according to accepted archaeological conservation standards. They will be monitored for known and potential impacts to their integrity;

  • identified potential cultural resources have been evaluated according to the commemorative intent and the CRM Policy;

  • features and resources that have not yet been investigated or evaluated will be respected in accordance with the CRM Policy; and

  • Level 2 cultural resources have been identified, inventoried, and evaluated, and strategies for their management put in place.

Excerpt from the Batoche NHSC Commemorative Integrity Statement


3.3.3 Built heritage management

There are five buildings or building complexes which have been identified as cultural resources and therefore will be managed in accordance with the CRM Policy. These buildings are: the Saint-Antoine-dePadoue Church and Rectory, Caron Sr. House, and two buildings located on the west side. The built heritage at Batoche NHSC has been managed in accordance with the objectives of the 1982 Management Plan. The buildings on the west side were stabilized, the church and rectory restored to the 1890s period, and the Caron Sr. House stabilized until a decision is made on its interpretive use.

The Saint-Antoine-de-Padoue Church is "Classified" as per the Federal Heritage Buildings (FHB) Policy. The Saint-Antoine- de-Padoue Rectory and the Jean Caron Sr. House are "Recognized" as per the FHB Policy. These buildings will be managed to ensure the protection of their character defining limits. The two buildings on the west side were deemed to be "not heritage" according to FHB Policy evaluation. They are, however, Level 2 cultural resources in accordance with CRM Policy.

Two other building complexes are at Batoche, on the east side. They are the Parenteau and Nogier farm buildings. Although they were deemed to be "not heritage" a number of years ago, they have yet to be evaluated as cultural resources according to CRM Policy. As part of the evaluation process, it is recommended that these two buildings be resubmitted to FHBRO in consideration of whether or not these buildings help portray the Métis community and river lot patterns. Determining whether or not the Nogier and Parenteau buildings are cultural resources is a priority item.

The following commemorative integrity objectives will guide the overall management of built heritage at Batoche NHSC:

The physical values of the site's built resources are safeguarded when:

  • the size, scale, orientation, and massing of all Level 1 structures, including the church, rectory and annexes, Caron Sr. House and annex, their construction techniques, and building materials of the surviving above-ground cultural resources of the site, are respected, protected, and monitored; and

  • the structural framing systems of the Level 1 buildings, including the Red River frame structural system of the church and rectory, the dovetailed crosstimber construction of the Caron House, and facing materials, are respected and preserved according to the CRM Policy, the Federal Heritage Buildings Review Office (FHBRO) Code of Practice, and international conservation conventions.

Excerpt from the Batoche NHSC Commemorative Integrity Statement


3.3.4 Artifacts and historic objects

Historic objects and collections will be managed for commemorative integrity when:

  • they have been evaluated according to the site's commemorative intent;
  • strategies are put in place for their effective protection and monitoring; and
  • access is ensured for research and presentation.

The evaluation of the archaeological and curatorial collections will await evaluation processes to be developed by Parks Canada. Reproductions will not be managed as cultural resources. While they will be used in site presentation, they will not be subject to conservation or other heritage protection requirements.


3.3.5 Ecosystem features management

In accordance with the CRM Policy, natural ecosystem features and palaeontological resources will be valued in a manner that reflects Parks Canada's role as an important environmental steward. There is a need for site specific inventory and evaluation, especially of fescue grasslands on the west side. A natural resources inventory will be conducted to determine the state of ecosystem features and palaeontological resources, and, to identify natural features of special significance that should be protected at Batoche. Based upon this inventory and evaluation, an ecosystem feature conservation plan will be developed in conjunction with the cultural landscape plan, to be known as the Cultural Landscape/Ecosystem Conservation Plan. The ecosystem conservation recommendations will respect the objectives of site commemorative integrity.

The natural environment and resources are safeguarded when:

  • the fescue grasslands on the site are protected and presented. It is important that this ecosystem and other elements of the natural landscape and of the site are inventoried and strategies developed to protect and present portions of these features, contingent on respecting the cultural resources and the overall commemorative intent of the site;

  • the diversity of habitats, important to the reproduction of a large number of native animal species, including amphibians, birds, mammals, and insects, are protected and presented, in a manner compatible with the commemorative intent of the site;

  • the evolution of the natural landscape and ecosystem components, and land use over time (i.e., ca. 1850 to present) is studied and defined, to serve as a basis for decision-making;

  • the public understands the changes in the landscape in the context of the history of Batoche; and

  • the importance of the natural environment to the history of the site is effectively communicated.

Excerpt from the Batoche NHSC Commemorative Integrity Statement


3.3.6 Evaluating cultural resources

There is the potential for the discovery of previously unknown or the reevaluation of existing cultural resources at Batoche. The following guidelines will be used to identify the level of significance of a cultural resource:

  • cultural resources dating to the period from 1872 to 1885 are Level 1;
  • cultural resources dating prior to 1872 are Level 2; and
  • cultural resources dating after 1885 will be evaluated on a case by case basis since some of these resources may help convey the commemoration of the Métis community of Batoche in to the 20th century.

3.3.7 Monitoring and evaluation

Heritage protection entails the proper management of cultural and natural resources through an adequate and representative inventory of resources, the consideration and evaluation of the resources' conditions and their heritage values in decision-making, and monitoring of site threats and management actions to ensure their protection. Without an ongoing record of perceived and known problems, management actions will be based on conjecture and without prioritization.

The inventory of cultural resources has been extensive for Batoche NHSC and, with the exception of trails and the Nogier and Parenteau farm buildings, evaluation of historic value has been done for much of the site. Threats to Batoche NHSC identified in the 1990 State of the Parks Report included decay of Caron Sr. House (now stabilized), visitor use, rodents, and vegetation impact to rifle pits and zareba (now managed through board walks and controlled access, and selective tree cutting and edging), and prairie fires (a potential threat although no major fires have occurred to date).

The cultural resources of Batoche NHSC are safeguarded when the resources have been identified, inventoried, and evaluated, and strategies for their monitoring been put in place; i.e.,

  • the historic value of the cultural resources has been fully considered and integrated into the planning, conservation, presentation, and operational programs;

  • the potential consequences and cumulative impacts of proposed actions on the historic value of the cui tural resources has been considered;

  • environmental assessments for the site consider and address the negative consequences of proposed actions on the historic value of cultural resources;

  • management decisions are based on interdisciplinary teamwork;

  • records and inventories of cultural resources (including basic data, records of decisions, actions taken, heritage recording, etc.) are up to date;

  • adequate research, recording, and investigation precede actions that affect cultural resources and their presentation; and

  • research and the results of research are the basis for activities having an impact on cultural resources and their presentation.

Excerpt from the Batoche NHSC Commemorative Integrity Statement

The 1994 State of the Parks Report upgraded both the Caron Sr. House and earthenwork features from poor to good condition.

Future monitoring requirements for heritage protection at Batoche NHSC should focus on the following areas:

  • an ongoing program of surveillance and monitoring for structural problems of the church and rectory believed to be chronic (e.g., bowing of walls at church), including a program to monitor foundation movement of the church as recommended in the Conservation Engineering Investigation of the Ground Floor Structure Final Report (Public Works Canada, May 1996);
  • fuel load and fire management requirements (to be identified in the Cultural Landscape/ Ecosystem Conservation Plan);
  • monitoring for impacts of pedestrian traffic on cultural and natural resources; and
  • environmental assessment and monitoring for potential impacts to cultural and natural resources on the west side should this area be open to public access.

3.4 Proposals by specific areas/resources

Sections 3.2 and 3.3 provide overall site objectives and guidelines for heritage presentation and protection at Batoche. This section provides proposals specific to the major nodes of cultural resources and facilities.


3.4.1 Visitor reception centre

The main point of arrival at Batoche NHSC will continue to be the VRC. Here, visitors will be provided with an orientation to the various services and programs available at the site. The orientation will not only be to the east side, but will include the west side of Batoche, the river lot system from Fish Creek to St. Laurent, other heritage places of the 1885 Rebellion/Resistance, and other national historic sites. At the VRC, the visitor will pay for those non-core services which he I she wishes to use.

The following information and services will be provided at the VRC:

  • in the audio-visual production and the exhibit hall, a level of information to provide awareness of all Batoche's messages, identified in the Commemorative Integrity Statement, will be communicated. These facilities will be available to all visitors to the site. Given this purpose and objective, both the audio-visual production and exhibit hall are core services;
  • the visitor will be made aware of the opportunities, messages and services available by going on-site. Lengths of various trails and site conditions will be identified to the visitor; and
  • the visitor will be made aware that heritage presentation at Batoche NHSC provides various perspectives to the circumstances, events and consequences of the 1885 Rebellion/Resistance and that he or she is encouraged to explore and consider these perspectives in understanding Batoche's national significance.

Review of the audio-visual production is a priority to ensure that it presents at least an awareness level as to the reasons for the site's national significance. This review will also evaluate whether the current program provides various perspectives — "the many voices of history" — to the reasons, events, and consequences of the 1885 Rebellion/ Resistance. This evaluation will be based upon the site's commemorative integrity and the principles and practice of cultural resource management. Any deficiencies will be corrected through changes to the audio-visual program and/ or improved messages in the exhibit hall. The exhibit hall will supplement the messages of the audiovisual program and provide access for visitors with special needs.

The physical values of Batoche's significance can be found in the cultural resources on the site. Evaluation of the audio-visual program and the exhibit hall must address the effectiveness of communicating Batoche' s symbolic values. The communication of these symbolic values is inherent to understanding Batoche's national significance. Therefore, the evaluation of the VRC's interpretive media must consider whether each of the following values, from the Batoche NHSC Commemorative Integrity Statement, is presented to the visitor:

  • Batoche's symbolic values of importance to the national history of Canada
    • Confirmed Canada's control of Western Canada
    • Contributed to the rise of Quebec nationalism
    • Led to the large-scale settlement of Western Canada by immigrants
    • Enabled fulfilment of the National Policy
    • Symbolized the clash of aspirations in the West
  • Summary of Batoche's symbolic values of importance to the Métis
  • Métis aspirations, then and now
  • The Dispersal of the Métis from The Red River Settlement
  • The political environment of 1885
  • The impact of the National Policy
  • Traditional and changing forms of land tenure
  • Métis self-government

3.4.2 Church rectory and cemetery

The Saint-Antoine-de-Padoue Church and Rectory were reported in the 1994 State of the Parks Report as in good condition in terms of risk to resource. "Good" means:

  • no appreciable deterioration in the stability or performance of any of the critical components of the resource (other than normal wear and tear), and
  • the condition is maintained through routine maintenance procedures.

Despite this rating conservation work is required on the church. Conservation recommendations cited in the Saint-Antoine-de-Padoue Church Investigation Report and the Conservation Engineering Investigation of the Ground Floor Structure Final Report have been integrated into the site's business plan. An ongoing program of surveillance and monitoring will be implemented for structural problems believed to be chronic.

The cemetery is the property of the Parish of Batoche. Through arrangements with the Parish, Batoche NHSC visitors can visit the cemetery by guided tour or using a selfguiding map. The site will continue to liaise with the Parish to ensure that visitors, staff, and partners treat the cemetery with respect.


3.4.3 Caron Sr. House

The Caron Sr. House was designated "Recognized" as per FHB Policy for its associations with the reconstruction of the Métis community after the 1885 Rebellion/Resistance, because it is one of the few surviving structures from the earliest phase of this reconstruction, and for its documentary value of a typical rural vernacular Métis house. Because of its representation of Métis community at Batoche, the house is identified as a Level 1 resource. The house has been stabilized.

Caron Sr. House is a candidate location for a partner to provide heritage presentation (including special programs) on the message of Métis community and the years after 1885. Opportunities will be sought with partners to develop heritage programming using the interior of the Caron House and/ or the yard. Proposals to restore the interior of the house will be evaluated and decided upon in accordance with guidelines in the CRM Policy.


3.4.4 Zareba and rifle pits

The 1994 State of the Parks Report identifies that, although the grounds of Batoche NHSC are in good condition (an improvement from 1990), the zareba and rifle pits are fragile. Board walks, to control and keep pedestrian traffic from impacting these resources, were constructed in 1993 at the zareba and the North West Field Force rifle pits overlooking the South Saskatchewan River.

The zareba, and the Métis and North West Field Force rifle pits are Level 1 resources integral to understanding the battle of Batoche. A large trench near the East Village is believed to have been the hiding place for Métis women and children during the battle. The historical use of this trench needs to be examined. To understand the strategic location of the rifle pits and zareba, it is essential to recognize the surrounding topography, use of coulees as escape routes, placement of rifle pits below terrace ridges, and location of historic trails. Maintenance of sight lines and landscape will be integral to the management of these cultural resources.


3.4.5 East Village

The East Village is a significant complex of cultural resources for communicating all Level 1 messages of Batoche. In response to the public demand to "make the village come more alive", personal and non-personal approaches to message delivery in the East Village will be evaluated for effective communication capability.

Reconstruction of buildings that were once part of the East Village was proposed in the 1982 management plan and supported by some in public meetings for the plan review. Any decisions concerning the suitability and feasibility of reconstructing historic buildings for heritage presentation will be based on guidelines provided in the CRM Policy. Costs to construct, furnish, and maintain reconstructions will be given very significant consideration in the decision-making process.

A canoe landing will be provided at the east side ferry crossing. A general site orientation will be provided to canoeists. This will be a core service to a visitor group which appears to be on the increase.


3.4.6 Trails

The Carlton and Humboldt Trails are Level 1 cultural resources; the Carlton Trail, in fact, is commemorated at Batoche NHSC with an HSMBC plaque. Batoche NHSC contains the largest surviving portion of the Carlton Trail. There are additional, secondary trails on both the east and west sides of Batoche. Many of the secondary trails were simply worn down dirt paths providing shortcuts linking houses to outbuildings, to work areas, or to nodes in the community. These trails are between 150 to 600 metres and found throughout Batoche. Where possible (through historical documentation and association with known cultural resources), these trails will be evaluated as to whether they are cultural resources and, if so, Level 1 or 2. The criteria provided in Section 3.3.6 will be used for this purpose.

These trails can provide routes for visitors to follow from one cultural resource or interpretive node to another. If trails, which have been identified as cultural resources, are identified for visitor access on-site, environmental impact assessment will be required in design and implementation to ensure that heritage values of these trails are not lost to visitor impact or facility construction.


3.4.7 West side

The west and east sides of Batoche NHSC are not subject to the same federal legislation and regulations. While the east side has been set apart as a national historic park under Part II of the National Parks Act, this has not been done for the west side. A decision will be reached on the status of the west side lands which will permit managers to operate Batoche NHSC under a consistent set of regulations. The large land base and capability for numerous recreational and other activities to occur on the site requires that Parks Canada have regulatory means by which it can manage the resources under its protection. The following approach will be used to decide the future administrative status of the west side lands:

  • the state of the inventory of the west side cultural resources will be evaluated:
    • if the inventory is not comprehensive for the entire west side lands administered by Parks Canada, then field investigation to complete the inventory will be undertaken; and
    • if the cultural resource inventory is comprehensive for the west side, then the cultural resources will be evaluated to determine the location and extent of Level 1 and Level 2 cultural resources.
  • the entire west side will be identified for setting apart under Part II of the National Parks Act if the entire west side bears cultural resources (i.e., no tracts void of Level 1 or 2 resources). However,
  • if tracts of land on the west side do not bear cultural resources, then these "void areas" will be evaluated for optional uses. This evaluation will include an environmental assessment to determine potential impacts from optional uses. This exercise will not create pockets of cultural resources separated by parcels of "optional use" land. For the sake of effective resource management, areas to be managed for cultural resources will be of a size large enough to incorporate related cultural resources, sight lines important to the cultural landscape (see 3.3.1), and recognizable boundaries. A public forum will be established and an opportunity provided for public and stakeholders to identify interests in and potential uses of these "optional use" lands. Pursuant to the environmental assessment and consultations, decisions will be made by Parks Canada as to if and how lands bearing cultural and natural resources will be set apart under the National Historic Parks Order and how any remaining lands will be dealt with.

Since 1982, management of the west side has essentially involved restricted access with no public use and no services or facilities. Opportunities for visitor access and heritage presentation on the west side will now be considered with this management plan.

The following considerations will guide any visitor access to the west side:

  • a visitor risk assessment will be completed as part of the opportunities assessment;
  • access and use will not detrimentally affect the cultural resources. Certain paths on the west side may be identified for visitor use and certain areas may not be included for visitor use;
  • personal and non-personal means of providing heritage presentation will be considered;
  • commemorative intent is the basis for heritage presentation on the west side;
  • no visitor services or facilities will be provided by Parks Canada on the west side. Visitors are expected to be day hikers responsible for bringing their own potable water and other needs. They are also expected to provide their own transportation to a west side entry point; and
  • access to the west side will be by land, although canoeists may be able to gain access at the historic ferry crossing or another location which does not impact on the historic place.

If access is permitted to the west side, an ongoing monitoring program will be established to identify and measure impacts to the cultural resources and ecosystem features, and evaluate visitor satisfaction. Management of the west side will be adapted according to the results of this monitoring.


3.5 Shared management

Participation of the Métis Society of Saskatchewan (MSS) in the development and operation of Batoche NHSC is a key feature of this management plan. "Shared management" means the sharing of responsibility for ensuring the commemorative integrity of national historic sites and is characterized by the ongoing active involvement of two or more parties for the benefit of a national historic site.

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and the MSS are entering into a shared management agreement which formalizes their participation at Batoche, in order to:

  • ensure the commemorative integrity of Batoche;
  • solidify the good working relationship that has developed between the MSS and its representatives and Batoche NHSC staff; and
  • build upon the respective strengths of the MSS and Batoche NHSC staff for the benefit of Batoche.

The agreement will result in the establishment of a shared management board. The participation of the MSS in Batoche NHSC will be significant in the areas of heritage presentation development, delivery and evaluation, and in human resources management. A Memorandum of Understanding to identify objectives of the agreement has been signed between the Minister of Canadian Heritage and the MSS.


3.6 Community use

Excerpt from the Batoche NHSC Commemorative Integrity Statement

Commemorative integrity of Batoche NHSC is enhanced when:

  • public traditions of active involvement in the site and presentation are continued; and
  • the involvement of the Métis people in the protection and presentation of the site is ensured.

Batoche NHSC has and will continue to maintain a significant place in the local community. It can do this by providing the community with a place at Batoche, and support the World Heritage Convention to give heritage a function in the life of a community. Opportunities will be explored with the surrounding community for use of Batoche NHSC in their celebrations and community events. Opportunities will be sought where such events enhance the commemorative intent of Batoche NHSC (for example, through presenting of local history and special church services).



3.7 Adjacent land use

Parks Canada will pursue cooperation with others in the protection and presentation of historic Métis buildings and river lot settlement patterns between Fish Creek and St. Louis. There are several measures by which Batoche NHSC is or may be involved in cultural resource management on adjacent lands:

  • the One Arrow Band is considering a band resolution, approved by both Ministers of Indian and Northem Affairs and Canadian Heritage, to restrict development on lots 47, 48, 49, 50 and 51. This in effect facilitates reserve status for the entire area east of Batoche NHSC and provides controls to unacceptable development adjacent to Batoche; and
  • Parks Canada has information on cultural resources on adjacent lands which may be of interest to landowners. The importance of maintaining evidence of river lot patterns must be conveyed to adjacent landowners. As part of its involvement with the surrounding community, Parks Canada as a leading heritage organization must identify these heritage values to property owners and to the public at large.

3.8 Quality service to clients

Quality service to Batoche's clients will be ensured by:

  • understanding our clients better — knowing who they are, their needs and expectations, and their levels of satisfaction with services and facilities;
  • making changes, within the bounds of existing resources, commemorative integrity and the CRM Policy, to respond to needs; and
  • maintaining ongoing research of our clients to adapt our services to changes in our audience.

The Parks Canada Saskatchewan Operations Marketing Strategy and Tactical Plan will be integral to developing and delivering quality service. The marketing strategy provides a detailed blueprint and work plan for undertaking communication actions. This blueprint describes each recommended communication product to a level that will allow Batoche NHSC to proceed directly to development and production. The following principles will guide quality service:

  • the VRC will be open during peak hours and seasons to provide orientation to the site. Alternative sources of orientation will be provided for canoeists landing at the East Village;
  • facilities will be maintained in a clean, safe condition;
  • visitors will be provided with informed answers to their enquiries, not conjecture. When an answer cannot be provided, the visitor will be referred to additional sources of assistance;
  • exhibits and audio-visual programs that impart understanding and awareness and stimulate appreciation of the site and its significant heritage values will be provided and maintained;
  • schedules of programs and activities available throughout the site will be displayed and offered as part of site orientation; and
  • all programs, whether self-guided or led by staff or partners, will be educational and enjoyable and acknowledge alternative viewpoints of history.

Guidelines in the Access Plan for Batoche National Historic Site (March 1991), for accessibility of persons with special needs, will be incorporated in projects and programs evolving from this management plan.


3.9 Battle of Fish Creek National Historic Site of Canada

The Battle of Fish Creek National Historic Site of Canada is where a major battle of the North West Rebellion/Resistance took place between the Métis and the North West Field Force on April 24, 1885. It is located about 24 kilometres south of Batoche. Administered by Parks Canada through staff at Batoche, Fish Creek is an important heritage place which has strong historic and commemorative ties to Batoche. Originally, Fish Creek was to be included as part of the Batoche NHSC Management Plan. Instead, a separate plan will be completed for the Battle of Fish Creek National Historic Site of Canada. Because of the commemorative and administrative links to Batoche, the management planning program for Fish Creek will make reference to this management plan.


4.0 Implementation

Parks Canada uses its annual business planning p rocess to identify how it will meet its objectives. The management plan provides the stra tegic direction upon which a s ite's business plan is based. The business plan will identify the specifics of when and how the management plan strategies will be implemented. The bus iness plan will set priorities based on ensuring si te commemorative integrity, service to clients, and wise and efficient uses of resources.

The implementation of many provisions in this management plan is dependent on the availability of financial resources and an adequate base of research. Approval of this plan does not constitute automatic approval of funding for implementation. Government app ropriations to Parks Canada -- primarily for heritage protection objectives and basic service to the visitor -are one source of funding for Batoche. Other sources of funding for this plan implementation will be sought through partnership initiatives, and through user fees for some services.

A shared management agreement between Parks Canada and the Métis Society of Saskatchewan will result in the establishment of a shared management board. One of the intended roles of the board is to participate in the development and implementation of the Batoche NHSC management plan and business plan.

Implementation of actions recommended in this management plan will be the responsibility of the Parks Canada Field Unit Superintendent for Batoche NHSC.


4.1 Cultural resources of national historic significance

The following activities, programs, and studies are the primary management actions to be undertaken. They are organized by the key objectives of the management planning program:

Determining appropriateness of Phase II proposals
Activity Schedule Section
Cultural landscape plan for maintaining sight lines and vestiges of river lots, and maintaining a record of site vegetation change in place of restoring a historic landscape. Early in the plan implementation. Part of the Cultural Landscape/Ecosystem Conservation Plan. 3.3.1
Interior restoration of Caron Sr. House and/or exterior restoration of yard. Only in accordance with CRM Policy guidelines. Candidate location for partnership involvement. 3.4.3
Reconstruction of buildings in East Village. Only in accordance with CRM Policy guidelines. Candidate location for partnership involvement. 3.4.5
Decision reached on administrative status of west side lands. Early in the plan implementation. 3.4.7
Presenting the public with the many voices of history
Activity Schedule Section
Monitoring and evaluation for the effective communication of messages
  • use of visitor surveys
  • development of other tools
Ongoing 3.2.3
Review of the VRC audio-visual program and make changes to ensure level of awareness of all messages is provided, that concept of multiple perspectives to history is explained, and those reasons for presenting in this manner are explained. Early in the plan. Implementation is a priority action given that the audio-visual presentation is a core orientation to the site. 3.4.1
Presenting the site as a whole
Activity Schedule Section
Establish interpretive trails on the east side linking site messages and interpretive media to in situ cultural resources. To be done subsequent to marketing research, resource evaluation of historic trails and cultural landscape plan. 3.2.1
3.3.1
3.4.6
Visitor access to the west side. Visitor risk management plan, environmental assessment to be completed prior to permitting access. 3.4.7
Monitoring for visitor impact (if access proceeds). Ongoing. 3.4.7
Making Batoche a significant place in the local community
Activity Schedule Section
Shared management of site between Parks Canada and the Métis Society of Saskatchewan. Ongoing. 3.5
Continued liaison with Parish to ensure that visitors, staff and partners treat the cemetery with respect. Ongoing. 3.4.2
Forum for developing interpretation of First Nation's role in 1885. Early in the plan implementation. 3.2.2
Community uses of Parks Canada facilities. 3.6
Stewardship initiatives with adjacent land owners. Ongoing. 3.7
Other activities to ensure commemorative integrity/cultural resource management objectives
Activity Schedule Section
Ecosystem feature management as part of the cultural landscape/ecosystem conservation plan. As part of the cultural landscape plan. 3.3.1
3.3.5
Maintaining inventory of archaeological resources and trails. As opportunity permits. 3.3.2
3.4.6
Determine whether Nogier and Parenteau farmstead buildings are cultural resources. Resubmit buildings to FHBRO. 3.3.3
Church conservation and monitoring program. Immediate. 3.4.2
Requirements of the Commemorative Integrity Statement are implemented. As identified.
Other activities toward quality service to clients
Activity Schedule Section
Marketing research to ensure communication products are geared to audience needs. To be done prior to refining or adding to heritage programs. 3.2
3.8
Access for people with special needs. As required. 3.8
Canoe landing at East Village. As demand requires. 3.4.5

5.0 Environmental and socio-economic impact statement

The following Decision Statement comes from the Batoche National Historic Site Management Plan Environmental Screening February 1997.

The Batoche National Historic Site Management Plan 1997 was subjected to an environmental assessment pursuant to the Cabinet Directive, The Environmental Assessment Process for Policy and Program Proposals (Federal Environment Assessment and Review Office, 1993). The environmental screening was conducted early in the final draft stage of the planning process, to ensure that the environmental effects of the initiatives contained in the plan were fully considered before any irrevocable decisions had been made. The evaluation of environmental effects included a consideration of cultural, natural and socioeconomic effects.

The environmental assessment focussed on three major initiatives that could result in environmental effects. Many of the initiatives are conceptual in nature and will require further assessment or screening when the specific proposals have been developed. For many of the initiatives where adverse environmental effects were identified, these effects can be mitigated by following established procedures. Details of required mitigation, surveillance and follow-up will have to be developed when the proposals progress from the conceptual phase to the design and implementation phase.

The 1997 Management Plan was also evaluated for cumulative effects to the environment. The following strategies were proposed to better evaluate cumulative effects over the next few years:

  1. determine social and physical carrying capacities, based on known and projected visitor use levels, and establish acceptable limits of change to manage the pressures from increased and changed use of the site, both on the east and on the west sides of the South Saskatchewan River;
  2. continue to develop alliances with stakeholders, including the Métis Society of Saskatchewan, to establish regional objectives to maintain the cultural and ecological resource integrity of the greater ecosystem; and
  3. assess the cumulative effects of the research and monitoring initiatives for both cultural and natural heritage resources in the context of the Cultural Landscape /Ecosystem Conservation Plan.

The environmental screening has determined that the potentially adverse environmental effects from the proposals as described in the Management Plan can be mitigated. Many proposals will however be subject to projectspecific assessments as the projects develop from conceptual stage to design and implementation.


6.0 Glossary

Conservation
Conservation encompasses the activities that are aimed at the safeguarding of a cultural resource so as to retain its historic value and extend its physical life. There are conservation disciplines that address different kinds of cultural resources. All share a broad concept of conservation that embraces one or more strategies that can best be placed on a continuum that runs from least intervention to greatest; that is, from maintenance to modification of the cultural resource.
Commemorative integrity
Commemorative integrity is a term used to describe the health or wholeness of a national historic site. A national historic site possesses commemorative integrity when: the resources that symbolize or represent the site's importance are not impaired or under threat; the reasons for the site's national historic significance are effectively communicated to the public; and the heritage values of the site are respected by all whose decisions or actions affect it.
Commemorative intent
Commemorative intent is a statement which describes the reason(s) for a site's national significance, i.e., the reason(s) for its designation as a national historic site. The statement is based on rigorous adherence to the Minutes of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada (HSMBC) which have been approved by the Minister responsible for Parks Canada. Approved HSMBC plaque inscriptions may also be used in writing the commemorative intent statement.
Core service
Treasury Board policy requires that if the evaluation of a Parks Canada service provided indicates that society as a whole benefits, the cost of that service will be paid for from sources other than user fees (i.e., a core service). However, if the benefit is primarily to specific groups or individuals, then fees must be employed as the primary means to finance the cost of that service. If the evaluation determined that there is benefit both to society as a whole and to the user, the costs of providing the service must be financed by a combination of fees and non-fee-based funding.
Cultural landscape
Any geographical area that has been modified, influenced, or given special cultural meaning by people.
Cultural resource
A human work or a place which gives evidence of human activity or has spiritual or cultural meaning, and which has been determined to have historic value. Level 1 designation is assigned to cultural resources which convey national historic significance (as determined from recommendations of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada). Level 2 designation is assigned to a cultural resource that is not of national historic significance but nonetheless has historic value.
Cultural resource management
Generally accepted practices for the conservation and presentation of cultural resources, founded on principles and carried out in practice that integrates professional, technical and administrative activities so that the historic value of cultural resources is taken into account in actions that might affect them. In Parks Canada, cultural resource management encompasses the presentation and use, as well as the conservation of, cultural resources.
Environment assessment
An assessment of the environmental effects of a project that is conducted in accordance with the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act and its regulations or assessment of the management plan in accordance with the Environmental Assessment Process for Policy and Program Proposals.
Ecosystem feature management
Natural ecosystem features and paleontological resources frequently form an integral part of the history and landscape of national historic sites and historic canals. These features and resources will be valued in a manner that reflects the role of Parks Canada as an important environmental steward.
Monitoring
Monitoring entails observing and recording change. It is the cornerstone to adaptive management. In cultural resource management there are essentially three reasons for moni taring:
  • to assess the effectiveness of policy or legislation intended to secure maintenance of desirable conditions;
  • to measure management regulations and actions; and
  • to detect incipient change (often external-to-site pressures) using indicators as early warning signals.
Reconstruction
Rebuilding of a vanished cultural resource to a particular period of time given there is no significant preservable remains to be threatened by construction, sufficient research information to support accurate rendering of the original, and reconstruction is the best possible means of achieving public understanding of a significant aspect of the past. Reconstruction is an interpretive option, not a conservation activity. Section 3.5.2.6.3, "Creating a Sense of the Past", of the CRM Policy provides specific guidelines for reconstructions.
Rehabilitation
Rehabilitation is the modification, including adaptive re-use, of a cultural resource to meet various functional requirements while preserving the historic character of the structure.
Restoration
Period restoration is the accurate recovery of an earlier form, fabric and detailing of a site or structure based on evidence from recording, research and analysis, through the removal of later additions and the replacement of missing or deteriorated elements of the earlier period. Depending on the intent and degree of intervention, period restoration may be a presentation rather than a conservation activity.
Shared management
Shared management means the sharing of responsibility for ensuring the commemorative integrity of national historic sites and is characterized by the ongoing active involvement of two or more parties for the benefit of a national historic site.

Appendix A

Status of Projects and Initiatives Identified in the 1982 Batoche Management Plan. Those projects identified with a (II) were for second stage of the 1982 plan implementation.

Objective Sub-objective Completed Outstanding
To provide for a full range of historical resource protection approaches ranging from laissez-faire to full period reconstruction. To leave undisturbed those historical resources not threatened by visitor use or development nor needed for commemoration of Batoche
  • West side village and rifle pits fenced
To preserve those historical resources which are vulnerable to visitor use or other hazards or which are candidates for eventual period restoration and reconstruction.
  • 2 west side buildings stabilized
  • Fishers and Walter & Baker Store remains stabilized
  • East Village foundations stabilized
  • Carriere residence?
  • C. Thomas residence?
  • Unidentified building next to Carriere residence?
To restore those historical resources which conform to the period of Batoche's commemoration (ca. 1860-1900).
  • Church ca. 1888
  • Rectory and depense
  • Caron Sr. House (stabilized, but not restored to "commemorate the agricultural aspect of the settlement of Batoche")(II)
  • Cemetery path and markers (not owned by Parks Canada)
To restore selected portions of the historical environment of Batoche.
  • removal of old exhibit
  • removal of recent buildings
  • partial landscaping of Church-Rectory of Zareba
  • west side (laissez-faire)
  • restoration of the battlefields and rifle pits around the East Village(II)
  • village of Batoche (incl. Champagne farm) (II)
To reconstruct selected structures in the village of Batoche and selected landscape features associated with the battle of Batoche, May 9-12, 1885.
  • Letendre Store & house (II)
  • Boyer's Store & residence (II)
  • Fisher's Store (II)
  • in fills and props (II)
  • Zareba flank (II)
To outline the interpretive media which will meet the requirements of orientation, integration and provision of a period atmosphere. To provide for audio-visual programs and exhibits to orient visitors to Batoche.
  • A/V show
  • VRC exhibit
  • outdoor exhibits
To provide for period furnishings, animation and demonstration programs at structures and landscape features that have been selected for period restoration and reconstruction.
  • Period furnishing of Church and Rectory
  • Costumed staff
  • Staff at all main nodes, especially Caron Farm and East Village
  • Period furnishing of Caron Farm, Letendre Store and House (II)
To provide interim interpretive media at historic resource unites at Batoche which will eventually be reconstructed or restored but which will not be so treated for some time.
  • Exhibits at the Zareba and East Village
To provided for other required media, such as pamphlets and publications, that will permit the visitor to gain an overview of Batoche and to tour the site according to an indiviual's personal wishes
  • Site pamphlets
  • Several history books
  • Souvenirs
  • Self-guiding pamphlets and trail system (e.g., Carlton and military trails)(II)
To outline the visitor services programs required to support the improved level of site development and commemorate at Batoche. To provide visitors with an efficient and safe transportation system which will afford a reasonable access to the principal resource units on the east side of the South Saskatchewan River, without intruding on the historic environment.
  • East Village access road and main access to VRC.
  • Vehicular access to church and recorty for people with special needs.
To provide orientation, snack services, picnic facilities, washrooms, and emergency services for visitors. VRC providing all these services and functions.
To encourage historically appropriate recreational opportunities. Picnic area near VRC.
To ensure the safety of both the park visitor and the itinerant traveller by relocating Provincial Highway 225 so as to circumvent the historical features of Batoche. Completed as planned.
To outline the operational requirements for managing and protecting the resources of Batoche. To provide for the necessary resource management, administration, maintenance and operational resources and facilities to manage the new level of development and commemoration Batoche. Provision of parking lot, office space, maintenance and storage facility, security, building fire control and waste disposal.
To manage nearby historical resources which are of thematic relevance to Batoche, in accordance with the Saskatchewan Rivers Agreement or by some other appropriate mechanism for regional interaction.
  • No agreement
  • No management plan Battle of Fish Creek NHSC
To manage and protect the resources of Batoche without the acquisition of any additional land. Completed as planned.
To manage and protect Batoche as a national historic park under Part II of the National Parks Act. Completed as planned. [West side of Batoche is not under the National Parks Act.]

Appendix B

The cultural resources of Batoche National Historic Site of Canada.
Archaeological features and landscape vestiges Description Historic importance Level Additional comments
Métis rifle pits Over 180 Métis rifle pits have been recorded at 51 locations at Batoche. Strategy and tactics of the Métis, use of the terrain. Very important in documenting and presenting the Métis role in the armed conflict. 1 15 of the rifle pit locations are on the east side and 36 on the west side. Many more on the east side have been lost to cultivation.
Middleton's zareba The zareba is extremely important as a physical resource of the battle of Batoche. The zareba is the major surviving cultural resource associated with NWFF in 1885. 1 A second zareba was constructed in the East Village after the battle. Faint traces of this zareba were identified in archaeological investigations of Fisher's and Boyer's stores.
North West Field Force (NWFF) rifle pits 24 NWFF rifle pits have been identified to date. They are located on river lots 52 and 53 and probably served as a defensive perimeter for the zareba. Associated with the role of the NWFF in 1885. 1 20 NWFF rifle pits are located overlooking the South Saskatchewan River.
Possible hiding place the Métis women and children. Large pit along Carlton Trail, west of the East Village. Possibly used by families to hide during the battle. tbe* *to be evaluated. The pit had been used in the early 20th century as a garbage dump. Further documentation on its possible use in 1885 is needed.
Gunner Phillips grave Marked grave. Direct association with the Battle of Batoche. 1
Batoche cemetery Including the graves of Métis killed in the 1885 Rebellion/Resistance. The cemetery is a resource for understanding the community of Batoche and the events of 1885. n/a The cemetery has not been evaluated becasue it is the property of the Parish and not Parks Canada.
Letendre's Store Stone and mortar foundation flanked by a depression on the east and a raised earthen rectangle to the west side. The surviving archaeological and landscape traces of the East Village are essential to documenting and presenting the development of the commercial core of the Métis community of Batoche, and the use of these buildings by the Métis provisional government in 1885. 1
Branconnier' s Ice House Stone foundation of ice house built in the early 20th century. 1 Location of former Garnot's stopping place which was dismantled by 1915.
Boyer's Store Cellar depressions and mounds from log foundation. 1
Fisher's Store Represented by cellar dpression 1 A depression at the back may be the cellar of Fisher's House.
Letendre's House Complete foundation system for house and annex are intact as is footing for verandah. Two cellars are present. 1 Resource has received extensive archaeological investigation.
Carriere building Raised earthen feature. May be one of the earliest buildings in the East Village area. 1 Resource has received extensive archaeological investigation
Champagne farm Cellars and foundation remains. Much of surface evidence relates to 20th century. 2 Visible feaures are evaluated as level 2. Buried features need to be evaluated.
1893 School Minimal physical resources. Site of the first Parish school. 1 Site of the school has both documentary and presentation value.
2nd and 3rd schools Minimal physical resources. 20th century representations of community. 2
Remains and other evidence of other buildings occupied in the 20th century Varies in nature and extent. Possible association with the Métis community of Batoche. tbe*/td> *To be evaluated in accordance with direction set in Management Plan.
West Village complex Foundations and cellars of at least 5 buildings. Locations of Walter and Baker store, Mountour's, and Alex Fisher's buildings. 1
Ferry crossing (east and west side) No evidence of ferry crossing, identified by Carlton Trail. Basis for where Letendre established operations. 1 Location only, no evidence of physical resources. Association with nationally significant Carlton Trail.
Telegraph cut line Evident on the west side. Established following 1885 and part of the community. 1
Survey mound Reportedly near where the Carlton Trail is intersected by Highway 225. Significant to the river lot system and events leading to 1885 Rebellion/Resistance. 1 Specific location requires identification and documentation.
Carlton Trail Evidence on both east and west sides. Commemorated at Batoche. 1
Humboldt Trail Evidence along east side from East Village southwards. Trail through the community. 1
Secondary trails Located on both east and west sides. Community links. tbe Purpose and dates of trails not always known (e.g., some on west side may be cattle trails). Trails to be evaluated for significance in accordance with direction set in Management Plan.
River lot tree lines The heritage value is the location of the tree lines, rather than the trees themselves. Visual demarcation of river lots. 1
Vestiges o human modification to natural landscape. tbe Needs to be studied and defined; monitoring and possible maintenance of vestiges to be based on documentation in accordance with direction set in Management Plan.
Pre-contact aboriginal sites 2 over 93 pre-contact sites and features have been identified at Batoche, the majority through surface finds. As opportunity permits there is a need to evaluate the nature and significance of these finds.
St.-Antoine-de-Padoue Church Heritage character resides in 1896/97 restored building, simple massing and proportions, construction techniques and materials, and interior layout and finishing The church and rectory are associated with the Métis community of Batoche. Both buildings were situated in the battle. 1 Classified by FHBRO
St.-Antoine-de-Padoue Rectory 1 Recognized by FHBRO
Jean Caron Sr. House Form and fabric, one of the few surviving buildings from immediately after 1885. Association with Métis community after the 1885 Rebellion/Resistance. 1 Recognized by FHBRO
Parenteau House Once a log dwelling, more recently used as an outbuilding. Possible association with the Métis community of Batoche. tbe Not Heritage by FHBRO. To be evaluated in accordance with direction set in Management Plan.
Nogier farmstead Barn, log shed and house. Possible association with the Métis community of Batoche. tbe Not Heritage by FHBRO. To be evaluated in accordance with direction set in Management Plan.
West side structure on the river lot 19 One room, one-storey log structure with gabled roof. 20th century, but not integral to understanding of the community of Batoche. 2 The building was stabilized in 1983. Not Heritage by FHBRO.
West side structure on the river lot 17 House and shed. 20th century, but not integral to understanding of the community of Batoche. 2 the house was stabilized in 1983. Not Heritage by FHBRO.
Church artifacts tbe Only those site-specific objects which have an association with the church's history to 1969. To be evaluated in accordance with direction set in Management Plan.
Rectory artifacts tbe Only those site-specific objects associated with the rectory's history to 1955. To be evaluated in accordance with direction set in Management Plan.
VRC exhibit artifacts tbe To be evaluated in accordance with direction set in Management Plan.
Artifacts from archaeological investigations of Batoche tbe To be evaluated in accordance with direction set in Management Plan.