2022

Revision of the Vegetation Management Plan

Chambly, Quebec, July 11, 2022 – In mid-June, Parks Canada proceeded to cut the fallow land in various areas along the Chambly Canal, thus respecting the development plan and the maintenance schedule. Some areas, called “pollination islands,” remained untouched. For several years, Parks Canada has been looking into setting up pollinator gardens at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site. These gardens are spaces of tall grass for which breeding birds have a particular fondness, as do insect pollinators like bees and monarch butterflies. 

The Chambly Canal is mainly made up of dikes. Dikes are water retention structures that are essential to the safety of visitors, residents and property. They are an integral part of the waterway’s structure since they hold back a large volume of water and thus, allow recreational navigation with the help of a network of locks located along the canal.

Dense vegetation on a dike can lead to potential safety problems. Not only can vegetation on the dike make visual monitoring and maintenance difficult or impossible, but if left untended, it degrades the condition of the structure and helps to camouflage burrowing animals.

As such, it is necessary to regularly cut all of this vegetation to ensure the sustainability of the facilities and the safety of users and nearby residents.

Since the spring of 2022, certain areas have been regularly cut to maintain low vegetation on the dikes. Another cut of the fallow land is planned in the next few weeks.

Prior to each vegetation intervention, Parks Canada experts conduct rigorous inspections to assess the presence of monarch nests and eggs on milkweed plants; if detected, a buffer zone is established to protect the eggs and species. The same goes for detecting the presence of animal nests; site surveys and nightly tours using a thermal sensor drone are carried out to detect their presence on the banks.


Young sport fishers in action!

Parks Canada Agency and the Fondation de la faune du Québec introduce young people to sport fishing

Chambly, July 5, 2022 — On Friday, July 22 at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site, Parks Canada will welcome 20 young people for a day-long initiation into sport fishing as part of the Young Sport Fishers' Program activities. With the support of Canadian Tire, its main partner, and the Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs (MFFP), this program promotes the next generation of sport fishers.

This Parks Canada activity, which is already sold out, was selected as one of the best projects for coaching and training young anglers. With the authorization of the MFFP, each young person will receive a Young Sport Fisher certificate, which will serve as a fishing licence until they turn 18.

During the 2022 summer season, the Fondation expects to reach close to 16,500 new enthusiasts, notably through local organizations that offer Young Sport Fishers introductory activities including quality training on fishing, safety, regulations, habitat and fish biology, followed by a fishing period supervised by qualified resources. Since its inception in 1997, the Young Sport Fishers' Program has introduced more than 320,000 youth to fishing.

After a two-year hiatus, we are pleased to be able to offer the Young Sport Fishers' Program in an updated format that is accessible to more youth. Thank you to Parks Canada Agency for ensuring that the next generation of anglers is introduced to sport fishing through their activities and training,

Jean-Claude D’Amours
Chief Executive Officer of the Fondation de la faune du Québec.

The Young Sport Fishers' Program is a presentation of the Fondation de la faune du Québec, with the support of its main partner, Canadian Tire.

About us

The mission of the Fondation de la faune du Québec is to enhance and promote conservation of wildlife and its habitat. Thanks to the contribution of more than one million hunters, fishers and trappers in Quebec, thousands of donors and numerous private companies, the Fondation has been supporting more than 2,000 organizations throughout Quebec since 1987, creating a true wildlife movement.


Team Up and Help Us Clean Up the Shorelines of the Chambly Canal!

Borrow your cleaning kit now

Chambly, Quebec, June 6 – Parks Canada is proud to support the "Team Up and Clean Up the Shoreline" program, a national initiative to keep Canada's shorelines free of litter, including plastic waste that can remain in the environment for up to 1,000 years. Two of Parks Canada's historic canals in Quebec have been selected to participate in this year's program: the Lachine and Chambly canals will welcome volunteers throughout the summer who would like to contribute to the cleanliness of their favourite canal by lending them the necessary equipment to pick up litter.

Interested parties can request their cleaning kit from Parks Canada staff at Locks 1, 2, 3 or 9. Each set contains a bucket, a pair of gloves, a clipboard, a data sheet, a pencil and a scale. Be sure to bring a first aid kit, hand sanitizer and sunscreen! After their collection, participants must keep track of the litter they have collected using a tracking form that will be provided to them. Collecting data amplifies the long-term impact of actions taken; this valuable information helps Parks Canada identify and mitigate sources of canal-side litter. Kits are available in limited quantities.

Through this simple act, volunteers will participate in citizen science and contribute to marine litter research. Together, we will help make the shorelines safer for both wildlife and humans.


Launch of the Boating Season

Chambly Canal National Historic Site

First boat of the season at lock No 9 of the Chambly Canal National Historic Site!
First boat of the season at lock No 9 of the Chambly Canal National Historic Site!

CHAMBLY, May 20, 2022 – The warm weather is finally here! It’s the perfect time to head back outside and reconnect with the places we love!

This morning, the Parks Canada’s team was happy to welcome the first boaters of the 2022 season at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site.

Are you dreaming of taking part in this wonderful experience? Visit the Parks Canada Website to learn about the many opportunities offered by Canada’s historic canals, and register now for your lockage permit! Spread the word, and enjoy the 2022 navigational season! parkscanada.gc.ca/canals

Land-based visitors

Many users will be sharing the Chambly Canal path – cyclists, pedestrians and in-line skaters will be among them. Parks Canada asks all visitors to follow the advice of public health experts on physical distancing and invites them to be courteous to make coexistence between all safer and more harmonious!


Fryer Island Habitat Restoration

Parks Canada and Nature-Action Québec partner to protect biodiversity

Painted turtle sunbathing on a tree branch floating in the water.
Nesting and lizarding sites will be established for Fryer Island's painted and snapping turtles.

Chambly, Quebec, May 19, 2022 – In collaboration with Nature-Action Québec, Parks Canada will soon proceed with the restoration of riparian and aquatic habitats on Fryer Island, mainly for the benefit of the herpetofauna (amphibians and reptiles) and aquatic fauna found there.

More specifically, the project aims to:

  • Provide additional habitat and nesting sites for turtles;
  • Limit the spread of certain invasive alien plant species (such as phragmites and buckthorn) in order to preserve biodiversity and habitat quality;
  • Revegetate the banks to increase the floral and faunal biodiversity of the site by planting native plants.

Teams from Nature-Action Québec and Parks Canada will be on site from May to October to carry out certain priority actions. We ask all visitors to please stay on the designated trails and avoid approaching the targeted areas. Signage will be posted on the site to clearly identify areas to be avoided.

This project is made possible through a contribution from the Community Interaction Program linked to the St. Lawrence Action Plan 2011-2026, and implemented by the governments of Canada and Quebec, as well as through the Maritime Affluents Program administered by the St. Lawrence Action Fund (SLF) and coordinated by the Regroupement des organismes de bassins versants du Québec (ROBVQ), and thanks to the financial support of the Government of Quebec under Advantage St. Lawrence, the new provincial maritime vision.

Rehabilitation of the dike

In parallel with this conservation project, the Agency will soon proceed with the rehabilitation and restoration of the dike located in the Fryer Island area. Significant damage has been observed in recent months; this damage includes holes caused by animals and erosion. Major repair and rehabilitation work is planned for the fall of 2022, after boating season. Construction fencing has already been installed on the site as part of the preparatory work. 


Winter Activities Along The Chambly Canal: Groomed Path

CHAMBLY, QUEBEC, JANUARY 10, 2021 – Parks Canada wishes to inform the public that this winter, the path at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site will be groomed from the Parc des Ateliers in Chambly to Bridge No 9, located in Carignan. The section on Sainte-Thérèse Street on the island of the same name and the one between Lock No. 9 and Bridge No. 10 will be plowed by the City of Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu as was the case in previous years.

It is important to note that certain conditions must be met before the trail can be groomed: the ground is frozen, there is sufficient snow on the ground and the weather forecast is favourable (below 0°); once these conditions are met, the snow will be compacted until the base is in place (20 cm of packed snow, depending on the ground surface). Then, grooming operations can be carried out regularly.

Everyone will be able to enjoy the groomed path, which provides an opportunity to practise various winter activities, including fat biking, snowshoeing, running and walking. A skating rink will also be set up in the canal by the City of Chambly, between the Bourgogne Street Bridge and Lock 4. Restrooms will also be open to users during the cold season at particular locations along the winter path.

Parks Canada works with its partners to develop the recreational offerings at the Chambly Canal and to encourage the practice of outdoor winter activities for the year-round enjoyment of all visitors to this exceptional site. The Agency would like to acknowledge the collaboration of the City of Chambly, Carignan and Saint-Jean-sur Richelieu for their support in providing this groomed path.

Note that the 13-kilometer long Lachine Canal National Historic Site trail, located in the heart of Montréal, will also be almost completely groomed by Parks Canada this winter.

2021

Paving of the Path

Chambly, Quebec, November 1, 2021 - Parks Canada wishes to inform the public that paving work on the Chambly Canal path will begin in the next few days. This work will include interventions in the sector from Lock No 4 to Rue de l'Église and on the rise of Lock No. 8.

This work, necessary to ensure the safety of path users and to improve traffic flow, will result in the temporary closure of certain sections of the path at intervals between now and the end of November 2021; a detour will be put in place via the municipal bicycle network. Users are asked to respect the signage in place throughout the duration of the work.

Parks Canada is carrying out infrastructure work at sites such as the Chambly Canal National Historic Site to ensure safe, high-quality visitor experiences by improving heritage assets, visitor facilities, waterways and roads located in national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas.


Resumption of the path rehabilitation

Chambly, Quebec, September 16, 2021 - Parks Canada wishes to inform the public that the rehabilitation of the entire length of the path, which began in the spring and was suspended during the summer season, has recently resumed at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site. This work will result in the temporary closure of certain sections of the path from September to November 2021.

This work includes standardizing signage on the path, redesigning rest areas and path borders, bringing guardrails up to standard, redesigning contact points, and work on the path surface and foundation (repair of paved and stone screen sections in poor condition). The work carried out in the spring has already significantly improved the condition of the path, to the delight of users. This second phase of work will thus put an end to the revitalization operations of this former towpath.

A traffic light will be added at Bridge No. 7, located in Carignan at the intersection of Route 223 and Chemin O'Reilly and Chemin Sainte-Thérèse, to ensure the safety of path users and to improve traffic flow. This specific work will result in the complete closure of Bridge No. 7 from October 18 to November 8; users are asked to use the detour set up via Route 112, Industriel Boulevard and Chemin de la Grande-Ligne.

These improvements are necessary to ensure the safety of users and the durability of the path along the Chambly Canal. The work will be carried out by sector; detours have been planned via Canal Road and the municipal network. Users are asked to respect the signage in place throughout the duration of the work, and to regularly consult the Chambly Canal Website for the most recent updates.

Dates & detours while the path rehabilitation
Location Period Detour
Weir No. 3 Mid-September to early October Detour via Bridge No. 3, Chemin du Canal and Bridge No. 4.
Bridge No. 4 September 21 to 24 Detour via Bridge No. 7.
Weir No. 4 End of September to mid-October In alternation.
Bridge No. 7 October 18 to November 8 Motorists: detour via Road 223, Industriel blv. and Chemin de la Grande-Ligne. Cyclists and pedestrians: detour via bridge No.4, chemin du Canal and bridge No. 9.
Canal Walls, in front of the Workshops Mid-October to mid-November Detour via Langevin and St-Jacques Streets, access via des Pins Street.

*** This schedule is provided for information purposes only and may be subject to changes due to weather conditions.


Launch of the Boating Season Chambly Canal National Historic Site

First boater of the 2021 season at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site! 

First boaters of the season at Lock 9 at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site ©Parks Canada

CHAMBLY, May 21, 2021 - This morning, Parks Canada’s team was happy to welcome at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site, the first boaters of the 2021 season.

The health and safety of visitors, boaters and employees is of the utmost importance and the Agency will follow the advice and guidance of public health authorities to determine visitor access and services.

Transport Canada's physical distancing standards for Canadian boaters must also be respected. It is possible that boat capacity may be considerably reduced depending on the canal, and that the wait time may be increased.

For more details about the service periods and the measures taken by the Agency to limit the spread of COVID-19 in Quebec’s historic canals, please visit the COVID-19 and your visit to the Chambly Canal National Historic Site webpage or call 1-888-773-8888 to plan your visit. 

Canal Visitors Banks 

Parks Canada is asking visitors to follow the advice of public health experts and to practice physical distancing and hygiene measures, limit public gatherings, as well as respect travel restrictions. 

Visitors should also leave no trace when they are visiting canal banks. Garbage containers has been installed to that end. If a garbage can is full, visitors should use the next one or bring their garbage with them.

There will be many users sharing the Chambly Canal path – cyclists, pedestrians and in-line skaters will be among them. Parks Canada asks all visitors to follow the advice of public health experts on physical distancing. They must be careful in their choices to avoid injury and minimize any need for emergency response. In addition, we invite them to be courteous and obey the signage to make coexistence between all safer and more harmonious.


Vegetation Management at the Chambly Canal
Watch Out for Invasive Species!

Chambly, Quebec, May 13, 2021 – Since early 2018, Parks Canada has been looking into setting up pollinator gardens at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site. These gardens are spaces of tall grass for which breeding birds have a particular fondness, as do insect pollinators like bees and monarch butterflies. In order to respect bird nesting and monarch breeding periods, which stretch from April to late September, Parks Canada generally avoids mowing these pollinator gardens until October each year. 

By not mowing these gardens, Parks Canada is helping to save the monarch, which is currently listed as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Parks Canada is responsible for the protection and recovery of the listed species living in national parks and historic sites under the Species at Risk Act. As part of this movement to protect wildlife, the Agency has made the decision to limit its actions in the fallow areas along the Chambly Canal.

Invasive species

Some invasive species, such as phragmites, are present along the Chambly Canal, and the Agency is aware that they can be a nuisance. Parks Canada is asking the public not to cut down these unwanted species themselves, which could cause unintentional harm to the area's plant and animal life and contribute to the spread of this plant. Environmental experts are studying invader control measures, and actions will be taken soon in that regard.

What is phragmites?

The common reed (Phragmites australis) is an invasive perennial grass that is very aggressive to biodiversity, spreads rapidly and out-competes indigenous species for water and nutrients. The methods used to fight invasive phragmites vary depending on the characteristics of its growing sites and the local restrictions and regulations in force.

Parks Canada is working on a plan to landscape the fallow areas along the Chambly Canal in order to properly define the green spaces while ensuring the safety of trail users. The species to be planted or seeded will be carefully selected to limit and control the spread of invasive species.


An award of excellence for the Chambly Jetty

CHAMBLY (Quebec), March 31, 2021 – On March 10, 2021, the Chambly Jetty Rehabilitation Project (also known as the “Federal Wharf”) was awarded one of the Excellence in Concrete Construction 2021 awards from the American Concrete Institute (ACI), Quebec and Eastern Ontario Chapter, for the "Repair and Restoration" category, making the project team very proud! 

The Excellence in Concrete Construction Awards program honours the vision of the most creative and innovative projects that the concrete industry has to offer. All types of concrete projects in the province of Quebec and in Eastern Ontario, completed in 2020, were eligible to receive an award in this annual competition, which brings together the best of the industry.

Sustainable Materials

The Federal Wharf is a concrete structure, which is submerged almost every year due to the spring flooding; therefore, it was important to use durable materials in its rehabilitation. For the designers, the choice of reinforced concrete with galvanized reinforcements was a natural one.

In order to contain the old jetty and serve as walls for the backfill of the new structure, sheet piles were used. This hybrid structural design of sheet piling and concrete guarantees a 50-year service life for the new jetty.

Many Challenges

Since the jetty is located in a sensitive environmental zone, the work had to respect numerous environmental constraints. From the use of biodegradable oils for the machinery used, to the installation of turbidity curtains to confine sediment-laden water, nothing was left to chance to ensure environmental protection.

As well, the work had to be carried out in winter so as not to interfere with the navigation season. Major constraints had to be considered and special measures taken during most of the sheet piling and concreting work, given that the Richelieu River was at its highest and coldest temperatures. Part of the concrete was submerged and many metal parts had to be welded directly under water by divers. This work undoubtedly required the expertise of all involved.

The rehabilitation of the Chambly Jetty completed a series of projects, funded by the federal infrastructure investment program, aimed at restoring public access to this magnificent place of contemplation, located in the heart of the Vallée-du-Richelieu. Parks Canada was very proud to make it accessible to visitors at the end of the summer of 2020, once again allowing everyone to enjoy the breathtaking view of the Chambly Basin and Fort Chambly.


Path Rehabilitation

Chambly, Quebec, March 29, 2021 - Parks Canada wishes to inform the public that work to repair the entire length of the path will soon begin at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site. This work will result in the temporary closure of certain sections of the path from April to June, and again from October to December 2021. 

This work includes standardizing signage on the path, redesigning rest areas and path borders, bringing guardrails up to standard, redesigning contact points, and work on the path surface and foundation (repair of paved and stone screen sections in poor condition). This fall, a traffic light will also be added to Bridge no. 7, located in Carignan at the intersection of Route 223 and O'Reilly and Sainte-Thérèse roads, to ensure the safety of path users and to improve traffic flow.

These improvements are necessary to ensure the safety of users and the durability of the path along the Chambly Canal. The work will be carried out by sector; detours have been planned via Canal Road and the municipal network. Users are asked to respect the signage in place throughout the duration of the work, and to regularly consult https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/lhn-nhs/qc/chambly for the most recent updates.

Dates & detours while the Path Rehabilitation
Location Period Detour
112 Viaduct April 6 to 13 Detour through the de l'Église, des Carrières Chemin Sainte-Thérèse and Weir no. 3
CN Bridge April 6 to 13 Detour through the de l'Église, des Carrières Chemin Sainte-Thérèse and Weir no. 3
Bridge no. 3 (upstream from lock no. 8) April 6 to 13 Detour through the de l'Église, des Carrières Chemin Sainte-Thérèse and Weir no. 3
Rue Saint-Jacques April 6 to 13 Detour through the de l'Église, des Carrières Chemin Sainte-Thérèse and Weir no. 3
Rue Saint-Georges April 21 to 28 Detour via Langevin, Saint-Georges, des Carrières and Saint-Jacques
Rue des Pins April 19 to 28 Detour via Langevin, Saint-Georges, des Carrières and Saint-Jacques
Rue de l’Église April 12 to 28 Detour via Langevin, Saint-Georges, des Carrières and Saint-Jacques
Rue Bourgogne April 19 to 23 Detour via Langevin, Saint-Georges, des Carrières and Saint-Jacques
Parc des Ateliers May 10 to 14 Detour via rue Caron
Old Bridge no. 9 (rue Sainte-Marie) May 6 to 18 Motorists:  Alternate traffic on Rue Sainte-Thérèse; presence of flaggers. Pedestrians and cyclists: detour via Road 223 and bridge No 7.
Weir no. 5 (above Bridge no. 10) April 29 to Mai 3 Traffic on the border of the construction site, possible obstructions
Bridge no. 10 (connects Île Sainte-Thérèse to Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu) April 29 to May 6 Traffic on the border of the construction site, possible obstructions

*** This schedule is provided for information purposes only and may be subject to changes due to weather conditions.

Parks Canada is carrying out infrastructure work at sites such as the Chambly Canal National Historic Site to ensure safe, high-quality visitor experiences by improving heritage assets, visitor facilities, waterways and roads located in national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas.


Magnificent Cottonwood to be Felled

Chambly, Quebec, February 4, 2021 – As announced last fall, Parks Canada had today felled the magnificent and immense cottonwood that flourished on the shore of the Basin, near Lock No. 1 at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site.

Remember that the tree was estimated to be over 125 years old, with the normal lifespan of this species typically being around 75 years. Although it appeared healthy, two of the four trunks were affected by significant rot (a large internal cavity) that compromised the tree’s structural integrity.

The stump of the tree will be left in place until a decision is made regarding the future of this plot of land.

Commemorating the tree

Witness to nearly a century and a half of history, this magnificent cottonwood has been part of the landscape of the Canal and Old Chambly for so long that it occupies an important place in the hearts of many of us.

Parks Canada recognizes the importance of this tree for citizens and visitors to the City of Chambly, and is currently working on a commemorative project, for which the details remain to be determined and which could take shape in 2022. Details of this project will be shared with the general public as soon as they are known.

The Agency would like to thank the citizens who sent it numerous suggestions to this effect. Many wanted to see the tree come to life around the canal; the cottonwood is unfortunately not strong enough to be turned into furniture, and the decay was so severe in the center of the trunk that the wood is too damaged to be reused. Other scenarios are therefore being studied so that this tree is never forgotten.

2020

Magnificent Cottonwood Soon to be Felled

Chambly, Quebec, November 12, 2020 – For public safety reasons, Parks Canada must fell the magnificent and immense cottonwood that flourished on the shore of the Basin, near Lock No. 1 at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site.

Le peuplier deltoïde de l’écluse no 1 de Chambly
The cottonwood at Lock No.1

The tree is estimated to be over 125 years old, with the normal lifespan of this species typically being around 75 years. Although it appears healthy, two of the four trunks are affected by significant rot (a large internal cavity) that compromises the tree’s structural integrity.

The tree also suffered damage during a period of heavy winds in the summer of 2018: a large branch broke off and fell into the Canal. A similar event took place in August 2020 following another episode of violent winds. Fortunately, these incidents resulted in no injuries, but they certainly contributed to the deterioration in the tree’s condition.

Preserving the tree

In the spring of 2019, Parks Canada called upon a forest engineer to assess the cottonwood to determine what measures needed to be taken to maximize the chances of preserving it. On the engineer’s recommendation, the tree was pruned and stabilized in March 2019. Flexible cables were installed in the tree crown to secure the main branch that was at risk of breaking off. During the stabilization, branch stubs and dead branches were pruned. The tree’s condition was continually monitored.

Haubanage du peuplier deltoïde au canal de Chambly
Stabilization of the magnificent cottonwood, March 2019

More recently, a forest engineer inspected it again and recommended that it be felled for public safety reasons. The loss of one of its main branches this summer caused a significant deformation in the tree’s crown, which has changed the way air circulates and flows around and inside the crown. This increases the range of movement of the remaining branches during violent winds and therefore their risk of breaking off.

Parks Canada has been monitoring the tree for a number of years and has made every necessary effort to save it. Unfortunately, its condition leaves no doubt: to ensure the safety of boaters, site users and employees, the tree must be felled. The tree will be felled in February or March of 2021, when the ground is frozen. This will minimize damage to the ground that can be caused by the repeated passage of heavy machinery.

Commemorating the tree

Witness to nearly a century and a half of history, this magnificent cottonwood has been part of the landscape of the Canal and Old Chambly for so long that present-day visitors and residents have never known the site without this giant. It occupies an important place in the hearts of many, and Parks Canada wants to give the tree the commemoration it deserves. The Agency is currently working on a commemorative project, for which the details remain to be determined. The project details will be shared with the public as soon as they are available. In the meantime, the public is invited to contact Parks Canada to share their ideas and suggestions to ensure this tree is never forgotten.

Learn about the Canal’s plant life and cultural landscape.


Clearing of the vegetation

Period: October to January, 2021.

Chambly, Quebec, October 29, 2020 – Parks Canada will begin to clear vegetation on the north and south sides of the waterway. The removal of the vegetation will ensure the long-term preservation of the Chambly Canal National Historic Site. 

The tree cover along the Chambly Canal and the abundant greenery have grown considerably over the past few years and have created over time a wall of plants that could affect the preservation of the banks and the canal infrastructure as well as their maintenance. For these reasons, Parks Canada must carry out the removal of plants in specific areas of the Chambly Canal (Sainte-Thérèse Island (200 m downstream from Bridge No.10 to Lock No.9); Sainte-Thérèse Island (about 500 m upstream from Bridge No. 9 to the mouth of the river canal); emergency spillway sector (100 m downstream of Spillway No. 4); dike of Siphon No. 2 (200 m upstream and 300 m downstream) - cleaning of both sides of the dike; dike between Lock No. 6 and the deposited Bridge No. 2 - cleaning on both sides of the dike; sector of the doors of locks Nos. 4 to 8; periphery of Siphon No. 3 on the city side). 

As part of this work, several ash trees affected by the invasive emerald ash borer will also be removed. Parks Canada is working with stakeholders, including municipalities, taking necessary action to prevent the emerald ash borer infestation from spreading and to ensure the protection of the environment and the public, while continuing to identify the best possible solutions to control the spread of this insect. 

Parks Canada is working on an action plan to ensure the long-term maintenance of the vegetation cover at the Chambly Canal, to preserve the canal’s natural beauty while protecting the historic integrity of this exceptional site. 

The clearing of the vegetation will begin in November 2020 and will take three weeks. It will be performed outside the nesting periods of migratory birds. The Chambly Canal’s path may at times be obstructed because of the work and all work areas will be marked off with traffic cones. Parks Canada asks everyone to exercise caution and to obey the temporary signage. 

For more information on the infrastructure projects underway at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site, visit the Info-work page.


Parks Canada announces the inauguration of the Chambly Jetty

August 25, 2020, Chambly, Quebec, Parks Canada Agency - The Government of Canada has committed to investing in the preservation and restoration of our national historic sites so that Canadians can have meaningful experiences that connect them to the natural and cultural heritage of these special places. 

Today, the Honourable Pablo Rodriguez, Quebec Lieutenant and Leader of the Government in the House of Commons, inaugurated the jetty at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site on behalf of the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, the Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson. The Government of Canada has invested close to $10 million so that citizens and thousands of visitors may once again use this iconic site. 

The Chambly Jetty (also known as the Federal Wharf) is located in the heart of Old Chambly, downstream from Lock No. 1 in the Chambly Basin. The new facilities ensure user safety and maintain the recreational activities associated with the Canal. New street furniture has also been added to make the visitor experience even more enjoyable. 

The Chambly Canal is a true oasis for cycling, boating and outdoor enthusiasts and offers moments of total relaxation in a place shaped by 175 years of history. In addition, its nine locks, as well as one bridge, are now manually operated by lock operators, just as they were when the Canal opened in 1843. 

In recent years, the Chambly Canal National Historic Site has undergone a major facelift, including infrastructure projects at the Chambly Jetty and the restoration of locks numbers 1, 2, 3 and 9 in Chambly and Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. Thanks to infrastructure investments, Parks Canada protects and preserves our national treasures, while supporting local economies and increased tourism. 

Quote 

“Two years ago, I was here to tell the people of Chambly that the Chambly Jetty would receive a facelift. Today, thanks to our investments, the project is finished, and pedestrians, cyclists and all visitors can enjoy it. We can be proud. This is an enormous boost for tourism and the many jobs that depend on it.”

The Honorable Pablo Rodriguez

Quebec Lieutenant and Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Quick Facts 

  • Built in the early 1840s, the structure of the Chambly Jetty has been modified several times to date. The Chambly Jetty is an important cultural resource at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site. Along with the historic cabins, the Superintendent’s house is one of the main elements of the northern entrance to this important navigation corridor on the Richelieu River. 
  • Following the flooding of the Richelieu River in 2011, the Chambly Jetty was closed to ensure user safety. Rehabilitation work took place over 18 months, starting in the fall of 2018.
  • The Government of Canada has invested $50 million for infrastructure work at the Chambly Canal National Historic Site as part of the largest federal infrastructure plan in the history of Parks Canada. This investment will help ensure these treasured places are protected and preserved in the future.

Temporary Closing of a Section of the Pathway

Chambly, Quebec, July 28, 2020 – Parks Canada wishes to inform the public that repair work along the Chambly Canal National Historic Site will result in the temporary closure of the pathway between Bridge No. 10 and Gouin Bridge. This closure will be in effect from August 3 to 7, 2020. 

Infrastructure improvement work along the Chambly Canal has been underway for sometime. The need for repeated passage of heavy trucks during the spring thaw contributed to the poor condition of this section of the pathway. Planned work will include filling the holes and leveling the surface. Dust suppression is also planned. 

Public safety is a priority for Parks Canada. Visitors are asked to use the municipal pathway during this temporary closure. We ask users to please respect the signage in place.

Parks Canada is pleased to note that infrastructure work at Lock No 9, in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu was completed this past spring. Work on the lock included replacing the doors, removing the hydraulics and replacing them with manual mechanisms, and repairing the sills, floor, sluices and walls. Various elements located in the lock were also cleaned and repainted. 

Parks Canada is leading infrastructure work in places like the Chambly Canal National Historic Site to ensure safe, high-quality experiences for visitors by improving heritage, visitor, waterway, and highway assets located within national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas.


Revised calendar, advanced navigation season

Parks Canada's Historic Canals in Quebec

CHAMBLY, QUEBEC, June 22, 2020 – Parks Canada wants to give an update regarding infrastructure work along historic canals in Quebec. Since the lifting of COVID-19 restrictions on construction sites, work could resume while respecting the new Canada and Quebec’s public health directives for the health and safety of workers. Timelines have been revised to take into account the challenges caused by these restrictions.

Despite these constraints, the work was carried out at a faster rate than expected thanks to increased efforts on the part of contractors and dedicated Parks Canada teams preparing for the season opening. The Quebec’s Waterways Unit is, therefore, proud to confirm the progressive reopening of the canals earlier than the original schedule. 

Thus, Parks Canada will welcome boaters as of July 1, at the Chambly Canal, and as of July 17 at Saint-Ours Canal, instead of the 3rd week of July as previously announced. As for the Lachine Canal, operations will resume on July 17, between Lock No. 3 and Lock No. 5. For the entire canal, the target date remains the first week of August. Non-motorized nautical activities have resumed since June 19, between Lock No. 3 and Lock No. 5. For the Carillon Canal, temporary work carried out during the next few weeks will allow the opening of the canal to navigation at the end of August, rather than having to cancel the whole 2020 boating season.The scope of work had to be reviewed and this had an impact on the schedule. 

Parks Canada apologizes for the inconvenience of these delays and thanks boaters as well as the community and local businesses for their patience and understanding. 

The Agency wishes to remind visitors and boaters that they should not expect to have the kind of experiences that they have had in the past. As Parks Canada adapts to the COVID-19 situation, visitor access and services on the canals will be limited. 

Those who choose to access historic canals and waterways should follow the advice of public health experts on physical distancing. Everyone will need to be careful in their choices to avoid injury and to minimize any need for emergency response. 

For more details about the service periods and the measures taken by Parks Canada to limit the spread of COVID-19 in the historic canals of Quebec, please consult the websites of each canals or call 1-888-773-8888 in order to plan your visit.


2020 NAVIGATION SEASON

Chambly and Saint-Ours Canals National Historic Sites

CHAMBLY, QUEBEC, June 2, 2020 – Parks Canada announces the upcoming gradual re-opening of the 2020 navigation season in Parks Canada’s Quebec’s historic canals. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the suspension of activities and construction sites at Parks Canada places, the navigation season has been delayed in the province's historic canals. 

The Chambly and Saint-Ours national historic canals are expected to welcome boaters for the navigation season from the third week of July, until Monday October 12, 2020. 

In Chambly: the Federal Jetty accessible to visitors in August

The work at Locks Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 9 will end in June while the repairs to the Federal Jetty will be completed in August. Thanks to the work carried out during the past year, the waiting docks can now be installed before the start of the navigation season. 

The jetty will now be embellished with new street furniture such as luminaires with aluminum decorative elements as well as a LED lighting module, benches, galvanized steel pipe railings, waste and recycling bins, bicycle racks, planter boxes, and Adirondack chairs. Branding of the Chambly Canal commemorative logo is also planned at the end of the pier. 

In Saint-Ours: a new roof for the Superintendent's house

From May to June, repair work on the roof of the Superintendent's house is taking place. The repairs include the reconstruction of the roof using a conservation approach to maintain its original style, i.e., the use of Canadian stainless steel sheet metals. Parks Canada is rebuilding the gable roof exactly as it was at the time of its construction, in the second half of the 19th century. 

Darvard Island’s wastewater collection system is scheduled to be repaired in the next few months. Due to this upcoming work, the oTENTik accommodations will not be available this summer. The site will, however, remain accessible in compliance with the directives issued by public health authorities in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Navigation Season

The health and safety of visitors, boaters, employees and all Canadians is of the utmost importance and the Agency will follow the advice and guidance of public health authorities in resuming visitor access and services. Only places and activities where health and safety risks can be mitigated will be available to visitors. The dates mentioned above for the opening of the Chambly and Saint-Ours canals are conditional on the evolution of the COVID-19 situation and the measures needed to flatten the curve and ensure everyone's safety. 

Transport Canada's physical distancing standards for Canadian boaters must also be respected. It is possible that boat capacity may be considerably reduced depending on the canal, and that the wait time may be increased. We thank boaters for their patience and collaboration. 

Caution on the banks

There will be many users sharing the Chambly Canal path – cyclists, pedestrians and in-line skaters will be among them. Parks Canada asks all visitors to follow the advice of public health experts on physical distancing. They must be careful in their choices to avoid injury and minimize any need for emergency response. In addition, we invite them to be courteous and obey the signage to make coexistence between all safer and more harmonious. 

Visitors and boaters should not expect to have the kind of experiences that they have had in the past.   As Parks Canada adapts to the COVID-19 situation, visitor access and services will be limited. 

Those who choose to access historic canals and waterways should follow the advice of public health experts on physical distancing. Everyone should be careful in their choices to avoid injury and to minimize any need for emergency response. 

For more details about the service periods and the measures taken by the Agency to limit the spread of COVID-19 in Quebec’s historic canals, please visit the Historic canals and waterways website or call 1-888-773-8888 to plan your visit.


Temporary Closing of Bridge No. 10 on May 28, 2020

Chambly, Quebec, May 26, 2020 – Parks Canada wishes to inform the public of a one-day closure of bridge No. 10, along the Chambly Canal National Historic Site, located in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. The bridge will be closed on May 28, 2020 from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. for repairs to the deck as part of ongoing federal infrastructure improvements.

A detour via bridge No. 9 will be in place on May 28 for the duration of the work. Public safety is a priority for Parks Canada. We ask users to please respect the signage in place.

Last fall, Parks Canada started repairs to the bridge to extend its use and ensure user safety. The work included repairing approaches, guardrails, foundation units, steel structures, wire meshes, and pivot beams, as well as paving to complete the work. 

Parks Canada is leading infrastructure work in places like the Chambly Canal National Historic Site to ensure safe, high-quality experiences for visitors by improving heritage, visitor, waterway, and highway assets located within national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas. 

Please note:

  • Parks Canada is following advice from public health experts and implementing measures to support Canada’s efforts to limit the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and reduce the risks to Canadians, visitors, Parks Canada team members, and contractors working at our places. 
  • Starting June 1, 2020, Parks Canada will gradually resume some operations at certain national parks, national historic sites, historic waterways, and national marine conservation areas. All camping facilities remain closed until at least June 21, 2020. Opening dates, visitor access and services will vary across the country. Parks Canada will only open places where measures can be implemented to minimize health and safety risks to employees and visitors. Canadians are encouraged to visit pc.gc.ca frequently for information and updates. 
  • Parks Canada’s construction projects are considered part of the Agency’s critical services to the public. Scheduled construction activities are proceeding as planned, but are subject to change due to the evolving situation related to COVID-19. Parks Canada will continue to communicate all developments to the public.

Parks Canada temporarily suspends all visitor services across the country until further notice 

March 17, 2020, Gatineau, Quebec, Parks Canada Agency - The health and safety of Canadians, visitors, and Parks Canada team members is of the utmost importance to the Agency. Parks Canada is following the advice of public health experts and taking steps to support the Government of Canada’s efforts to limit the spread of COVID-19 and reduce risks to visitors, employees, and other users of Parks Canada spaces. 

Effective at 12:01 a.m. on Thursday, March 19, 2020, Parks Canada is temporarily suspending all visitor services in all national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas across the country until further notice. The Agency will be monitoring the situation and will communicate regularly. 

Parks Canada will limit its activities to basic critical operations and many staff will work from home. Visitor facilities will be closed temporarily, including washrooms and day use facilities. Some conservation activities will also be temporarily suspended, including projects with external researchers. 

While visitor services are temporarily suspended, Parks Canada will continue to deliver a number of critical functions, including highway management and snow removal, fire response, dam operations and water management on historic waterways, as well as avalanche forecasting and control, among others.

Visitors may use front country and backcountry areas as well as accessible green spaces. Should Canadians decide to visit, they should remember that they are always responsible for their own safety. They should consult Parks Canada’s website to be prepared for their visit and be aware of any area closures. Search and rescue services may be limited. Visitors should exercise additional caution at this time and avoid activities with safety risks.

There are a number of tourism businesses and operations within Parks Canada places. These operators are valued partners and provide important services to visitors. They may continue to operate and clients should check with them before visiting to ensure that there has been no change to their services.

Parks Canada will cease taking new reservations until April 30, 2020. All existing reservations for this period will be refunded in full. In addition, the Agency is currently developing an approach to honour passes, in light of travel restrictions and closures related to COVID-19. Details will be communicated in due course.

A complete list of Parks Canada places that are closed and the parameters of these closures will be available on the Parks Canada website soon. Please visit pc.gc.ca regularly for updates.

Quote
“At this critical time, our top priority remains the health and safety of Canadians. We are doing everything we can to contain the novel coronavirus and reduce the burden on our healthcare system. We all look forward to resuming normal operations at Parks Canada places, but for now we must follow the advice of public health experts and work together to limit the spread of COVID-19.”

The Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson,
Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada


Related Links


Stabilization work to be done on west bank of Chambly Canal: tree planting and greening of the site also planned 

Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, January 6, 2020 – This winter, stabilization work will be carried out on the Chambly Canal, a Parks Canada property. The purpose of the work is to stabilize the west bank of the canal along Champlain Street between Loyola and LeSieur streets, in order to prevent subsidence. Localized slippages have already occurred in the area. Work will start at the bottom of the canal, then continue on the embankment. In addition, the guardrail will be replaced. All of the work should be wrapped up by the end of March. 

In the spring, after completion of the work, 70 new trees will be planted to add greenery to the bank. First, the few existing trees, which have grown spontaneously over the years, will be removed to make way for more desirable species. Then a line of red oak, white oak, yellow birch and black cherry trees will be planted 114 metres apart so that visitors can still enjoy an attractive view of the canal and the river.

COVABAR, a watershed management group for the Richelieu River basin, also participated in the project. Its mission was to save the fish in the affected section of the canal. The costs of this bank stabilization work on the Chambly Canal are shared between the city of Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu and Parks Canada.