The installation of the four gates of Lock No. 9 on the Chambly Canal turned out to be a spectacular operation! They arrived at night by convoy (under police escort for part of the journey given their unusual shape) directly from Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures, where they were designed in the workshop. Then, the gates were installed using a crane on their lower pivot in the lock.

Did you know? The new lock gates for Lock No. 9 are made primarily from British Columbia Douglas fir and white oak. Each door weighs more than 5 tonnes, the weight of an adult elephant. These are arched doors, which means, the two leaves lean against each other to form a "V". This concept, which dates back to Leonardo Da Vinci, ensures that the pressure of the water keeps the doors closed.

Watch this video to witness some impressive maneuvers!

New Lock Doors at the Chambly Canal

Transcript

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[Music] There is no spoken dialogue .

Aerial view of the work conducted at lock No. 9 of the Chambly Canal. Background music starts playing. [Title: Chambly Canal National Historic Site]

Aerial view from another, closer angle. A crane holds one of the new lock gates at the end of steel cables.

[Text] Some spectacular work took place at lock No. 9 of the Chambly Canal.

Aerial view from an even closer angle. We see one of the new lock gates being installed.

[Text] A return to manual lock mechanisms.

A Parks Canada employee who helps a boat owner to moor the ship to cross the locks.

Change of angle. Seen from the side, the crane lifts and moves one of the new lock door into the lock.

[Text] The new doors are made of British Columbia Douglas fir and white oak.

Change of angle. We go from the side to the front of the lock. The door continues to descend into the lock under the supervision of the workers.

[Text] Each gate weighs more than 5 tons, the weight of an adult elephant!

[Text] With these operations, all the canal locks are now manual.

Fade to black. Music stops. This text appears on the screen: "Like. Comment. Share. PC.GC.CA".

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© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by Parks Canada, 2020.

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