shoreLINES is a quarterly newsletter intended to keep our partners and stakeholders informed about Parks Canada's activities and heritage places in Northern Ontario.

In 2008, small plastic resin pellets known as nurdles were spilled into Lake Superior during a train derailment. They are washing up on shorelines throughout Lake Superior NMCA.

Searching for Trash

by Sarah Rauh

Do you know of a location along the shoreline of Lake Superior National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) that needs some tender loving care? Have you come across a collection of garbage or other marine debris while exploring the North Shore? If so, we want to hear from you!

In 2008, small plastic resin pellets known as nurdles were spilled into Lake Superior during a train derailment. They are washing up on shorelines throughout Lake Superior NMCA.  

A Natural Lab!
by Ryan Scheer and Janelle Laing

Why conduct ecological research in a national park? From ants to herring gulls to large-scale mapping projects, Pukaskwa National Park (PNP) has hosted many research studies over the years. Researchers are drawn to national parks to take advantage of their uniquely natural environments.

Here is a word cloud showing what we heard during the Essence of Tourism Workshop.


The Fort's Essence

by Elia Marini

In the fall of 2019, the team at Fort St. Joseph National Historic Site launched into the development of a Visitor Experience Strategy. Why do we do this? How does it help us? Why does this matter? Let me try to explain!

Panneau d’interprétation du Groupe des Sept à la plage Horseshoe, dans le parc national Pukaskwa.

Group of Seven Centennial

by Michaela Campbell and Svenja Hansen

Though the members met and began travelling and painting together seven years earlier, 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Group of Seven, a school of landscape painters officially active from 1920 to 1933. Over the course of five decades, members of this group and their contemporaries visited and painted landscapes across Canada, including the northern shore of Lake Superior.

Looking at shipwreck sonar data while out on Lake Superior

Underwater Cultural Resource Inventory

by Lisa Nyman

Lake Superior National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) is home to 70 known archaeological sites--from pictographs to gravesites, shipwrecks, and more. Certainly, there are more that we don’t yet know about.

 

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