Table of Contents

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Chief Executive Officer of Parks Canada, 2016.

Cette publication est aussi disponible en français.

National Library of Canada cataloguing in publication data:

  • Parks Canada
  • Fort Malden National Historic Site of Canada and Amherstburg Navy Yard
  • National Historic Site of Canada Management Plan.

Available also on the Internet.

  • ISBN: R64-454/2016E-PDF
  • Cat. no. 978-0-660-03581-9

For more information about the management plan or about Fort Malden and Amherstburg Navy Yard National Historic Sites of Canada:

Mailing address:
Fort Malden National Historic Site of Canada
P.O. Box 38, 100 Laird Avenue
Amherstburg, ON N9V 2Z2
Canada

Telephone:
519-736-5416

Fax:
519-736-6603


Our Mandate

On behalf of the people of Canada, we protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure their ecological and commemorative integrity for present and future generations.

Our Role

  • We are guardians of the national parks, the national historic sites and the national marine conservation areas of Canada.
  • We are guides to visitors from around the world, opening doors to places of discovery and learning, reflection and recreation.
  • We are partners, building on the rich traditions of our Indigenous Peoples, the strength of our diverse cultures and our commitments to the international community.
  • We are storytellers, recounting the history of our land and our people – the stories of Canada.

Our Commitments

  • To protect, as a first priority, the natural and cultural heritage of our special places and ensure that they remain healthy and whole.
  • To present the beauty and significance of our natural world and to chronicle the human determination and ingenuity which have shaped our nation.
  • To celebrate the legacy of visionary Canadians whose passion and knowledge have inspired the character and values of our country.
  • To serve Canadians, working together to achieve excellence guided by values of competence, respect and fairness.

Foreword

The Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of the Environment and Minister responsible for Parks Canada

Canada’s national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas belong to all Canadians and offer truly Canadian experiences.

These special places make up one of the finest and most extensive systems of protected natural and cultural heritage areas in the world.

The Government is committed to preserving our natural and cultural heritage, expanding the system of protected places and contributing to the recovery of species-at-risk. At the same time, we must continue to offer new and innovative visitor and outreach programs and activities so that more Canadians can experience Parks Canada places and learn about our environment, history and culture.

This new management plan for Fort Malden National Historic site of Canada and Amherstburg Navy Yard National Historic Site of Canada supports this vision.

Management plans are developed through extensive consultation and input from various people and organizations, including Indigenous Peoples, local and regional residents, visitors and the dedicated team at Parks Canada.

National parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas are a priority for the Government of Canada. I would like to thank everyone who contributed to this plan for their commitment and spirit of co-operation.

As the Minister responsible for Parks Canada, I applaud this collaborative effort and I am pleased to approve the Fort Malden National Historic Site of Canada and Amherstburg Navy Yard National Historic Site of Canada Management Plan.

The Honourable Catherine McKenna
P.C., M.P.
Minister of the Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada

Recommendations

Recommended by:

Daniel Watson

Chief Executive Officer, Parks Canada
Gatineau, Canada

Jarred Picher

Chief Financial Officer, Parks Canada
Field Unit Superintendent
Southwestern Ontario Field Unit, Parks Canada

Acknowledgements

The preparation of the Fort Malden and Amherstburg Navy Yard National Historic Sites Management Plan involved many people. The input of this diverse group of individuals has resulted in a plan that will guide the management of the sites for many years. The following individuals and groups deserve special recognition for their contribution:

  • Attendees of the public consultation meetings and the partner and stakeholder meeting, and those who provided written comments on the planning proposals;
  • Caldwell First Nation and Walpole Island First Nation;
  • Partner organizations that provide programming and host events at Fort Malden and the Amherstburg Navy Yard; and
  • Regular visitors, organized groups and attendees of our special events who share their ideas and feedback.

Executive Summary

This management plan for Fort Malden National Historic Site and Amherstburg Navy Yard National Historic SiteFootnote 1 provides strategic direction over the next 10 years for achieving Parks Canada’s mandate to protect and present Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and to foster public appreciation, understanding, and enjoyment of this heritage, for present and future generations. The plan was developed with partner, stakeholder, and public involvement and serves as the primary public accountability document for the two national historic sites. In so doing, the plan provides Parks Canada staff and engaged partners and stakeholders with a framework for action, implementation, and decision-making.

The management plan includes:

  • A vision for the future towards which the two national historic sites will aspire over the next 10 years;
  • Two key strategies with six supporting objectives that provide concrete direction to address major
    issues and opportunities that orients efforts and resources towards achieving the vision;
  • An implementation strategy summarizing objectives, planned actions, and targets for measuring the success of management actions; and
  • A summary of the Strategic Environmental Assessment.

Key strategy 1:

Strengthen the distinct but related identities of Fort Malden and the Amherstburg Navy Yard to enhance public understanding of their historical relationship.

This strategy focuses on generating a better understanding of the sites’ heritage values, and on strengthening the presence of Fort Malden as a 19th-century fort and its relationship during the 1830s to the Amherstburg Navy Yard’s Commissariat Building. Achievement of this strategy will enhance public understanding of the two sites’ historic functions and relationship, and of the Parks Canada brand. The three objectives associated with this key strategy are:

  • That Parks Canada fully articulates the reasons for the sites’ designation as national historic sites, and maintains their contributions to meeting Parks Canada corporate targets;
  • That residents and visitors value the sites as the “pride of the community” and understand the shared nature of the historical and physical evolution of the two sites and the town; and
  • Through a market-based approach, Canadians have access to a diversified menu of opportunities to explore, discover, and connect with the sites on their own terms.

Key strategy 2:

Engage a range of communities—from local to those in the United States—to foster their connection with Fort Malden and the Amherstburg Navy Yard.

This strategy is directed at working with existing partners and stakeholders to foster the connection of Canadians to the sites, and to the building of new relationships. A key objective in support of this strategy is an enhanced relationship with the Caldwell and Walpole Island First Nations. There is an opportunity to build on this relationship and incorporate Indigenous Peoples’ traditions and stories relating to Fort Malden into visitor experience and public outreach initiatives. A second objective is that partners and stakeholders are meaningfully engaged, in order to help Parks Canada reach target markets;

  • to help strengthen interpretive and public outreach programs;
  • and to help increase and diversify the base of support for the sites.

1.0 Introduction

The Parks Canada Agency manages national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas on behalf of Canadians. Parks Canada is a proud steward of these heritage places and protects and presents them for the benefit and enjoyment of Canadians while ensuring that these places remain unimpaired for present and future generations.

This management plan is the key accountability document to the Canadian public with respect to Fort Malden National Historic Site and Amherstburg Navy Yard National Historic Site. The plan has been approved by the Minister of the Environment and tabled in Parliament.

Management plans are developed for Parks Canada’s administered places based on legal requirements and Agency policies with regard to planning and reporting. This plan outlines how Parks Canada’s legislated mandate of protection, education, and enjoyment of these two national historic sites will be met. Indigenous communities, partners, stakeholders, and the general public were engaged in the development of this plan through workshops and meetings as well as through written submissions and continuing dialogue with Parks Canada staff. The ideas and advice captured throughout the planning process helped to shape the final document and future direction of these two national historic sites.

This management plan sets clear, strategic direction for the management and operation of Fort Malden National Historic Site and Amherstburg Navy Yard National Historic Site for the next 10 years. It outlines a vision, a set of objectives, and an implementation strategy with focused targets and actions. In doing so, this management plan contributes to achieving Parks Canada’s corporate vision:

Canada’s treasured natural and historic places will be a living legacy, connecting hearts and minds to a stronger, deeper understanding of the very essence of Canada.

Management direction presented in this plan ensures that actions undertaken for protection, visitor experience, and public appreciation and understanding are integrated and mutually supportive. The plan also ensures the effective use of public funds in the national historic sites’ management, by providing a framework by which to monitor, measure, and report on the effectiveness of the plan’s proposed actions for each site. The plan will contribute to the development of business plans and work plans within Parks Canada’s Southwestern Ontario Field Unit. Finally, it will be used as a tool to engage in continuing dialogue with Indigenous communities, partners, stakeholders, and the public about the management of Fort Malden National Historic Site and Amherstburg Navy Yard National Historic Site into the future.

2.0 Purpose and significance of Fort Malden National Historic Site of Canada and Amherstburg Navy Yard National Historic Site of Canada

Fort Malden National Historic Site and Amherstburg Navy Yard National Historic Site are located in the Town of Amherstburg, Ontario. Each in its own beautiful waterfront setting near the mouth of the Detroit River, an International Heritage River, the two sites are directly across from the state of Michigan and within a 20-minute drive from the City of Windsor.

The fort and navy yard are beloved sites for the local community, and have long been gathering places for leisure and special events—everything from dog-walking to annual arts and wine festivals—that attract many thousands of visitors.

The two sites share common stories, as detailed below.

Fort Malden

In 1921, Fort Malden was designated as a place of national historic significance because of the role it played:

  • As the principal military station for the defence of the western frontier for the period 1796-1813;
  • In the War of 1812; and
  • In the defence of the western frontier during the border raids of 1837-1838.

The National Historic Site designation for Fort Malden preserves the remnants of the second British fort built at this location. The first, Fort Amherstburg, was established in 1796. This centre of British operations during the War of 1812 was destroyed by the British when forced to retreat in September 1813. Today, there are no visible remains of this earlier fortification. The fort's current dimensions can be attributed to the American army, which occupied the ruins of Fort Amherstburg between October 1813 and July 1815. Following British re-occupation, a brick barracks, cook house, guardhouse, artillery shed and several storage buildings were built in the 1820s, but little was done to upgrade the earthworks. With the lessening of tensions between the United States and Britain the fort was allowed to decay and the last British troops left in 1836.

The Upper Canadian Rebellion of 1837-39 meant a renaissance for Fort Malden. Troops were rushed to the fort to repel attacks by rebels and American sympathizers. Between 1838 and 1840 the fort was almost completely rebuilt. Two large barracks holding 400 soldiers were hastily erected, as was an officers’ barracks, guardhouse, jail, and other buildings. The earthworks were repaired and armed with cannons. The end of the rebellion and improved relations with the Americans saw the last regulars depart in 1851, after which Enrolled Pensioners (retired soldiers) maintained the fort and farmed the surrounding military reserve. During this period (1851-58) a total of 85 pensioners’ cottages were built.

The acquisition of the fort grounds by the province of Canada West for a "lunatic" asylum between 1859 and 1870 saw the construction of new buildings, including a two-storey brick laundry/bakery built in 1861-62 (the site’s interpretation centre). Subsequent use as a lumber yard and planing mill was followed in the early 20th century by the site’s subdivision for housing. Through the efforts of local citizens, the federal government acquired land for a small park in 1937, which has since been expanded to become the landmark it is today, commemorating events that helped to shape the Canadian nation.

Today, the fort comprises the remnants of the American and second British fortifications in the form of earthworks and the 1819 Brick Barracks, as well as the interpretation centre, pensioner’s cottage, and a visitor orientation centre. The designated “historic place” of nationally-significant cultural resources consists of remaining elements of the original earthworks, the 1819 Brick Barracks, and exposed and below grade archaeological features.

Amherstburg Navy Yard

In 1928, the Amherstburg Navy Yard was designated as a National Historic Site for its importance as a British naval station for lakes Erie and Huron, from its construction in 1796, until its destruction by the British in late 1813. The site is now situated within the Town of Amherstburg’s King’s Navy Yard Park, land leased from Parks Canada. Parks Canada owns the 1831 Commissariat Building, which was built following the navy yard period to support the operation of Fort Malden. The Commissariat Building has been under lease to the Provincial Marine, a local not-for-profit re-enactment organisation that presents the naval history of the community and uses the building as a headquarters and interpretive centre to promote War of 1812 heritage.

The nearby but non-operational Bois Blanc Island Lighthouse and Blockhouse National Historic Site is subject to a separate management approach that addresses the part of the site administered by Parks Canada—i.e., the Lighthouse and adjacent Parks Canada lands.

 
Fort Malden National Historic Site of Canada and Amherstburg Navy Yard National Historic Site of Canada located in Amherstburg, Ontario

3.0 Planning Context

Regional Setting

Fort Malden and Amherstburg Navy Yard are located in Essex County in Southwestern Ontario, in the Town of Amherstburg. The Town is situated within a predominantly agricultural setting, with an overall 2011 population of 21,556. The location of both sites on the Town’s waterfront makes them popular for residents and visitors. Windsor, with a 2011 population of 210,891, is less than 25 kilometres from the two sites. More than 20% of Windsor’s population comprises new Canadians and 21% are visible minorities, making it Ontario’s most ethnically-diverse city outside of the Greater Toronto Area. Windsor is also situated across the Detroit River from the 4.3 million people living in metropolitan Detroit, Michigan. More than 46 million people live within a 450-kilometre radius of the sites. The sites also have a strong geographic and thematic relationship with American historic sites along the Detroit River and Lake Erie relating to the War of 1812—River Raisin National Battlefield Park in Monroe, Michigan, Fort Meigs in Perrysburg, Ohio, and Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial in Put-in-Bay, Ohio.

The region offers a wide range of leisure and tourism opportunities, including large casino hotels, amusement parks such as Cedar Point, events such as the North American International Auto Show, and a host of performing arts, major league sports, and numerous community theatres, museums, libraries, festivals, parks, and beaches. Wine tourism is growing, with 17 wineries operating in 2016. Although little natural environment remains, Point Pelee National Park, just 50 kilometres east of Amherstburg, is world-renowned for bird watching, and the Essex Region Conservation Authority (ERCA) manages 19 conservation areas.

The Town of Amherstburg is rich in heritage and history, and is home to three other national historic sites—Bellevue,Footnote 2 Nazrey African Methodist Episcopal Church, and Christ Church (Anglican). Two museums are found close by—the Park House Museum, which is situated between Fort Malden and the Amherstburg Navy Yard Park/Commissariat Building, and the Amherstburg Freedom Museum. Bois Blanc Island Lighthouse and Blockhouse NHS (the lighthouse portion of which is administered by Parks Canada) is situated just offshore in the Detroit River. Within the wide array of leisure and tourism experiences offered, Fort Malden and the Amherstburg Navy Yard offer unique opportunities for discovery, enjoyment, and learning.

Regional Setting of Southwestern Ontario National Historic Sites - Text Version

Map showing Parks Canada locations in Southwestern Ontario:

  1. Battle Hill
  2. Southwold Earthworks
  3. Point Clark Lighthouse
  4. Woodside
  5. HMCS Haida
  6. Battle of Cook's Mills
  7. Navy Island
  8. Ridgeway Battlefield
  9. Queenston Heights
  10. Battlefield of Fort George
  11. Butler's Barracks
  12. Fort George
  13. Fort Mississauga
  14. Mississauga Point Lighthouse

Indigenous Relations

Building relationships with Indigenous communities is a priority for Parks Canada. The two sites are situated within the traditional homelands of the Walpole Island First Nation and the Caldwell First Nation. Between 1796 and 1813, the first fort was a headquarters for the British Indian department and as such was a centre for negotiations between the British and the Indigenous communities of the Central Great Lakes region. Fort Malden staff have consulted with Walpole Island First Nation and Caldwell First Nation Indigenous communities, especially on programming and exhibits at the site related to the renewal of the interpretation centre. Parks Canada would welcome a further strengthening of these relationships.

Nationally-Significant Cultural Resources

Commemorative integrity provides a foundation for Parks Canada’s stewardship of national historic sites. A Commemorative Integrity Evaluation evaluates a site’s degree of commemorative integrity, in terms of heritage resource condition, effectiveness of communication, and selected management practices. The most recent evaluation (2002) for Fort Malden assessed the site’s commemorative integrity to be “Fair”. The principle challenges identified in the evaluation were:

  • The reasons for designation were not clearly communicated to visitors;
  • Inadequate inventory, evaluation and monitoring of archaeological and historic object collections;
  • Inadequate inventory and evaluation of level 2 archaeological sites; and
  • Serious concerns with the condition of the Interpretation Centre’s roof; significant threats to the resources due to water infiltration, climate, and erosion.

The 2002 Commemorative Integrity Evaluation ranked resource condition as “fair”, effectiveness of communication as “good”, and selected management practices as “fair.” Work undertaken to improve these ratings included replacement of the Interpretation Centre roof in 2003 and an assessment of the earthworks. Work in 2011 included a condition assessment of objects and the conservation of those in poor condition;

  • a review and assessment of the archaeological collection and their War of 1812 context;
  • an evaluation of the Commissariat Building and identification of required mitigation work;
  • and the initiation of a multi-year earthworks rehabilitation plan.

Completion of a Commemorative Integrity Statement for the Amherstburg Navy Yard and a Commemorative Integrity Evaluation for both sites within the next two years will enable Parks Canada to fully document the site’s importance and condition.

Visitor Experience

Fort Malden National Historic Site offers programming on its grounds, as well as in its several buildings: the Visitor Orientation Centre, Interpretation Centre, Brick Barracks, and Pensioner’s cottage. Government of Canada Economic Action Plan investments in 2010 supported infrastructure and visitor experience renewal, by extending the pathway along the waterfront to the Fort’s south gate, adding a palisade wall, and by overhauling the Interpretation Centre exhibits. The pathway extension in particular has been very popular with town residents, and has helped strengthen the fort’s connection to the Town’s historic district. The Commissariat Building managed by the Provincial Marine is open from June to September.

Visitors to Fort Malden can experience the beautiful waterfront setting, or choose to visit the historic fort by first entering the Visitor Orientation Centre, which offers an introductory video presentation and a gift shop. The War of 1812 and Rebellion of Upper Canada exhibits in the Interpretation Centre feature an extensive artifact collection. The Pensioner’s Cottage and 1819 Brick Barracks also interpret the site’s unique story, and programs in the Barracks allow children to experience 19th-century cooking techniques and overnight programs. Black powder demonstrations are also offered, which are further animated by the “Caldwell’s Western Rangers” (named for the militia unit recruited from Essex County during the War of 1812), whose activities cultivate a more personal connection to the site for volunteers and visitors. Each year, Fort Malden hosts historical events including the annual Military Heritage Days. The fort also serves as a venue for community events and activities such as Canada Day Celebrations, the Shores of Erie International Wine Festival, and the Gibson Gallery’s Art by the River, which celebrated its 49th anniversary in 2015; these events have increased site attendance and their promotion has raised the site’s local and regional profile. The Commissariat Building exhibits and programs managed by the Provincial Marine, focus on the defence of Canada in the early 19th century.

Since 2004, visitation increased steadily and peaked in 2010/2011 with 48,378, largely on account of third party events. A change in the Government of Canada’s approach to engaging schools and the temporary closure of the Interpretation Centre to stabilize the structure has impacted visitation numbers in recent years. The 2015 Visitor Information Survey found that 77% of Fort Malden visitors were from 6 Ontario. Americans accounted for 16% of visitation (a slight increase from 14% in 2009). Visitor party size has decreased slightly with 50% (2015) travelling in parties of three or more; 33% of parties travelled with children 16 and under, and 32% were repeat visitors. Significantly, most surveyed visitors in 2009 stayed 2 to 3 hours compared to 1 to 1.5 hours in 2004. As in 2004, most visitors were very satisfied with their Fort Malden visit; interaction with Parks Canada staff receiving the highest ratings. In 2009, 72% of surveyed visitors agreed with the statement that Fort Malden is meaningful to me.

Public Outreach Initiatives

Fort Malden staff have participated in off-site educational programs and in local events and festivals, including Art in the Park, the Essex Fun Fest, the Leamington Tomato Festival, and the Amherstburg Rotary Club’s Rib Fest. Caldwell’s Western Rangers participate in many events and festivals, thus serving as ambassadors for the sites, engaging Canadians that otherwise may not have the opportunity to visit. The Internet and new media compellingly communicate Parks Canada’s messages to emerging markets.

External Communications

A variety of local and regional print media such as the River Town Times and the Windsor Star provide promotional and news coverage for many Fort events and programs. Television, radio, and Internet news distribution channels also provide an outlet for Parks Canada's messages. Ontario Travel, Tourism Windsor Essex Pelee Island, and the Town of Amherstburg's publications and tourism centres are other avenues of communication that could be further developed. Internet and social media outlets are used and have been positively received. The events and programmes in support of the War of 1812 Bicentennial celebrations have provided an opportunity to tap into a broader market through promotional partnering with the network of 1812 sites, and in particular neighbouring Chatham-Kent County. Parks Canada polling data has enhanced the agency’s ability to better understand how, where, and when Canadians are gaining access to their information—be it social media, television, magazines, the Internet, or other sources.

Partner and Stakeholder Engagement

In addition to engagement with Indigenous communities, Parks Canada partners with the local community and the Town of Amherstburg, and has a longstanding relationship with the Provincial Marine that leases the Commissariat Building for its interpretive programming. Fort Malden staff have built relationships, cooperative programming, and cross-promotion with other sites and groups, important examples being the Amherstburg Freedom Museum and the Nazrey Church National Historic Site. Finally, because of the location of the two sites across from the United States, there is considerable collaboration and cross-promotion with sites and organizations across the border. Celebrations such as the War of 1812 Bicentennial provided additional opportunities to create linkages with Indigenous communities, and with communities locally, nationally and internationally in Michigan, Ohio, and Kentucky.

Public Engagement in the Planning Process

Public engagement in the development of this management plan has included Indigenous communities, the public, partners, and stakeholders. Indigenous communities were continuously consulted during the plan’s development throughout 2011, including a number of on-site meetings. A newsletter and comment form were available in paper and on the Parks Canada website in October and November 2011. Two public meetings and one partner and stakeholder meeting were held to solicit feedback on a draft vision and key strategies in November 2011. Following these public meetings, additional comments were received via the website posting. The main themes of the public consultations are described in the next section.

4.0 Key Issues, Challenges, and Opportunities

The two sites face some common issues and challenges, as well as exciting opportunities. They benefit from an active local community that is fully engaged in its history and considers Fort Malden the heart of its historical identity. Large Canadian and American markets are nearby, and strong historical ties link historic sites on both sides of the border relating to the War of 1812 and other areas of shared history. The participation of Fort Malden in the 2012-2015 War of 1812 Bicentennial celebrations resulted in longterm benefits in terms of awareness, understanding, partnering, and visitation.

A major consideration of this plan is the lack of a strong connection—thematic and physical—between the two sites. Visitors are not aware of their historical relationship, and the sites’ separation by a residential area means a weak physical connection that makes the facilitation of integrated visitor experiences challenging. The opportunity associated with this current fragmented relationship is that the historic fabric of the town situated between the two sites offers much to enrich the visitor experience.

Participants at the November 2011 public and partner/stakeholder consultation meetings expressed general support for the proposed vision and key strategies. They stressed a number of opportunities to attract a wider range of markets, most notably site programs that are more interactive, engaging, and historical. The Barracks and Interpretation Centre were cited as specific examples in this regard. Participants noted that a better flow of information to the local community regarding cultural resources, facilities, and programs would improve local awareness of Fort Malden, and increase local residents’ appreciation, understanding, support, and enjoyment of the site.

Fort Malden

Increases in visitation to Fort Malden since 2009 indicate the site is relevant to an increasing number of Canadians. Third party events bring in large numbers of visitors and hold great potential to facilitate meaningful heritage experiences in unique ways and familiarize visitors with the Parks Canada brand. With enhanced site programming, the 2012-2015 War of 1812 Bicentennial celebrations have increased the potential for visitors to connect with the site and with Parks Canada, thus generating potential longterm benefits for visitors, partners, and the Agency.

The most significant issue affecting Fort Malden is that whether inside or beyond the site boundaries, the fort does not appear to be what the average person would imagine to be a military fort. Only one building remains from the fort periods. Residential properties sit just a stone’s throw from the fort property. The addition of a palisade wall in 2011 has improved the site’s identity somewhat but the fort’s “sense of place” remains ambiguous. The opening of the south gate in 2011 to extend community access to the waterfront portion of Fort Malden has increased visitor exposure to the fort and its messages, and added a new form of “gateway” that enhances the fort’s identify. But as an extension of town waterfront parkland, this new access has also reduced the sense of a special historic place within the community, and has highlighted the need for a clearer visitor experience relationship between the Visitor Orientation Centre, Interpretation Centre, Brick Barracks, and in-ground cultural resources. The Interpretation Centre was temporarily closed for structural stabilization work which limited programme delivery and visitation numbers.

The use and state of cultural resources present both opportunity and challenge. There are opportunities to use Fort Malden’s outstanding collection of historical and archaeological artifacts to effectively communicate the importance of the fort and the Commissariat Building, and provide an opportunity to reengage the local community that donated many artifacts. Conservation issues include the continuing 8 erosion of the earthworks at the north curtain wall, and the effects that popular community events can have on the site’s heritage buildings and below-ground cultural resources.

Amherstburg Navy Yard

A key issue for the Amherstburg Navy Yard is the lack of a Parks Canada presence at Parks Canada’s Commissariat Building. The municipality operates King’s Navy Yard Park on lands leased from Parks Canada. Situated within this park, the Commissariat Building is valued highly by the local community as a place of leisure. The building is interpreted by the Provincial Marine, and reflects their historical connection and focus. As a result, many people are unaware of Parks Canada’s ownership of the lands that make up the King’s Navy Yard Park and the Commissariat Building, or of the building’s relationship to Fort Malden. The communication of messages of national significance that support the Navy Yard’s designation as a national historic site are inadequate.

Several cultural resource management issues could be addressed cooperatively to ensure the integrity of the Commissariat Building in terms of its condition and materials, and a surrounding landscape that reflects the heritage values of the building. Strong community support for and use of the park suggest opportunities exist to strengthen public understanding of the relationship between this site and Fort Malden and of Parks Canada’s role.

5.0 Parks Canada’s continuing Management Activities for Protected Heritage Places

The Parks Canada Guiding Principles and Operational Policies provide overarching direction on how Parks Canada’s manages its protected heritage places. They guide the ongoing management of overall program areas and activities that may not be addressed in the management plan itself.

Respect for Indigenous Peoples:

Parks Canada respects Indigenous rights and land claim agreements. In managing protected heritage places, Parks Canada will work collaboratively with Indigenous peoples to incorporate traditional knowledge, values and cultural heritage. Building mutually beneficial relationships with Indigenous communities is a priority for Parks Canada.

Commemorative Integrity:

Parks Canada manages its national historic sites to achieve “wholeness,” that is: articulating the reasons for a site’s designation; identifying the designated place, the resources and their values, the messages of national significance, and all other relevant values and messages; and by managing the site in a manner that respects its historic fabric and associated values and messages.

Public Outreach Initiatives and External Communications:

Through public outreach initiatives and external communications activities, Parks Canada will promote Canadians’ appreciation and understanding of Parks Canada’s mandate and conservation work, and encourage them to support and contribute to the protection and presentation of Parks Canada protected heritage places.

Stakeholder and Partner Engagement:

Parks Canada protected heritage places will be managed in a manner that recognizes the role and value of partners, constituents and stakeholders, and engages them in a way that responds to their needs and expectations.

Visitor Experience:

The lifestyles and values of Canadians are changing as a result of significant demographic shifts, as are their attitudes towards travel and leisure. Travellers have more choice, are better informed, and want a bigger role in choosing and creating their travel experiences. Parks Canada will increase and continually update its understanding of the needs and expectations of travellers, and will offer unique, authentic, interactive, personalized and diverse experiences that respond to Canadian interests and reflect their stories.

Environmental Stewardship:

Parks Canada protected heritage places will be managed in a manner that minimizes negative environmental impacts and encourages innovative approaches employing environmentally sound technologies and practices.

Sustainable Tourism:

Parks Canada is the largest provider of natural and historic tourism products in Canada and its iconic destinations form the cornerstones of the Canadian tourism industry. Parks Canada supports sustainable tourism and works in collaboration with tourism providers.

Monitoring and Reporting:

Parks Canada systematically monitors a protected heritage place’s condition and trends in terms of resource protection, public appreciation and understanding and visitor experience.

6.0 A vision for Fort Malden and Amherstburg Navy Yard

The vision that follows describes the desired future of the two sites in 10 years in their enduring essence and character; in the values they embody and that are communicated; and in how Canadians might embrace and interact with these vibrant, healthy, and important places—as visitors; at home, at leisure, at school, and in their communities; and as partners and stakeholders. The vision was developed with the involvement of the public, Indigenous Peoples, stakeholders, and partners.

It is 2027. As part of a network of historic sites across Ontario and in the United States that played a key role in defining the boundaries and culture of a new nation, Fort Malden National Historic Site and Amherstburg Navy Yard National Historic Site transport Canadians and international visitors back to the early 1800s. On the grounds and in the buildings of these sites, visitors are struck by the hardships of men and women that bravely maintained a presence here for decades in the defence of Canada, including the War of 1812 and the Rebellion of 1837-1838. They are moved by the critical role played by Indigenous Peoples during the wars and the relationships that were developed at Fort Malden through the British Indian Department.

Through the sound conservation of the heritage resources, memorable interpretive programs, and community events that capture the mind and imagination, visitors fully understand and appreciate Fort Malden and the Amherstburg Navy Yard. They learn of the symbiotic bond between the two sites, the community’s own history, Canadian and American perspectives on the conflicts that twice created the fort, and as the location for pre-confederation treaty-making with Indigenous communities. A strong relationship with Indigenous communities enables exciting opportunities for mutual learning and benefit that enrich the experiences and understanding of visitors to Fort Malden and the Amherstburg Navy Yard.

The fort and town continue to evolve together as they have over a long and fascinating shared history. Residents of Amherstburg and surrounding area embrace Fort Malden as the community’s heritage place—the pride of the community and the hub of the local network of historic places. The relationships between Parks Canada and community partners and stakeholders run deep. These relationships nurture and support the fort’s dynamic role—as a place fundamental to the community’s identity, as an oasis for leisure and relaxation and for festivals that have made the fort home for decades, and as a place of exciting, engaging, and interactive learning.

Set in a beautiful municipal park which has been a community gathering place for generations, the Commissariat Building in Amherstburg Navy Yard encourages visitors to experience, discover and learn about the important roles the Provincial Marine and the Royal Navy played in the defence of this country, the national significance of Amherstburg Navy Yard and the Commissariat Building.

The two sites collectively form an integral part of town life and a living legacy that, acting together with the unique historical character of the town and energetic community partners and stakeholders, whisk visitors back to a turbulent and a critical period in the creation of a new nation. Those touched by the sites develop a new found interest in Canada’s history and a lasting impression of Parks Canada as a steward of protected heritage places.

7.0 Key Strategies and Objectives

Expected Results of the Key Strategies

The key strategies will help support the achievement of the vision, the outcomes defined nationally by Parks Canada, as well as outcomes specifically oriented to the two sites. The expected results are:

  • Increased visitation to the two sites;
  • A stronger perception of the fort’s historic identity, for visitors and the local community;
  • A stronger physical and thematic connection between Fort Malden and the Commissariat Building, and public understanding of this connection;
  • Increased public awareness and understanding of the sites;
  • Improvements in commemorative integrity, including cultural resource condition, public understanding, and management practices;
  • A higher level of Indigenous Peoples engagement with and presence at the sites;
  • Higher level of partner, stakeholder, and volunteer support for and involvement in the sites, in a way that makes them feel they have opportunities to influence and contribute to Parks Canada’s activities;
  • A higher level of engagement with other relevant sites, both in Ontario and in the United States;
  • Levels of visitor enjoyment and satisfaction that meet or exceed Parks Canada targets; and
  • Visitors feel they learn from active participation, and have a sense of personal connection to the sites and to the Parks Canada brand.

Key strategy 1:

Strengthen the distinct but related identities of Fort Malden and the Amherstburg Navy Yard to enhance public understanding of their historical relationship.

The intent of this strategy is to better understand the sites’ heritage values, to strengthen the fort’s identity as a fort and Parks Canada’s presence at the Commissariat Building, and to improve public awareness and understanding of the sites’ historic relationship. The objectives that support this strategy are oriented to a combination of physical “cues” and programming and communication directions that do not rely on historic reconstructions. This strategy will be successful when:

  • Visitors and residents are aware of the relationship between the two sites and the nature of this relationship;
  • Canadians are aware of Parks Canada’s stewardship of the Commissariat Building and its historic connection with Fort Malden;
  • All components of the visitor experience cycle meet or exceed the expectations of key target markets.

The benefits of achieving these outcomes will be an enriched visitor experience, and a community that better understands the historic and continuing place of these two sites in historic Amherstburg, and that visits the sites and participates in their programs.

Objective 1:

Parks Canada fully articulates the reasons for the sites’ designation as national historic sites, and maintains their contributions to meeting Parks Canada corporate targets.

Objective 2:

Residents and visitors value Fort Malden and the Amherstburg Navy Yard as the “pride of the community,” and understand the shared nature of the historical and physical evolution of the two sites and the town.

Objective 3:

Through a market-based approach, Canadians have access to a diversified menu of opportunities to explore, discover, and connect with the sites on their own terms.

Key strategy 2:

Engage a range of communities, from local to those in the United States, to foster their connection with Fort Malden and the Amherstburg Navy Yard.

The intent of this strategy is to:

  • Increase awareness of the two sites;
  • Enhance the connection of a broad range of communities of interest to the sites, building on the momentum generated by the 2012-2015 War of 1812 Bicentennial celebrations;
  • Have mutually beneficial relationships with partners and in particular Indigenous communities;
  • Invite new information and perspectives on the history of the area such as oral traditional knowledge held by Elders;
  • Increase other parties’ participation in the facilitation of a greater diversity of visitor experiences and public outreach initiatives;
  • Increase visitation, revenue, and the sites’ role in regional tourism; and
  • Allow for the sharing of resources to achieve ends that might otherwise not be achievable.

Strategic efforts will focus on the nurturing of existing relationships—and the building of new ones. It involves working with partners and stakeholders to facilitate a range of visitor experiences and public outreach initiatives. In particular, Parks Canada will focus on relationships with the Caldwell and Walpole Island First Nations, and American sites relating to the Fort Malden story in particular. Efforts will also be made to improve local awareness of the site and its programs.

Indigenous Peoples’ involvement in the Fort Malden story embraces the influence of treaties on their involvement before, in, and following the War of 1812, and Canadians’ understanding of the implications of these interactions and treaties today. This long-standing relationship provides an opportunity to raise Canadians’ awareness and understanding of Indigenous Peoples’ history in the area and of Canada’s responsibilities with respect to Indigenous Peoples.

This strategy will be successful when Indigenous communities, partners, and stakeholders are engaged in the protection and presentation of the sites, when they have—and feel they have—opportunities to influence and contribute to Parks Canada activities at the sites, and when more engaging, interactive onsite programs are offered as a result of this engagement.

Objective 1:

Parks Canada and Caldwell and Walpole Island First Nations have explored how best to incorporate Indigenous Peoples’ traditions, stories, and participation relating to the Fort Malden story into the menu of visitor and public outreach programs.

Objective 2:

Meaningfully engaged community, stakeholders and partners help field unit staff reach target markets; help to strengthen interpretive and public outreach programs; and help to increase and diversify the base of support for the sites.

8.0 Implementation Strategy

Key strategy 1:

Strengthen the distinct but related identities for Fort Malden and the Amherstburg Navy Yard to enhance public understanding of their historical relationship.

Objective 1:

Parks Canada fully articulates the reasons for the sites’ designation as national historic sites, and maintains their contributions to meeting Parks Canada corporate targets.

Targets:

  • All Parks Canada monitoring and reporting document requirements relating to national historic sites are met; and
  • The sites meet Parks Canada targets for national historic sites conservation.

Actions and Implementation Timeframe

Short Term
  • Identify opportunities associated with the opening of the waterfront that would enhance visitor learning and experience of the reasons for the designation of the fort as a national historic site.
  • Work with community partners to strengthen the physical and historic connections between the two sites and the town and the reasons for designation for the Amherstburg Navy Yard, through visual cues, selfguided interpretation, and promotion.
  • Develop an approach with partners to manage existing and new special events to ensure commemorative integrity is respected, and that expose visitors to the reasons for designation of the two sites. This could include the development of special event guidelines for Fort Malden.
  • Delineate the 1837 fort and portions of the 1796 fort within the current site boundaries to help enhance the sense of place and enclosure (e.g., footprint of former buildings, expanded existing heritage garden in cooperation with others.
  • In cooperation with the Town of Amherstburg and other interested parties, mark the limits of the 1812 fort in the town, through the use of visual and/or electronic media “cues”.
Long Term
  • Identify opportunities associated with the opening of the waterfront that would enhance visitor learning and experience of the reasons for the designation of the fort as a national historic site.
  • Work with community partners to strengthen the physical and historic connections between the two sites and the town and the reasons for designation for the Amherstburg Navy Yard, through visual cues, selfguided interpretation, and promotion.
  • In cooperation with the Town of Amherstburg and other interested parties, mark the limits of the 1812 fort in the town, through the use of visual and/or electronic media “cues”.
 

Objective 2:

Residents and visitors value Fort Malden and the Amherstburg Navy Yard as the “pride of the community,” and understand the shared nature of the historical and physical evolution of the two sites and the town.

Targets:

  • There is evidence of improved physical and programming links between the two sites; and
  • There is evidence of the original fort boundaries beyond Fort Malden, either in physical or cyber
    space.

Actions and Implementation Timeframe

Short Term
  • Identify opportunities associated with the opening of the waterfront that would enhance visitor learning and experience of the reasons for the designation of the fort as a national historic site.
  • Work with community partners to strengthen the physical and historic connections between the two sites and the town and the reasons for designation for the Amherstburg Navy Yard, through visual cues, selfguided interpretation, and promotion.
  • Develop an approach with partners to manage existing and new special events to ensure commemorative integrity is respected, and that expose visitors to the reasons for designation of the two sites. This could include the development of special event guidelines for Fort Malden.
  • Delineate the 1837 fort and portions of the 1796 fort within the current site boundaries to help enhance the sense of place and enclosure (e.g., footprint of former buildings, expanded existing heritage garden in cooperation with others.
  • In cooperation with the Town of Amherstburg and other interested parties, mark the limits of the 1812 fort in the town, through the use of visual and/or electronic media “cues”.
Long Term
  • Identify opportunities associated with the opening of the waterfront that would enhance visitor learning and experience of the reasons for the designation of the fort as a national historic site.
  • Work with community partners to strengthen the physical and historic connections between the two sites and the town and the reasons for designation for the Amherstburg Navy Yard, through visual cues, selfguided interpretation, and promotion.
  • In cooperation with the Town of Amherstburg and other interested parties, mark the limits of the 1812 fort in the town, through the use of visual and/or electronic media “cues”.
 

Objective 3:

Through a market-based approach, Canadians have access to a diversified menu of opportunities to explore, discover, and connect with the sites on their own terms.

Targets:

  • Target markets for visitor experience and public outreach initiatives are defined through the On- Target Strategy;
  • A 10% increase in visitation to Fort Malden by 2018/2019 compared to the 2015/2016 baseline of 26,735 visitors;
  • 90% of surveyed visitors enjoyed their visit;
  • 85% of surveyed visitors consider that they learned about the two sites;
  • 85% of surveyed visitors consider the sites meaningful to them; and
  • 90% of surveyed visitors are satisfied, and at least 50% are very satisfied with their visit.

Actions and Implementation Timeframe

Short Term
  • Use social science and other tools such as market research and the expertise of key regional tourism associations to assess the current visitor experience cycle and public outreach initiatives.Footnote 3
  • Confirm current and new visitor target markets and public outreach audiences based on market analysis, with a particular reference to new Canadians, urbanites, young adults, and school-aged children/youth.Footnote 4
  • Renew each component of the visitor experience cycle so that activities, services, and infrastructure are relevant and responsive to target market motivations, preferences, needs, and expectations. Focus on authentic, interactive, and engaging interpretive programs that provide a vivid sense of the hardships and uncertainties of life in a 19th-century fort, and community-based events such as citizenship ceremonies and weddings.
  • Review and enhance the information that welcomes, orients, and informs visitors of the history of the sites and the programs, exhibits, and facilities available, so that visitors can better understand the two sites and maximize the potential of their visit.
  • Reach target markets and audiences by promoting the two sites, their programs, and the Parks Canada brand through existing and future partnerships with heritage and tourism organizations.
Long Term
  • Renew each component of the visitor experience cycle so that activities, services, and infrastructure are relevant and responsive to target market motivations, preferences, needs, and expectations. Focus on authentic, interactive, and engaging interpretive programs that provide a vivid sense of the hardships and uncertainties of life in a 19th-century fort, and community-based events such as citizenship ceremonies and weddings.
  • Review and enhance the information that welcomes, orients, and informs visitors of the history of the sites and the programs, exhibits, and facilities available, so that visitors can better understand the two sites and maximize the potential of their visit.
  • Reach target markets and audiences by promoting the two sites, their programs, and the Parks Canada brand through existing and future partnerships with heritage and tourism organizations.
 

Key strategy 2:

Engage a range of communities—from local to those in the United States—to foster their connection with Fort Malden and the Amherstburg Navy Yard.

Objective 1:

Parks Canada and Caldwell and Walpole Island First Nations have explored how best to incorporate Indigenous Peoples’ traditions, stories, and participation relating to the Fort Malden story into the menu of visitor and public outreach programs.

Targets:

  • Greater number of on-site programs involving Indigenous communities in comparison to 2015/2016; and
  • Indigenous communities feel they have an opportunity to influence and contribute to Parks Canada activities at the sites.

Actions and Implementation Timeframe

Short Term
  • Establish a collaborative arrangement to help build and guide the relationship between Parks Canada and the Caldwell and Walpole Island First Nations, and to explore how best to incorporate their stories, messages, and participation into the menu of visitor opportunities.
Long Term
  • Work with Indigenous communities to enhance on-site and off-site learning opportunities, through such tools as:
    • Collaboration in developing and delivering on-site programs;
    • Presentations to Parks Canada staff and the public to enhance cultural awareness and knowledge;
    • Involvement of Parks Canada staff in off-site Indigenous communities’ cultural events where possible; and
    • On-site Indigenous Peoples’ focused events such as symbolic gift giving and other traditional activities.
  • Explore ways to improve Indigenous communities’ economic opportunities through programming and activities such as craft selling at events, and summer employment opportunities for youth/young adults.
  • Facilitate further research to determine the nature and extent of Indigenous Peoples’ activities at the two sites, particularly prior to the arrival of the British.
 

Objective 2:

Meaningfully engaged community, stakeholders and partners help field unit staff reach target markets; help to strengthen interpretive and public outreach programs; and help to increase and diversify the base of support for the sites.

Targets:

  • Greater number of volunteers in comparison to 2015/2016;
  • Increased number of partnering agreements in comparison to 2015/2016;
  • A majority of partners and stakeholders support the protection and presentation of Fort Malden and the Amherstburg Navy Yard;
  • A majority of partners and stakeholders feel they have opportunities to influence and contribute to Parks Canada’s activities; and
  • An increased amount of media coverage annually compared to 2015/2016.

Actions and Implementation Timeframe

Short Term
  • Sustain the relationships developed from the 2012-2015 War of 1812 Bicentennial commemorations to assist in meeting this objective.
  • Work to sustain a vigorous cadre of volunteers in, for example, the Caldwell’s Western Rangers, Fort Malden gun crew, and high school volunteer programs, as a means to enhance programming.
  • Explore opportunities for dialogue with the Black community— including the Amherstburg Freedom Museum—regarding the development of more cross-promotional opportunities that would enhance the relevance of the sites for their community. Parks Canada staff participate in off-site events of partners to promote the site in the local community and beyond where relevant and feasible. Seek to cross-promote the sites with other local sites, and with those in Ontario and in the United States that have a connection to the Fort Malden/Commissariat Building story, and investigate possibilities for coordinated program and/or web content.
Long Term
  • Work to sustain a vigorous cadre of volunteers in, for example, the Caldwell’s Western Rangers, Fort Malden gun crew, and high school volunteer programs, as a means to enhance programming.
  • Explore opportunities for dialogue with the Black community— including the Amherstburg Freedom Museum—regarding the development of more cross-promotional opportunities that would enhance the relevance of the sites for their community. Parks Canada staff participate in off-site events of partners to promote the site in the local community and beyond where relevant and feasible. Seek to cross-promote the sites with other local sites, and with those in Ontario and in the United States that have a connection to the Fort Malden/Commissariat Building story, and investigate possibilities for coordinated program and/or web content.

9.0 Summary of Strategic Environmental Assessment

A strategic environmental assessment (SEA) was completed for the Fort Malden National Historic Site of Canada and Amherstburg Navy Yard National Historic Site of Canada Management Plan in accordance with the 2010 Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals.

The SEA compared the results of each proposed management action against factors identified as critical to the successful management of the site: resource condition, effectiveness of communications, and selected management practices supporting commemorative integrity; and the natural environment, species-at-risk, and visitor experience. The actions are oriented primarily to meeting national targets for visitation and visitor satisfaction, and also respond to any deficiencies in Commemorative Integrity identified in the 2002 Commemorative Integrity Evaluation (CIE). The plan proposes innovative approaches to enhance visitor experience and external relations to ensure the sites’ relevance to Canadians.

The management plan actions will result in primarily positive effects and will contribute to objectives in support of improving conditions or trends to cultural integrity and meaningful visitor experience. Several actions specifically address deficiencies identified in the 2002 CI Evaluation for the condition of cultural resources, the effectiveness of communication, and for selected management practices, and will help improve the sites’ commemorative integrity.

Only a minor number of management actions have been identified as having potential for adverse effects. In some cases subsequent projects or activities will require an environmental assessment (EA) pursuant to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, such as actions arising from opening up the grounds for greater community involvement and special events. In addition, restoration of any Level 1 cultural resources or any projects or activities that might affect Level 1 cultural resources may also trigger a requirement for an EA. No specific mitigation strategies have been identified for the implementation of the actions proposed in this management plan as the actions are still at a conceptual stage. Once specific details become available, these actions should be assessed for potential effects to commemorative integrity and the environment. Should project or activity specific environmental assessments be required, mitigation measures may be identified to offset any adverse effects identified in those assessments. Mitigation is also guided by the Parks Canada Principles of Management, specifically those principles relating to commemorative integrity, environmental stewardship and sustainable tourism.

There are no specific follow-up monitoring requirements identified in this SEA. Future Commemorative Integrity Evaluations and completion of a State of the Site Report will identify any undesirable site conditions and, if trends or conditions decline, corrective measures can be undertaken.

Adverse cumulative effects are not anticipated; in contrast, over the long term, effects relating to resource condition, effectiveness of communication and selected management practices will improve. The character of the surrounding community is unlikely to change substantially in the near future, however, site staff should continue to be aware and informed of urban planning developments and provide input into any land use decisions that might adversely affect the commemorative integrity of Fort Malden and Amherstburg Navy Yard National Historic Sites.

The management plan concepts have been subject to public consultation which, by way of several actions that were developed as a result of public input, improved the plan.

Overall, the SEA concluded that the direction proposed in the management plan is consistent with Parks Canada and Government of Canada environmental and cultural resource management policy and the 19 majority of the proposed actions will positively affect the critical factors identified above, specifically those associated with commemorative integrity and visitor experience. No adverse residual environmental effects are expected to result as a result of management plan implementation.

References

  • Parks Canada. Parks Canada Guiding Principles and Operational Policies. Department of Canadian Heritage, 1994.
  • Parks Canada Agency Act, S.C. 1998, c. 31.
  • Parks Canada (2001b). Fort Malden National Historic Site of Canada Management Plan.
  • Parks Canada (2002a). Fort Malden National Historic Site of Canada Commemorative Integrity Evaluation.
  • Parks Canada (2009). Fort Malden National Historic Site of Canada Visitor Survey.
  • Parks Canada (2008a). Parks Canada Guide to Management Planning.
  • Parks Canada (2009a). Fort Malden National Historic Site of Canada Visitor Survey.
  • Parks Canada (2009b). Parks Canada Environmental Management Directive.
  • Parks Canada (2011a). External Relations Toolkit.
  • 2011 Parks Canada (2011b). On Target – A Strategic Focus for External Relations and Visitor Experience.
  • Parks Canada. (2011c). Strategic Environmental Assessment of the Fort Malden National Historic Site of Canada and Amherstburg Navy Yard National Historic Site of Canada Draft Management Plan.

Glossary

Commemorative Integrity:
A historic place may be said to possess commemorative integrity when the resources that symbolize or represent its importance are not impaired or under threat, when the reasons for its significance are effectively communicated to the public, and when the heritage value of the place is respected.
Cultural Resource:
A human work or place that gives evidence of human activity or has spiritual or cultural meaning, and which has been determined to have historic value.
Cultural Resource Management:
Generally accepted practices for the conservation and presentation of cultural resources, founded on principles and carried out in a practice that integrates professional, technical and administrative activities so that the historic value of cultural resources is taken into account in actions that might affect them. In Parks Canada, Cultural Resource Management encompasses the presentation and use, as well as the conservation of cultural resources.
Field Unit:
An administrative division developed by Parks Canada combining the management and administration of one or more national park(s), national historic site(s), marine conservation area(s) or historic canal(s).
Heritage Value:
Historic value is a value or values assigned to a resource, whereby it is recognized as a cultural resource. These values can be physical and/or associative.
Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada:
An independent body that provides the Minister of the Environment with impartial and expert advice on matters relating to historical commemoration. Also referred to as the ‘HSMBC’.
National Historic Site:
Any place declared to be of national historic interest or significance by the Minister responsible for Parks Canada.
Public Appreciation and Understanding:
Parks Canada aims to reach Canadians at home, at leisure, at school, and in their communities through communication and education opportunities designed to increase appreciation for and understanding of the significance of Parks Canada’s heritage places and the importance of protecting and presenting them. Parks Canada also seeks to broaden its base of support by engaging its stakeholders and partners, and encouraging shared leadership through active participation in the development and implementation of the Agency’s future direction.
Stakeholder:
A person or organization with an interest in Fort Malden and the Amherstburg Navy Yard National Historic Sites of Canada. Organizations may include both government and non-government organizations, commercial, and for profit and non-profit organizations.
Target Market:
A market segment is a group of individuals that are similar to one another and have something significant in common, such as needs, wants and/or characteristics. The market segments that you decided to prioritize and actively pursue are your target markets.
Visitor:
Someone who enters a protected place for recreation, education or cultural purposes.
Visitor Experience:
The sum total of a visitor’s personal interaction with heritage places and/or people that awakens their senses, affects their emotions, stimulates their mind and leaves them with a sense of connection to these places.