HMCS Haida is Canada’s “most fightingest ship,” the first-ever ceremonial flagship of the Royal Canadian Navy, and the last of the twenty-seven tribal class destroyers in the world. Canada’s most famous warship served in the Royal Canadian Navy from 1943 to 1963, participating in the Second World War, the Korean Conflict, and the Cold War. HMCS Haida is now a Parks Canada National Historic Site docked in Hamilton, Ontario. As a museum ship, she now serves as a place to remember, explore, and connect.

Indigenous culture

HMCS Haida was named after the Haida Nation on the west coast of Canada. When HMCS Haida was designated the Flagship of the Royal Canadian Navy, the Hereditary Chiefs of the Haida Nation gave the ship a red and white flag bearing the two-headed Thunderbird. The flag is flown on the ship’s yardarm during special events.

History

HMCS Haida was commissioned in the Royal Canadian Navy in 1943, serving in the Second World War, two tours of duty in the Korean Conflict, and the Cold War. HMCS Haida was a fighting ship and in twenty years of service only lost two men.

Engineering

The Canadian Tribal Class destroyers were very sophisticated warships equipped with the latest radar and sonar detection and communications technology, and thicker hull plates designed to withstand ice in Canadian waters.