Port-Royal, Fort Anne, Charles Fort, Fort Edward and Melanson Settlement National Historic Sites of Canada

Table of Contents

November 2016

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Chief Executive Officer of Parks Canada, 2016.

Cette publication est aussi disponible en français.

Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication

Parks Canada
The national historic sites of southwest Nova Scotia: Port-Royal, Fort Anne, Charles Fort, Fort Edward and Melanson Settlement national historic sites of Canada; management plan.

Issued also in French under the title:
Les lieux historiques nationaux du Sud-Ouest de la Nouvelle-Écosse - Plan directeur 2016

Available also on the Internet.

  • ISBN 978-1-100-18097-7
  • Cat. no.: R64-455/2016E-PDF
  1. Port-Royal National Historic Site (N.S.)—Management.
  2. Fort Anne National Historic Site (Annapolis Royal, N.S.)—Management.
  3. Charles Fort National Historic Site (Annapolis Royal, N.S.)—Management.
  4. Melanson Settlement National Historic Site (N.S.)—Management.
  5. Fort Edward National Historic Site (Windsor, N.S.)—Management.
  6. Fortification—Nova Scotia—History.
  7. Acadians—Nova Scotia—History.
  8. Nova Scotia—History I. Title. II. Title: Port-Royal, Fort Anne, Charles Fort, Fort Edward and Melanson Settlement national historic sites of Canada.

FC2314 P67 P37 2012  971.6  C2011-980014-4

For more information about the management plan or about Port-Royal, Fort Anne, Charles Fort, Melanson Settlement, and Fort Edward National Historic Sites of Canada:

Mailing address:
National Historic Sites of Southwest Nova Scotia:
PO Box 9, 295
St. George Street,
Annapolis Royal
Canada
N.S. B0S 1A0

Telephone:
902-532-2321

Fax:
902-532-2232

Website:

Front Cover Image Credits

Top images: Chris Reardon; main image: Chris Reardon.

Foreword

The Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of the Environment and Minister responsible for Parks Canada

Canada’s national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas belong to all Canadians and offer truly Canadian experiences.

These special places make up one of the finest and most extensive systems of protected natural and cultural heritage areas in the world.

The Government is committed to preserving our natural and cultural heritage, expanding the system of protected places and contributing to the recovery of species-at-risk. At the same time, we must continue to offer new and innovative visitor and outreach programs and activities so that more Canadians can experience Parks Canada places and learn about our environment, history and culture.

This new management plan for the National Historic Sites of Southwest Nova Scotia (Port-Royal, Fort Anne, Charles Fort, Fort Edward and Melanson Settlement) supports this vision.

Management plans are developed through extensive consultation and input from various people and organizations, including Indigenous peoples, local and regional residents, visitors and the dedicated team at Parks Canada.

National parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas are a priority for the Government of Canada. I would like to thank everyone who contributed to this plan for their commitment and spirit of co-operation.

As the Minister responsible for Parks Canada, I applaud this collaborative effort and I am pleased to approve the National Historic Sites of Southwest Nova Scotia Management Plan.

Original signed by

Catherine McKenna
Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada

Recommendations

Recommended and original signed by

Daniel Watson
Chief Executive Officer, Parks Canada
Gatineau, Canada

Julie Tompa
Field Unit Superintendent
Mainland Nova Scotia Field Unit, Parks Canada

Acknowledgements

The preparation of this management plan involved many people. The resulting document was guided by the contributions of the public, stakeholders, business, and community leaders, tourism organizations, all levels of government, and heritage groups who took the time to provide sound advice to Parks Canada at various open houses, and stakeholders meetings. The Mi'kmaq of Nova Scotia are recognized for their important contribution to the development of this plan.

The contributions of numerous Parks Canada staff including planners, graphic designers, cultural resource management specialists, and the management planning team have created a relevant and professional blueprint for the future.

These efforts have collectively allowed Parks Canada to develop a plan that will guide the management of these sites for the next 15 years.

Executive Summary

Fort Anne, Port-Royal, Charles Fort, Fort Edward, and Melanson Settlement National Historic Sites are places of national historic significance interrelated by events and geography that invite all Canadians to explore the fascinating history and spectacular beauty of Southwest Nova Scotia. These national historic sites are collectively managed under the Mainland Nova Scotia Field Unit of Parks Canada and are together referred to as the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia.

This management plan provides strategic direction for achieving Parks Canada’s mandate at the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia, namely: protection of heritage resources; the facilitation of meaningful visitor experiences; and fostering public appreciation and understanding of protected heritage places managed by Parks Canada. The plan was developed with the involvement of the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia, partners, stakeholders, and the public. It is the primary public accountability document for these sites and will provide Parks Canada staff with a framework for decision making.

The management plan includes:

  • a vision for the future;
  • two overarching key strategies, which will guide the direction of the five sites over the next fifteen years;
  • individual chapters that highlight how the overarching strategies will be implemented at each of the sites;
  • a summary of administration and operations;
  • a summary of the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) conducted for this management plan; and,
  • an implementation strategy that summarizes the key planned actions.

The two overarching key strategies provide concrete direction for addressing the major issues and opportunities facing the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia and for focusing resources towards achieving the vision. They are as follows:

Inspiring the Discovery of the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia

This strategy focuses on improving and diversifying visitor experience opportunities and strengthening promotions to inspire an increasing number of people to discover this outstanding network of national historic sites. This strategy also seeks to inspire the discovery of the sites amongst Canadians unable to visit them in person. Actions that will contribute to this strategy include: conducting research to better understand the motivations, needs, and expectations of current and potential visitors; confirming new target markets in the face of changing tourism trends; increasing interactive and experiential programming at Port-Royal National Historic Site (NHS), developing new self-guided media at Fort Anne National Historic Site (NHS); developing the concept of a network of national historic sites in Southwest Nova Scotia including promotional and positioning tools to implement the concept; and reviewing and updating the sites’
web-pages.

Shared Stewardship and Community Gathering Places

This strategy underscores Parks Canada’s focus on reaching out to area residents Footnote 1, the Mi’kmaq, Acadians, and other partners and stakeholders to build on a culture of conservation and on working together to ensure the sites are relevant to local and regional audiences. By tapping into the knowledge and passion of the Mi’kmaq, partners, stakeholders, and area residents, the protection of cultural resources as well as visitor experience opportunities at these sites will be enhanced. In particular, Parks Canada will work with the Mi’kmaq, partners, stakeholders, and area residents to encourage the use of the sites as community gathering places and to facilitate unique opportunities, such as special events, that will engage area residents and attract new audiences. Actions that will contribute to this strategy include: exploring the possibility of establishing a permanent mechanism for local engagement with the sites; working with the Mi’kmaq to identify areas of research that will serve to enhance Mi’kmawrelated visitor experience and public outreach opportunities; enhancing opportunities for community stewardship.

Individual Site Chapters

Individual chapters have been developed to highlight areas of importance and specific actions to be undertaken at each site. Efforts at Port-Royal NHS will focus on enhancing the visitor experience offer through the creation of a menu of visitor experience opportunities, including hosting special events. Emphasis at Fort Anne will be placed on developing self-guided media, building stronger local partnerships, supporting community use of the site, and ensuring the security of the curatorial collection. In addition, attention will be paid to address minor impairments to commemorative integrity at Fort Anne. At Charles Fort NHS, a small site located within the grounds of Fort Anne, Parks Canada will work to raise awareness and understanding of the site and to build connections with the Scottish heritage community.

At Fort Edward NHS, Parks Canada will ensure that visitors have access to informative pre-trip information. Parks Canada will also work with the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia and with local and regional organizations to encourage community use of the site. At Melanson Settlement NHS, emphasis will be placed on working with others to ensure the protection of the site within its larger historic-geographic context, and on strengthening opportunities to engage Mi’kmaw and Acadian communities in ways that will enhance our understanding of the site’s historical significance.

1.0 Introduction

1.1 Purpose of the Management Plan

Parks Canada manages national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas on behalf of Canadians. Parks Canada is a proud steward of these heritage places and protects and presents them for the benefit and enjoyment of Canadians while ensuring they remain unimpaired for present and future generations.

This management plan is the key accountability document for Port-Royal, Fort Anne, Charles Fort, Melanson Settlement, and Fort Edward national historic sites. This plan replaces the 2004 plan for Melanson Settlement and the 2001 plan for Fort Anne, Port- Royal, Fort Edward, and Charles Fort (formerly Scots Fort). It provides a framework for decision-making, sets strategic direction for the management and operation of the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia, and was developed through public consultation.

1.2 Legislative and Policy Basis for Management Planning

The Parks Canada Agency Act (1998) confers on Parks Canada the responsibility to implement the Canada National Parks Act (2000) and ensure the commemorative integrity of national historic sites. In accordance with legislation and policy, management plans are prepared for national historic sites owned and/or administered by Parks Canada, to be reviewed and updated every ten years in consultation with Canadians.

Parks Canada also has a duty to consult with Aboriginal peoples regarding matters that may affect asserted Aboriginal or treaty rights. The Mi‘kmaq of Nova Scotia claim unextinguished Aboriginal title as well as Aboriginal and treaty rights throughout Nova Scotia. The Made-in-Nova Scotia Process is the forum for the Mi‘kmaq, Nova Scotia, and Canada to resolve issues related to Mi’kmaw treaty rights, Aboriginal rights, including Aboriginal title, and Mi’kmaw governance. Issues of resource harvesting within national parks and national historic sites, and the exercise of other Aboriginal or treaty rights are currently under discussion at the Made-in-Nova Scotia Negotiation Table. Parks Canada also places a high priority on developing mutually beneficial relationships with Aboriginal people. As part of developing this relationship, Parks Canada is actively working with the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia to improve the presentation of Mi’kmaw history and heritage in national historic sites in Nova Scotia. To these ends, Parks Canada will continue to work with the Mi'kmaq of Nova Scotia on issues related to management planning and other matters of interest to the Mi'kmaq of Nova Scotia. The Mi‘kmaq of Nova Scotia were consulted on this management plan through a formal process. The accommodations requested during this consultation have been incorporated into this management plan.

1.3 Planning according to Parks Canada’s Mandate

Parks Canada’s Mandate
On behalf of the people of Canada, we protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations.

from Parks Canada Agency’s Charter

Parks Canada’s mandate is comprised of three mutually supportive areas that are delivered in an integrated fashion:

Protection of Heritage Resources

For national historic sites, the protection of heritage resources relates to the principle of commemorative integrity and the application of cultural resource management principles and practices. Commemorative integrity is a way of describing the health or wholeness of a national historic site. A national historic site possesses commemorative integrity when the resources that symbolize or represent its importance are not impaired or under threat; the reasons for the site’s national historic significance are effectively communicated to the public; and the site’s heritage values are respected by all those whose decisions or actions affect the site. Frequently, natural ecosystem features are also integral to the history and landscape of a national historic site and are valued in a manner that reflects the role of Parks Canada as an important environmental steward.

Meaningful Visitor Experience

Visitor experience is defined as the sum total of a visitor’s personal interaction with protected heritage places and/or people that awakens their senses, affects their emotions, stimulates their mind, and helps the visitor to create a sense of connection to these places.

Public Appreciation and Understanding

Parks Canada aims to reach Canadians at home, at leisure, and in their communities through communication and other opportunities designed to increase awareness, understanding, and appreciation of the significance of Parks Canada’s heritage places and the importance of protecting and presenting them. Parks Canada also seeks to broaden its base of support by engaging stakeholders and partners, and encouraging shared leadership through active participation in the development and implementation of the Agency’s future direction.

1.4 Regional Context and Geographic Location

The national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia are all located in the Annapolis Valley. Fort Edward is in Windsor and the other sites are in or near Annapolis Royal (see Map 1: Regional Setting and Map 2: Local Setting). These national historic sites are significant heritage tourist attractions in the region. Together, the sites play a central role in efforts of the Provincial Department of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism to provide experiential opportunities for visitors.

The sites are located within a region, known as Kespukwitk (or “Land’s End”), which has been inhabited by the Mi’kmaq for millennia. Starting in the 17th century, they were joined by French and English settlers who established towns and villages throughout the region, many of which exist today. The Mi’kmaq continue to live here in the communities of L’stkuk (Bear River), Acadia, Glooscap, and Annapolis Valley. The richest farmland in the province may be found in Southwest Nova Scotia, making agriculture, along with the fishery in coastal areas, major regional industries. The tourism industry is also a significant contributor to the economy, generating about 2,500 jobs and approximately $137,600,000 in revenue annually. In addition to the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia, tourism attractions include both provincial and municipal heritage sites as well as a wide variety of not-for-profit and commercial operations. The Bear River First Nation Heritage and Cultural Centre continues to appeal to a wide audience. The population of Southwest Nova Scotia is approximately 119,000 and includes a significant francophone population of more than 12,000, located primarily in the area west of Weymouth along what is known as the “Acadian Shore”. First Nations communities in the region are home to approximately 2,000 people, collectively and individually representing a key community of interest in the development and implementation of this plan.

1.5 The Management Plan review process and consultation

The management planning process included a review of the existing management plans, issue analysis, and consideration of the results of social science research. It also included consultations with the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia, stakeholders, partners, area residents, and the public to provide an opportunity for these groups to help shape the future direction of the sites. As part of the consultation process, a newsletter was distributed broadly to the public; stakeholder meetings and open houses were held and a dedicated email address was created to which the public could submit their views in writing. All of the ideas, comments, and feedback received through the consultation process were carefully considered by the planning team. Some have already resulted in changes at an operational level and are not necessarily included in this strategic document. However, all of the key themes communicated by the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia, partners, visitors, and other stakeholders have been incorporated into this plan. Parks Canada is committed to further involving interested parties during its implementation.

Map 1: Regional Context

National Historic Sites administered by Parks Canada in Nova Scotia: Regional settings - Text Version
  1. Fort Anne and Charles Fort
  2. Port-Royal
  3. Melanson Settlement
  4. Fort Edwards
  5. Grand-Pré
  6. Fort Lawrence
  7. Halifax Defence Complex
  8. Canso Islands
  9. St. Peters Canal
  10. Fortress of Louisbourg
  11. Alexander Graham Bell
  12. Marconi

Map 2: Local Context

National Historic Sites in Southwest Nova Scotia - Local setting

2.0 Places of National Historic Significance Interrelated by Events and Geography

Parks Canada is responsible for six national historic sites in the Annapolis Valley: Port- Royal NHS and Melanson Settlement NHS in present day Port-Royal; Fort Anne NHS and Charles Fort NHS in the town of Annapolis Royal; Fort Edward NHS in the town of Windsor; and Grand-Pré NHS in the village of Grand Pré, near Wolfville (Map 2). (A separate management plan has recently been completed for Grand-Pré NHS.) The national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia bore witness to events of international significance that shaped the destinies of peoples and of nations and are interrelated by a number of major historic themes – of arrival and settlement, loss and dislocation, and alliance and conflict – that are integral to the story of Canada.

The Annapolis Valley is a lush coastal area with abundant terrestrial and marine resources and sheltered coves. The Mi’kmaq call this place Kespukwitk (“Land’s End”) and have lived here for thousands of years. By the 17th century, the region’s riches had been discovered by others – French, English and Scots – who wished to carve out a place for themselves in this “new” world. As a result, the area became a meeting place of cultures – a place where alliances were forged and discord sown as newcomers sought to establish communities and build societies while the Mi’kmaq sought to preserve a way of life. The first of these new settlements was established by the French near today’s Port- Royal NHS. Between 1605 and 1613, approximately 35 men lived at the original habitation, tending fields and gardens and trading for furs. Welcomed by the Mi’kmaq, these settlers lay the groundwork for an alliance that would endure for more than a century. Today, the reconstructed Port-Royal Habitation tells the story of the region’s first French settlers and the Mi’kmaq who helped them adapt to their new environment.

Less than two decades after these first settlers abandoned the habitation at Port-Royal, Scottish settlers arrived to establish their own settlement. Built in 1629 by Sir William Alexander to serve as a base from which to settle the colony of New Scotland (or “Nova Scotia”), Charles Fort was located on a flat, high point of land at the confluence of the Annapolis and Allain Rivers, a spot used by the Mi’kmaq as a campsite on one of their travel routes. Like the inhabitants of the Port-Royal habitation before them, the Scots established good relations with the Mi’kmaq. When the area, termed “Acadie” by the French, was returned to France under a peace treaty in 1632, the French occupied Charles Fort and over the years which followed, built a succession of four forts on the site before it became known as Fort Anne under the British.

Over the course of the century which followed, French settlements grew throughout the region, particularly along the Dauphin River (today called the Annapolis River). The settlers began the distinctive practice of dyking and the reclamation of tidal salt marshes for farmland, which is interpreted at Melanson Settlement NHS. Eventually developing 7 an identity independent of France, the settlers became known as Acadians. By the 1670s, they were living in settlements in the Chignecto region and by the 1680s, had established settlements at Grand Pré, Pisiquid, Cobequid and at other locations in the region.

It is perhaps inevitable that, having attracted so many people with competing interests, the region should be drawn into international conflicts being waged elsewhere throughout much of the 17th and 18th centuries. As a result, the Annapolis Valley, particularly the site that is now Fort Anne NHS, served as the setting for battles fought between English (British after 1707) and French forces for control of the North American continent. Both imperial powers considered the conquest of this fortified site as the key to the domination of this part of what is now eastern Canada. For much of the 17th century, Port-Royal was the capital of Acadia and under French control. However, in 1710, the fort fell to British and New England troops and a British governor and garrison replaced their French counterparts. Three years later, the Treaty of Utrecht confirmed British sovereignty over Acadia and Port-Royal was renamed Annapolis Royal, becoming the capital of Nova Scotia. The Mi’kmaq, too, were drawn into these conflicts, joining other Aboriginals and the French in waging war against the British, who had presumed ownership of Mi’kmaw lands.

Until the founding of Halifax in 1749, British officials governed the Mi’kmaq, Acadian, and small British populations of Nova Scotia from Fort Anne in Annapolis Royal. Shortly after the transfer of the capital to Halifax, the British decided to construct a fort in the Pisiquid area (present-day Windsor) to secure land communication with the garrison at Annapolis Royal. It also served as a suitable location from which to assert British authority over Acadians in the region and for meetings with the Mi’kmaq, who frequented the area thanks to its proximity to river travel routes and opportunities for trade. In the years which followed, Fort Edward would play a significant role in the deportation of Acadians from the region and serve as an important point of contact between the Mi’kmaq and colonial officials for the purposes of trade and communication.

Because of the central roles played by these sites in the events which have shaped Canada, they have been designated as national historic sites. Each site has a “Statement of Commemorative Intent” which flows from the recommendations of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada (HSMBC) and encapsulates the reasons why each site was deemed to be of national historic significance. These statements are included in Appendix B along with summaries of the cultural resources having national, regional or local historical significance.

3.0 Current Situation

3.1 Heritage Resource Conservation

3.1.1 The State of Commemorative Integrity

Commemorative Integrity (CI) Evaluations have been conducted to assess the condition of cultural resources, the effectiveness of communication of messages of national historic significance, and management practices at each of the national historic sites in Southwest Nova Scotia. The heritage resources of four of the sites were rated as being in ‘good’ condition, while those at Fort Anne are considered to be in ‘fair’ condition. Management regimes at all five sites are in place and effective. The communication of messages relating to national significance and management practices have been assessed as fair or good for all of the sites.

3.1.2 Issues Related to Commemorative Integrity

There are no critical issues facing any of the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia in terms of their commemorative integrity; however, some minor issues were identified which are discussed below and have been addressed in the key strategies and individual site chapters of the plan.

The Condition of Cultural Resources at Fort Anne NHS (see Fort Anne NHS Site Map, page 25):

  • The archaeological sites at Fort Anne are deemed to be in ‘fair’ condition. Although a great deal of archaeological research has been conducted, this research has yet to be compiled into a comprehensive inventory.
  • The buildings and structures associated with the reasons for designation are rated ‘fair’, the issue being bulging of the south side of the Sally Port. Although not noted in the CI Evaluation, on-going monitoring has also revealed structural deterioration in parts of the Officers’ Quarters.
  • The cemetery located in Fort Anne, which is a cultural resource directly linked to the reasons for national significance, is in’ fair’ condition and improving. However, some of the stones in the cemetery not related to the reasons for designation are in ’fair’ to ‘poor’ condition. In order to address the challenge of cemetery maintenance, the Fort Anne Garrison Graveyard Conservation Plan has been prepared and is being implemented.
  • There are substantial archaeological, curatorial, and library collections associated with Fort Anne that are stored in Parks Canada’s conservation facilities or are located on site. The CI Evaluation rated objects related to the reasons for designation as ‘fair’ overall, primarily due to challenges related to proper on-site storage. Since the CI Evaluation, a preliminary assessment of the artefacts, significant library holdings, and photographs has been conducted, resulting in recommendations for improving storage and cataloguing.
Communication of Messages at all sites:

The communication of messages at Port-Royal, Charles Fort, and Melanson Settlement were found to be good overall, with Fort Anne and Fort Edward receiving fair ratings. A few messages at Fort Edward could be conveyed more effectively while at Fort Anne, communicating the vast number of messages identified in the site’s Commemorative Integrity Statement Footnote 2 is a challenge. The CI Evaluations identified a number of other gaps and weaknesses in the commemorative integrity statements for the sites. As a result, a review of the statements for all five sites will be conducted to address these issues and will include information to better reflect other perspectives (e.g., Mi’kmaq) of the sites’ historical significance.

Incomplete Records at Fort Edward and Melanson Settlement:

The archaeological collection for Fort Edward has been inventoried and catalogued; however, a report based on that data has not been completed. For Melanson Settlement there is neither an in-depth inventory nor report of archaeological resources on site for use by site managers in decision-making.

On-going Issues of Concern Regarding Melanson Settlement:

The issue of artefact hunting at Melanson Settlement, raised in the 2004 management plan for the site, is still a concern. Concerns have also been voiced by local residents and the Queen Anne Marsh Body about the extent to which the province will ensure the longterm maintenance of the dykes in the area surrounding the site (the province only maintains dykes that support actively cultivated areas).

Ecological Resources:

The majority of the sites feature manicured grounds with the exception of Melanson Settlement, where an ecological inventory has been undertaken. Moving forward, ecological inventories will be conducted for the remaining sites to assess and inventory the sites’ ecological resources.

3.1.3 Future Direction of Heritage Resource Conservation

At these five sites, large-scale interventions are rarely necessary due to regular monitoring of resource condition and on-going maintenance. For the next ten-year cycle, Parks Canada will continue to maintain the commemorative integrity of the sites by adhering to the principles and practices of cultural resource management – with particular attention being paid to maintaining or improving the condition of the cultural resources at Fort Anne. Weaknesses in the communication of messages will be addressed 10 and inventories and records completed. The details of this work are outlined in Key Strategy 2 and in the individual site chapters.

3.2 Visitor Experience

Parks Canada seeks to facilitate opportunities for visitors to create their own experiences in ways that are personally meaningful to them and that foster a connection to the heritage place visited. “Connection to place” is a concept that expresses the emotional, intellectual, and spiritual attachment Canadians and visitors feel towards Parks Canada’s natural and cultural heritage places. For descriptions of the special characteristics that foster a connection to place at each of the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia, see Appendix C.

3.2.1 The Sites’ Audiences

A 2005 visitor survey for Fort Anne (the last one completed for this site) found 29% of visitors are American and 64% Canadian, with 20% coming from within Nova Scotia and 9% from the region (within 80 km). 2011 and 2015 visitor surveys and a 2007 Visitor Origin Monitoring Programming for Port-Royal found similar results for this site. Footnote 3 Visitors to both sites are primarily adult independent travelers, cruise and motor-coach tourists, special event groups, and local residents who use the sites for recreational purposes. Most visitors are on their first visit to the sites and spend an average of about 80 minutes at both Port-Royal and Fort Anne. Visitors are primarily motivated to come to these sites to visit with family and friends (64%), opportunities to learn (50%), high quality service (25%), participate in hands-on activities (24%), and recreational opportunities (21%).

Recent research for Fort Edward Footnote 4 reveals that 80% of visitors are Canadian and 13% American. Of the Canadian audience, 32% are from Nova Scotia (21% of respondents were on a day-trip from Halifax), 17% from Ontario, and the remainder from the rest of Canada. When asked what other locations and attractions the respondent had visited or was planning to visit that day, 37% indicated Grand-Pré NHS, and 28 % and 26% respectively indicated Port-Royal and Fort Anne. Visitors are motivated to come to the site primarily to experience a new place/local people/explore (33%), to explore family ancestry, heritage, and landmarks (30%), and to observe/learn at their own pace (20%).

Social science research indicates that visitation at the sites has declined significantly in recent years. This issue is discussed in the Key Visitor Experience Issues section found in Section 3.2.3.

3.2.2 The State of Visitor Experience

The state of visitor experience for the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia is based on visitor surveys and other social science research. Footnote 5 This research demonstrates that the vast majority of visitors to the sites are very satisfied with their visit as well as with the facilities and services offered, far exceeding all of the performance benchmarks established by Parks Canada. Visitors are also satisfied, although slightly less so, with the planning and arrival phases of their visits. Satisfaction with their visit as a learning experience is very high with slightly lower grades received for satisfaction with interpretation activities and programming. Visitors are slightly less satisfied with interpretive activities at Port-Royal than at the other sites. Many visitors to Port-Royal anticipate more activities, demonstrations, sensory and experiential opportunities. The research also found that insufficient attention has been paid to offering a menu of opportunities to visitors based on their differing motivations, needs, and preferences.

In the future, Parks Canada will assess visitor experience at these national historic sites through the use of indicators; namely, visits, enjoyment, satisfaction, learning, and meaning, as part of the Visitor Information Programme. For a more detailed summary of the state of visitor experience, see Appendix D.

3.2.3 Key Visitor Experience Issues

Declining Visitation – Shifting Tourism Trends and Need to Target New Markets

Over the last ten years, visitation at Fort Anne and Port-Royal has dropped from approximately 36,500 to 28,000 and from 37,000 to 19,000 visits per year respectively. At Fort Edward, visitation has fallen from approximately 3,000 visitors in the year 2000 to 1,100 in 2015. At Melanson Settlement, a small site and relatively new member of the Parks Canada family of national historic sites (opened in 2004), visitation has maintained itself at approximately 3,000 visits per year as measured in 2006 and 2012.

The most significant shift in visitor composition affecting heritage sites throughout Atlantic Canada is seen in the decline over the last ten years in commercial bus group tours, particularly bus groups coming from the United States. Port-Royal received 436 commercial groups in the year 2000, 198 in 2005, 107 in 2008, and 101 in 2011. Similarly, Fort Anne received 361 commercial groups in 2000, a number which has declined to 58 groups in 2011. More recently, tourism operators and travel industry experts are suggesting that this industry may recover, but with smaller groups serving niche markets. Footnote 6 The 2007 Visitor Experience Assessment (VEA) for Fort Anne and Port-Royal suggested that Parks Canada has a strong understanding of the needs and interests of existing visitor markets, but that less was known about potential markets in the face of these shifting tourism trends and there has been limited targeting of the new markets. Social science has also shown that the “capture rate” of visitors who come to the area is quite low with less than ten percent of visitors to the Annapolis Royal area visiting Fort Anne or Port-Royal.

Visitation at Port-Royal and Fort Anne increased in 2010 for the first time in many years by approximately 2.5% and 2% respectively. Research suggests that this increase is largely attributable to the wide variety of special events held during the 2010 season. A critical aspect of visitor experience in recent years, has been opportunities for visitors to participate in special events, such as Mi’kmaw days held at Port-Royal, and in 2010 Annapolis Royal 300th anniversary events at Fort Anne as examples.

Parks Canada facilitated an above-average number of special events during the 2010 season to see if special events could contribute to the following goals: achieving greater visibility for the sites; reaching out to new and local audiences, regaining some of the market share lost due to declining bus-tour numbers; and working to ensure the sites, particularly Fort Anne, are sustainable. Research analysis indicates that although most special events do not generate revenue, they have resulted in increased visitation, particularly by attracting repeat and local visitors, and they support regional tourism. Footnote 7 In future, efforts at Fort Anne and Fort Edward will focus on self-guided opportunities while special programs and events will continue to be offered at Port-Royal.

Need to Respond to the Differing Interests, Needs, and Preferences of Visitors

Parks Canada has introduced the use of the Canadian Tourism Commission’s “Explorer Quotient” (EQ) – a new way of matching visitors’ needs, interests, and expectations based on their personal values and travel motivations, with opportunities for experiences tailored to what they are seeking. Analysis of explorer types to Canada’s national historic sites has revealed that national historic sites attract a high percentage of “Authentic Experiencers” who appreciate and understand both natural and cultural environments and enjoy using all of their senses to explore and to be fully immersed in travel experiences; “Free Spirits” who are primarily seeking fun and the thrill and emotional charge of doing things; and “Cultural Explorers” who seek opportunities to immerse themselves in the entire experience of the culture, people, and settings of the places they visit. In addition, a pilot Visitor Origin Monitoring Program (VOMP) for Port-Royal (2007) provided analysis of the demographics, social values, and behavior of Port-Royal’s visitors based on 66 lifestyle types associated with Canada’s neighbourhoods. Footnote 8 The NHS will apply EQ principles to Visitor Experience Opportunities at the sites (see individual chapters).

3.2.4 Future Direction of Visitor Experience

In view of the decline of particular markets, especially the American commercial-bus tour market, other markets are being targeted by the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia including: tourists in Nova Scotia and in Annapolis Royal (i.e., increasing the “capture rate” of tourists already in the province/area); residents from the local area, Halifax Regional Municipality and New Brunswick; Acadians; the Mi’kmaq; and the regional small-cruise ship industry. Parks Canada will work in collaboration with the Nova Scotia Department of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism, the Atlantic Canada Tourism Partnership, and Parks Canada specialists to support efforts to rejuvenate the bus tour market as opportunities arise. Further social science research is required to confirm these target markets and to better understand the demographics, motivations, needs, and preferences of both current and potential visitors. This research will inform the development of visitor experience products and programs, at Fort Anne and Port-Royal. Emphasis will be on personal programs at Port-Royal, and on self-guided opportunities at Fort Anne. Social science data will also inform the promotion of these national historic sites. Parks Canada will work closely with partners in marketing and promotions to maximize the collective energies of the many agencies and organizations working to attract visitors to the Annapolis Valley.

Working with area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners, and stakeholders, Parks Canada will welcome opportunities that attract new and local audiences. Mi’kmaw interest in targeted special events at Port-Royal NHS was demonstrated by the 1,000+ attendance at the Membertou 400 celebrations in June of 2010. Special events will be planned and managed strategically with consideration given to the need to generate revenue.

3.3 Public Appreciation and Understanding

3.3.1 The State of Public Outreach and External Communications

Parks Canada facilitates opportunities for Canadians to discover and learn about the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia and develop a personal sense of connection to the sites via information provided through publications, the Parks Canada website, and other media. External communications also promotes understanding and appreciation of the national significance of the sites and the Agency’s system of heritage places.

Parks Canada seeks to engage Canadians at home, at leisure, and in their communities, particularly through the sites’ web-pages, special presentations, information bulletins, and exposure through TV, radio, and print media.

3.3.2 The State of Stakeholder, Mi’kmaq and Partner Engagement

The people of Annapolis Royal, Windsor, and the Greater Annapolis Valley have a longstanding sense of ownership of and connection to the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia. Local people were integral to the designation of Fort Anne as a national historic site in 1917. In the late 19th century, Fort Anne became a local gathering place for the people of the Annapolis Royal area where residents could attend band concerts, play cricket, or stroll the grounds. The recreational use of the site did not diminish appreciation of its historical significance. Local people, particularly the members of the Historical Association of Annapolis Royal, were also instrumental in the 1939 reconstruction of the Habitation at Port-Royal. The passion and commitment to Fort Anne and Port-Royal continues today and Fort Anne in particular continues to be a community gathering place. Many people within the community of Windsor also have a strong connection to Fort Edward and are highly engaged with Parks Canada in all areas of its management.

The Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia are a special partner with Parks Canada (see Section 1.2). Mi’kmaw heritage is significant to the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia, especially at Fort Anne and Port-Royal which were designated in part for their roles in the development of Mi’kmaw-European relationships. Parks Canada works closely with local Mi’kmaq communities, especially L’setkuk (Bear River) First Nation, in the delivery of special events related to Mi’kmaw heritage. This includes “Mi’kmaw Days” held at Port-Royal every summer at which visitors experience Mi’kmaw traditions, history, games, and lifestyles.

The national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia convey significant aspects of the history of several other cultural communities in Canada, including that of Acadians and African Nova Scotians. Parks Canada works closely with representative organizations of these groups to effectively convey this cultural heritage to Canadians at these sites.

Other important partners include tourism associations, the Historical Association of Annapolis Royal (HAAR), the West Hants Historical Society, and the Kings County Historical Society. For a full summary of partner and stakeholder engagement, see Appendix E.

3.3.3 Key Public Outreach Initiatives, External Communications, and Partner/Stakeholder Issues

Need for Clear External Relations Strategy

Although the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia are engaged in successful public outreach activities, the program will benefit from clear identification of target audiences, objectives, and priorities as outlined in the Field Unit External Relations Strategy.

Web-pages

While the web-pages for these national historic sites contain information on the sites’ history and cultural heritage, they are not very engaging or dynamic and thus do not encourage the discovery of the sites by Canadians unable to visit in person. Work to improve the web-pages is a priority.

Importance of Community Support and Engagement with the Sites

Just as area residents have been integral to the protection of these sites since before their designation, they are also important to their future. Area residents continue to act as stewards of the sites, and Parks Canada will tap into their knowledge and passion. Area residents have contributed to visitor experience opportunities and special events, especially in recent years. In the future this collaboration will be targeted to balance the capacity of the sites with the expectations of the community.

Importance of Relationship with the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia

Parks Canada is working with the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia to establish an advisory committee of Mi’kmaw representatives to provide advice and input on matters related to the national parks and national historic sites within Nova Scotia, including the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia. On-going cooperation and engagement with the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia is very important as Parks Canada seeks ways to further enhance visitor experience opportunities relating to Mi’kmaw history and heritage.

Importance of Relationships with Acadians, African Nova Scotians, and Other Cultural Communities

On-going cooperation and engagement with these cultural communities is important as Parks Canada continues to protect the sites’ cultural resources, to facilitate meaningful visitor experience opportunities and to attract new audiences.

3.3.4 Future Direction of Public Outreach, and Stakeholder, Mi’kmaw and Partner Engagement

Parks Canada has recently reasserted its commitment to external relations, which includes public outreach and stakeholder and partner engagement, and has conducted an internal reorganization to more effectively deliver on this priority. The Mainland Nova Scotia Field Unit is implementing an External Relations Strategy. This strategy establishes clear objectives and actions for strengthening relationships with communities of interest through external communications programs and products.

An important focus of external relations work for these sites will be strengthening relationships with the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia as well reaching out to area residents, other cultural communities, partners, and stakeholders to increase the relevance of the sites to these groups. Parks Canada will work with the Mi’kmaq, stakeholders and partners to implement a number of actions linked to the key strategies. In particular, Parks Canada welcomes the use of the sites as community gathering places and will work with area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners, and stakeholders to welcome events that are targeted and draw new audiences to the sites. Parks Canada will continue to strengthen relationships with local and regional media to raise the profile of the sites and will explore the use of a variety of media to reach Canadians who cannot personally visit the sites.

4.0 Vision for the National Historic Sites of Southwest Nova Scotia

It is the year 2025 and the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia – Port-Royal, Fort Anne, Charles Fort, Melanson Settlement, and Fort Edward – located in the beautiful Annapolis Valley, welcome visitors from the region, across Canada, and around the world. Enchanted by the sweeping views, the fragrant salty air, enormous tides, and the lush valley, visitors easily imagine why the region has been inhabited by the Mi’kmaq for thousands of years and why it attracted so many newcomers whose descendants continue to call this place home. This is a meeting place of cultures – where alliances were forged as Mi’kmaq, Acadians, English, and Scots, among others, strove to build and sustain communities. It has also been a place of great conflict, a focal point of the struggle for empire between France and Britain. Although scenes of dramatic events are from a seemingly distant past, modern-day visitors to the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia are able to forge personal connections to the sites through the timeless and universal stories they tell of arrival and settlement, loss and dislocation, alliance and conflict.

Varied opportunities facilitate visitors’ discovery of the sites’ history, natural beauty, and distinct sense of place Children and adults delight in using all of their senses to experience the day-to-day life of the early French explorers and of the Mi’kmaq at the Port-Royal Habitation. Fort Anne’s stories are conveyed in ways that appeal to many kinds of visitors and include self-guided tours, interactive exhibits, and an annual encampment. While walking and playing on the sites’ grounds, visitors pause to enjoy the fantastic view of the Annapolis Basin at Fort Anne and Port-Royal, and of the Avon and St. Croix Rivers at Fort Edward, where they can also touch the timbers of Canada’s oldest remaining blockhouse. Others are excited to trace Nova Scotia’s Scottish history at Charles Fort or to learn, at Melanson Settlement, how the Acadian communities adapted to and thrived in the region. Canadians unable to visit the sites in person experience them through the web, and other public outreach programming and discover how the stories of the sites illuminate some of the key developments in our nation’s history.

The invaluable cultural resources, landscapes, and viewplanes of these national historic sites are protected for Canadians of this and future generations to discover and enjoy. Just as area residents were key catalysts for the protection of Port-Royal and Fort Anne, area residents, the Mi’kmaq, Acadians, and other partners, stakeholders, and cultural communities are essential to the future of these sites. Through outreach efforts, area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners, and stakeholders, feel a strong connection to the sites, contribute to stewardship and visitor experience opportunities and utilize the sites as gathering places. Strengthened cooperative efforts increasingly integrate the sites into a regional tourism network ensuring they are destinations for visitors to Southwest Nova 18 Scotia and that they continue to play an important role in the economic development and heritage of the Annapolis Valley.

5.0 Key Strategies for the National Historic Sites of Southwest Nova Scotia

Key strategies provide concrete direction for addressing the major issues facing the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia and focus efforts and resources towards achieving the vision. The key strategies also address how the various elements of Parks Canada’s mandate – resource protection, visitor experience, and public appreciation and understanding – will be achieved in a mutually supportive manner. There are two overarching key strategies that apply to all five of the national historic sites addressed in this plan. Under each is a clear set of objectives aimed at achieving the strategy.

Although the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia are interrelated by events and geography and share many of the same opportunities and challenges, they are also unique and require individual management attention. Thus, individual chapters have been developed which detail the site-specific objectives and actions that will be implemented to achieve the overarching key strategies (Sections 5.3 to 5.7).

Management Guidelines

Management guidelines are included here to outline on-going policies and commitments that Parks Canada will continue to respect and follow at all of the national historic sites addressed in this plan.

These are:

  • The Parks Canada Agency Act states that it is in the national interest to “ensure the commemorative integrity of national historic sites” (Parks Canada Agency Act, 1998: Preamble). When considering cultural resource management, Parks Canada adheres to the principles in the Parks Canada Cultural Resource Management Policy.
  • The grounds of the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia will be managed to promote the sites’ cultural landscapes, protect ecological values, preserve viewplanes, and preserve open space for public use.
  • Historical and archaeological information, as well as the archaeological and curatorial collections associated with these sites, will be available for research to the public and stakeholders.

5.1 Key Strategy 1 - Inspiring the Discovery of the National Historic Sites of Southwest Nova Scotia

This key strategy focuses on improving and diversifying the visitor experience offer and strengthening promotional opportunities that will help inspire increased numbers of people to enjoy and discover this outstanding network of national historic sites. This strategy also seeks to inspire the discovery of the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia amongst Canadians unable to visit the sites in person. 20

Through research and analysis, Parks Canada will better understand visitors’ travel motivations, needs, and preferences. Based on this analysis, Parks Canada will confirm target visitor markets, which are currently identified as tourists visiting Nova Scotia, tourists travelling to Annapolis Royal, the residents of the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM), Acadians, the Mi’kmaq, cruise visitors travelling to regional small ports, and specific markets in New Brunswick. In addition, Parks Canada will work with partners to support efforts to rejuvenate the motorcoach market as opportunities arise. Parks Canada will strive to facilitate visitor experience opportunities designed to attract and meet the needs, expectations, and interests of visitors from these target markets.

Effort will be placed on promoting the sites as a network linked by history, culture, and geography. Parks Canada will work collaboratively with the tourism industry and regional tourism partners to achieve mutually beneficial positioning and promotional goals. This will include conveying the message that the sites are an interrelated group of “must see” destinations within the beautiful and historic Annapolis Valley and the greater region of Southwest Nova Scotia – ideal both for visitors vacationing in Nova Scotia and as a weekend getaway for markets within the Maritimes. Footnote 9 Finally, Parks Canada’s efforts to inspire discovery of the sites for Canadians at home and at leisure will include improving the web-pages for the sites.

Objectives to Achieve Key Strategy 1

Objective 1.1 The motivations, preferences, needs, and expectations of current and potential visitors are understood and the extent to which the current visitor offers meet those needs is assessed.

Objective 1.2 Current and potential visitors have access to inspiring and informative pre-trip information and the arrival stage of the trip planning (visitor experience) cycle is improved.

Objective 1.3 Opportunities for visitors to discover, enjoy, and connect with the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia are improved.

Objective 1.4 Working with others, the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia are promoted both individually and as a network of sites within the region.

Objective 1.5 Canadians unable to visit the sites in person are inspired to discover the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia.

5.2 Key Strategy 2 - Shared Stewardship and Community Gathering Places

For well over a century, the people of Southwest Nova Scotia have been essential to the stewardship and protection of the national historic sites in their region and have enjoyed the sites as community gathering places. These national historic sites also hold special significance for the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia as well as for Acadians, African Nova Scotians, Scottish, Planter and Loyalist descendants who have contributed to their protection. This strategy underscores Parks Canada’s on-going responsibility to ensure the commemorative integrity of the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia while seeking to build on this culture of shared stewardship by working together to ensure the sites remain relevant to local and regional audiences. By tapping into the knowledge and passion of the Mi’kmaq, partners, stakeholders, and area residents, protection of the sites and visitor experience opportunities will be enhanced. Parks Canada will work to increase awareness of and strengthen support for the sites through public outreach ` aimed at local and regional audiences. In particular, Parks Canada will work with the Mi’kmaq, partners, stakeholders, and area residents and organizations interested in using the sites as community gathering places and to welcome unique opportunities, including special events that engage local people and attract new audiences.

Objectives to Achieve Key Strategy 2

Objective 2.1 Relationships with area residents are strengthened and their sense of connection to the sites is increased.

Objective 2.2 The Mi’kmaq use and engage with the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia according to their needs and interests.

Objective 2.3 Parks Canada welcomes Acadian, African Nova Scotian, and other cultural communities’ involvement with and connection to the sites.

Objective 2.4 Public outreach opportunities for local and regional audiences increases awareness of and strengthens support for the sites.

Objective 2.5 The cultural resources and the heritage values of the sites are protected with the involvement of area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners, and stakeholders.

Objective 2.6 Collaborative events and opportunities with area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners and stakeholders encourage use of the sites while supporting revenue generation objectives.

Site Specific Chapters

In addition to the objectives outlined above, site-specific objectives have been identified to achieve the overarching key strategies at each of the sites. These are presented in the individual site chapters which follow.

5.3 Managing Fort Anne National Historic Site

Applying Key Strategy 1 - Inspiring the Discovery of Fort Anne NHS

At Fort Anne emphasis will be placed on the development of self-guided visitor experience opportunities. This offer will take into account the motivations, needs, and preferences of visitors. Objective 1 Self-guided visitor experience opportunities at Fort Anne meet the needs, interests, and motivations of target markets.

Applying Key Strategy 2 - Shared Stewardship and Community Gathering Place at Fort Anne NHS

Of importance for Fort Anne is addressing minor impairments to commemorative integrity, and doing so, to the extent possible, in collaboration with area residents, the Mi’kmaq, Acadians, and other partners and stakeholders. Collaboration will be important relative to the management of the curatorial and archival collection housed in the Officers’ Quarters such that the collections are accessible to the public and stakeholders to the extent possible. The on-going protection of the site’s cultural landscape and extraordinary view-planes is also a priority – integral not only to the commemorative integrity of the site, but to visitor use and enjoyment.

Parks Canada will work with area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners, and stakeholders to ensure the relevance of this site to the people of Annapolis Royal and the greater region of Southwest Nova Scotia.

Objective 1 Minor impairments to the commemorative integrity at Fort Anne are addressed and the site’s cultural resources and heritage values are protected with the involvement of area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners, and stakeholders.

Objective 2 By working with area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners, and stakeholders, the management of Fort Anne’s curatorial, archival, and library collections is improved and accessibility of these resources to researchers and the community is made possible. 23

Objective 3 Collaborative events and opportunities with area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners and stakeholders encourage use of the sites while supporting revenue generation objectives.

Map 3: Fort Anne and Charles Fort NHSs – Site Map

Fort Anne and Charles Fort National Historic Sites

Site Map

Level I Cultural Resources

  • Officers’ Quarters
  • Powder Magazine
  • Underground Powder Magazine
  • Parade Square Well
  • Covert Way Well
  • Earthworks and Fortifications
  • Dry-stone Retaining Wall
  • Sally Port
  • Shoreline Cribwork
  • Queen’s Wharf Ruins
  • Cemeteries
    1. Acadian Cemetery
    2. Part of Garrison Cemetery
    3. Gravestones (6%)
  • Below-ground Resources
  • Library Collection (Officers’ Quarters, 15%)
  • Portion of Curatorial Collections (Officers’ Quarters)
  • Archaeological Collection (Officers’ Quarters, 66%)
  • Some Exhibits (Officers’ Quarters)

Level II Cultural Resources

  • Below-ground Resources
  • Garrison Cemeteries
    1. Gravestones (59%)
    2. Cast-Iron Fence
  • Library Collection (Officers’ Quarters 85%)
  • Curatorail Collection (Officers’ Quarters)
  • Archaeological Collection (Offciers’ Quarters 33%)
  • Some Exhibits- in Officers’ Quarters
  • Plaques and Monuments

Map 4: Fort Anne NHS – Viewplane

For Anne National Historic Site - Viewplane

5.4 Managing Charles Fort National Historic Site

Applying Key Strategy 1 - Inspiring the Discovery of Charles Fort NHS

Given the location of Charles Fort is within the boundaries of Fort Anne, inspiring its discovery hinges on the success of inspiring the discovery of Fort Anne (as outlined in the management chapter for Fort Anne). However, Charles Fort is also a distinct national historic site unto itself and further work is required to increase awareness of the site amongst Canadians and to enhance opportunities for visitors to discover the site once they are on the Fort Anne grounds.

Objective 1 Opportunities for visitors to Fort Anne to discover Charles Fort are enhanced.

Applying Key Strategy 2 - Shared Stewardship and Community Gathering Place at Charles Fort NHS

Charles Fort holds special significance for many people of Scottish heritage and those with an interest in the Scottish history of Canada and Nova Scotia. In the fall of 2010, Parks Canada hosted a special event in partnership with the Annapolis Royal 300th team and the Annapolis Heritage Society to celebrate Charles Fort as the birthplace of Nova Scotia, or “New Scotland.” And in June of 2011, the opening event of the International Gathering of the Clans in Nova Scotia was held at Fort Anne. Parks Canada will build on these recent experiences to strengthen the connection between the Scottish heritage community and Charles Fort.

Objective 1 Building on experience gained from special events in 2010 and 2011, opportunities to feature the unique heritage of Charles Fort are encouraged and the connection between the Scottish heritage community and the historic site is strengthened.

5.5 Managing Port-Royal National Historic Site

Applying Key Strategy 1 - Inspiring the Discovery of Port-Royal NHS

To inspire the discovery of Port-Royal NHS, special attention to the enhancement of visitor experience opportunities is required. The 2006 and 2011 VIPs for Port-Royal suggest that many visitors to the site enjoy what they experience but that many are seeking more activities, demonstrations, and sensory and experiential opportunities. In response to these findings, a Wigwam has been built outside the Habitation to enhance the interpretation of the site’s historical significance to the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia through participatory programming. In addition, special events that feature Mi’kmaw heritage through demonstrations and hands-on activities are hosted at Port-Royal three times a season. Parks Canada will continue to learn from and build on these experiences and will work towards offering a menu of opportunities for visitors based on their motivations, needs, and preferences.

Although the concerns about the planning and arrival phase of the visitor experience cycle at Port-Royal have largely been addressed, implementation of this strategy will further these efforts through improvements to the interpretation of the story of the Habitation as a reconstruction.

Objective 1 A menu of experiential and sensory visitor experience opportunities meets the needs, expectations, and interests of target markets.

Applying Key Strategy 2 - Shared Stewardship and Community Gathering Place at Port-Royal NHS

Parks Canada will work to foster a strengthened spirit of shared stewardship of Port- Royal, and encourage the involvement of area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners, and stakeholders in the enhancement of visitor experience opportunities. Port-Royal has a long history with many historic milestones; many of which hold special meaning for the Mi’kmaq. A particularly important milestone was the 400th anniversary of the baptism of Grand Chief Membertou, commemorated in 2010 in partnership with the Mi’kmaq Association for Cultural Studies. This event brought over 1,000 visitors to Port-Royal NHS to experience a re-enactment of the baptism and to celebrate Mi’kmaw traditions, culture, and heritage. Other milestones, such as the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the Jesuits to Canada in 2011, provided additional opportunities to work with partners to offer unique events and to facilitate fresh and innovative visitor experiences that will attract area residents and new or niche audiences. While there are few specific actions required to improve the state of cultural resource management at Port-Royal NHS at this time, Parks Canada will continue to ensure the 28 commemorative integrity of the site with the involvement of the Mi’kmaq, area residents, partners, and stakeholders as appropriate.

Objective 1 By working with the Mi’kmaq, partners, stakeholders, and area residents, quality special events and opportunities based on the unique heritage of Port-Royal attract local and new audiences while supporting revenue generation objectives.

Objective 2 The cultural resources and the heritage values of Port-Royal are protected and presented with the involvement of the Mi’kmaq, local people, partners, and stakeholders as appropriate.

Map 5: Port-Royal NHS – Site Map

Port-Royal NHSSite Map

Level I Cultural Resources

  1. The Habitation
  2. Archaeological Collection (80%)

Level II Cultural Resources

  • Curatorial Collection
  • Archaeological Collection (20%)
  • Historic Objects
    • Reproduction Furnishings
    • C.Q. Jeffreys’ Paintings

Map 6: Port-Royal NHS – Viewplane

Port Royal National Historic Site - Viewplane

5.6 Managing Melanson Settlement National Historic Site

Applying Key Strategy 1 - Inspiring the Discovery of Melanson Settlement NHS

Melanson Settlement is a small national historic site with a newly developed and wellreceived visitor experience offer, currently attracting approximately 3,000 visitors annually. Although unstaffed, Melanson Settlement facilitates opportunities for selfguided exploration of the site. An interpretive node includes a short looped trail that leads from the parking lot to a lookout with a striking view of the uplands, marsh and river. Visitors may also explore the untended lower fields on foot, knowing the ground on which they walk contains remnants of the lives of the Acadians who once settled here.

At Melanson Settlement, Parks Canada will promote the site in partnership with others as part of a network of sites in the region. Self-guided visitor experience opportunities at Melanson Settlement will be offered at a scale appropriate for this small site, focusing on opportunities related to the site’s rich archaeological resources and its Acadian heritage.

Objective 1 Self-guided visitor experience opportunities at Melanson Settlement relative to the site’s archaeological resources and Acadian heritage are available.

Applying Key Strategy 2 - Shared Stewardship and Community Gathering Place at Melanson Settlement NHS

This key strategy is particularly relevant to Melanson Settlement NHS for several reasons. First, the designated place of Melanson Settlement is valued not only for its in situ cultural resources, but its proximity to and location within a broader landscape. Working with others is thus essential to the protection of the site as well as the management of the broader historic-geographic context, including the surrounding dyked and cultivated salt marshes and views of the Annapolis River. Reaching out to the community and fostering a shared sense of stewardship is also important as Melanson Settlement is unstaffed and more vulnerable than the other sites to disturbance and cultural vandalism.

In addition, Melanson Settlement is highly valued by specific audiences, particularly people of Acadian descent who have been engaged with the protection and presentation of this site since its inception. An important opportunity for this site moving forward is to work to strengthen the relationship with the Acadian community and to increase awareness of the site with support and engagement from area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners, and stakeholders.

Objective 1 The cultural resources and historic values of Melanson Settlement are protected with the involvement of area residents, the Mi’kmaq, the Acadian community, and other partners and stakeholders as appropriate.

Objective 2 Awareness of and support for the site, particularly among the Acadian community, is strengthened.

Map 7: Melanson Settlement NHS – Site Map

Melanson Settlement National Historic Site - Site map

Map 8: Melanson Settlement NHS – Site Setting

Melanson Settlement National Historic Site - Site setting

5.7 Managing Fort Edward National Historic Site

Applying Key Strategy 1 - Inspiring the Discovery of Fort Edward NHS

Given that Fort Edward NHS is geographically removed from the other national historic sites in Southwest Nova Scotia and has faced challenges associated with way-finding to the site, the emphasis for this key strategy will be on enhancing pre-trip planning information and the arrival stage of the visitor experience cycle. Attention will be paid to the fact that many visitors to Fort Edward are on a day-trip from Halifax (currently 21%) and that the majority will visit Fort Edward en route to other sites. Parks Canada will therefore work with others to promote the site, both as part of the network of Southwest Nova Scotia national historic sites and in relation to Grand-Pré NHS. Footnote 10

Parks Canada will provide opportunities for visitors to experience the site and will encourage the involvement of the Mi’kmaq, partners and stakeholders in the delivery of the visitor offer.

Objective 1 Current and potential visitors have access to inspiring and informative pre-trip information, and the arrival stage of the trip planning (visitor experience) cycle is improved.

Objective 2 Working with others, Fort Edward is promoted both individually and as part of a network of national historic sites within the region.

Objective 3 Visitor opportunities to experience the Fort Edward view-plane and grounds are offered.

Applying Key Strategy 2 - Shared Stewardship and Community Gathering Place at Fort Edward NHS

Many people within the community of Windsor – area residents, members of the West Hants Historical Society, town councilors, and staff, among others – have a strong interest in the future of Fort Edward National Historic Site as evidenced by a strong sense of pride and of ownership. They see Fort Edward as a valuable community asset. Parks Canada will work with the community and welcome their use of and engagement with the site as a cherished community gathering place.

Objective 1 The cultural resources and heritage values of Fort Edward are protected with the involvement of area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners, and stakeholders.

Objective 2 Area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners, and stakeholders are encouraged to use the site as a community gathering place.

Map 9: Fort Edward NHS – Site Map

Fort Edward National Historic Site - Site Map

Level I Cultural Resources

  • The Blockhouse
  • The Trace, Glacis and Ditch
  • Archaeological Collection (about 90% of the collection offsite)

Level II Cultural Resources

  • Remnants of Earth Walls
  • Curatorial Collection
  • Archaeological Collection (about 10% of the collection offsite)
  • Plaques and Monuments

Map 10: Fort Edward NHS – Viewplane

Fort Edward National Historic Site - Viewplane

6.0 Administration and Operations

At the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia, Parks Canada strives to deliver its mandate of resource protection, visitor experience, and public outreach while demonstrating effective and cost-efficient management of human and financial resources and sound environmental stewardship.

There are no major changes planned for the administration and operation of facilities during the ten-year cycle of this management plan. Existing assets (including buildings and other infrastructure) are adequate and meet health and safety requirements. However, most assets are aging, requiring higher levels of maintenance, and eventually they will require upgrades or replacement. Health and safety requirements will continue to be satisfied and facilities maintained through regular maintenance programs.

Parks Canada is committed to minimizing the aspects of its assets and operations that have an actual or potential impact on the environment and is working with the Environmental Management Coordinator (EC) to implement initiatives in accordance with the Parks Canada Environmental Management Directive (Parks Canada 2009). Recent improvements at the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia include bringing petroleum storage tanks up to current code, completing updated Environmental Emergency Response Plans for the sites, and installing a fire suppression system at Port- Royal NHS.

7.0 Monitoring and Reporting

Parks Canada uses a variety of tools to monitor and report on the state of the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia. Cultural resources are monitored through a cyclical maintenance program. Asset management and cultural resource management staff from the Mainland Nova Scotia Field Unit conduct regular assessments of the sites’ cultural resources. The condition of cultural resources is also assessed and reported upon through Commemorative Integrity Evaluations.

Visitor experience is monitored through visitor surveys and other social science studies, including Visitor Information Programs (VIP) and Visitor Experience Assessments (VEA). Aspects of visitor experience are also assessed and reported on through the Commemorative Integrity (CI) Evaluations. In addition, Parks Canada is in the process of implementing a structured monitoring program to ensure that Parks Canada is successfully facilitating opportunities for visitors to establish a strong sense of connection to the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia.

The Parks Canada Agency is also developing a national program that will measure Canadians' level of awareness and understanding of Parks Canada’s administered places, and the level of stakeholder and partner engagement in their protection and presentation. The national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia are working to contribute to this national initiative.

Monitoring and reporting is also essential to the management planning cycle. Annual implementation reports record performance in putting the management plan into action. As of 2008, a “State of the Site” assessment is required for heritage places administered by Parks Canada. This assessment provides an overview of the sites’ condition and trends relative to commemorative integrity, public outreach, and visitor experience, as well as the state of the sites’ Aboriginal advisory relationships. As well, it forms the basis for the next ten-year management plan review, and will determine major issues and challenges to be addressed in the next management planning cycle.

8.0 Summary of Strategic Environmental Assessment

Parks Canada is responsible for assessing and mitigating the impact of its actions on natural ecosystems and cultural resources. The "Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals," requires a strategic environmental assessment of all plans, programs, and policies submitted to the federal Cabinet or to a Minister for approval, including management plans for national historic sites.

Accordingly, a strategic environmental assessment (SEA) of the objectives, programs, and management actions outlined in the management plan was carried out.

The objectives of the SEA were:

  • to ensure that the strategic directions, objectives, and specific actions contained within the plan respect and support the commemorative integrity goals and objectives for Port-Royal, Fort Anne, Charles Fort, Fort Edward, and Melanson Settlement National Historic Sites of Canada (collectively known as the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia);
  • to assess the implications of various alternatives considered in the plan, to enhance positive effects and avoid or mitigate negative effects;
  • to ensure that the plan adequately addresses the multiple stressors and concerns relating to the residual and cumulative effects; and
  • to document the potential trade-offs and implications, including both positive and adverse residual impacts of the overall plan.

Relevant federal environmental policies, including those of Parks Canada, were considered in the policy review. The proposed strategic directions outlined in the management plan are consistent with these policies. Implementation of the management direction and the specific actions that are proposed are expected to result in progress towards greater commemorative integrity for the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia.

The SEA included evaluation of cumulative environmental effects from all proposed actions. It also considered the full range of potential impacts on the natural and cultural values of the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia, both from ongoing operations and from proposed actions.

The management plan proposes a few management actions that could potentially result in some adverse environmental impact. However, it is expected that these impacts can be mitigated once they are examined more closely during project-specific environmental impact analysis pursuant to the Parks Canada Interim Management Directive on Implementation of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act 2012.

The following initiatives may be subject to project-specific environmental impact analysis:
  • special events taking place at the national historic sites;
  • new visitor experience opportunities;
  • masonry stabilisation of Sally Port and wall structure stabilisation of the Officers’ Quarters at Fort Anne National Historic Site;
  • maintenance of the historic view-plane at Fort Edward; and
  • improved trail maintenance at Fort Edward National Historic Site.

Collectively, the strategic direction and management actions outlined in this management plan are in line with the integrated mandate of Parks Canada and will contribute to overall protection and improvement of the commemorative integrity of the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia.

Appendix A - Implementation Strategy with Targets and Actions

Implementation of this management plan is the responsibility of the Mainland Nova Scotia Field Unit Superintendent. The management actions proposed in this management plan will be implemented through the Field Unit’s annual Sustainable Business Plan, which identifies the management plan actions that will be implemented annually, along with the costs and specific timing. A summary of the priority planned actions is presented in the table below.

The Implementation Strategy is divided into two main sections:

  • Overarching Key Strategy 1 and Key Strategy 2 which includes objectives, targets and actions that apply to all five national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia.
  • Chapters for each national historic site which includes site-specific objectives, targets and actions.

To understand the commitments being made at each site, it is important to review the overarching key strategy section and site-specific chapter for each national historic site.

Key Strategy1: Inspiring the Discovery of the National Historic Sites of Southwest Nova Scotia

Objective 1.1 The motivations, preferences, needs, and expectations of current and potential visitors are understood and the extent to which the current visitor offers meet those needs is assessed.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Based upon social science and the market research and tourism expertise of key regional tourism associations, confirm current and potential target markets. AvailableX -
Conduct VIP research to evaluate the state of visitor experience and management effectiveness in facilitating visitor experience based on the motivations, preferences, needs and expectations of markets. AvailableX -

Objective 1.2 Current and potential visitors have access to inspiring and informative pre-trip information and the arrival stage of the trip planning (visitor experience) cycle is improved.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Improve the quality and user-friendliness of pre-trip, and special activities information on the sites’ web-pages. AvailableX AvailableX
Ensure that the menu of visitor experience opportunities is available to all potential visitors in appropriate media. AvailableX AvailableX
Work to increase visibility on destination marketing websites, such as NovaScotia.com. AvailableX -

Objective 1.3 Opportunities for visitors to discover, enjoy, and connect with the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia are improved.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Apply findings from social science and market research Footnote 11 to all visitor experience planning. AvailableX AvailableX
Develop visitor experiences for the five sites that are based upon and linked to the concepts and objectives outlined in this plan. AvailableX -
Incorporate analysis of social science research and results of an EQ-matching workshop into visitor experience programming. AvailableX AvailableX
Conduct a review of the Commemorative Integrity Statements for all five sites with a view to address weaknesses identified in the CI Evaluations and to include information which reflects other perspectives (e.g. Aboriginal) regarding the sites’ historical significance. AvailableX AvailableX
Work with the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia to enhance Mi’kmaw themes and opportunities for visitors to connect with the Mi’kmaw heritage of the sites and region. AvailableX AvailableX
Work with the Mi’kmaq, partners, cultural communities, and stakeholders to enhance visitor experience opportunities as appropriate. AvailableX AvailableX

Objective 1.4 Working with others, the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia are promoted both individually and as a network of sites within the region.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Continue to collaborate with tourism groups such as Destination Southwest Nova to effectively promote the sites to target markets. AvailableX AvailableX
Develop the concept of a “network” of national historic sites within Southwest Nova Scotia and develop promotion and positioning tools to implement the concept, ensuring crossmessaging and cross-promotion at the sites. AvailableX AvailableX
Encourage greater cross-promotion between Grand-Pré National Historic Site and the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia, so as to benefit from the regional impact of a successful World Heritage inscription. AvailableX AvailableX
Increase promotions in the Halifax Regional Municipality, particularly through partnership with local attractions and Destination Southwest Nova Association. AvailableX AvailableX
Work with Acadian tourism organizations and attractions in the region to enhance awareness and ensure cross-promotion of opportunities. AvailableX AvailableX
Develop and implement strategies to promote the sites within New Brunswick, such as cross-promoting with Parks Canada’s national historic sites in New Brunswick, building connections with other New Brunswick heritage attractions, and attending consumer shows. AvailableX AvailableX
Develop and implement a strategy to better promote the sites within Annapolis Royal and the area, targeting people visiting the town. AvailableX AvailableX

Objective 1.5 Canadians unable to visit the sites in person are inspired to discover the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Contribute to the implementation of the Field Unit External Relations strategy at these sites. This will include audience segmentation and determining appropriate media for specific audiences. AvailableX -
Review and continuously update the sites’ web-pages on the Parks Canada website with new information and opportunities that facilitate inspired discovery of the sites. AvailableX AvailableX
Explore opportunities to use digital technology, such as digitized maps of archaeological resources, to better facilitate interactive learning opportunities. - AvailableX
Strategy Targets
  • Fort Anne Visitation : 36,352Footnote *
  • Port-Royal Visitation: 30,353Footnote *
  • Fort Edward Visitation: 1,227Footnote *
  • The “capture rate” of visitors already within Annapolis Royal increases. (Baseline 2006: 5% of visitors to Annapolis Royal visited Fort Anne and 2% visited Port- Royal in 2011.)
  • Satisfaction with pre-trip information increases for Port-Royal and Fort Anne. (Baseline: 82% and 80% respectively.)
  • 90% of visitors at surveyed sites enjoy their visit.
  • 85% of visitors at surveyed sites consider the site visited as meaningful to them.

Key Strategy 2: Shared Stewardship and Community Gathering Places

Objective 2.1 Relationships with area residents are strengthened and their sense of connection to the sites is increased.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Communicate with area residents to determine their interest for involvement with the sites, such as exploring possibilities for establishing a permanent mechanism for increased and ongoing engagement. AvailableX AvailableX
Ensure Parks Canada’s presence at strategic and relevant community events, activities, and meetings. AvailableX AvailableX

Objective 2.2 The Mi’kmaq use and engage with the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia according to their needs and interests.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
In cooperation with the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia, participate in the creation of an Aboriginal Advisory Committee for Nova Scotia that will serve as a forum for addressing issues pertaining to the Southwest Nova Scotia sites. AvailableX AvailableX
Work with the Mi’kmaq to enhance visitor experience and public outreach relative to Mi’kmaw heritage. - AvailableX
Work with the Mi’kmaq to identify and carry out research regarding these sites as considered mutually appropriate. - AvailableX
Facilitate the use of the sites by the Mi’kmaq according to their needs and interests, such as for increased special events and gatherings. AvailableX AvailableX
Work with the Mi’kmaq to ensure effective communication and promotion of events, activities, and opportunities relevant to Mi’kmaw communities (e.g. the Mi’kmaq Maliseet Nations News). AvailableX AvailableX
Work with the Mi’kmaq and area residents to encourage greater involvement of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal youth in many aspects of site operations and activities via the Parks Canada volunteer program. AvailableX AvailableX

Objective 2.3 Parks Canada welcomes Acadian, African Nova Scotian, and other cultural communities’ involvement with and connection to the sites.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Continue to work with the Acadian Consultative Committee to encourage their on-going input into the telling of the sites’ stories through visitor experience and public outreach opportunities. AvailableX AvailableX
Work with Acadian partner organizations to seek opportunities for Acadian activities and events at the sites. AvailableX AvailableX
Increase visibility and profile within Acadian communities, particularly by communicating through French language media in the Maritimes, including CIFA (radio) and Le Courier (print), and by continuing to participate in festivals on the Acadian shore. AvailableX AvailableX
Encourage greater involvement of the African Nova Scotian community in the telling of the stories at these sites as they relate to African Nova Scotian heritage. AvailableX -
Work with the Valley African Nova Scotian Development Association to identify and address areas of mutual interest and/or concern. - AvailableX

Objective 2.4 Public outreach opportunities for local and regional audiences increases awareness of and strengthens support for the sites.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Work with the Mi’kmaq, partners (such as universities, local historical societies, elder hostels, etc.), and communities to respond to requests that relates to the sites’ history and archaeology. - AvailableX

Objective 2.5 The cultural resources and the heritage values of the sites are protected with the involvement of area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners, and stakeholders.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Tap into the knowledge and interest of the Mi’kmaq and community members to support volunteer projects that will foster a greater sense of connection and provide direct value to the sites. For example, Parks Canada will explore opportunities for a volunteer to oversee the archival collection at Fort Anne while researchers are present. - AvailableX

Objective 2.6 Collaborative events and opportunities with area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners and stakeholders encourage use of the sites while supporting revenue generation objectives.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Based on the results of the 2010 Special Events Survey and as part of the External Relations Strategy for the Field Unit, the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia will
  • Work in collaboration with local and regional organizations and municipal governments who wish to use the sites for special events. (e.g. concerts, reunions and other public gatherings).
  • Develop a strategy to address recent increased interest in weddings and other private functions being held at Fort Anne and Port-Royal.
AvailableX -
Strategy Targets
  • The condition of the cultural resources at all of the sites is maintained or improved.
  • Factoring in changes in seasonality, visitation by area residents increases at Fort Anne, Port-Royal, and Fort Edward (see targets within individual site chapters).
  • Special events attendance increases from the 2010 baseline.
  • The percentage of media bulletins picked up by the local and regional media increases.

Site Specific Chapter – Fort Anne NHS

Applying Key Strategy 1: Inspiring the Discovery of Fort Anne NHS

Objective 1 Self-guided visitor experience opportunities at Fort Anne meet the needs, interests, and motivations of target markets.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Conduct social science research to better understand the motivations, needs, and preferences of current and potential visitors. AvailableX -
Refresh the exhibits in the Officers’ Quarters by 2012. AvailableX -
Install rotating exhibits to be updated regularly to make the site more relevant to new audiences, to attract media coverage, and help support repeat visitation. - AvailableX
Utilize the opportunity of the 100th anniversary of Fort Anne in 2017 to raise the profile of this site and to develop relevant programming and events. AvailableX -
Develop interactive visitor opportunities such as geo-tours, apps and the use of hand-held GIS devices, or other new technologies to enable personal exploration of Fort Anne. - AvailableX
Implement a 2 – 3 year transition plan for Fort Anne as a selfguided National Historic Site, including a media / interpretation plan. AvailableX -
Strategy Targets
  • Develop a baseline of visitor satisfaction for self-guided activities (availability and quality).
  • Fort Anne Visitation: 36,352Footnote *
  • 90% of visitors to Fort Anne enjoy their visit.
  • 85% of visitors to Fort Anne consider the site meaningful to them.
  • 85% of visitors to Fort Anne consider they learned about the cultural heritage of the place.

Applying Key Strategy 2: Shared Stewardship and Community Gathering Place at Fort Anne NHS

Objective 1 Minor impairments to the commemorative integrity at Fort Anne are addressed and the site’s cultural resources and heritage values are protected with the involvement of area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners, and stakeholders.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Work with communities of interest to enhance knowledge of the Fort Anne cemetery and invite their involvement in future planning for its conservation and protection. - AvailableX
Continue to implement the conservation and maintenance plan for the cemetery. AvailableX AvailableX
Structurally stabilize the walls of the Officers’ Quarters and carry out masonry stabilisation of the Sally Port by December 2016. AvailableX -
Complete the compilation of the archaeological records for the site. - AvailableX
Create a digitized map of Fort Anne’s archaeological resources thereby supporting the management of the site and the development of enhanced and experiential visitor experience opportunities. - AvailableX
Conduct an ecological inventory at Fort Anne and combine results with cultural resource information to inform the management approach to grounds maintenance and landscaping. - AvailableX
Improve the communication of messages of significance, as per findings in the CI Evaluation. AvailableX -

Objective 2 By working with area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners, and stakeholders, the management of Fort Anne’s curatorial, archival, and library collections is improved and accessibility of these resources to researchers and the community is made possible.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Implement the recommendations from an assessment of Fort Anne’s artefacts, library holdings, and photographs by 2019. AvailableX AvailableX
Tap into the knowledge and interest of community members to enrich our understanding of the curatorial collection. - AvailableX
Encourage interested individuals to conduct research on items in the curatorial collection and share their findings with others, such as through newspaper articles, local heritage society newsletters, etc. - AvailableX

Objective 3 Collaborative events and opportunities with area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners and stakeholders encourage use of the sites while supporting revenue generation objectives.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Work in collaboration with the Historical Association of Annapolis Royal, the Town of Annapolis Royal, area residents, the Mi’kmaq, and other partners and stakeholders on projects of mutual interest and value. AvailableX -
Develop a new partnering agreement with the Historical Association of Annapolis Royal (updating the 2001 agreement). AvailableX -
Strategy Targets
  • The condition of cultural resources at Fort Anne is maintained or improved by 2017.
  • The management of Fort Anne’s curatorial, library, and archival collections is improved by 2019.
  • Visitation by area residents increases. (Baseline: paid visitation – 9% from within 80 km in 2005.)

Site Specific Chapter - Charles Fort NHS

Applying Key Strategy 1: Inspiring the Discovery of Charles Fort NHS

Objective 1 Opportunities for visitors to Fort Anne to discover Charles Fort are enhanced.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
In response to social science research, further incorporate messages relating to Charles Fort into Fort Anne’s self-guided visitor experience programming as opportunities arise. AvailableX -
In parallel with efforts for Fort Anne, incorporate the Explorer Quotient concept into self-guided programming to provide visitor experiences that meet the needs and interests of visitors interested in Charles Fort. AvailableX AvailableX
Strategy Targets
  • Awareness of Charles Fort amongst visitors to Fort Anne increases. (Baseline: knowledge question from Fort Anne 2005 VIP.)

Applying Key Strategy 2: Shared Stewardship and Community Gathering Place at Charles Fort NHS

Objective 1 Building on experience gained from special events in 2010 and 2011, opportunities to feature the unique heritage of Charles Fort are encouraged and the connection between the Scottish heritage community and the historic site is strengthened.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Welcome the use of Fort Anne/Charles Fort as a community gathering place for people of Scottish heritage. AvailableX AvailableX
Research and integrate the story of Mi’kmaw and Scottish relations into programming at Charles Fort. - AvailableX
Continue to find ways to celebrate the Nova Scotia Charter. AvailableX AvailableX
Strategy Targets
  • A stakeholder relationship is developed with the Scottish heritage community.
  • Opportunities that celebrate Charles Fort are well received.

Site Specific Chapter - Port-Royal NHS

Applying Key Strategy 1: Inspiring the Discovery of Port-Royal NHS

Objective 1 A menu of experiential and sensory visitor experience opportunities meets the needs, expectations, and interests of target markets.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Analyse social science research (2011 VIP) to better understand the motivations, needs, and preferences of current and potential visitors. AvailableX -
Incorporate the Explorer Quotient concept into programming to create a menu of experience opportunities by enhancing/modifying existing programmes and developing new visitor experience products. AvailableX AvailableX
Assess and build on experience gained through the Wigwam programming to increase interactive, sensory, and experiential visitor experience opportunities. - AvailableX
Refurbish the Boulay Room to facilitate visitor opportunities to discover the story of the reconstruction of the Habitation, which is a message of national historic significance. AvailableX -
Re-establish connections with La Féderation acadienne de la Nouvelle-Écosse (FANE) to explore the possibility of collaborating on new interactive programming around the Order of Good Cheer. AvailableX -
In collaboration with the Mi’kmaq, build on past experiences to further enhance Mi’kmaw programming on site. AvailableX AvailableX
Strategy Targets
  • Visitor satisfaction with the availability and quality of interpretation activities at Port-Royal increases. (Baseline 2011 VIP. Availability 78%, Overall 97 %.)
  • Port-Royal Visitation: 30,353. Footnote *
  • 90% of visitors to Port-Royal enjoy their visit.
  • 85% of visitors to Port-Royal consider the site meaningful to them.
  • 85% of visitors to Port-Royal consider they learned about the cultural heritage of the place.

Applying Key Strategy 2: Shared Stewardship and Community Gathering Place at Port-Royal NHS

Objective 1 By working with the Mi’kmaq, partners, stakeholders, and area residents, quality special events and opportunities based on the unique heritage of Port-Royal attract local and new audiences while supporting revenue generation objectives.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Work with the Mi’kmaq, partners, stakeholders, and area residents to host special events at Port-Royal, paying particular attention to opportunities to commemorate the significant historic milestones of the site. AvailableX AvailableX
In collaboration with the Mi’kmaq, build on past experiences to facilitate meaningful special events at Port-Royal. AvailableX AvailableX
Work with the Municipality of the County of Annapolis on issues and opportunities as they pertain to Port-Royal. AvailableX AvailableX

Objective 2 The cultural resources and the heritage values of Port-Royal are protected and presented with the involvement of the Mi’kmaq, area residents, partners, and stakeholders as appropriate.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Conduct an ecological inventory at Port-Royal and combine results with cultural resource information to inform the management approach to grounds maintenance and landscaping. - AvailableX
Review the inventory of historic objects to re-assess their condition. AvailableX -
Messages of national significance pertaining to Mi’kmaw heritage will be conveyed through programming. AvailableX -
Specific land parcels adjacent to Port-Royal will be transferred to the Federal Crown Footnote 12 when the occasion presents itself, providing an opportunity to recreate a more authentic landscape in front of the Habitation. - AvailableX
Strategy Targets
  • The number of visitors at special events at Port-Royal increases. (Baseline 2010 – excluding Membertou event.)
  • Visitation by area residents increases. (Baseline: 2% within 80 km in 2011.)

Site Specific Chapter - Melanson Settlement NHS

Applying Key Strategy 1: Inspiring the Discovery of Melanson Settlement NHS

Objective 1 Self-guided visitor experience opportunities at Melanson Settlement relative to the site’s archaeological resources and Acadian heritage are available.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Utilize the archaeology reports to enhance self-guided visitor experience opportunities and public outreach via the web pages. - AvailableX
Strategy Targets
  • Visitation to Melanson Settlement increases (traffic and trail marker data).

Applying Key Strategy 2: Shared Stewardship and Community Gathering Place at Melanson Settlement NHS

Objective 1 The cultural resources and heritage values of Melanson Settlement are protected with the involvement of area residents, the Mi’kmaq, the Acadian community, and other partners and stakeholders as appropriate.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
In collaboration with Field Unit law enforcement staff, ensure protection of the site and its resources. AvailableX AvailableX
Advance efforts to protect cultural resources from artefact hunting through enhanced public outreach and monitoring. AvailableX -
Encourage mutually beneficial partnerships with archaeological researchers interested in working at the site. - AvailableX
Continue to work with area residents, the Province of Nova Scotia, and the Queen Anne Marsh Body to promote the protection and management of the historic-geographic context of the site. AvailableX AvailableX

Objective 2 Awareness of and support for the site, particularly among the Acadian community, is strengthened.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Work with Acadian partner organizations to support their ongoing engagement with this site and, where possible, welcome opportunities for Acadian activities at the site. AvailableX AvailableX
Increase visibility and profile of the site with Acadian communities, as outlined in Objective 2.3, including crosspromotion with Grand-Pré NHS and in conjunction with Acadian World Congress. AvailableX AvailableX
Work with the Municipality of the County of Annapolis on issues and opportunities as they pertain to Melanson Settlement. AvailableX AvailableX
Strategy Targets
  • The inventory of archaeological resources is completed, thereby improving the condition of select management practices.
  • The number of incidents of cultural vandalism at the site decreases. (Baseline 2010.)

Site Specific Chapter - Fort Edward NHS

Applying Key Strategy 1: Inspiring the Discovery of Fort Edward NHS

Objective 1 Current and potential visitors have access to inspiring and informative pre-trip information and the arrival stage of the trip planning (visitor experience) cycle is improved.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Review directional signage to Ford Edward and address issues raised. - AvailableX
Collaborate with the local Visitor Information Centre, Destination Southwest Nova Scotia Association, and others to ensure that operating seasons and other information about Fort Edward is better communicated. AvailableX AvailableX
Improve the web-pages for Fort Edward on the Parks Canada website, especially directional information. AvailableX AvailableX

Objective 2 Working with others, Fort Edward is promoted both individually and as part of a network of national historic sites within the region.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Ensure that Fort Edward is part of the concept of a “network” of national historic sites within Southwest Nova Scotia. Ensure cross-messaging and cross-promotion at the sites and with partners such as Destination Southwest Nova Scotia. AvailableX -
Encourage greater cross-promotion between Fort Edward NHS and Grand-Pré NHS, so as to benefit from the regional impact of a successful World Heritage inscription. AvailableX AvailableX

Objective 3 Visitor opportunities to experience the Fort Edward view-plane and grounds are offered.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Work with the Town of Windsor to address the need for improved maintenance of the Canada Remembers Trail at Fort Edward. AvailableX AvailableX
Strategy Targets
  • Fort Edward Visitation : 1,227Footnote *
  • The percentage of visitors who find out about Fort Edward from signs increases. (Baseline 2009/10 at 12%.)
  • The percentage of visitors who find out about the site on-line increases. (Baseline 4%.)
  • Cross-promotion of Fort Edward is improved at Visitor Information Centres, other attractions, and other national historic sites in Southwest Nova Scotia.

Applying Key Strategy 2: Shared Stewardship and Community Gathering Place at Fort Edward NHS

Objective 1 The cultural resources and heritage values of Fort Edward are protected with the involvement of area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners, and stakeholders.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Conduct an ecological inventory and combine results with cultural resource information to inform the management approach to grounds maintenance and landscaping. - AvailableX
Communicate with the town and potential developers of adjacent land regarding the heritage values of the site. AvailableX AvailableX
Encourage the Mi’kmaq and other heritage organizations to undertake research on specific issues and time periods in the history of Fort Edward that have relevance to different cultural communities (for example, traditional Mi’kmaw use of the area, the presence of the Jewish Legion during the First World War). AvailableX AvailableX
Display more artefacts at the site and in the community at the West Hants Historical Society Museum. AvailableX -

Objective 2 Area residents, the Mi’kmaq, partners, and stakeholders are encouraged to use the site as a community gathering place.

Actions and Implementation Year(s) Short term Long term
Ensure on-going use of the site as a community open space. AvailableX AvailableX
Encourage on-site visits by local schools. AvailableX AvailableX
Provide public outreach by working with community groups to ensure Parks Canada’s presence at strategic and meaningful community events AvailableX AvailableX
Strategy Targets
  • Visitation from area residents increases. (Baseline: 2009/10, 20% of respondents to the comment cards were within 40 km radius of the site.)

Appendix B - Statements of Commemorative Intent and Summary of Cultural Resources

Port Royal is a national historic site because of its legacy – French culture, commerce and colonization, and the experiences of Mi'kmaq and French colonists 1605-1613; and the replica of the Habitation as a milestone in the Canadian heritage movement.

The dominant feature of Port-Royal National Historic Site is the reconstructed Habitation completed in 1939 on what was believed to be the original site of the 17th-century Habitation of the French colonists. Footnote 13 This impressive reconstruction comprises a series of adjoining buildings, a courtyard, a palisaded enclosure protecting the entrance, and a gun platform opposite covering seaward approaches. The replica of the Habitation is of national historic significance as a milestone in the Canadian heritage movement. Other resources of national historic significance include an archaeological collection recovered at the time of the reconstruction (although nothing relating to the original Habitation was found), historic objects, such as reproduced furnishings, and the designated place itself which has recently been defined by the HSMBC as the footprint of the reconstructed habitation including the courtyard. Resources of local, regional, or other significance include a curatorial collection and HSMBC plaques (see Port-Royal Site Map, p. 26).

Fort Anne is a national historic site for its role in early European colonization, settlement, and government in Acadie and Nova Scotia in the 17th and 18th centuries; in the struggle for empire in the 17th and 18th centuries; as the centre of changing social, political, and military relations among the Mi’kmaq, the Acadians, and British living in the area throughout the 17th and 18th centuries; and as an example of Vauban-style fortifications that survive due largely to successive generations of Canadians who treasure their cultural landscapes.

The cultural resources that are associated with Fort Anne’s national historic significance include the Officers’ Quarters, powder magazines, earthworks, archaeological resources, wharf ruins, and cemeteries, as well as the designated place itself which has recently been clarified by the HSMBC as including the Dominion Park that was created in 1917, bounded by the low water mark of the Allain and Annapolis Rivers and the cemetery grounds acquired in 1968. In addition, substantial portions of Fort Anne’s library, curatorial, and archaeological collections are also associated with the designation of national significance (see site map, p. 25). Resources of local, regional, or other heritage value include some archaeological resources, cemetery stones, and some items in the library, curatorial, and archaeological collections.

Charles Fort was designated a national historic site in 1951 [initially as Scots Fort]. The reasons for designation, as derived from the text of the plaque erected in 1952, are:

  • it was a fort built by Sir William Alexander to plant the colony of “Nova Scotia”;
  • it was occupied by Scottish colonists from 1629 to 1632, when the territory was restored to France.

Cultural resources of national historic significance at Charles Fort include the designated place, Footnote 14 the landscape (elevated terrace at confluence of Allain and Annapolis Rivers), underground in situ resources (archaeological remains uncovered during excavations in 1989-1992), and recovered objects (primarily archaeological objects housed in a conservation facility) (see site map, p. 25). In addition, an original copy of the 1621 Charter of Nova Scotia granted to Sir William Alexander is on permanent loan to Fort Anne NHS from the province of Nova Scotia and is on exhibit in the Officers’ Quarters.

Melanson Settlement was designated a national historic site because it’s in situ resources reflect the family communities in which the Acadians settled along the Dauphin River (now Annapolis) and where they undertook a form of agriculture unique in North America.

Cultural resources of national significance at Melanson Settlement include the designated place, in situ resources (the archaeological remains of the Melanson Settlement), and most of the substantial archaeological collection consisting of artefacts and archaeological records. The designated place is the terraced area of the three properties where in situ resources from the Acadian period of settlement are located (see site map, p. 34). The designated place is valued for these resources as well as its proximity to the salt marshes where the Melansons, in cooperation with their neighbours, the Guilbeaux, built dykes and cultivated the reclaimed land; its proximity to the Melanson-Guilbeau dykes; its views over the dykes, salt marshes, the Annapolis River, and the site of the former Guilbeau settlement; its geographic setting; its location; and its uncompromised sense of place (see site setting map, page 35). Cultural resources of local, regional, or other historical significance include a portion of the modern dyke that is within the administered property, and historic objects.

Fort Edward is a national historic site because of its role in the struggle for predominance in North America from 1750 to the war of 1812.

Cultural resources of national significance at Fort Edward include the 1750 blockhouse, earthworks and fortifications, below-ground resources, an archaeological collection, as well as the designated place itself which has recently been clarified by the HSMBC as being the area surrounding the remnants of the fort defined by the 25 metre contour line within the land owned by Parks Canada. Where the 25 metre contour line extends beyond the Parks property, on the extreme western edge, the boundary is defined by the limits of the Parks Canada Property (see site map, p. 38). Artefacts stemming from excavations on the site are in storage at the Parks Canada conservation facilities. Resources of local, regional, or other historical significance include some of the earthworks, a curatorial collection, and some of the site’s archaeological collection.

Appendix C - Special Characteristics of the National Historic Sites of Southwest Nova Scotia that Foster Connection to Place

Port-Royal National Historic Site

At Port-Royal National Historic Site visitors step through time to experience the day-today life of one of the first French settlements in North America. The foundation of visitor experience opportunities at Port-Royal is the reconstructed Habitation and engaging with costumed animators who bring the Habitation to life. In the Habitation, opportunities include discovering how the Mi’kmaq shared their knowledge of plants for medicinal purposes with the French; and examining the various types of furs that the French acquired from the Mi’kmaq. Outside the Habitation, visitors can experience the Habitation’s herb garden, enjoy the walking trails, take in the tremendous view, engage in a Mi’kmaw interpretative program in the Wigwam, and discover the panels and monuments throughout the grounds. Special events and programs at Port-Royal during the summer include Mi’kmaw days at which visitors may experience Mi’kmaw traditions, history, games, and lifestyles.

Fort Anne National Historic Site

Fort Anne National Historic Site offers a range of opportunities for visitors including National Association of Interpreters award-winning exhibits and the Fort Anne Heritage Tapestry, stitched with the help of over one hundred local volunteers and depicting four centuries of the history of the site and area, housed in the Officers’ Quarters. The majority of the site’s artefact collection which, although not directly connected to the reasons for designation, has local heritage significance, is also stored here. Families often participate in the Xplorer program, the Seek and find activity or “Quest for the Keys.” A popular activity is the candlelight graveyard tour of the Garrison Graveyard offered by The Historical Association of Annapolis Royal.

On the grounds of Fort Anne, visitors have opportunities to explore the earthworks, interpretative panels, and monuments. Many walk the accessible trail that provides excellent views of the fortifications as well as the Annapolis River and Basin. The site is well used particularly by local people for walking and outdoor recreation including kite flying. Visitors also are offered opportunities to participate in special events throughout the summer, including Canada Day celebrations, and the 84th Regiment of Foot Encampment – a weekend long event during which animators re-enact what life was like for soldiers and their families at the fort in the late 18th century.

Charles Fort National Historic Site

The visitor experience of Charles Fort National Historic Site (which is located within the boundaries of Fort Anne NHS) includes opportunities to see the exact location where archaeological remains of the fort were unearthed. The story is told through the HSMBC plaque which is located adjacent to where these excavations took place. Of particular interest to many visitors, is the original copy of the Nova Scotia Charter from 1621 housed in the Officers’ Quarters as well as the exhibits interpreting the history of early Scottish settlement in Nova Scotia.

Melanson Settlement National Historic Site

Although unstaffed, visitors are afforded opportunities for self-guided exploration of Melanson Settlement NHS. An interpretive node includes a short looped trail that leads from the parking lot to a lookout with a striking view of the site, as well as the uplands, marsh, and Annapolis River. Original artwork enlivens the interpretive panels that tell of the importance of Melanson Settlement. Visitors may also explore the untended lower fields on foot.

Fort Edward National Historic Site

The visitor experience offer at Fort Edward National Historic Site (includes the opportunity to see, touch, and experience the oldest remaining blockhouse in Canada as well as to witness the extraordinary views and vantage points that were critical to the military function of the site. An exhibit inside the blockhouse contains information on the history of Fort Edward NHS. Outside, on the bastions, interpretive panels present the story of Fort Edward’s role in the history of the area The Fort Edward property also serves as a community green space and includes the Canada Remembers Trail that was jointly funded by the Town of Windsor and the Royal Canada Legion.

Appendix D - The State of Visitor Experience

This brief summary of the state of visitor experience for the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia is based on social science research, including the most recent visitor surveys (2011 for Port-Royal and 2005 for Fort Anne), a 2007 Visitor Experience Assessment (VEA) for Fort Anne and Port-Royal, a 2007 Visitor Origin Monitoring Program for Port-Royal, and a 2010 Special Events Survey for Fort Anne, Port-Royal, and Fort Edward. The last full survey for Fort Edward was 2001; however, visitor comment cards from 2009 and 2010 have also been assessed. Footnote 15

Research demonstrates that the majority of visitors are very satisfied with their visit overall (98% at Port-Royal, 97% at Fort Anne, and 95% at Fort Edward- 2001). Visitors are very satisfied with the facilities and services at the sites, particularly staff courtesy and knowledge, and also the condition of picnic/day-use areas, trails, and Visitor Centres. Moreover, 97% and 94% of visitors at Port-Royal and Fort Anne respectively indicated that their visit met their expectations and 95% of visitors to Fort Anne indicated their visit was memorable. Footnote 16

The social science suggests that visitors are satisfied, although slightly less so, with the planning and arrival phases of their visits. The VEA found that aspects of the planning and arrival phases are strong at both Port-Royal and Fort-Anne but web-based information is inadequate and way-finding signage could be improved. This is also the case for Fort Edward. The VEA also found some concerns regarding visitor orientation at both Fort Anne and Port-Royal. In response to these findings, the arrival area at Port- Royal has been redesigned to improve visitor orientation and signage both to and within Fort Anne and Port-Royal has been improved. The web-pages are also currently being improved.

Satisfaction with the visit as a learning experience was 97% for Fort Anne, 95% for Port- Royal and 85% for Fort Edward. The overall satisfaction rating with interpretation activities and programs is 78%, 89%, and 95% respectively for Port-Royal, Fort Anne, and Fort Edward. At Port-Royal visitors have been very satisfied with the majority of interpretation programs and presentations available but the “quality of period activities to observe” and availability of interpretation activities received slightly lower ratings at 84% and 61% respectively. The 2011 VIP for Port-Royal suggests that many visitors to the site enjoyed what they did experience but many are seeking more activities, demonstrations, and sensory and experiential opportunities at this site. Similarly, the VEA found that the interior and exterior exhibits at Fort Anne are good and that the staff delivers excellent guided tours Footnote 17, however, there are limited sensory or experiential opportunities for visitors and fewer opportunities for visitors to learn directly from site staff (personal interpretation) at Fort Anne than Port-Royal.

Appendix E - The State of Stakeholder and Partner Engagement

Area Residents: Please see page 15 of the plan.

Partners The Mi’kmaq: See page 15 & 16 of the plan.

Acadians:

Parks Canada has an important partnership with the Acadian Consultative Committee – an advisory body that provides a mechanism for the Acadian people of the Maritimes to be involved in Parks Canada’s decision-making process for those national historic sites and national parks that derive their national significance (solely or in part) from their association with Acadian people.

African Nova Scotians:

Parks Canada works with the African Nova Scotian community in terms of the presentation of African Nova Scotian heritage at the sites. Parks Canada has an agreement with the Valley African Nova Scotian Development Association (VANSDA) regarding interpretive signage on African Nova Scotian heritage with signs mounted at Port-Royal and Petit Parc (a small property owned by Parks Canada, and used under a license of occupation by the town of Annapolis Royal).

The Historical Association of Annapolis Royal (HAAR):

The HAAR was an important player in the establishment of Port-Royal and is currently a key partner in the protection and presentation of Fort Anne. The HAAR hosts the graveyard tours at Fort Anne and reinvests the funds raised from the tours into heritage activities, sites, and resources. A new partnering agreement is being developed with the Association.

West Hants Historical Society:

Parks Canada has had a contract with the West Hants Historical Society since the late 1990s to deliver the visitor experience offer at Fort Edward. As a stakeholder, the organization also contributes valuable input in the overall management of the site.

Kings County Historical Society:

Parks Canada has an ongoing agreement with the Kings County Historical Society to maintain and promote an exhibit at the Kings County Museum developed by Parks Canada on the New England Planters, the people who settled the Nova Scotian farmlands left vacant following the expulsion of the Acadians.

The Tourism Industry:

Parks Canada works closely with different branches of the tourism industry, including Tourism Nova Scotia.

Stakeholder Involvement

Stakeholders are defined as groups or individuals representing all sectors of Canadian society that have an interest in, or an influence upon Parks Canada’s actions and directions. The stakeholders for the national historic sites of Southwest Nova Scotia include interested individuals as well as organizations from:

  • The culture and heritage sector, including historical associations;
  • Museums and art councils;
  • Tourism sector, including small local businesses and larger tourism associations;
  • Boards of trade and economic development agencies,
  • Academia, including universities and colleges such as l’Université Sainte Anne and Acadia University and the Centre of Geographic Sciences, part of the Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC); and
  • Municipal governments, including the municipality of the County of Annapolis as well as the town councils of Annapolis Royal and Windsor.

Opportunities for stakeholder involvement include the management plan consultation process, consultation on fees, information-sharing, and participation in operational issues, visitor surveys, and event planning and coordination.

Appendix F - Glossary

Commemorative Integrity:
A historic place may be said to possess commemorative integrity when the resources that symbolize or represent its importance are not impaired or under threat, when the reasons for its significance are effectively communicated to the public, and when the heritage value of the place is respected.
Commemorative Integrity Statement (CIS):
An elaboration of what is meant by commemorative integrity for a particular national historic site. The CIS provides the benchmark for planning, managing, operations, reporting, and taking remedial action.
Commemorative Intent:
Refers specifically to the reasons for a site’s national significance, as determined by the Ministerially-approved recommendations of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada. A Statement of Commemorative Intent (SOCI) answers the question – when and for what reason was the site designated as being of national historic significance
Connection to Place:
A concept that reflects the relevance and importance of protected heritage places to Canadians. It expresses the emotional, intellectual, and spiritual attachment Canadians and visitors feel toward natural and cultural heritage places. Parks Canada works to foster this sense of attachment through meaningful opportunities for enjoyment and learning provided onsite and through public outreach.
Conservation:
Activities aimed at safeguarding a cultural resource so it retains its historic value and physical life is extended. Activities include: maintenance, preservation, and modification.
Cultural Landscape:
Any geographic area that has been modified, influenced, or given special cultural meaning by people.
Cultural Resource:
A human work or a place, which gives evidence of human activity or has spiritual or cultural meaning, and which has been determined to have historic value.
Cultural Resource Management (CRM):
Generally accepted practices for the conservation and presentation of cultural resources, founded on principles and carried out in a practice that integrates professional, technical, and administrative activities so that the historic value of cultural resources is taken into account in actions that might affect them. In Parks Canada, Cultural Resource Management encompasses the presentation and use, as well as the conservation of cultural resources.
Cultural Resource Management Policy:
The policy of Parks Canada for the management of cultural resources under its jurisdiction, including those at historic canals, marine conservation areas and national parks, as well as national historic sites.
Designated Place:
Refers to the place designated by the Minister on recommendation of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada (HSMBC). Information on what constitutes the 70 designated place for a particular national historic site is drawn from the minutes of the Board. The designated place can be larger or smaller than the administered property.
Designation:
This occurs when the Minister approves a recommendation for recognition of a person, place or event’s national historic significance from the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada.
Explorer Quotient:
This is a way to understand and segment travellers based on their social values and travel motivations. Developed by the Canadian Tourism Commission, in collaboration with Environics (a Canadian marketing and social science research firm), the model recognizes that two people can be standing in the exact same spot, participating in the exact same activity, yet have two completely different experiences.
Field Unit:
An administrative division created by Parks Canada, combining the management and administration of one or more national park(s), national historic site(s), marine conservation area(s) or historic canal(s).
Heritage Values:
Are attributes of a resource which have value. Heritage values derive from many sources, including historical association, architectural significance, environmental or cultural importance and continuity of use.
Historic Object:
A generic term used to refer to any movable cultural property acquired by Parks Canada curatorial services for interpretive or reference purposes. Historic objects are subject to the directive, Management of Historic Objects and Reproductions.
Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada (HSMBC):
An independent body that provides the Minister with impartial and expert advice on matters relating to historical commemoration. Also referred to as “the Board” or the “HSMBC”.
Historic Value:
Historic value is a value or values assigned to a resource, whereby it is recognized as a cultural resource. These values can be physical and/or associative.
Intervention:
A term referring to any activity (or non-activity) that has a physical impact on a cultural resource.
Key Strategy:
Concrete expression of the vision statement that provides heritage place-wide direction. Must give a clear overview of how the protected heritage place will be managed and how the three mandate elements will be achieved in a mutually supportive manner.
National Historic Site:
Any place declared to be of national historic interest or significance by the Minister responsible for Parks Canada upon the recommendation of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada. The name is commonly used to refer to the area administered by Parks Canada, or another owner, as a national historic site.
Other (resource):
A resource that has been evaluated and deemed not to possess any or enough historic value to be considered a cultural resource. Such a resource is not managed under the CRM policy but falls under operational policies.
Partner:
A partner refers to an organization that is in a collaborative working relationship with Parks Canada. This working relationship is based on mutual benefit and a formalized arrangement that sets out shared goals and objectives and the terms of the arrangement. Partners can be from the not-for-profit sector (such as NGOs, academia, cooperative associations, etc.), other governmental organizations or the for-profit sector.
Personal Interpretation:
These are programs that are offered by Parks Canada interpreters (guides) and volunteers. They include guided nature walks, outdoor theatre presentations, historic re-enactments, talks on specific topics, guided site tours, hands-on activities, among others.
Presentation:
Activities, services, and facilities that bring the public into direct or indirect contact with national historic sites, national parks, national marine conservation areas, and historic canals, and the resources associated with them.
Public Outreach:
Public outreach is reaching Canadians at home, at leisure and in their communities through effective and relevant learning opportunities designed to increase understanding and appreciation of the natural and historical heritage of Parks Canada’s places, and to encourage individuals and communities to support and become engaged in their protection and presentation.
Stakeholder:
Refers to individuals or groups representing all sectors of Canadian society that have an interest in or influence upon the Agency’s actions and directions. Stakeholders self-select their level of involvement. Stakeholders may have a geographic sphere of influence or they may have a virtual constituency, with no actual geographic locations.
Target:
Established to facilitate measuring and reporting on progress in achieving results.
Visitor Experience:
Visitor experience is the sum total of a visitor's personal interaction with heritage places and/or people that awakens their senses, affects their emotions, stimulates their mind and helps the visitor to create a sense of connection to these places.