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The lock at Davis
The lock at Davis was rebuilt in 1982 following a structural failure.
© Parks Canada

152,0 km – 152,1 km

Davis Lockstation is the most isolated of all the Rideau lockstations. The single lock is in a short excavated channel and established navigation between Opinicon Lake and Sand Lake. Earthen embankment dams and a single weir cross the river, establishing the slackwater section above it.

Cultural Resources

One lock – A manually operated lock with a lift of 2,7 m. The lock was rebuilt in 1982 in its original position.

Earth embankment dams – Two earth embankment dams with combined length of 40 m, and height of 4,0 m, 1829. CRM1.

Weir – A reinforced concrete stoplog weir with one bay, 1920. CRM2.

Defensible lockmaster’s house – A one-storey stone building, 1842. A summer kitchen was added in 1898.CRM1.

Lockstation office – A two-storey frame structure, 1875. CRM2.

The Davis Lockstation was built in a narrow, natural river gorge
The Davis Lockstation was built in a narrow, natural river gorge that connected Opinicon Lake (bottom) and Sand Lake (top).
© Parks Canada
The earth embankment dams and weir
The earth embankment dams and weir at Davis Lockstation raised the level of Opinicon Lake.
© Parks Canada

Davis Lockstation to Jones Falls Lockstation

152,1 km – 159,0 km

The construction of a stone arch dam at Jones Falls enlarged Sand Lake for navigation.

The locks and dam at Jones Falls Lockstation rise19 m
The locks and dam at Jones Falls Lockstation rise19 m. It was the most complex construction project undertaken for the Rideau.
© Parks Canada
Sand Lake to the Jones Falls Lockstation
From Sand Lake to the Jones Falls Lockstation the navigation channel winds through islands of pre-Cambrian rock created by the Frontenac Arch.
© Parks Canada

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