9.1 Level Two Engineering Works

In total 20 engineering works were evaluated as level two cultural resources. These include the two locks on the Tay Canal plus other dams, weirs, embankments, bridges, channels and turning basins along the system built between 1887 and the early 1950s. No structure built in 1967 or later was evaluated. (Specific details regarding these structures is available in the cultural resource inventory of the Rideau Canal.)

9.1.1  These level two engineering works are valued for their:
  • association with the commercial and recreational use of the Canal;
  • association with corridor communities and expansion of the Canal system;
  • role in the continuing operation of the Canal;
  • evidence of changing construction technologies;
  • manual mode of operation;
  • surviving physical attributes of form and material.
9.1.2  The values of the level two engineering works will be respected when:
  • they are monitored and maintained in an operational condition;
  • the current manual mode of operation is maintained;
  • the current material type, massing and form are safeguarded whenever possible;
  • the current material type and design of the gate and valve opening mechanism is maintained;
  • the current material type and design of lock gates is maintained;
  • the appropriateness of any repairs or other interventions to the works are reviewed in accordance to the principles of the Parks Canada’s CRM Policy.

9.2 Level Two Buildings

In total 19 Canal buildings were evaluated as level two cultural resources, nine of which were Federal Heritage Buildings. No building constructed in 1967 or later was evaluated.

9.2.1 The level two Canal buildings are valued for their:
  • association with the post-military operation and maintenance of the Canal;
  • association with working and social life on the Canal;
  • association with industrial activities in corridor communities;
  • designation as Federal Heritage Buildings;
  • functional design qualities;
  • surviving physical attributes of form and material;
  • contribution to the historic character of their associated lockstations.

NOTE: the collection of outbuildings at Poonamalie is valued as a farmstead landscape assemblage, not for any individual value.

9.2.2 The values of the buildings will be respected when:
  • their current material, form, and functional design qualities are safeguarded;
  • their heritage settings are preserved;
  • repairs and other interventions adhere to the procedures of  the CRM Policy.

9.3 Archaeological Sites

No comprehensive inventory of archaeological sites exists. Those archaeological sites that pre-date or post-date the Canal’s military period up to 1967 are considered potential level two cultural resources until they are evaluated otherwise.

9.3.1 The Canal’s level two archaeological sites are valued for their:
  • association with the evolving use of the Canal;
  • association with the post-military operations, maintenance and working life on the Canal;
  • surviving physical elements.
9.3.2 The level two archaeological sites will be respected when:
  • an inventory and evaluation record of all archaeological sites is developed and maintained;
  • known archaeological sites on Canal lands are monitored and safeguarded by adhering to the Guidelines for the Management of Archaeological Resources in the Canadian Parks Service;
  • all operational projects involving below ground or water disturbance on Canal lands are reviewed to ascertain the potential impact on resources.

9.4 Merrickville Industrial Ruins (Level two)

9.4.1  The industrial ruins are valued for their:
  • association with the evolution and variety of industrial activity on this site;
  • association with industrial activity in the Rideau Corridor area;
  • remaining physical form and material;
  • contextual setting - relation to the locks, the rapids and other industrial buildings adjacent to the site.
9.4.2  The values of the Merrickville ruins will be respected when:
  • their physical form and material are safeguarded;
  • repairs and other interventions adhere to the procedures of the CRM Policy;
  • the current contextual setting is maintained.

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