Designated place refers to the place designated as a national historic site by the Minister of Canadian Heritage on the recommendation of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada. Information on what constitutes the designated place for a particular historic site is drawn from the minutes of the Board.

In the case of the Rideau Canal, the designated place consists of the lands and waters under the jurisdiction of Parks Canada including the bed of the Rideau Canal to the high water mark between the Ottawa River and the harbor in Kingston.

The designated place of the Merrickville Blockhouse is the footprint of the building.

All the resources within the designated place for the Rideau Canal which are directly related to the construction of the Canal and the military period of operation, including the Merrickville Blockhouse National Historic Site of Canada, are deemed to illustrate, reflect or give expression to the national significance of the site. These are level one cultural resources.

While the designated place describes the boundary of the Canal in terms of identifying the level one cultural resources, it is important to note that there are historic values of the Canal system and its environment that extend beyond the administered Canal lands and waters. Significant view sheds, visual linkages and associative values encompass a variety of urban, rural and natural areas adjacent to the Canal.  The following identifies associated lands of particular importance to the values of the Rideau Canal; these include but are not restricted to:

  • the view sheds from the Canal locks and channel to the central core of Ottawa between the Mackenzie King Bridge and the Ottawa River;
  • the views sheds and visual linkages in the Kingston harbor landscape that  portray the relationship between the fortifications, the harbor and the Canal;
  • the views from the Canal and Canal lands to the heritage shore-lands and communities between Becketts Landing and Kilmarnock lockstation;
  • the views from the Canal and Canal lands to the heritage shore-lands along the Newboro channel;
  • the views from the Canal and Canal lands to the heritage community of Chaffey’s Locks;
  • the views from the Canal and Canal lands to the heritage shore-lands and communities at Davis Locks, Jones Falls, Upper and Lower Brewers and Kingston Mills lockstations.

5.1 The Rideau Canal as a designated place is valued for:

  • the engineering achievement of the construction of the Canal;
  • its continuous seasonal operation since 1832;
  • the survival and integrity of the Canal system with the majority of its original built resources intact;
  • the continuity and integrity of the lockstations and the sense of a complete “system” that these stations convey;
  • the historic, ecological and visual associations with the certain shore-lands and communities along the waterway which contributes to the unique historical environment of the Canal;
  • the extensive wetlands and lakes of the Canal which reveal the relationship  between Canal construction and the natural environment and which are an integral part of the unique historical environment of the waterway.

5.2 The Merrickville Blockhouse as a designated place is valued for:

  • its association with the military period of the Rideau Canal
  • its association with the Merrickville Lockstation
  • its landmark status in the village of Merrickville
  • as a fine example of the best type of blockhouses erected for the defense of the Rideau Canal
  • its defensive features, including:
    • an unobstructed view up and down the waterway at the Merrickville lockstation and down the Prescott and Brockville Roads;
    • thick, vented stone walls, fire resistant design;
    • apertures for musket and artillery fire;
    • self-sufficient design which included storage for provisions and armaments, as well as barracks

    5.3 The designated place will be unimpaired or not under threat when:

    • through navigation of the Canal system is maintained to help assure the preservation of the unique historical environment and safeguard the level one cultural resources;
    • the cultural resources related to the military period are safeguarded according to Parks Canada’s Cultural Resource Management [CRM] Policy (see detailed description of cultural resources below);
    • the existing manual mode of operation of locks, dams and weirs on the system is maintained;
    • the visual relationship between the Canal and the heritage landscape in the central core of Ottawa remains evident and intact;
    • the views and visual linkages which enhance the military character of the Kingston harbor landscape and portray the relationship between the fortifications, the harbor and the Canal remains evident and intact;
    • the heritage character of corridor shore-lands are safeguarded from inappropriate development or uses;
    • the visual relationship between the Merrickville Blockhouse and the heritage landscape adjacent to the site remains intact;
    • the heritage character of those identified corridor communities are safeguarded;
    • the landmarks, view scapes and natural ecosystem features of the Canal’s islands, shore-lands and wetlands that are related to the construction of the Canal and which are part of the Canal’s unique historical environment are safeguarded;
    • the level one historic values of the designated place are effectively communicated to the public.

  • original fabric in the lower storey.