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Four images: Two people on bicycles, a group of powwow drummers, a group of campers outside a semi-permanent tent, a diver holding a sea urchin.

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the President & Chief Executive Officer of the Parks Canada Agency, 2019.

  • Catalogue No.: R61-108E-PDF
  • ISSN 2561-1526

 

Minister’s message

The Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada

As the newly-appointed Minister responsible for Parks Canada, I am pleased to present the Agency’s 2018–19 Departmental Results Report.

Parks Canada plays an important role in protecting our natural environment and cultural heritage sites, so Canadians can continue to enjoy the health, recreational, and educational benefits these special places have to offer.

In close collaboration with Indigenous peoples, stakeholders, partners, and Canadians from coast to coast to coast, Parks Canada team members work hard to tell the stories of our natural and cultural history.

Protecting nature and biodiversity are top priorities for Parks Canada and the Government of Canada. Canada’s Nature Legacy, a historic $1.3-billion investment to conserve our natural heritage, funds more protected areas and safe havens for wildlife.

The Government of Canada is committed to doubling its protected areas, with a goal of conserving at least 17 percent of land and inland waters, and 10 percent of coastal and marine waters by 2020. Some recent achievements toward these goals include:

  • Formally establishing, in partnership with Indigenous peoples, Thaidene Nene National Park Reserve – an area of great cultural importance to the Łutsël K’é Dene First Nation and the Northwest Territory Métis Nation peoples.
  • Protecting Canada’s High Arctic, in collaboration with the Government of Nunavut and the Qikiqtani Inuit Association, by establishing Tallurutiup Imanga National Marine Conservation Area.
  • Broadly and extensively consulting on the proposed national park reserve in the South Okanagan–Similkameen.

In addition, Canada developed a multi-jurisdictional action plan, in consultation with 11 Indigenous organizations, which lays out actions to ensure Wood Buffalo National Park World Heritage Site remains a treasured place with Outstanding Universal Value for generations to come.

Over the past year, Parks Canada saw significant investments in conservation, including $20.9 million in funding for Waterton Lakes National Park recovery efforts from the 2017 Kenow Wildfire, and $3.4 million to protect and restore the unique, sensitive ecosystem on Sable Island National Park Reserve.

Protecting and commemorating Canada’s rich heritage is of high importance for Parks Canada. For example, the Government invested more than $61 million to restore and protect the birthplace of Confederation, Province House National Historic Site. Canada also welcomed Pimachiowin Aki, the country’s first mixed World Heritage site, which blends both natural and cultural heritage.

Reconciliation and renewed nation-to-nation relationships with Indigenous peoples, based on a recognition of rights, respect, co-operation, and partnership, is of the highest importance to the Government.

Indigenous peoples are partners in conserving Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and Parks Canada collaborates with Indigenous communities and organizations in matters of conservation, including species recovery and habitat restoration. For example, in 2018, the Land Sea People Management Plan – the first of its kind – was developed collaboratively with the Haida Nation.

The Plan, which reflects both Indigenous and western values and knowledge, strengthens terrestrial and marine protections in Gwaii Haanas, while respecting the area’s cultural, social, and economic significance.

The Government of Canada is committed to ensuring that Canadians can continue to connect with and enjoy our national parks, historic sites, and marine conservation areas. Through innovative programs such as the Learn-to Camp program, Parks Canada creates a connection between first-time campers and the Canadian camping experience, builds awareness of family health and wellness, and introduces children and families to a lifetime of outdoor activities. The Government also encourages families and youth to connect with nature and learn about Canada’s history, through granting free admission to youth 17 and under and new Canadians at all national parks, historic sites, and marine conservation areas.

The Government continues to invest in Parks Canada’s infrastructure, including providing $368 million in funding through Budget 2019 for capital projects. These investments will ensure safe, high quality and meaningful experiences for visitors and support local economies.

Parks Canada places represent the best that Canada has to offer. I look forward to building on these important accomplishments by continuing to protect our natural and cultural heritage, and sharing the stories of who we are, including the histories, cultures, and contributions of Indigenous peoples.

Original signed by
The Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson Minister, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada

President & Chief Executive Officer’s message

Ron Hallman, President & Chief Executive Officer, Parks Canada Agency

I am proud to present the 2018–19 Departmental Results Report for the Parks Canada Agency. This year’s report sets out, for the first time, the Agency’s performance against the Departmental Results Framework.

In Canada, we are fortunate to have some of the world’s most remarkable historic and natural places. In every corner of the country, Parks Canada team members work with Indigenous peoples, stakeholders, partners, academic institutions, and Canadians to protect and present these national treasures. We know that working together is the key to continued success.

During the reporting period, the Agency continued to advance and increase collaboration with Indigenous peoples to achieve conservation gains. We are working to make increased use of Indigenous knowledge and to facilitate the restoration of Indigenous peoples’ connections to the land. For example, the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations and Kluane First Nation are engaging in harvesting activities in their traditional territories within Kluane National Park – hunting, trapping, fishing or gathering plants for food and medicine – thereby ensuring that these traditional practices remain a vital part of their culture.

Parks Canada received $221 million over 5 years through Canada’s Nature Legacy. Over the coming years, this funding will enable Parks Canada to improve the connectivity of national parks with the broader landscape, increase the use of science and knowledge to inform conservation decision-making, and contribute to the conservation of species at risk.

In 2018–19 Parks Canada took concrete measures to preserve biodiversity, contribute to the recovery of species at risk, and build ecosystem resilience in response to climate change and other stressors. Specific examples of concrete action taken in 2018–19 to maintain or restore ecological integrity included:

  • the reintroduction of bison to Banff National Park – a significant historic, ecological and cultural achievement;
  • completing the first ever management plan for Rouge National Urban Park and adding lands from the City of Pickering as well as the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority – a major step forward in the completion of the Rouge; and,
  • the creation of a temporary navigation exclusion sector in Sainte-Marguerite Bay in Saguenay–St Lawrence Marine Park to promote the recovery of the population of the endangered St. Lawrence beluga whale.

Parks Canada will continue to focus its efforts on understanding and responding to, those conservation-related indicators that are not yet reflecting desired results and will review selected indicators to ensure they are providing the information required to inform decision-making. In support of cultural heritage conservation and presentation the Agency invited Canadians to share their views on Parks Canada's Framework for History and Commemoration: National Historic Sites System Plan 2019. This framework proposes a new, comprehensive and engaging approach to presenting Canada's history through diverse, wide-ranging and sometimes complex perspectives, including the difficult periods of our past. In particular, Parks Canada continues to seek to tell broader, more inclusive stories of Canada, the framework will ensure that the history and voices of Indigenous peoples are incorporated at heritage places.

As the country’s largest tourism provider, Parks Canada is providing more than 25 million visitors a year with high-quality and meaningful experiences. To make trip planning even easier, we updated the Parks Canada mobile app with information on Learn-to Camp and enhanced trip planning tools. The app reached the 200 000 download milestone. The Agency national advertising campaign helped raise awareness about Parks Canada’s commitment to protecting the environment and encouraged visitors to make meaningful connections with nature and Canada’s history.

Parks Canada places are an important part of local economies, helping to generate billions of dollars annually and employ tens of thousands of people. The Agency works with communities to help grow tourism and create local jobs. Over the last year, we continued to implement our partnership with the Indigenous Tourism Association with the goal of enhancing and growing authentic Indigenous experiences across the country and to promote market-ready Indigenous travel experiences.

Parks Canada is delivering almost 1 000 infrastructure projects across the country that will help to maintain, restore and improve contemporary and heritage assets under Parks Canada’s care. Parks Canada is also developing a long-term plan to better support the effective maintenance and ongoing sustainability of its infrastructure portfolio comprised of 17 586 assets with a current replacement value of $25.8 billion.

I am immensely proud to lead the Parks Canada Agency and its its exceptional team. I look forward to building on Parks Canada’s successes and to supporting the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, in fulfilling his mandate.

Original signed by
Ron Hallman
President & Chief Executive Officer,
Parks Canada Agency

Results at a glance

 
Results at a glance - Infographic
Results at a glance - Text Version
Section Indicator Description and Results
Parks Canada at a glance 450,000 km2: Area protected by Parks Canada
171 National Historic Sites
46 National Parks
4 National Marine Conservation Areas
1 National Urban Park
Visitation 25.1 million people visited Parks Canada places.
Learn-to Camp: 96,000 participants coast-to-coast-to-coast.
Youth and New Canadians: Free Admission for youth 17 and under (ongoing), and for new Canadians for one year, using the Cultural Access Pass Program
Reconciliation $23.9M over 5 years to integrate Indigenous views, history and heritage in Parks Canada places (source: Budget 2018)
19 Natural and Cultural heritage places managed cooperatively with Indigenous peoples
Natural heritage Conservation and Restoration Program (CoRe): 41 CoRe projects with 64% active management targets achieved.
The Salmon Recovery project led to the return of 3,000+ Atlantic salmon to Fundy National Park.
Species at risk: 55 recovery activities with $2 million in Nature Legacy funding.
In 2018–19 critical habitat for 17 species at resk was legally protected.
Establishment: 77% terrestrial regions represented in the national parks system (target 84% by 2019–20).
Establishment: 17% marine regions represented in the national marine conservation area system (target 31% by 2019–20).
Conservation: 82% national park ecosystems - Ecological integrity was maintained or improved.
Cultural heritage Designations and commemoration: 3,816 designations of people, places and events of importance formally recognized.
Since 2016, 260 commemorative plaques have been unveiled.
Collections and conservation: 31 million archaeological and historical objects in Parks Canada's collection
Parks Canada Assets Total asset value: $25.8 billion, with over 17,500 assets in our portfolio.

  • Significant advancements towards establishing national parks and national marine conservation areas that are representative of Canada’s terrestrial and marine regions.

  • Focus on climate change:
    • suite of tools including an adaptation framework;
    • series of regional and site-specific reports summarizing the evolution of climate conditions at heritage places and the potential impacts;
    • Climate change adaptation workshops for three heritage places experiencing or most vulnerable to impacts of climate change;
    • led two working groups with federal, provincial and territorial managers, Indigenous, industry and academic partners, to develop and share knowledge and best practices for heritage place stewardship in the context of climate change; and
    • co-led tri-national Canada—Mexico—United States projects, including the development of tools to help marine protected areas adapt to climate change.

  • A new national human-wildlife strategy to support and educate the public, to reduce and avoid conflict and endangerment of people and wildlife, and to monitor and analyse trends.

  • Building a conservation ethos in Canada through a science and conservation promotional campaign “The Parks Insider”.

  • Over 400 ecological data sets now available on the Government of Canada’s Open Data Portal and existing datasets being updated regularly.

  • A new Framework for History and Commemoration to replace the National Historic Sites System Plan and implement a new approach to history commemoration and presentation.

  • Welcomed 25.1 million visitors – a 1% increase over 2016–17 baseline.

  • 900 thousand followers on Facebook and 500 thousand on Twitter; two million views of the videos on Parks Canada’s YouTube channel; 250 thousand downloads of Parks Canada’s app and 2.4 million subscribers to the Parks Canada newsletter.
 

2018–19 Actual spending

$1,460,324,164

2018–19 Human Resources

5,566 Full-Time Equivalents

 
 

For more information on Parks Canada Agency's plans, priorities and results achieved, see the Results: what we achieved section of this report.


Results: what we achieved

Core responsibility

Protecting and presenting Canada’s natural and cultural heritage

Description

Establish national parks and national marine conservation areas; designate places, persons and events of national historic significance; protect and conserve natural and cultural heritage guided by science and Indigenous knowledge; provide opportunities to visit, experience and enjoy Canada’s natural and cultural heritage; work with the public, other federal departments, provinces, territories, Indigenous peoples, and stakeholders to carry out these responsibilities

Departmental Result 1: Canada’s natural heritage is protected for future generations

Departmental Result: Canada’s natural heritage is protected for future generations Target 2018–19 Actual results
Contribute to the 2020 Biodiversity Goals and Targets for Canada (Target 1 ‐ Terrestrial): percentage of terrestrial regions represented in the national parks system 84% by March 31, 2020 77%
Contribute to the 2020 Biodiversity Goals and Targets for Canada (Target 1 ‐ Marine): percentage of marine regions represented in the national marine conservation area system 31% by March 31, 2020 17%

Parks Canada protects Canada’s natural heritage through the establishment of national parks and national marine conservation areas in regions representative of Canada’s terrestrial and marine ecosystems. As of March 31, 2019, the percentage of Canada’s terrestrial regions represented in the national parks system and the percentage of marine regions represented in the national marine conservation area system remained steady at 77% and 17% respectively. Through collaboration with Indigenous peoples and provincial and territorial governments, the Agency continues to work towards achieving its targets by March 31,2020. In launching and advancing negotiations, feasibility assessments, and public consultations, the Agency made demonstrable progress toward the establishment of three potential future national parks and five national marine conservation areas.

Establishing Thaidene Nene National Park Reserve





2018–19 negotiations and consultations with the Government of the Northwest Territories, Lutsël K’e Dene First Nation and Northwest Territory Métis Nation culminated in August 2019, with the formal establishment of Thaidene Nene National Park Reserve.Footnote 1





Global conservation efforts

  • Canada has committed to meet Target 11 of the Aichi Biodiversity Targets under the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity targets by protecting 17% of lands and freshwaters and 10% of marine and coastal areas by 2020. Parks Canada contributed to these international targets by advancing the establishment of national parks and national marine conservation areas.
  • Parks Canada co-chaired the global initiative #NatureForAll, which aims to inspire broad–based public and cross–sectoral support and action on nature conservation in Canada and across the world.
  • As Canada’s State Member for the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Parks Canada continued to play a leadership role on the IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas.

For details on 2018–19 establishment progress please refer to the Supplementary Information: Program Achievement Details on the Parks Canada website.


Departmental Result: Canada’s natural heritage is protected for future generations Target 2018–19 Actual results
Percentage of national park ecosystems where ecological integrity is maintained or improved 90% by March 31, 2019 82%

Open Government

Parks Canada has published approximately half of the ecological data sets it uses to guide decision making, with more than 400 data sets now available on the Government of Canada’s Open Data Portal and existing datasets being updated regularly.

An ecosystem has ecological integrity when:

  • it has the living and non-living pieces expected in its natural region; and
  • its processes (the engines that make an ecosystem work; e.g. fire, flooding, predation) occur with the frequency and intensity expected in its natural region.

By the end of 2018–19, ecological integrity was maintained or improved in 82% of national park ecosystems – eight percent lower than the Agency’s target of 90% and six percent lower than 2017–18 results. This is the single largest one year change in this indicator over the four years that it has been reported. This drop can be attributed to a variety of factors, some of which are known (e.g. fire, overgrazing, natural fluctuations of populations) and others currently unknown. Expanding on ongoing conservation projects, Parks Canada will continue to investigate the causes for the decline and develop and implement new conservation projects to maintain or improve ecological integrity. Most national park ecosystems are in good or fair condition: of the 119 ecosystems in 43 national parks that were assessed, 60% are in good condition; 24% are in fair condition and 16% are in poor condition. Seventy-two park ecosystems are stable (61%), 26 have improving trends, and 21 have declining trends.


Ecological integrity status and trends of ecosystems in 43 national parks, Canada, 2018


Note: Park ecosystems may include forest, freshwater, wetlands, grasslands, shrublands, tundra, coastal/marine and glaciers, depending on what is present in each park.
Data are not yet available for Akami-Uapishkᵁ-KakKasuak-Mealy Mountains National Park Reserve, Nááts'įhch'oh National Park Reserve, Qausuittuq National Park, and Rouge National Urban Park.
Ecological integrity status and trends of ecosystems in 43 national parks, Canada, 2018 - Text Version
Ecological integrity status Improving (number of ecosystems) Stable (number of ecosystems) Declining (number of ecosystems) Total (number of ecosystems)
Good 15 55 2 72
Fair 10 10 8 28
Poor 1 7 11 19
Total 26 72 21 119

Conservation and Restoration Program (CoRe)

During 2018–19, Parks Canada undertook 41 CoRe projects in 30 sites, including:

  • Returning 3,000 adult Atlantic salmon to the Upper Salmon River in Fundy National Park as part of the Fundy Salmon Recovery project.
  • Removing non-native fish from 12 lakes and 98,000 logs from 18 lakes in La Mauricie National Park.
  • Restoring 135 metres of clam garden wall at Gulf Islands National Park Reserve in partnership with Hul’q’umi’num and WSÁNEĆ Nations.

A Nature Legacy for Canada

In Budget 2018, $1.3 billion in funding was announced for nature conservation, known as A Nature Legacy for Canada. Through this significant investment, Parks Canada received $221 million over 5 years to support the implementation of Canada’s Nature Legacy, which will change the way conservation is implemented in Canada by improving the integration of national parks with the broader landscape and the use of science and knowledge to inform conservation decision-making. This funding will also contribute to the conservation of species at risk by using multi-species and ecosystem-based strategies. Progress made in this area will be reported in future Departmental Results Reports.

Conservation and Restoration Program

Parks Canada’s Conservation and Restoration Program (CoRe) fund projects that restore ecological integrity, recover species at risk, and enhance the health of marine and Great Lakes environments. In 2018–19, the Agency undertook 41 CoRe projects in 30 sites. CoRe projects have achieved 64% of their active management targets over the past five years, which exceeds the 60% baseline measure of success.

Species at risk

Parks Canada uses a site-based, multi-species approach to implement species conservation and recovery. Recovery actions were taken through CoRe projects, and an additional two million dollars of Nature Legacy funds were allocated in 2018–19 for 55 recovery activities in 26 parks. Through the Nature Legacy funding, the Agency implemented 50 species at risk recovery projects in protected heritage areas across the country, including for black-tailed prairie dog, Atlantic salmon, plains bison, monarch butterfly and little brown bat. Moreover, the Agency is well on track to implement its multi-species Species at Risk Act action plans, with 26% of proposed actions already implemented and 50% targeted by 2023.

For more information on the Agency’s 2018–19 conservation results, including: Parks Canada’s Conservation and Restoration Program (CoRe), species at risk conservation and recovery, fire management, managing human-wildlife interactions and hyperabundant and non-native species, and climate change and marine conservation policy please refer to the Supplementary Information: Program Achievement Details and the annual CoRe report on the Parks Canada website.


Departmental Result: Canada’s natural heritage is protected for future generations Target 2018–19 Actual results
Number of heritage places managed in a way consistent with the Government’s commitment to nation to‐nation, Inuit-Crown and government-to-government relationships 23-25 by March 31, 2020 19

Cooperative Management in Action

During 2018–19, the Wood Buffalo National Park Cooperative Management Committee was actively engaged in decision making through its participation in the Strategic Environmental Assessment process and the development of an action plan for addressing concerns regarding the Outstanding Heritage Value of this UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Parks Canada recognizes the historic and ongoing responsibilities of Indigenous peoples in the stewardship of natural and cultural heritage of their traditional territories. To this end, the Agency has been working to advance cooperative management with Indigenous peoples at the heritage places it administers. As of March 31, 2019, the number of heritage places with cooperative management structures where Indigenous peoples participated in decision-making was 19. There was no increase nor decrease in this indicator over the planning period. While the 2017–18 results reported 20 heritage places managed cooperatively, this was an error.

Throughout 2018–19, Parks Canada and Indigenous partners worked to negotiate agreements, such as in Atlantic Canada, which will create new or enhance existing cooperative management structures at Parks Canada places. The results of these ongoing negotiations are anticipated for the 2019–20 reporting year and beyond.

For more information on 2018–19 actions related to the protection of Parks Canada’s natural heritage, please refer to the Supplementary Information: Program Achievement Details on the Parks Canada website.


Departmental Result 2: Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for future generations

Departmental result: Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for future generations Target 2018–19 Actual results
Number of places, people and events of importance to Canadians that are formally recognized 3,778 by March 31, 2021 3,816

Commemorating history

In 2018–19:

  • 55 of the targeted 80 commemorative plaques were unveiled as part of the Agency’s ambitious undertaking to accelerate the commemoration of national historic designations and reduce the number of unplaqued designations.
  • 260 commemorative plaques have been unveiled since 2016 through ceremonies and social media.
  • Pimachiowin Aki (Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe) for the land that gives life) received recognition as a UNESCO World Heritage Site on July 1, 2018.
  • 8 new places added to Canada’s Tentative List for UNESCO World Heritage Sites as a result of submissions/applications by Canadians.

Parks Canada supports the designation and commemoration of cultural heritage through formal recognition programs at the national level, including designations of people, places and events of national historic significance, heritage railway stations, heritage lighthouses, Prime Minister’s Gravesites, Canadian World Heritage Sites, Federal Heritage Buildings and Canadian Heritage Rivers. The participation of Canadians in the identification of places, persons and events of national historic significance and in their commemoration is a key element of these programs.

Parks Canada exceeded its designation target in this area in 2017–18. As of March 31, 2019 there were a total of 3,816 designations, a net increase of 4 over the previous year. The total number of formal recognitions in a given year is dependent on many factors that impact the rate of growth and the overall total number of designations. These include the number of nominations and eligible subjects as well as changes to the designation status of some formal recognitions as a result of loss or reviews of reasons for designation.

In its 2018 Report on Conserving Federal Heritage Properties, the Office of the Auditor General noted the increase in designations of federal heritage properties in Canada and identified the need to work sufficiently to conserve the heritage value and extend the physical life of these places. As part of the Government of Canada’s response to the report, Parks Canada has begun work with other custodian departments to review the approach for designating federal heritage buildings and to establish a consistent standard of heritage conservation across the federal government.

In 2018–19, Parks Canada worked with Canadians, including Indigenous peoples, to develop a new Framework for History and Commemoration to replace the National Historic Sites System Plan and implement a new approach to history commemoration and presentation. The Framework is informed by public history and the concepts of historical thinking, and provides direction to tell more diverse and inclusive stories at heritage places. The Framework also includes guidance to the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada on handling controversial designations and reviewing the national historic significance of persons, places and events.

Wrecks of HMS Erebus and HMS Terror National Historic Site

Laying the foundations for the first Parks Canada-administered national historic site in Nunavut, which is now jointly managed with the Inuit. In 2018,the second annual Umiyaqtutt Festival was held. The event brought with it many benefits, including:

  • an increase in the skillset and capacity within community for event management and tourism opportunities;
  • an opportunity to showcase the important role Inuit knowledge and the community of Gjoa Haven played in the discovery of the Franklin wrecks; and
  • the Arctic Tourism Summit’s Cultural Tourism Award, recognizing Parks Canada staff, members of the Franklin Interim Advisory Committee and representatives from the Hamlet of Gjoa Haven.

In 2018–19, Parks Canada continued work to implement the Government’s response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Call to Action 79 for historical commemoration activities, and recognition and acknowledgement of the contributions that Indigenous peoples have made to Canada’s history.

To contribute to this response to Call to Action 79, Budget 2018 announced $23.9 million over five years to Parks Canada to integrate Indigenous views, history and heritage into the national parks, marine conservation areas and historic sites managed by the Agency. This provided the Stories of Canada initiative with funding to support Indigenous partners in building capacity to tell their histories in new ways at Parks Canada administered places. This includes supporting research, co-development, and presentation of stories.

In 2018–19, the Agency developed criteria and identified 25 Parks Canada administered places to receive Stories of Canada initiative funding in order to implement the new approach to history presentation and key practices, including seeking opportunities for Indigenous peoples to share and communicate their histories on their own terms.










Departmental result: Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for future generations Target 2018–19 Actual results
Percentage of cultural resources in Parks Canada's care that are safeguarded 90% by March 31, 2022 63%

In 2018–19, 63% of the total number of historical and archaeological objects, archaeological sites and cultural landscapes managed by Parks Canada were safeguarded. Parks Canada is making good progress towards the target of 90% safeguarded by 2022.

In 2018–19, the Agency:

  • Made progress on the project to consolidate the collection of historical and archaeological objects – one of the largest in North America – to a new purpose built collection facility in Gatineau, Quebec. To date 40% of historical objects and 40% of archaeological objects are being kept in a way that meet the following three requirements: controlled environment, secure conditions and appropriately monitored;
  • Completed the development of a preventive conservation strategy which provides a cost-effective, evidence-based and sustainable approach to identify and reduce potential hazards to cultural resources and protect these resources before degradation that would require expensive treatment;
  • Completed the formal inventory of 80% of known archaeological sites and 91% of cultural landscapes; and
  • Began final phases of testing and deployment of the Cultural Resource Information Management System, which will consolidate critical cultural resource information from multiple sources to facilitate evidence-based decision making, reporting and presentation. Roll–out of the system is anticipated in fall of 2019.

Departmental result: Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for future generations Target 2018–19 Actual results
Percentage of heritage structures in poor condition that have improved 100% by March 31, 2020
159 out of 433
37%

In 2018–19, eight cultural heritage assets were improved from poor to fair or good, bringing the results to date to 37% (159) of the overall target of 433 (100%).

Through the course of this reporting period, and through lessons learned in the delivery of the federal infrastructure program, Parks Canada has adapted the program of work to reflect:

  • The need to redirect funding to address higher priority risks associated with assets not included in the original baseline;
  • Fewer projects advancing in order to offset cost increases incurred by other more critical projects; and
  • The need to identify a more accurate target, based on what the Agency considers to be achievable by the end of March 2020 with current funding.

As a result, this indicator’s baseline and target will be adjusted effective in 2019–20.

For more information on 2018–19 actions related Parks Canada’s cultural heritage programs, please refer to the Supplementary Information: Program Achievement Details on the Parks Canada website.


Departmental result 3: People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them

Departmental result: People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them Target 2018–19 Actual results
Maintain or increase the number of people that connect with nature at Parks Canada places 24.7M or greater by March 31, 2019 25.1M

Visiting a Parks Canada place is one of the most effective ways of connecting Canadians to their culture and heritage and ensuring support for Parks Canada’s mandate. The Agency maintained pre-2017–18 visitation levels following the successful Canada 150 celebrations, which provided free admission to Parks Canada places.

In 2018–19, Parks Canada met its visitation target to maintain or increase visitation to Parks Canada places, with a 1% increase over the 2016–17 level of 24.7 million visitors to 25.1 million visitors. Also compared to the 2016–17 levels, overall visitation to national parks increased by 3% from 15.4 million visitors to 15.9 million visitors. Visitation to national historic sites fell by 1% from 9.3 million visitors to 9.2 million visitors, compared to 2016–17 levels.

By managing visitation in more popular places to ensure sustainability and quality visitor experiences, visitation levels at the seven Mountain Parks (Banff, Jasper, Yoho, Kootenay, Waterton Lakes, Mount Revelstoke and Glacier) were maintained at 2016–17 levels – with a total of 8.9 million visitors. This was largely as result of Parks Canada’s strategy of featuring lesser-known places in its outreach and marketing campaigns. Visitation to all other national parks increased by 7% from 5 million to 5.3 million visitors.

Canadians who visit Parks Canada places also continue to connect to them. About eight in 10 (80%) of Canadian visitors felt the place they had visited was meaningful to them.

Parks Canada surpassed its performance targets related to enjoyment and satisfaction. More than 9 in 10 Canadian visitors to national parks enjoyed their visit (97%) and were satisfied with it (95%). Almost the same is true with national historic sites, where more than 9 in 10 Canadian visitors enjoyed their visit (96%) and were satisfied with it (96%).

The percentage of visitors that consider that they learned about the natural heritage of the national park was 69% and the percentage of visitors that consider that they learned about the cultural heritage of the national historic site was 93%. Overall, 92% of visitors affirmed that their visit to the national historic site contributed to their understanding of history.

For more information on Parks Canada’s innovation and diversification of its programs and services to Canadians, please refer to the Supplementary Information: Program Achievement Details on the Parks Canada website.

Annual visitation at Parks Canada places between 2008–09 to 2018–19

Annual visitation at Parks Canada places between 2008–09 to 2018–19 – Text Version
2008–09 2009–10 2010–11 2011–12 2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
Visitation (Million) 20.8 20.7 20.2 20.1 20.6 20.7 21.8 23.3 24.7
(baseline)
27.2 25.1
Year-over-year growth (%) 0 -2 0 2 0 5 7 6 10
(Canada 150 and free admission)
1
(over baseline)

Visitor enjoyment and satisfaction with Parks Canada places

Annual visitation at Parks Canada places between 2008–09 to 2018–19 – Text Version
Enjoyment Satisfaction
Target (%) 90 90
National Historic Sites 96 96
National Parks 97 95
Departmental result: People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them Target 2018–19 Actual results
Percentage of visitors to Parks Canada places that are new Canadians and young adults 14% by March 31, 2020 12%

Young adults and new Canadians continue to be important target markets for Parks Canada. With a focus on youth and families, campaigns and programs and services continue to encourage visitation by this important market. Starting in 2018, admission for youth 17 and under was made free at national parks, historic sites, and marine conservation areas. Parks Canada also continued to offer free admission for one year to new Canadian citizens through the Institute for Canadian Citizenship’s Cultural Access Pass Program. Building on previous years’ efforts to reach urban Canadians, in particular youth and families with young children, Parks Canada outreach teams were present in several communities, partner venues and festivals in urban areas across the country. Focussing on one-on-one interactions, these outreach programs connected with more than half a million Canadians in 2018, fostering a greater sense of belonging and making Parks Canada’s work more relevant to them.

Departmental result: People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them Target 2018–19 Actual results
Percentage of Canadians that support the protection and presentation of Parks Canada places 78% - 82% by March 31, 2019 88%

Digital Engagement

  • 874,080 Facebook followers
  • 464,135 Twitter followers
  • 87,706 Instagram followers
  • 14,989 YouTube subscribers with approximately 2 million views
  • 2.4 million newsletter readers
  • 250,000 mobile app downloads
  • 275,000 contest participants

In 2018–19 Parks Canada exceeded its target of percentage of Canadians that support the mandate of the Agency by 6%. As determined through Parks Canada’s quarterly awareness tracking survey, 88% of Canadians support Parks Canada’s mandate. This success is attributable to the Agency’s ongoing work to reach Canadians through strategic outreach, promotion, engagement and advertising.

In 2018, Parks Canada implemented a science and conservation promotional campaign "The Parks Insider". This innovative approach successfully encouraged public interest and enthusiasm for the Agency’s science and conservation work. This campaign took Canadians deep into the heart of Parks Canada’s conservation landscape by showcasing both people and their stories. The campaign featured biographies of and interviews with Parks Canada scientists.


For more information on the Agency’s outreach, promotion and engagement activities, please refer to the Supplementary Information: Program Achievement Details on the Parks Canada website.


Science and Conservation through Social Media Campaigns

  • #ParksInsider reached 2 million people
  • ParksInsider Videos had over 2 million views on Facebook/YouTube
  • 55 videos on science and conservation had 1.4 million views
  • #ScienceWithAView reached 2.7 million people
  • #MarineMonday, #WildlifeWednesday, #FunFactFriday — weekly social media videos featuring conservation projects

Dark-sky preserves in Canada - Text Version

Parks Canada is a world leader in night skies conservation. We manage 10 out of 17 dark-sky preserves in Canada.