Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Section 1. Context for the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2016–2019 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS):

  • sets out the Government of Canada’s sustainable development priorities
  • establishes goals and targets
  • identifies actions to achieve them, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA).

In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Parks Canada supports reporting on the implementation of the FSDS and its Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy, or equivalent document, through the activities described in this supplementary information table.

Section 2. Sustainable Development in Parks Canada Agency

Parks Canada’s Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy for 2017 to 2020 describes the department’s actions in support of achieving:

FSDS Goal 2: Achieving Low Carbon Government;

FSDS Goal 6: Healthy Coasts and Oceans;

FSDS Goal 8: Sustainable Managed Lands and Forests;

FSDS Goal 9: Healthy Wildlife Populations;

FSDS Goal 12: Connecting Canadians to Nature, and

FSDS Goal 13: Safe and Healthy Communities.

This supplementary information table presents available results for the departmental actions pertinent to these goals. Last year’s supplementary information table is posted on the department's website. This year, Parks Canada is also noting which UN Sustainable Development Goal target each departmental action contributes to achieving.

Section 3. Departmental performance by FSDS goal

The following tables provide performance information on departmental actions in support of the FSDS goals listed in section 2.

FSDS Goal 2: Achieving Low-Carbon Government

Parks Canada has developed a Greening Operations Standard and Action Plan to provide strategic direction to ensure sustainable workplace operations that contribute to a low-carbon government.

FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved
Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025 Improve the energy efficiency of our buildings/operations‡ In 2017-18, Parks Canada will:
  • Reduce GHG emissions from its facilities and fleet by 2% below 2005 levels, with facilities contributing 1.4%.
  • Validate its facilities portfolios for GHG reporting with regards to fuel, electricity and non-energy sources.
  • Promote Energy Performance Contracts (EPC) for its facilities in order to include high-performance green building standards for new constructions or major renovations.
13.2: Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

Source
Starting Points:

Total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year): [38.8] ktCO2e.

Total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet in fiscal year 2016-17: [33.3] ktCO2e

GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year): = [27.4] ktCO2e

GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2016-17 = [20.8] ktCO2e

Performance indicator(s):

Percentage change in total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet since 2005 levels.

Percentage change in GHG emissions from facilities relative to combined total (facilities and fleet) Agency 2005 levels.
5.4% change in total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet since 2005 levels.

16% change in total Agency GHG emissions from combined total (facilities and fleet) since 2005 levels.
  Modernize our fleet In 2017-18, Parks Canada will:
  • Reduce GHG emissions from its facilities and fleet by 2% below 2005 levels, with the fleet contributing to a 0.6% reduction.
  • Purchase 75% of its light fleet vehicles from more energy efficient vehicles on the Agency’s Preauthorized Vehicle List (PVL).
  • Promote the development of 5-year replacement plans for heavy-duty fleet vehicles by moving to vehicles with greater efficiency and lower emissions.
  • Promote right-size and low-carbon intensity fleet-vehicles.
13.2: Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

Source
Starting Points:

Total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year): [38.8] ktCO2e

Total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet in fiscal year 2016-17: [33.3] ktCO2e

GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year): = [11.4] ktCO2e

GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2016-17 = [12.4] ktCO2e

Performance indicator(s):

Percentage change in total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet relative to 2005 levels.

Percentage change in GHG emissions from fleet relative to combined total (facilities and fleet) Agency 2005 levels.
5.4% change in total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet since 2005 levels.

+23% change in total Agency GHG emissions from combined total (facilities and fleet) since 2005 levels.
  Support the transition to a low-carbon economy through green procurement In 2017-18, Parks Canada will:
  • Integrate sustainability into common-use procurement instruments, processes and controls.
  • Require key procurement officials to support and promote green procurement.
  • Provide green procurement awareness and training for staff involved in procurement.
  • Set Agency targets to reduce the environmental impact of specific goods and services (e.g. IM/IT equipment, light fleet, heavy fleet).
12.7: Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities

Source
Starting Points:

Number of key procurement officials that have facilitated green procurement through various activities and/or tools. in 2016-17 (base year): [7]

Number of procurement decision makers that have completed training on green procurement in 2016-17 (base year): [35]

Number of goods and services categories with specific green procurement targets in 2016-17 (base year): [3]

Performance indicator(s):

Percentage of key procurement officials that have facilitated green procurement through various activities and/or tools.

Percentage of procurement decision makers that have completed training on green procurement.

Percentage change in the number of goods and services with specific green procurement targets.
100% of key procurement officials have facilitated green procurement through various activities and/or tools.

96% of procurement decision makers have completed training on green procurement.

0% change in the number of goods and services with specific green procurement targets.
  Demonstrate innovative technologies In 2017-18, Parks Canada will:
  • Partner with Canadian environmental businesses to test on the Agency’s sites new clean technology developments through the Build in Canada Innovation Program (BCIP). For example, the Agency will use innovative technology to analyse in real time the amount of petroleum contamination in soil samples.
12.7: Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies.

Source
Starting point:

Number of BCIP-funded clean environmental technologies tested across Agency facilities in 2016-17 (base year): [2]

Performance indicator(s):

Percentage change in the number of BCIP-sponsored clean environmental technologies tested.
150% change in the number of BCIP-sponsored clean environmental technologies tested.
  Promote sustainable travel practices In 2017-18, Parks Canada will:
  • Continue to apply its Travel Directive and related policies to ensure the most efficient travel practices are pursued.
  • Promote green meeting practices by increasing videoconferencing facilities by 15% by March 2019 relative to March 2016 level.
  • Promote the creation of voluntary workplace Green Teams that will steward sustainable commuting and resource use.
12.7: Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities

Source
Starting Points:

Number of videoconferencing facilities in fiscal year 2016–17 (base year): [72]

Number of voluntary workplace Green Teams in fiscal year 2016–17 (base year): [2]

Performance indicator(s):

Percentage change in videoconferencing facilities.

Percentage change in the number of voluntary workplace Green Teams.
0% change in videoconferencing facilities.

100% change in the number of voluntary workplace Green Teams.
  Understand climate change impacts and build resilience. In 2017-18, Parks Canada will:
  • Continue to identify, assess, prioritize and take action to address climate change risks across the Agency’s areas of responsibility.
  • Undertake site-specific climate change adaptation workshops to develop provisional climate change adaptation plans for at least 8 PCA heritage sites, as the start of a multi-year program.
13.2: Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning.

Source
Starting point:

A draft Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for the Agency has been developed to identify climate change risks.

Number of PCA heritage sites that have been subject to PCA’s site-specific climate change adaptation planning exercise.

Performance indicator(s):

Percent completion of a comprehensive assessment of climate change risks and mitigation measures (Target: 100% completion by Fall 2019).

Percentage of targeted PCA heritage sites which developed climate change adaptation plans (Target: 75% by 2020)
10% completion of a comprehensive assessment of climate change risks and mitigation measures.

3% of targeted PCA heritage sites have developed climate change adaptation plans.
  Improve transparency and accountability Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
  Develop policy for low-carbon government Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

FSDS Goal 6: Healthy Coasts and Oceans

Parliament mandated, through the Parks Canada Agency Act and the Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act, that Parks Canada establish a system of national marine conservation areas (NMCAs) representative of the diversity of Canada’s 29 oceanic and Great Lakes marine regions. Parks Canada’s role is to ensure the protection and ecological sustainability of these NMCAs, facilitate unique experiences and an appreciation of marine heritage, and engage Canadians in the management of NMCAs.

FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved
By 2020, 10% of coastal and marine areas are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures Protect and manage marine and coastal areas In 2017-18, Parks Canada will:
  • Confirm and announce a final boundary and commencement of negotiations of an Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreement with the Qikiqtani Inuit Association for a national marine conservation area in Lancaster Sound in Nunavut.
  • Continue ongoing feasibility assessments for proposed national marine conservation areas in the Southern Strait of Georgia area of British Columbia and the Îles de la Madeleine area offshore Quebec.
  • Launch and support feasibility assessments for new proposals for national marine conservation areas in unrepresented marine regions including for a site in eastern James Bay and for a site in south western Hudson Bay.
14.2: By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans.

Source
Starting point:

As of March 31, 2016, the national marine conservation area system was 17 percent complete. The system includes four areas representing five of the 29 marine regions.

Performance indicator(s)

Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national marine conservation areas.

Target: 2 (Annually)
The Agency made demonstrable progress towards establishing national marine conservation areas in two unrepresented regions:
  • Lancaster Sound: In August 2017, the Governments of Canada and Nunavut and the Qikiqtani Inuit Association together announced an agreement on the final boundary and interim protection of the new Tallurutiup Imanga National Marine Conservation Area.
  • Strait of Georgia: Significant progress has been made in establishing relationships with the 19 First Nations and engaging stakeholders with respect to the Southern Strait of Georgia national marine conservation area proposal.
  • Additional work was undertaken to complete an accord between the Governments of Canada and Quebec for a marine protected area network, including Magdalen Islands. Parks Canada and the Cree Nation Government have developed a draft memorandum of understanding for a feasibility assessment for a national marine conservation area in Eastern James Bay.
  Build our knowledge of coastal ecosystems, MPAs and fisheries. In 2017-18, Parks Canada will:
  • Continue work with other federal departments, Indigenous peoples and stakeholders on policy to govern the management of national marine conservation areas. This will contribute to meeting Canada’s targets for marine conservation.
  • Continue work on piloting a national monitoring program which will enable the Agency to better understand the state of the National Marine Conservation Area System and more effectively manage these areas.
14.A: Increase scientific knowledge, develop research capacity and transfer marine technology, taking into account the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Criteria and Guidelines on the Transfer of Marine Technology, in order to improve ocean health and to enhance the contribution of marine biodiversity to the development of developing countries, in particular small island developing States and least developed countries.

Source
Starting point:

National marine conservation area monitoring plans are being implemented to help operating sites inform decision making and contribute condition assessments to future State of Canada’s Natural and Historic Places Reports.

Performance indicator(s)

Number of operating sites that contribute condition assessments to the State of Canada’s Natural and Historic Places Report
target(s): 4 by March 2021
In progress:
  • National Marine Conservation Area managers continue to implement their monitoring programs by testing out measures, collecting data, developing protocols and creating and strengthening partnerships.

FSDS Goal 8: Sustainable Managed Lands and Forests

Parks Canada has been entrusted to protect an increasing number of natural areas within a system of national parks that represents each of Canada’s 39 natural terrestrial regions. Once established, Parks Canada’ role is to manage these national parks in a manner that ensures their ecological integrity for present and future generations.

FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved
By 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures Conserve natural spaces. In 2017-18, Parks Canada will:
  • Confirm a final boundary and negotiate the necessary establishment agreements with the Government of the Northwest Territories and Lutsel K’e Dene First Nation, and an impact and benefit agreement with the Northwest Territories Metis Nation, leading to the establishment, development and operation of a national park reserve in the Thaidene Nëné area located in the East Arm of the Great Slave Lake of the Northwest Territories.
  • Advance work on the feasibility assessment for a proposed national park in the Interlake region of the Manitoba Lowlands natural region of the national park system.
15.1: By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements.

Source
Starting point:

Currently, 30 of 39 of Canada’s natural regions are represented by 46 national parks and national park reserves.

Performance indicator(s):

Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks.

Target: 2 (Annually)
The Agency made demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks in one unrepresented region:
  • Northwestern Boreal Uplands: The Agency made demonstrable progress towards the establishment of a national park reserve in the Thaidene Nëné area located in the East Arm of Great Slave Lake of the Northwest Territories. Negotiations with the Government of the Northwest Territories, Lutsël K’e Dene First Nation and Northwest Territory Metis Nation continued during 2017-18 and are close to completion.
  • Parks Canada and the Government of Manitoba have exchanged perspectives and information regarding previous work done on the idea of a national park in the Manitoba Lowlands natural region. This exchange included the work entailed in a feasibility assessment. Parks Canada requires the consent of the Government of Manitoba, who, to date, is not prepared to support a feasibility assessment for a national park in this region. Parks Canada remains interested in undertaking this work, including consultations with the province and Indigenous organizations.
By 2019, the condition of 90% of ecological integrity indicators in national parks is maintained or improved Conserve natural spaces. In 2017-18, Parks Canada will:
  • Continue to monitor the ecological integrity of park ecosystems, to restore impaired ecosystems and to recover species at risk on a priority basis through the national Conservation and Restoration program and other park-based initiatives. Thirteen major projects, from Terra Nova in Newfoundland to Gwaii Haanas in British Columbia, are oriented toward land and forest restoration by 2019 with three more projects to begin in 2017.
15.1: By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements.

Source
Starting point:

90% of indicators in national park monitoring plans consider the condition as maintained or improved.

Performance indicator(s):

Percentage of indicators in national park monitoring plans for which condition is maintained or improved.

Target: 90% annually
In 2017-18, Parks Canada’s Heritage Conservation Program mostly met its performance target by maintaining or improving 88 percent of its ecological integrity indicators monitored throughout 42 of 46 national parks.
  • Three of 118 indicators need their decline in condition stabilized to meet this target.
  • The Agency undertook a total of 45 restoration projects in 33 sites in 2017-18 as part of the Conservation and Restoration program.

FSDS Goal 9: Healthy Wildlife Populations

Parks Canada has a legal obligation to maintain or improve ecological integrity of national park ecosystems, while providing benefit and enjoyment to Canadians and international visitors. The Agency uses indicators to summarize and assess the ecological condition of the main ecosystems in each national park, i.e. forests, tundra, wetlands or freshwater. Using this information, Parks Canada identifies and conducts priority restoration initiatives for impaired ecosystems.

Parks Canada is committed to the protection and recovery of species at risk, many of which can be found within Parks Canada lands and waters. Parks Canada works to protect species at risk, along with their residences and habitat, and also supports and undertakes recovery activities to maintain or improve their conservation status.

FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved
By 2020, species that are secure remain secure, and populations of species at risk listed under federal law exhibit trends that are consistent with recovery strategies and management plans. Use legislation and regulations to protect species at risk and migratory birds. In 2017-18, Parks Canada will:
  • Recover species at risk on a priority basis through the national Conservation and Restoration Program.
  • Complete action plans for the remaining national parks with three or more species at risk (Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site, Pukaskwa National Park and Banff, Jasper, Yoho, Kootenay and Waterton Lakes national parks).
15.5: Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species.

Source
Starting point:

As of 2016, Parks Canada had completed seven multi-species action plans for parks with five or more species at risk. With the completion of that target, the current focus is on parks with three or more species at risk.

Performance indicator(s):

Number of action plans for national parks with 3 or more species at risk.

Target: 16 by March 2018
As of March 2018, Parks Canada had completed a total of 21 multi-species action plans for national parks with 3 or more species at risk. These addressed 174 species at risk occurring across 42 national parks. This surpassed the Agency’s planned target of 16.

FSDS Goal 12: Connecting Canadians with Nature

Parks Canada builds public awareness of and connection to the protected heritage places that it administers, as well as the natural and cultural resources in them. Through relevant and effective promotion and engagement initiatives, Parks Canada is working to strengthen Canadians’ awareness and appreciation of their national protected heritage places and Parks Canada’s important mandate to protect and present these places. By encouraging Canadians to visit these places, and in providing them with the information and means to enjoy them, Parks Canada allows more Canadians to experience the outdoors and learn about our heritage. These experiences can also lead to learning, personal growth and mental and physical health benefits. By strengthening the connection Canadians feel to their national heritage places, Parks Canada is helping to foster enthusiasm for Canada’s natural and cultural heritage and create a culture of stewardship and care for these places and the environment more broadly.

FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved
By 2020, maintain or increase the number of Canadians that get out into nature – for example, by visiting parks and green space – and increase participation in biodiversity conservation activities relative to a 2010 baseline. Promote public participation In 2017-18, Parks Canada will:
  • Engage and promote activities that focus on target urban markets to showcase iconic locations, experiences and learning opportunities by using market intelligence, product development and promotions.
  • Continue to work with partners to increase reach through broadcasting, mass media, social media, and presence at partner venues and key events in major urban centres.
  • Launch an improved website and a new mobile app designed to help new visitors learn about Canada’s natural and cultural heritage and plan their visit.
  • Continue to engage youth through programs, such as The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Youth Ambassador program, Canada’s Coolest School Trip Contest and the post-secondary Campus Club network, Students on Ice program and partnerships with youth organizations.
  • Continue to develop national strategic partnerships for targeted collaborative activities including program delivery, promotional campaigns, contests, scientific and academic research, learning tools and products and experiences.
11.4: Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage.

Source
Starting point:

As of 2016-17, Parks Canada reached 11.5 million Canadians through outreach and multimedia initiatives.

Performance indicator(s):

Increase the reach (media views and impressions and connections at outreach events) of Parks Canada’s administered places.

Target: 10% by March 2018
Parks Canada increased its reach in 2017 by an astounding 1590% far surpassing its planned target of 10%.
  • This result is largely attributable to the “Your Free Discovery” campaign; an integrated communications and marketing campaign that reached millions of Canadians and international visitors.
  • Parks Canada experienced a surge in use of its digital media in 2017-18, assisting visitors with planning and enjoying their visits. The Agency’s social media following across channels now exceeds 1 million.
  • Parks Canada launched a renewed website and a new national mobile app in 2017 to improve the visitor experience by providing better access to information on Parks Canada places and services.
  • Throughout 2017, Sophie Grégoire Trudeau in her role as Honourary Guide for families, encouraged families to get out into nature and appreciate the country’s natural and cultural treasures; examples of her work include participating at a Learn-to Camp event on Parliament Hill and launching Canada’s Coolest School Trip which expanded in 2018 to include more grades —grades 7, 8, and 9.
  • Parks Canada continued its partnership with CIBC and Mountain Equipment Co-op (MEC) to distribute and promote the 2017 Discovery Pass in their branches and stores across Canada. CIBC and MEC, as well as Air Canada contributed to the “Discover Canada” contest. As part of an ongoing collaboration with Google, Parks Canada conducted a virtual reality pilot using a technology called Google Expeditions at Inspiration Village in Ottawa and at several outreach locations in Vancouver.
  Enhance programs and services for visitors In 2017-18, Parks Canada will:
  • Play a key role in the celebrations to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Canadian confederation by making admission to Parks Canada places free.
  • Prepare for free admission to Parks Canada places for all visitors under the age of 18, beginning in 2018.
  • Continue its partnership with the Institute for Canadian Citizenship, whereby new Canadian citizens are offered complimentary admission to Parks Canada’s destinations for one year through the Institute’s Cultural Access Pass.
  • Host 30 overnight Learn to Camp events, as well as new outreach events, half and full day learn to camp programs and other activities to help get Canadians outdoors.
  • Continue to innovate, expand and diversify the range of programs and services available at its heritage places.
  • Implement a strategy to improve collaboration with Indigenous peoples, communities and businesses in offering a greater number of Indigenous Tourism experiences at Parks Canada places.
  • Continue to renew visitor infrastructure such as trails, day-use areas, campgrounds and visitor centres to ensure the quality and reliability of visitor offers, and respond to changing demands and needs of Canadians.
11.4: Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage.

Source
Starting point:

In 2016, there were 24.7 million visits to Parks Canada administered places.

Performance indicator(s):

Increase in the number of visits at Parks Canada administered places.

target(s): 2% annually.
Visitation to Parks Canada’s places increased by 10%.
  • More than 27.2 million visitors; the highest level of visitation the Agency has experienced in almost two decades.
  • Canada 150 was a key focus for the Agency -- from offering free admission to national parks, national marine conservation areas and national historic sites and free lockage at heritage canals, to enhanced programs and services. In total, 8.5 million Discovery Passes were distributed in Canada and abroad.
  • Parks Canada implemented free admission for youth 17 and under to all Parks Canada places starting in 2018 and beyond.
  • Parks Canada hosted 21 Citizenship Ceremonies that welcomed over 1000 new Canadian citizens.
  • The expanded Learn-to Camp program increased participation 20-fold; from 3,500 participants in 2016 to approximately 75,000 at 500 events.
  • Parks Canada piloted two new accommodation products in 2017-18: Ôasis at Fundy National Park and MicrOcube at Riding Mountain and Forillon national parks.
  • Over 30 Indigenous experiences and story-telling initiatives have been supported in various parks and sites — creating new opportunities for Indigenous peoples to tell their own stories in their own ways.
  • Parks Canada continued to make investments in infrastructure to ensure the quality and reliability of visitor facilities.

FSDS Goal 13: Safe and Healthy Communities

Parks Canada is responsible for 479 sites registered in the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory as of March 31, 2017. With funding from the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP, the Agency undertakes risk reduction activities (through remediation and/or risk management) at federal contaminated sites under its responsibility. Efforts at remediating contaminated sites serves to protect the health of Canadians as well as the environment.

FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved
By 2020, address the 4,300 substances identified as priorities for action under the Chemicals Management Plan. Demonstrate leadership on assessing and remediating contaminated sites. In 2017-18, Parks Canada will:
  • Contribute to the delivery of Phase III of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) to reduce potential environmental and human health risks and related financial liabilities.
  • Assess 13 FCSAP-funded federal contaminated sites.
  • Remediate or risk-manage 23 high-priority federal contaminated sites.
12.4: By 2020, achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle, in accordance with agreed international frameworks, and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil in order to minimize their adverse impacts on human health and the environment.

Source
Starting Points:

Number of FCSAP-funded sites where assessment activities have been completed by 2016-17 (base year): [4].

Number of FCSAP-funded high-priority sites where FCSAP-funded risk reduction activities have been completed by 2016-17 (base year): [2]

Performance indicator(s) / Target:

Change in the number of FCSAP-funded sites where assessment activities have been completed.

Change in the number of FCSAP-funded high-priority sites where FCSAP-funded risk reduction activities have been completed.
2 FCSAP-funded sites where assessment activities have been completed.

0 FCSAP-funded high-priority sites where FCSAP-funded risk reduction activities have been completed.

Section 4. Report on integrating sustainable development

During the 2017–18 reporting cycle, Parks Canada considered the environmental effects of 11 proposals subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, as part of its decision-making processes. Through the Strategic Environmental Assessment process, none of these Agency proposals were found to have negative effects on progress toward achieving the 2016 to 2019 FSDS goals and targets. For example, The Strategic Environmental Assessment for the Wapusk National Park Management Plan found that the plan supported Themes III and IV of the FSDS

Additional information on the results of the Strategic Environmental Assessments is available at: https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/nature/eie-eia/itm3.

Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

General Class Contribution Program

General information
Name of transfer payment program General Class Contribution Program
Voted
Start date 1995-1996
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017-2018
Strategic Outcome Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Link to the department’s Program Alignment Architecture Program 1.1 Heritage Places Establishment
Program 1.2 Heritage Places Conservation
Program 1.3 Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
Program 1.4 Visitor Experience
Program 1.5 Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management
Description The objective of the program is to assist recipients in conducting activities and delivering projects that will support the Agency in fulfilling its mandate to preserve and protect nationally significant examples of Canada's natural and cultural heritage and present and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations.
Results achieved Projects under the General Class Contribution Program achieved one or more of the following results:
  • Canadians recognize, appreciate and are engaged in the values of natural and cultural conservation
  • Stakeholders are engaged in terms of interest and involvement of common objectives towards ecological or cultural integrity.
  • Parks Canada managers and stakeholders have access to a better knowledge base for informed decision-making and dialogue on commercial, ecological or indigenous issues of mutual interest.
Comments on variances The variance in actual spending is the result of additional contributions sourced from operating funding. Planned spending is based on a preliminary annual forecast. Total Authorities are based on actual approvals.
Audits completed or planned Not applicable
Evaluations completed or planned Evaluation planned for 2021-22
Engagement of applicants and recipients Not applicable
Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Actual spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 4,883,166 4,477,298 4,464,324 6,688,980 6,223,024 1,758,700
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 4,883,166 4,477,298 4,464,324 6,688,980 6,223,024 1,758,700

National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places

General information
Name of transfer payment program National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places
Voted
Start date 2008-09
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016-17
Strategic Outcome Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals, and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Link to the department’s Program Alignment Architecture Program 1.2: Heritage Places Conservation
Sub-Program 1.2.5: Other Heritage Places Conservation
Description The program assists recipients in conducting activities aimed at ensuring the heritage value of non-federally owned or administered heritage places that have been formally recognized by the Government of Canada. It provides financial contributions to eligible recipients to share the costs of work necessary to ensure the physical health of a heritage place and to ensure Canadians understand the importance of the site and its role in the history of Canada.
Results achieved The program launched a call for proposals, with decisions rendered in June 2017. A total of 64 proposals were received of which 46 projects were approved for funding. Of the 46, three projects were withdrawn by recipients and another 8 projects were extended into 2018-19. An additional 27 projects, extended from the previous fiscal year, were completed by March 31, 2018.
Comments on variances The variance is the result of the availability of additional supplementary funding in 2017-18, which allowed for the approval of more projects than originally planned, as well as the extension of projects from the previous fiscal year to alleviate delivery hardships.
Audits completed or planned Not applicable
Evaluations completed or planned Evaluation planned for 2020-21
Engagement of applicants and recipients
  • Promotion and outreach through internal national networks across the Agency to inform potential applicants and recipients;
  • Communication with the Federal Provincial-Territorial Collaboration on Historic Places in Canada and targeted heritage organizations/stakeholders to promote the program;
  • Information shared via different social media channels and web presence on the Parks Canada website and www.historicplaces.ca;
  • Direct correspondence to inform newly eligible site owners; and
  • Presence at key stakeholder conferences.
Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Actual spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use

2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance 2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 933,398 6,262,998 10,000,000 12,737,002 11,768,415 1,768,415
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 933,398 6,262,998 10,000,000 12,737,002 11,768,415 1,768,415

Internal audit engagements completed in 2017-18

Title of internal audit Completion date
Audit of Asset Accounting January 2018

Evaluations completed, or planned to be completed, in 2017-18

Title of evaluation Link to the department’s Program Alignment Architecture or Program Inventory Status on March 31, 2018 Deputy head approval date*
Evaluation of Townsite Management Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management Completed May 2017
Horizontal Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation (Clean Air Agenda) Heritage Places Conservation Completed February 2018
Horizontal Evaluation of Species at Risk Program Heritage Places Conservation In progress June 2018
Evaluation of National Historic Site Conservation Heritage Places Conservation In progress October 2018
Evaluation of National Historic Site Visitor Experience Visitor Experience In progress October 2018

* An evaluation is considered complete when the deputy head approves the evaluation report (including a management response and an action plan).

Response to parliamentary committees

Réponse aux comités parlementaires

Preserving Canada's Heritage: the Foundation for Tomorrow – The 10th Report of the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development, December 2017

The Committee reported that many of Canada’s historic places are disappearing or under threat and that the federal government needs to take stronger action to preserve Canada’s historic places.

In total, the committee made 17 recommendations. The following were specific to Parks Canada:

Parks Canada’s National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places is the main program providing financial support to owners and lessees of national historic sites, heritage lighthouses and heritage railway stations that do not belong to the federal government. The committee heard that the needs of these organizations exceeded the available funding. To correct the problem, the Committee recommended that the annual funding for the National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places be set at a minimum of $10 million.

The Committee’s study highlighted the specific issues and challenges facing historic places in rural areas. The Committee recommended that Parks Canada review the National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places to determine whether historic places in rural Canada are receiving their fair share of the funding, and if not, changes should be made to the program to account for their circumstances.

The Committee also examined the issue of preserving Indigenous heritage places. The Committee found that Indigenous peoples define their heritage in a more holistic manner than the Western model. As a result, solutions currently used to protect heritage places must be adapted in order to preserve Indigenous heritage places.

Indigenous peoples must participate in the protection and preservation of heritage places. The Committee recommended that Parks Canada support an Indigenous-led initiative to determine how places that are important to them should be protected and preserved.

Finally, the Committee adopted the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s calls to action that concern the protection and preservation of Indigenous heritage in Canada. As such, Indigenous peoples must be included on the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada so that the Board integrates Indigenous history, heritage values and memory practices into Canada’s national heritage and history.

The Government of Canada shares the Committee's concerns regarding the need to better protect and conserve heritage places in Canada. Parks Canada's mandate is to protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada's natural and cultural heritage on behalf of all Canadians. The Government is also committed to achieving reconciliation with Indigenous peoples through a renewed, nation-to-nation, government-to­government and Inuit-Crown relationship based on the recognition of rights, respect, co-operation, and partnership. As part of this work, the Government is committed to promoting the recognition and understanding of the history of Indigenous peoples and the important contributions they have made to Canada since time immemorial. This commitment includes establishing Indigenous representation on the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada.

The Government’s full response can be viewed here: https://www.ourcommons.ca/DocumentViewer/en/42-1/ENVI/report-10/response-8512-421-310.

Response to audits conducted by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada (including audits conducted by the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

2017 Fall Reports of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development to the Parliament of Canada

Report 2—Adapting to the Impacts of Climate Change

This audit focused on the extent to which federal organizations, including Parks Canada Agency, had made progress in adapting to climate change. The audit examined federal leadership efforts and whether departments and agencies implemented the Federal Adaptation Policy Framework. The framework states that all federal departments and agencies must take action and consider climate change impacts in their programs, policies, and operations.

The audit found that nine departments and agencies, including Parks Canada, did not fully assess climate change risks in their areas of responsibility. Instead, each included climate change broadly as an influence in their corporate risk management documents.

The audit found that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Global Affairs Canada, Infrastructure Canada, Parks Canada, and Public Safety Canada did not explicitly link any activities to the climate risk drivers identified in their corporate risk management documents. Although they identified some measures related to climate change adaptation, these measures were either at an early stage of implementation or limited in scope.

As a result of these findings, Parks Canada should identify, assess, prioritize, and address the climate change risks related to its areas of responsibility.

Parks Canada agreed with the recommendation and is committed to identifying, assessing, prioritizing, and addressing climate change risks across the Agency’s areas of responsibility. Building on its existing programs and policies, such as the Conservation and Restoration Program, the Agency will complete a comprehensive assessment of climate change risks and mitigation measures by fall 2019.

Response to audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

The Office of the Commissioner for Official Languages (OCOL) performed a follow-up audit of its 2012 Audit of Parks Canada. The 2016 audit followed up on the nine recommendations from 2012.

The 2016 report identified that two of the nine recommendations were implemented and further work was required on the remaining seven.

In the spring of 2018 the OCOL confirmed that PCA had taken actions to implement the remaining seven recommendations. These were:

  • Recommendation 2: The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that Parks Canada establish and implement a new official languages action plan that includes specific measures regarding its visitor communications activities so that it can ensure services of equal quality in English and French. This plan must include timeframes, performance indicators and an accountability mechanism. Parks Canada must also establish and implement a monitoring mechanism for the official languages action plan.

    To address this recommendation Parks Canada appointed a new official languages (OL) Champion and Co-Champion and developed the Official Languages Strategy 2018-2021.

  • Recommendation 3: The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that Parks Canada develop an official languages policy that takes its activities and programs into account and includes all of the components of Part IV of the Official Languages Act. This policy must reflect the Agency’s new structure in terms of the visitor experience and refer to the DesRochers decision, particularly the principles related to equal access and services of equal quality. Parks Canada must also develop a communications strategy to effectively communicate the policy to all employees.

    To address this recommendation Parks Canada developed an OL directive that respects the recommendations' requirements.

  • Recommendation 4: The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that Parks Canada amend its performance management procedures by including a provision on the implementation of Part IV of the Official Languages Act in the performance evaluations of managers, team leaders and any other employees who are required to communicate with the public in both official languages and who negotiate service agreements with third parties.

    To address this recommendation Parks Canada took a number of actions that included: adding OL in the discussion of performance management when performance pay was admissible; requiring that candidates met the language profile of the position prior to applying to PCX-4, PCX-5 and PCX-6 competitive staffing processes; developing OL tools for all team members providing service to the public; and including OL-specific narrative statements in internal guidance documents.

  • Recommendation 5: The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that Parks Canada include in its new service agreements, as well as in those that are being renewed, specific language clauses that reflect the provisions of Part IV in order to fully comply with the Official Languages Act.

    To address this recommendation Parks Canada ensured that the specific language clauses were included in service agreements, which included testing samples of different types of service agreement instruments, which demonstrated the OL clauses were included.

  • Recommendation 7: The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that Parks Canada ensure that employees who are required to communicate with the public have language skills that reflect the realities and requirements of their positions in terms of the Agency’s official languages operational obligations. Moreover, the Agency must conduct an in-depth review of the bilingual skills of all of its employees to verify that there is sufficient capacity to provide services of equal quality in English and French.

    To address this recommendation Parks Canada conducted a risk analysis to identify key issues and areas of concern; formalised the talent management process for PCX staff using the public service's executive talent management system (ETMS); and included the OL bilingual skill obligations of employees serving the public in the Parks Canada OL Directive.

  • Recommendation 8: The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that Parks Canada develop a mechanism for regular and formal consultations of national, provincial and regional representatives of official language communities. He also recommends that Parks Canada take the specific needs of these communities into account when developing its activities, programs and services for visitors.

    To address this recommendation Parks Canada's actions included: adding a section on OL Minority Communities (OLMC) in the Agency's guidelines for planning and reporting management; adding OLMCs as stakeholders in the Agency's Stakeholder and Partner Engagement Registry; and developing a joint communication that outlined the Agency's obligations, as well as functions of the Registry that relate to OLMC.

  • Recommendation 9: The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that Parks Canada establish an evaluation framework for the implementation of Part IV of the Official Languages Act, implement an appropriate monitoring mechanism and evaluate all of its services related to bilingual service delivery as well as those offered by third parties. The Agency must take necessary measures in the event of non-compliance.

    To address this recommendation Parks Canada's actions included: implementing a performance measurement monitoring framework as part of the OL strategy 2018-2021; and performing monitoring activities that includes secret shopper exercises and verifying the Agency's internet content.

Parks Canada is committed to further reporting on the ongoing implementation of these recommendations in 2018-19.

Status Report on Projects Operating with Specific Treasury Board Approval

Project name and project phase Original estimated total cost (dollars) Revised estimated total cost (dollars) Actual total cost (dollars) 2017-18 Main Estimates (dollars) 2017-18 Planned spending (dollars) 2017-18 Total authorities (dollars) 2017-18 Actual spending (dollars) Expected date of close out
Link to the organization’s program(s): Sub-Program 1.5.3: Heritage Canal Management
Trent Severn Waterway: Bolsover Dam at Lock 37 – Closing Phase. 18,760,174 34,720,246 33,041,355 - - 2,016,718 57,232 2018-19

Note: Dollar amounts exclude both the goods and services tax (GST) and the harmonized sales tax (HST).


Owing to legislative changes, the fees results for the Parks Canada Agency are available in the 2017 to 2018 Fees Report.