Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Overview of the federal government’s approach to sustainable development

The 2013–16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada’s sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, the Parks Canada Agency supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities described in this supplementary information table.

2. Our Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

This Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy describes Parks Canada Agency’s actions in support of Theme I: addressing climate change and air quality, Theme III: protecting nature and Canadians, and Theme IV: shrinking the environmental footprint, beginning with government. The report for 2016–17 presents a high-level overview of results and is the final report under the 2013–16 FSDS. Last year’s report is available on the departmental website.

3. Departmental performance highlights

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Under Theme I the Parks Canada Agency contributed to the 2013–16 FSDS through one implementation strategy for Goal 1: Climate Change.

Implementation strategies: performance summary

Regarding implementation strategy 1.2.9: Improve understanding of climate-driven ecological change in Canada’s North by using a combination of remote sensing techniques and working with park cooperative management boards to assess how ecological integrity and traditional land use may be affected by climate-driven changes in northern national parks.

  • Since this Implementation Strategy was set to be achieved by March 2016, the final result was reported in the Agency’s 2015-16 DSDS.

Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians

Under Theme III the Parks Canada Agency contributed to the 2013–16 FSDS through seven implementation strategies for Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians.

Department-led targets

The following table shows the FSDS target led by Parks Canada Agency.

FSDS goal FSDS target FSDS performance indicator FSDS performance results
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians Target 4.4: Improving the Health of National Parks – Improve the condition of at least one ecological integrity indicator in 20 national parks by 2015. Ecological Integrity of national parks Parks Canada met its target of 20 national parks with at least one improved ecological integrity indicator in March 2015.

In 2016-17, Parks Canada continued to achieve important conservation gains through its Conservation and Restoration Program.

Implementation strategies: performance summary

Regarding implementation strategy 4.1.9: Develop action plans for all protected areas with five or more species at risk by March 2016.

  • Since this Implementation Strategy was set to be achieved by March 2016, the final result was reported in the Agency’s 2015-16 DSDS.
  • In 2016-17, Parks Canada completed 11 action plans for national parks with three or more species at risk. The Agency’s target is to complete 16 by March 2018.

Regarding implementation strategy 4.3.13: Make demonstrable progress on a yearly basis towards establishing national parks in one unrepresented region.

Parks Canada made demonstrable progress towards the establishment of a national park reserve in the Northwestern Boreal Uplands region of the Northwest Territories (Thaidene Nëné proposal).

  • The Agency initiated negotiations on a land transfer agreement with the Government of the Northwest Territories in December, 2016 and is on track to confirm a final boundary, conclude negotiations and recommend signature of the agreement within the 2017-18 fiscal year. The necessary Establishment Agreement with the Łutsël K'e Dene First Nation, and an Impact and Benefit Agreement with the Northwest Territories Métis Nation have been initialled and final drafting and financial details are being concluded leading to the establishment, development and operation of a national park reserve in the Thaidene Nëné area located in the East Arm of the Great Slave Lake of the Northwest Territories. Public consultations were concluded in October of 2016 and a report will be forthcoming in the summer of 2017.

Regarding implementation strategy 4.3.14: Increase the number of represented terrestrial natural regions from 28 in March 2012 to 30 of 39 by March 2015.

  • Since this Implementation Strategy was set to be achieved by March 2015, the final result was reported in the Agency’s 2014-15 DSDS Report.

Regarding implementation strategy 4.4.1: 80% of active management targets to improve ecological integrity are met by March 2015.

  • Since this Implementation Strategy was set to be achieved by March 2015, the final result was reported in the Agency’s 2014-15 DSDS Report.

Regarding implementation strategy 4.5.6: Make demonstrable progress on a yearly basis towards establishing national marine conservation areas in two unrepresented regions.

Parks Canada made demonstrable progress towards the establishment of national marine conservation areas in three unrepresented regions.

  • The feasibility assessment on the proposed national marine conservation area in Lancaster Sound commenced in 2009 was completed and the feasibility report was submitted to the Governments of Canada and Nunavut and the President of the Qikiqtani Inuit Association.
  • Progress on the Southern Strait of Georgia national marine conservation area reserve proposal in the Strait of Georgia marine region focused on ongoing work to engage with the 19 First Nations in the area, as well as engaging stakeholders and reinvigorating the Canada / British Columbia Steering Committee which oversees the project.
  • Parks Canada and the Cree Nation Government met and discussed a draft Memorandum of Understanding respecting a study to examine the feasibility of establishing a national marine conservation area to represent the James Bay marine region.

Regarding implementation strategy 4.7.4: In accordance with mandated responsibilities, provide environmental and/or other information to reduce the risk of, and advice in response to, the occurrence of events such as polluting incidents, wildlife disease events or severe weather and other significant hydro-meteorological events as applicable.

  • To mitigate this risk, Parks Canada continued to update and exercise emergency and business continuity plans actions, and to provide emergency response staff with ongoing training and awareness to ensure a state of readiness in the event of a natural disaster.
  • The Agency also implemented measures to safeguard its built assets against the impacts of natural disasters such as applying more resilient designs and materials in replacing damaged assets.
  • The most significant events affecting Parks Canada operations and Canadians in communities within and surrounding parks and sites include wildfires, floods, avalanches, landslides, hurricanes, storm surges, blizzards and hail. These types of events may impose highly variable and unforeseen expenses, and require the Agency to reallocate internal resources in order to respond and to ensure the ongoing safety of visitors and personnel. Unlike the busy wildfire season of 2015 with 122 wildfires at 27 sites with a total area burned of 458,300 hectares, over 3 times the 10 year average, the 2016 season was a slower than average year with 70 wildfires in 15 sites with a total area burned of 7,360ha.
  • Parks Canada’s efforts to manage this risk continued to focus on actions aimed at ensuring the ongoing safety of visitors and staff as well as the sustainability of operations. Such as the decision to maintain geographically separated Dispatch centres for operation continuance purposes. As well, the Agency implemented measures to safeguard its built assets against the impacts of natural disasters.

Regarding implementation strategy 4.8.1: Implement the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and complete remediation and risk management activities at known high priority federal contaminated sites.

  • Parks Canada is responsible for 479 sites registered in the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory as of March 31, 2017. With funding from the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, the Agency undertakes risk reduction activities (through remediation and/or risk management) at federal contaminated sites under its responsibility. In 2016-17, Parks Canada closed four (4) federal contaminated sites and undertook remediation and/or risk management activities at other 44 contaminated sites.

Theme IV: shrinking the environmental footprint, beginning with government

Under Theme IV, the Parks Canada Agency contributed to the 2013–16 FSDS through twenty-two implementation strategies for Goal 6: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions and Energy; Goal 7: Waste and Asset Management; and Goal 8: Water Management.

FSDS goal FSDS target FSDS performance indicator FSDS performance results
Goal 6: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions and Energy

Reduce the carbon footprint and energy consumption of federal operations
Target 6.1: GHG emissions reduction

The Government of Canada will reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its buildings and fleets by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020.

Parks Canada will reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its buildings and fleets by 10.1% below 2005 levels by 2020
Updated GHG reduction implementation plan in place by March 31, 2015. The Parks Canada Master Plan for the Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions was updated as of March 31, 2015
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2005–06. 39.1 kt CO2 equivalent
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2016–17, not accounting for renewable power emission credits, if applicable 37,0 kt CO2 equivalent

“On track”
Renewable power emission credits applied in fiscal year 2016–17 (kt CO2 equivalent). 0 kt
Percentage change in GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005–06 to fiscal year 2016–17, inclusive of renewable power emission credits, if applicable. -5,4%

“On track”
Adjustments made to base year GHG emissions. No
Goal 7: waste and asset management

Reduce waste generated, and minimize the environmental impacts of assets throughout their life cycle.
Target 7.1 (Optional): Real Property Environmental Performance

As of April 1, 2014, and pursuant to departmental Real Property Sustainability Frameworks, an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance will be achieved in Government of Canada real property projects and operations.
A Real Property Sustainability Framework in place to improve the management of energy, waste and water in departmental real property assets by March 31, 2015. Actual completion date: February 2015
Total number of existing Crown-owned buildings (over 1000 m2) and new lease or lease renewal projects (over 1000 m2) where the Crown is the major lessee, assessed for environmental performance using an industry-recognized assessment tool, and associated floor space (m2). 17 out of 21 Crown-owned buildings

34,215 m2 / 42,840 m2

“Achieved”

(Targeted performance level: 11 Crown-owned buildings / 22 790 m2)
0 new lease or lease renewal projects

0 m2
Assessment tool used: BOMA Best
Total number of existing Crown-owned buildings, new construction, build-to-lease projects and major renovations projects achieving an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance, and associated floor space (m2). 0 Crown-owned building

Performance level achieved: N/A
0 new construction projects

0 m2

Performance level achieved: N/A
0 build-to-lease projects

0 m2

Performance level achieved: N/A
0 major renovation projects

0 m2

Performance level achieved: N/A
Number of fit-up and refit projects achieving an industry-recognized level of high-environmental performance. 0 fit-up and refit projects

0 m2

Performance level achieved: N/A
Target 7.2: green procurement

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.
Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place. Parks Canada had this departmental approach in place as of April 1, 2014

The Policy on Green Procurement has been implemented. Procurement activity involves the integration of environmental performance considerations ranging from the initial procurement planning, the acquisition, maintenance and final disposal if need be. The Parks Canada intranet site provides specific guidance and tools for the implementation of Green Procurement practices.
Number and percentage of specialists in procurement and/or material management who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Procurement Green course (C215) or equivalent, in the given fiscal year. 35 of 42

83.33%

“On track”

(Targeted performance level 90%)
Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement, in the given fiscal year 5 of 5

100%

“Achieved”

(Targeted performance level: 100%)

As part of their annual performance evaluation, procurement managers and functional heads are expected to adhere to and implement all government procurement policies and guidelines, this includes support and contribution towards green procurement.
Target 7.2: green procurement (Optional)

1. As of March 31, 2017, 75% of vehicles purchased annually will be from the Parks Canada Preauthorized Vehicle List. (Optional)
Percentage of vehicles purchased that were on the Parks Canada Preauthorized Vehicle List. 97 of 126

77%

“Achieved”

(Targeted performance level: 75% of vehicles purchased)
Target 7.2: green procurement (Optional)

2. As of March 31, 2017, 95% of printers, photocopiers, and multi-functional devices will have environmental features such as duplex printing capability or automatic shutoff mode. (Optional)
Number of printers, photocopiers, and multifunctional devices purchased or leased that has an environmental feature relative to total number purchased. 100%

67 of 67

“Achieved”

(Targeted performance level: 95% of printers, photocopiers, and multifunctional devices)
Target 7.2: green procurement (Optional)

3. As of March 31, 2017, 100% of office computers will have a minimum lifespan of three years, to reduce electronic waste. (Optional)
Average service life of office computers. 100%

Average service life of office computers is 3 years.

“Achieved”

(Targeted performance level: 100%)
Target 7.3: Sustainable Workplace Operations (Optional)

As of April 1, 2015, the Government of Canada will update and adopt policies and practices to improve the sustainability of its workplace operations. (Optional)
An approach to maintain or improve the sustainability of the departmental workplace is in place by March 31, 2015. Actual completion date: February 2015

“Achieved”

Implementation strategies: performance summary

Regarding Implementation strategy element or best practice 7.1.1.1: Achieve a level of performance that meets or exceeds the custodian’s current commitment(s) to sustainable buildings using industry-recognized assessment and verification tool(s).

  • The Parks Canada Green Building Directive (2012) and the Parks Canada Environmental Management Directive (2009) include requirements to meet a level of green performance for new construction, major building renovations and refit or fit-up projects. The Green Building Directive also requires the use of Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) Best to assess buildings more than 1000 square meters.

Regarding Implementation strategy element or best practice 7.1.1.2: Conduct life-cycle assessments for major construction and renovation projects using an industry-recognized tool.

  • Parks Canada Green Building Directive encourages, as a best practice, a Life Cycle Approach using Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), Athena Environmental Impact Estimator / EcoCalculator, and/or other relevant tools.

Regarding Implementation strategy element or best practice 7.1.1.3: Develop plans to address environmental performance assessment recommendations for existing Crown-owned buildings.

  • Parks Canada developed plans to address environmental performance assessment recommendations for existing Crown-owned buildings based on the results of BOMA BESt assessments carried out in 2014-15.

Regarding Implementation strategy element or best practice 7.1.1.4: Manage the collection, diversion and disposal of workplace waste in Crown-owned buildings in an environmentally responsible manner.

  • Parks Canada continues to seek opportunities to improve the management of workplace waste.

Regarding Implementation strategy element or best practice 7.1.1.5: Manage construction, renovation and demolition waste in Crown-owned buildings in an environmentally responsible manner.

  • Parks Canada uses LEED performance criteria for Materials and Resources in construction, renovation, and demolition project specifications and management principles.

Regarding Implementation strategy element or best practice 7.1.1.7: Develop an approach to training for building operators of Crown-owned buildings.

  • Parks Canada employs a significant number of building operators responsible for the operation of complex real property assets. Parks Canada established training needs according to roles and responsibilities; recommended and/or provide specific training where necessary (e.g., NRCan Dollars to $ense for energy management); and included operator qualifications (training and certification) in relevant real property management contracts

Regarding implementation strategy 7.2.1.5: Leverage common use procurement instruments where available and feasible.

  • Parks Canada leverages the use of common procurement instruments whether they are mandatory or optional. In the case of optional use, Parks Canada encourages the use of existing Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements due to their ease of use and fast acquisition of the needed goods or services.

Regarding implementation strategy 7.2.3: Train acquisition cardholders on green procurement.

  • This best practice remains a goal of Parks Canada to ensure green procurement awareness and understanding is incorporated in training for acquisition PSPC card holders.

Regarding implementation strategy 7.2.4: Increase awareness of the Policy on Green Procurement among managers.

  • All procurement training for Parks staff includes a portion on green procurement and the use of common procurement instruments.

Regarding Implementation strategy element 7.3.1.1: Engage employees in greening government operations practices.

  • Parks Canada encourages the creation of Green Teams to engage employees in greening workplace practices and celebrating the Canadian Environment Week through the Commuter Challenge.

Regarding Implementation strategy element 7.3.1.2: Integrate environmental considerations into corporate policies, processes and practices in accordance with departmental refresh cycles.

  • Parks Canada ensures draft policy, procedure and best practice documents are reviewed by the Manager, Environmental Management.

Regarding Implementation strategy element 7.3.1.3: Maintain or improve existing approaches to sustainable workplace practices (printer ratios, paper usage, and green meetings).

  • Parks Canada continues to maintain a national printer ratio average of at least 8 employees per multifunctional device. Parks Canada promotes paper reduction through increased use of electronic devices and applications and continue commitment to equip meeting rooms with convenient presentation technology. Parks Canada continues to promote paper reduction by enforcing double-sided printing on all multifunctional devices.

Regarding Implementation strategy element 7.3.1.4: Minimize the ratio of information technology (IT) assets per employee.

  • Parks Canada undertakes print optimization reviews including reduction of personal printers; continues enforcing device allocation policy of one computing device per employee; and continues to offer standardized docking stations to provide laptop users with convenient access to the Parks Canada network while in the office.

Regarding Implementation strategy element or best practice 7.3.1.5: Select and operate IT and office equipment in a manner that reduces energy consumption and material usage.

  • Parks Canada purchases IT and office equipment that include energy efficient features such as double-sided printing, sleep mode (reduced power), and higher ink efficiency. Parks Canada continues to enable an energy-saving policy on all networked computers and laptops, with set minimum inactivity thresholds for monitors and computers

Regarding Implementation strategy element or best practice 7.3.1.6: Dispose of e-waste in an environmentally sound and secure manner.

  • Parks Canada promotes its Disposal of Surplus Electronic and Electrical Waste Guideline and work with partners such as PWGSC GCSurplus to ensure most appropriate disposal methods are selected.

Regarding Implementation strategy element or best practice 7.3.1.7: Reuse or recycle workplace materiel and assets in an environmentally sound and secure manner.

  • Consistent with the Parks Canada Environmental Management Directive, Parks Canada, implements solid waste management programs where feasible (e.g., recycling, compost).

Regarding Implementation strategy element or best practice 7.3.1.8: Minimize all non-hazardous solid waste generated, and leverage service offerings to maximize the diversion of waste.

  • Consistent with the Parks Canada Environmental Management Directive, Parks Canada Promotes the Federal Policy on Green Procurement and conducts life-cycle analyses of procured products and solid waste where applicable.

Regarding Implementation strategy element or best practice 7.3.1.9: Increase the population density in office buildings, and increase space utilization in special purpose buildings.

  • Parks Canada follows PWGSC direction regarding implementation of Workplace 2.0 and capitalizes on opportunities to reduce space requirements.

Regarding Implementation strategy element or best practice 7.3.1.10: Maintain or improve sustainable fleet management.

  • Parks Canada purchases at least 75% of new light feet vehicles from the Parks Canada Preauthorized Vehicle List.
FSDS goal FSDS target FSDS performance indicator FSDS performance results
Goal 8: Water Management (Optional) Target 8.1: Water Management

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will take further action to improve water management within its real property portfolio.
Approach to improving water management included in Real Property Sustainability Framework by March 31, 2015. Actual completion date: February 2015

“Achieved”
Amount and percentage of floor space in buildings over 1000 m2 that includes water metering, in fiscal year 2015–16 (where feasible). 30 055 m2 existing Crown-owned

70%

“On-track”

(Targeted performance level: 42,840 m2 existing Crown-owned
100%)
0 m2 new Crown and built-to-lease

0%
0 m2 major renovations

0%
0 m2 leases

0%

Implementation strategies: performance summary

Regarding implementation strategy 8.1.1.1: Conserve potable water.

  • As per its Green Buildings Directive, Parks Canada recommends the identification of strategies for potable water use reduction and seeking opportunities to reduce consumption as a best practice.

Regarding implementation strategy: 8.1.1.2: Manage storm water run-off.

  • Parks Canada establishes a plan to manage storm water in scoped projects.

Regarding implementation strategy: 8.1.1.4: Meter the water usage in new projects.

  • Parks Canada, through its Real Property Sustainability Framework (2015), encourages implementing water metering in scoped projects.

Additional Agency Sustainable Development Activities and Initiatives

In addition to its core implementation strategies, Parks Canada contributed to sustainable development through additional activities such as the engagement of Canadians through stakeholder and partner relationships and visitor experiences.

Performance summary

Stakeholder and Partner Engagement

Parks Canada provided increased opportunities for Canadians to be involved with Parks Canada places in activities they consider meaningful and relevant.

  • Parks Canada increased the percentage of volunteers by 15%.
  • 100% of collaborative initiatives with five national strategic partners were maintained or expanded.
Visitor Experience

Parks Canada facilitated a diverse range of opportunities in Parks Canada’s protected heritage places for visitors to learn about, experience, and enjoy the spirit, wonder, and awe of Canada’s network of heritage places.

  • There was a 6% increase in the number of visits at Park Canada’s administered places.
  • 78% of visitors considered the place to be meaningful to them.
  • 96% of visitors were satisfied with their visit.

4. Report on Strategic Environmental Assessment

During the 2016–17 reporting cycle, Parks Canada Agency considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, as part of its decision-making processes. Through the Strategic Environmental Assessment process, Agency proposals were found to have positive effects on progress toward the 2013–16 FSDS goals and targets in Theme I: addressing climate change and air quality, Theme III: protecting nature and Canadians, and Theme IV: shrinking the environmental footprint, beginning with government.

Additional information on the results of the Strategic Environmental Assessments is available on the departmental website.

Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

Name of transfer payment program National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places
Voted
Start date 2008-09
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016-17
Strategic Outcome Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals, and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture Program 1.2: Heritage Places Conservation
Sub-Program 1.2.5: Other Heritage Places Conservation
Description The Program assists recipients in conducting activities aimed at ensuring the heritage value of non-federally owned or administered heritage places that have been formally recognized by the Government of Canada. It provides financial contributions to eligible recipients to share the costs of work necessary to ensure the physical health of a heritage place and to ensure Canadians understand the importance of the site and its role in the history of Canada.
Results achieved The Program launched two calls for proposals, with decisions rendered in May and September 2016. A total of 91 proposals were received of which 72 projects were approved for funding. Of the 72, two projects were withdrawn by recipients and another 33 projects were extended into 2017-18. Project delivery time frames were adjusted to avoid undue hardships on recipients. Future calls for proposals will aim to communicate funding decisions earlier in the year.
Comments on variances The variance is the result of project cancellations; instances where contributions were reduced due to reduced scope of work undertaken by recipients or cost savings incurred; and the extension of projects into the following fiscal year to alleviate delivery hardships.
Audits completed or planned Nil
Evaluations completed or planned Nil
Engagement of applicants and recipients
  • Promotion and outreach through internal national networks across the Agency to inform potential applicants and recipients;
  • Communication with the Federal Provincial-Territorial Collaboration on Historic Places in Canada and targeted heritage organizations/stakeholders to promote the program;
  • Information shared via different social media channels and web presence on the Parks Canada website (www.pc.gc.ca) and www.historicplaces.ca;
  • Direct correspondence to inform newly eligible site owners; and
  • Presence at key stakeholder conferences.
Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014–15 Actual
spending
2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Planned
spending
2016–17 Total
authorities available for use
2016–17 Actual
spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 915,289 933,398 10,000,000 10,000,000 6,262,998 3,737,002
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 915,289 933,398 10,000,000 10,000,000 6,262,998 3,737,002

Internal audits completed in 2016–17

Title of internal audit Internal audit type Completion date
Internal Audit of Financial and Administrative Processes - Quebec Waterways Field Unit Compliance and internal controls April 2016
Point of Sale (POS) Audit Report Compliance and internal controls August 2016
Internal Audit of Financial and Administrative Processes - Ontario Waterways Field Unit Compliance and internal controls January 2017
Audit of the Governance of the Federal Infrastructure Investment Program at Parks Canada Compliance, internal controls and financial management controls February 2017

Evaluations in progress or completed in 2016–17

Title of evaluation Status Deputy head approval date Link to department’s programs
Evaluation of Law Enforcement Program Completed March 2017 Heritage Places Conservation
Evaluation of General Class Contribution Program Completed March 2017 Across all programs
Evaluation of Townsite Management In progress May 2017 Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management
Evaluation of National Historic Site Conservation In progress December 2017 Heritage Places Conservation
Evaluation of National Historic Site Visitor Experience In progress December 2017 Visitor Experience
Horizontal Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation (Clean Air Agenda) In progress September 2017 Heritage Places Conservation
Horizontal Evaluation of Species at Risk Program In progress December 2017 Heritage Places Conservation
Horizontal Evaluation of Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan In progress September 2018 Heritage Places Conservation

Parks Canada Multi-Year Evaluation Plan 2016-17

Response to parliamentary committees and external audits

Response to parliamentary committees

Taking Action Today: Establishing Protected Areas for Canada's Future

Report of the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development, March 2017

In 2010, Canada committed to a set of 20 targets known as the Aichi Targets established under the Convention on Biological Diversity. Target 1 commits parties to an aspirational goal of protecting at least 17% of terrestrial and inland waters and 10% of coastal and marine areas by 2020. The target also mandates that protection focus on areas of particular importance for biodiversity and ecosystem services and that protected areas be well-managed, ecologically representative, well-connected and integrated into the wider landscapes and seascapes. Canada’s achievement of target 11 formed the foundation of the Committee’s study.

The Report outlined that the federal government has a variety of roles to play to meet its Aichi Targets. It must provide the leadership needed to ensure coherent and coordinated plans are developed to reach the targets. It must partner with Indigenous peoples to establish and recognize new types of protected areas in Indigenous territories while providing new opportunities for Indigenous economic development and advancing reconciliation. The federal government must also put its own house in order by coordinating its efforts, accelerating the establishment of federal protected areas and demonstrating political will, including through the provision of funding.

The Committee made 36 recommendations to the federal government to help Canada rapidly increase the extent of its protected spaces in a coordinated and equitable manner. The majority of the report’s recommendations are consistent with initiatives currently being advanced by the Parks Canada Agency, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Natural Resources Canada and Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada.

The Government shares the Committee’s urgency to achieve our nation’s protected area and conservation goals. Two key initiatives are contributing to conserving Canada’s natural legacy: the Pathway to Canada Target 1 initiative, focused on the 17 percent terrestrial goal; and the Marine Conservation Target initiative focused on increasing marine and coastal protection to five percent by 2017 and to 10 percent by 2020. As there is a strong alignment between the Committee’s report and the design of work under the terrestrial and marine initiatives, the Government expects to receive advice that will address many of the recommendations raised by the Committee.

The Government’s response can be viewed here: https://www.ourcommons.ca/DocumentViewer/en/42-1/ENVI/report-5/response-8512-421-186

Response to the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

Fall 2016 - Fall Reports of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development

Report 3 - Departmental Progress in Implementing Sustainable Development Strategies

This audit examined whether the Department of Justice Canada, National Defence, Parks Canada, Public Services and Procurement Canada, and Veterans Affairs Canada adequately: applied the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals and its related guidelines to policy, plan, and program proposals submitted for approval to an individual minister or to Cabinet, including Treasury Board; reported on the extent and results of their strategic environmental assessment practices as required by the Cabinet directive and its related guidelines; and, met their departmental sustainable development strategy commitments and the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy commitment to strengthen their strategic environmental assessment practices.

The audit concluded that Parks Canada was successful in applying the Cabinet directive (i.e., conducting assessments, strengthening strategic environmental assessment practices, and publically posting the results). One recommendation, regarding the timeliness of the assessment process, was directed at the Agency. Management agreed with the recommendation and committed to review its practices to ensure timely integration of strategic environmental assessment information into the decision-making process by March 31, 2017.

The Government’s response can be viewed here:

http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_cesd_201610_03_e_41673.html

External audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

There were no external audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages requiring a response in 2016–17.

Status Report on Projects Operating with Specific Treasury Board Approval

Project name and project phase Original estimated total cost (dollars) Revised estimated total cost (dollars) Actual total cost (dollars) 2016–17
Main Estimates (dollars)
2016-17
Planned spending (dollars)
2016-17
Total authorities (dollars)
2016-17
Actual spending (dollars)
Expected date of close-out
Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture: Sub-Program 1.5.3: Heritage Canal Management
Trent Severn Waterway: Bolsover Dam at Lock 37 – Closing Phase 18,760,174 34,720,246 32,984,363 - - 7,271,481 5,254,763 2017-18

Note: Dollar amounts exclude both the goods and services tax (GST) and the harmonized sales tax (HST).

User Fees and Regulatory Charges (User Fees Act)

Fee NameUser Fees and Regulatory Charges (User Fees Act) table note 1 Fee Type Fee- setting Authority Year Introduced Year Last Amended 2016-17 Planning Years
Forecast Revenue (dollars) Actual Revenue (dollars) Estimated Full Cost (dollars) Performance Standard Performance Results Other Information Fiscal Year Forecast RevenueUser Fees and Regulatory Charges (User Fees Act) table note 2User Fees and Regulatory Charges (User Fees Act) table note 3User Fees and Regulatory Charges (User Fees Act) table note 4 (dollars) Estimated Full Cost (dollars)
Entry Fees Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act 1911 Increased in 2008. New fees added in 2010. 57,846,411 64,338,295 281,556,867 90% of visitors are satisfied. 96% of visitors are satisfied. Free admission in 2017. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels. 2017-18 9,007,361 282,376,550
2018-19 61,838,295 284,182,194
2019-20 61,838,295 288,804,515
Camping Fees Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act 1890 Increased in 2008. New fees added in 2010. 24,655,142 29,700,631 30,272,644 90% of visitors are satisfied. 96% of visitors are satisfied. Camping fees will be kept in 2017. Occupancy rates may increase. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels and ensure clear communications on what is and is not free. 2017-18 29,700,631 30,540,914
2018-19 29,700,631 31,112,009
2019-20 29,700,631 31,858,515
Lockage Fees Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act 1972 Increased in 2008. New fees added in 2010. 1,483,548 1,307,057 25,525,160 90% of visitors are satisfied. 93% of visitors are satisfied. Free lockage in 2017. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels. 2017-18 - 25,737,385
2018-19 1,307,057 26,434,747
2019-20 1,307,057 27,713,999
Municipal Services Other products and services Canada National Parks Act 1946 Water and sewer fees increased in 2001; remainder in 2003. Garbage fees increased in 1996. 3,871,377 3,913,501 11,054,376 100% of drinking water and sewage effluent samples meet quality standards.

Garbage collection frequencies are established in consultation with Community Councils and the Business Community, based on minimum standards established for each community and required to ensure the health and safety of both humans and wildlife.
Standards were met. No impact on this service category in light of free admission in 2017. 2017-18 3,913,501 10,963,177
2018-19 3,913,501 11,127,448
2019-20 3,913,501 11,578,661
Other Revenues Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act 1965 Business licences increased in 1994. Other fees increased in 2008. New fees added in 2010. 3,426,633 3,586,961 4,427,947 90% of visitors are satisfied. 95% of visitors are satisfied. No impact on this service category in light of free admission in 2017. 2017-18 3,586,961 4,135,993
2018-19 3,586,961 4,158,665
2019-20 3,586,961 4,217,393
Total 91,283,111 102,846,445 352,836,993   2017-18 46,208,454 353,754,020
2018-19 100,346,445 357,015,064
2019-20 100,346,445 364,173,084

Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees

General information by fee

General information
Fee Name Service Standard Performance Results Stakeholder consultation in 2016-17 or prior fiscal years Other Information
Entry Fees 90% of visitors are satisfied 96% of visitors are satisfied Service standard description was included in the 2013 online fee consultation information. Free admission in 2017. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels.
Camping Fees 90% of visitors are satisfied 96% of visitors are satisfied Service standard description was included in the 2013 online fee consultation information. Camping fees will be kept in 2017. Occupancy rates may increase. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels and ensure clear communications on what is and is not free.
Lockage Fees 90% of visitors are satisfied 93% of visitors are satisfied Service standard description was included in the 2013 online fee consultation information. Free lockage in 2017. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels.
Municipal Services 100% of drinking water and sewage effluent samples meet quality standards.

Garbage collection frequencies are established in consultation with Community Councils and Business Community.
Standards were met Parks Canada’s standards for drinking water and sewage effluent quality are based on guidance documents published by Health Canada (Drinking Water) and Environment Canada (Sewage Effluent), both of which included public consultations as part of the development process.

Garbage collection standards have evolved over time in response to individual community needs and specific frequency of pickups is set in consultation with users.
No impact on this service category in light of free admission in 2017.
Other Revenues 90% of visitors are satisfied 95% of visitors are satisfied Service standard description was included in the 2013 online fee consultation information. Enhanced programs fees will be kept in 2017. Demand may increase. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels and ensure clear communications on what is and isn’t free.
Mooring Fees 90% of visitors are satisfied 92% of visitors are satisfied Service standard description was included in the 2013 online fee consultation information. Mooring fees will be kept in 2017. Demand may increase. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels and ensure clear communications on what is and isn’t free.
Heritage Presentation Special Program Fees 90% of visitors are satisfied 95% of visitors are satisfied Service standard description was included in the 2013 online fee consultation information. Heritage Presentation Special Programs fees will be kept in 2017. Demand may increase. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels and ensure clear communications on what is and isn’t free.
Pool Fees (Swimming Pools and Hot Springs) 90% of visitors are satisfied No locations with this service were surveyed in 2016. Service standard description was included in the 2013 online fee consultation information. Pool and Hot Springs fees will be kept in 2017. Demand may increase. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels and ensure clear communications on what is and isn’t free.