Departmental Performance Report 2015-16

Supplementary Information

Table of Contents

Supporting Information on Lower-Level Programs

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

Internal Audits and Evaluations

Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits

Status Report on Projects Operating with Specific Treasury Board Approval

User Fees and Regulatory Charges (User Fees Act)

External Fees (Policy on Service Standards for External Fees)


Supporting Information on Lower-Level Programs

Sub-Program 1.1.1: National Park Establishment

Description

This program entails the establishment of at least one national park in each of Canada's 39 natural regions, in accordance with the National Parks System Plan. The completion of the system will protect representative examples of Canada's natural diversity, and provide opportunities for Canadians to experience, understand and appreciate these places. Five steps are involved in the process to establish a national park: identify areas representative of a natural region; select an optimum national park candidate from the list of representative areas; assess the feasibility of establishing the proposed park through studies and consultations; negotiate new park agreements, including any that may be required with Indigenous peoples or organizations; and formally establish the national park in legislation. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
15,863,291 7,990,089 (7,873,202)


Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
17 8 (9)


Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetActual Result
National parks are created in unrepresented regions. Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks. 2 by March 2016 3

Sub-Program 1.1.2: National Marine Conservation Areas

Description

This program aims to establish at least one national marine conservation area in each of Canada's 29 marine regions, in accordance with the National Marine Conservation Areas System Plan. The expansion and completion of the system will protect and conserve representative examples of the diversity of Canada's oceans and Great Lakes, and provide opportunities for Canadians to experience, understand and appreciate these places. Five steps are involved in the process to establish a national marine conservation area: identify areas representative of a marine region; select an optimum national marine conservation area candidate from the list of representative areas; assess the feasibility of establishing the proposed marine conservation area through studies and consultations, including the development of an interim management plan; negotiate new national marine conservation area agreements, including any that may be required with Indigenous peoples or organizations; and formally establish the national marine conservation area in legislation. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,515,966 876,838 (639,128)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
6 7 1


Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetActual Result
National marine conservation areas are created in unrepresented regions. Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national marine conservation areas. 2 by March 2016 3

Sub-Program 1.1.3: National Historic Site Designations

Description

This program involves supporting the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada in the designation of places, persons, and events of national historical significance. It includes screening nominations, performing historical and archaeological research, preparing submission reports, and obtaining ministerial approval, as well as systems planning, consultation with proponents and key stakeholders, and providing information to the general public. As most nominations for designation come from the public, the participation of Canadians in the identification and commemoration of places, persons, and events of national historic significance is a key element of the program. The Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada reviews all eligible nominations and recommends subjects to the Minister of the Environment and Climate Change, who makes the final decision regarding official designations. National historic sites, persons, and events reflect the determination and ingenuity of Canadians, and illustrate the richness and diversity of our nation's history. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
2,756,490 1,123,843 (1,632,647)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
32 22 (10)


Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetActual Result
Places, persons and events are submitted for consideration to the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada for national historic designation. Percentage of public nominations reviewed for eligibility within 6 months of receipt. 100% annually 83%

Sub-Program 1.1.4: Other Heritage Places Designation

Description

This program involves commemorating or designating federal heritage buildings, Canadian Heritage Rivers, heritage lighthouses and heritage railway stations. It also supports the nomination of World Heritage Sites in Canada which recognize natural and cultural heritage of outstanding universal value. Parks Canada works with other government departments, other levels of government and a wide range of partners to identify and recognize significant heritage places through their designation. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding. A grant is also provided to support the Trans Canada Trail Foundation's Fundraising Campaign.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
7,526,789 7,728,726 201,937


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
3 13 10


Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Other heritage places are considered for national or international designation. Percentage of federal buildings submitted for heritage evaluation that have been reviewed within six months of receipt. 95% annually 71%
Percentage of lighthouses nominated for Heritage Lighthouse designation that have been reviewed. 100% by May 2015 100%
Number of candidate nominations for Canadian World Heritage Sites where Parks Canada has provided advice and review. 3 annually 4

Sub-Program 1.2.1: National Park Conservation

Description

This program aims to maintain or restore ecological integrity in national parks through protection, conservation, restoration or mitigation activities, as mandated under the Canada National Parks Act. To implement this program, Parks Canada carries out applied science, monitoring and reporting, active management, ecological restoration, species recovery, environmental impact assessment, fire management and compliance activities. Some of these activities are done in collaboration with the general public, stakeholders, partners, local and Indigenous communities. This program also includes fulfilling legal responsibilities assigned to Parks Canada by the Species at Risk Act and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
99,321,011 105,105,530 5,784,519


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
614 660 46


Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Management actions result in improvements to ecological integrity in national parks. Percentage of active management targets that have been met as part of Parks Canada's Conservation and Restoration program. 60% annually 59%
Number of action plans for national parks with 5 or more species at risk. 7 by March 2016 7

Sub-Program 1.2.2: National Urban Park Conservation

Description

This program aims to protect the natural and cultural heritage of diverse landscapes at the national urban park as mandated under federal legislation. It includes conserving natural and cultural resources, protecting or recovering species at risk, promoting a vibrant farming community and sustainable farming practices and engaging people from local communities and across Canada in conservation. To implement this program, Parks Canada carries out applied science, monitoring and reporting, active management, ecological restoration, cultural resource preservation, restoration and rehabilitation, species recovery, environmental impact assessment, fire management, archaeology and compliance activities, most of which is done in collaboration with the general public, stakeholders, partners, local and Indigenous communities. This program also includes fulfilling legal responsibilities assigned to Parks Canada by the Species at Risk Act and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
4,082,455 2,575,533 (1,506,922)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
5 6 1


Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetActual Result
National urban park conservation is improved. Completed monitoring and reporting plan. 1 by the year following establishment On track

Sub-Program 1.2.3: National Marine Area Conservation

Description

This program aims to protect and conserve national marine conservation areas by ensuring that they are managed and used in an ecologically sustainable manner for the lasting benefit of Canadians and coastal communities without compromising the structure and function of the ecosystems with which they are associated as mandated under the Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act. This program also includes fulfilling legal responsibilities assigned to Parks Canada under the Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park Act, the Species at Risk Act, and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. To implement this program, Parks Canada carries out applied science, monitoring and reporting, management of marine resource uses, ecological restoration, active management, species recovery, and environmental impact assessment and compliance activities. Some of these activities are undertaken in collaboration with other federal or provincial authorities, the general public, stakeholders, partners, local and Indigenous communities. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,518,004 3,510,265 1,992,261


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
13 26 13


Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetActual Result
National marine area conservation is maintained. Number of completed monitoring and reporting plans. 4* by March 2016. 4
*Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park, Fathom Five National Marine Park, Lake Superior National Marine Conservation Area and Gwaii Haanas National Marine Conservation Area Reserve and Haida Heritage Site.

Sub-Program 1.2.4: National Historic Site Conservation

Description

This program aims to ensure the commemorative integrity of national historic sites, including heritage canals on Parks Canada lands. This program includes the evaluation of resources including buildings and engineering works, archaeological sites, landscapes, and historical and archaeological objects to determine their heritage value. The heritage value of resources is considered in all decisions affecting cultural resources, such as buildings and engineering works. This includes setting priorities for their management, monitoring their condition and assessing impacts of interventions. Key activities reflect the management regime for Parks Canada-administered national historic sites such as the preparation of commemorative integrity statements for national historic sites, commemorative integrity assessments, compliance activities, and monitoring and conservation actions to maintain or improve the condition of cultural resources. This program also includes fulfilling legal responsibilities assigned to Parks Canada by the Species at Risk Act and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
87,853,920 48,470,566 (39,383,354)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
229 172 (57)


Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Cultural resources of national significance at targeted national historic sites administered by Parks Canada are maintained. Percentage of objects of which conditions were unknown are assessed. 100% by March 2016 100%
Number of archaeological sites where threats have been assessed and reduced. 12 by March 2018 4 (On track)
Percentage of assessments completed that include measures to mitigate or reduce impacts to cultural resources. 100% annually 100%
Condition of heritage assets in poor or very poor condition is improved to fair or good. Percentage of assets assessed to be in poor or very poor condition that have improved to fair or good. 100% by March 2020 16% - 43 out of 272
(On track)

Sub-Program 1.2.5: Other Heritage Places Conservation

Description

This program provides support for national historic sites not administered by Parks Canada, Heritage Lighthouses administered by Parks Canada and the Gravesites of Canadian Prime Ministers; and provides conservation advice on other protected heritage areas (Federal Heritage Buildings, Heritage Railway Stations, other Heritage Lighthouses, and Canadian Heritage Rivers). Parks Canada aims to ensure that nationally significant heritage value is protected and known and that Canada's examples of nationally or internationally significant natural and cultural heritage are safeguarded so that they can be experienced by current and future generations. Parks Canada has responsibilities for the protection and conservation of 12 of the 17 World Heritage Sites in Canada, and the Agency's involvement in World Heritage is governed by an international convention to which Canada is a signatory. Parks Canada's National Historic Sites Cost-Sharing Program is used to provide contribution funding to non-federally owned national historic sites to support their conservation. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding. Parks Canada provides an annual grant in support of the International Peace Garden, on the borders of North Dakota and Manitoba, as a memorial to peace between Canada and the United States.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
6,114,263 3,800,438 (2,313,825)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
19 9 (10)


Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Parks Canada programs support the conservation of places administered by others. Number of national historic sites where threats have been mitigated or reduced through cost-sharing agreements. 30 by March 2018 15 (On track)
Percentage of reviews of intervention on federal heritage buildings completed within required time frame. 100% annually 100%
Percentage of responses to the World Heritage Centre for State of Conservation reports concerning Canadian World Heritage sites within the required timeframe. 100% annually 100%

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Heritage Places Promotion

Description

Heritage places promotion aims to help Canadians become aware of the places Parks Canada administers, their natural and historical heritage, and the work carried out to protect and present them. Targeted initiatives are responsive and relevant to audiences' needs and interests and are informed by social science research. A wide range of interactive and learning experiences including music, art and film initiatives are offered at venues such as festivals, sporting events, museums, zoos and aquariums in major urban areas. The reach and relevance of these initiatives are enhanced through collaboration with stakeholders and partners and by maximizing positive coverage through broadcast news, mass, specialized and social media. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
26,824,704 27,083,542 258,838


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
257 234 (23)


Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetActual Result
Canadians appreciate the places administered by Parks Canada. Percentage of Canadians that appreciate the places administered by Parks Canada. 80% by March 2018 To be measured in March 2018

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Partnering and Participation

Description

This program encourages the participation of partners and stakeholders and leads to new or expanded opportunities for Canadians to discover and develop a sense of connection to their protected heritage places. Partnering arrangements advance shared or complimentary goals and objectives, and result in a wide range of collaborative activities including program delivery, promotional campaigns, contests, scientific and academic research, learning tools and new products. Partners include private sector organizations as well as other government departments, NGO's, academic institutions, and Indigenous peoples, who in a number of places co-manage national heritage places. Stakeholders engage with Parks Canada through a wide variety of activities such as the Minister's Round Table, formal and informal consultation processes, and the national volunteer program. Stakeholders include individuals, groups and organizations that have an interest in Parks Canada and ensure that Canadians' needs and priorities are clearly expressed and inform Parks Canada's actions and direction. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
10,914,988 13,659,601 2,744,613


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
94 101 7


Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Stakeholders and partners are engaged in the protection and presentation of Parks Canada's administered places. Increase in the percentage of Parks Canada volunteers. 10% by March 2018 26% (On track)
Percentage of collaborative initiatives with five national strategic partners that are maintained or expanded. 75% by March 2018 100% (On track)

Sub-Program 1.4.1: National Park Visitor Experience

Description

This program fosters opportunities for Canadians and international visitors to discover, experience, enjoy and develop a sense of personal connection to Canada's national parks. This program includes a range of activities, services, and products associated with pre-visit planning, the on-site visit, and post-visit communications. It includes tourism marketing, trip planning information, reception, orientation, interpretation (e.g., guided walks, presentations, exhibits, audio-visual material, technology applications), recreational activities, special events, merchandise, compliance, visitor safety services, and visitor facilities (e.g., visitor reception centres, campgrounds, trails, park roads). The program is supported by market and visitor analytics, trend analysis, and performance measurement. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
202,778,912 280,646,906 77,867,994


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,154 1,288 134


Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Visitors at surveyed national parks enjoyed their visit. Average percentage of visitors that enjoyed their visit. 90% annually 94%
Visitors at surveyed national parks learned from experience and active participation. Average percentage of visitors that consider that they learned about the natural heritage of the national park. 60% annually 73%
Condition of visitor experience assets in poor or very poor condition is improved to fair or good. Percentage of assets assessed to be in poor or very poor condition that have improved to fair or good. 100% by March 2020 11% - 112 out of 1,028
(On track)

Sub-Program 1.4.2: National Urban Park Visitor Experience

Description

This program fosters opportunities for Canadians and international visitors to discover, experience, enjoy and develop a sense of personal connection to Canada's national urban park. This program includes a range of activities, services, and products associated with pre-visit planning, the on-site visit, and post-visit communications. It includes tourism marketing, trip planning information, reception, orientation, interpretation (e.g., guided walks, presentations, exhibits, audio-visual material, technology tools), recreational activities, special events, merchandise, compliance, visitor safety services, and visitor facilities (e.g., visitor reception centres, campgrounds, trails). The program is supported by market and visitor analytics, trend analysis, and performance measurement. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
8,557,154 2,003,020 (6,554,134)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
10 8 (2)


Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Visitors surveyed at the national urban park enjoyed their visit. Average percentage of visitors that enjoyed their visit. 90% annually Not measurable in 2015-16
Visitors surveyed at the national urban park learned from experience and active participation. Average percentage of visitors that consider that they learned about the natural and cultural heritage of the national urban park. 60% annually Not measurable in 2015-16

Sub-Program 1.4.3: National Marine Conservation Area Visitor Experience

Description

This program fosters opportunities for Canadians and international visitors to discover, experience, enjoy and develop a sense of connection to Canada's national marine conservation areas. This program includes a range of activities, services, and products associated with pre-visit planning, the on-site visit, and post-visit communications. It includes tourism marketing, trip planning information, reception, orientation, interpretation (e.g., presentations, exhibits, audio-visual materials), recreational activities, special events, merchandise, compliance, visitor safety services, and visitor facilities (e.g., visitor reception centres, docks, day-use areas). The program is supported by market and visitor analytics, trend analysis, and performance measurement. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
2,373,953 3,215,033 841,080


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
18 20 2


Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetActual Result
Visitors at surveyed national marine conservation areas enjoyed their visit. Average percentage of visitors that enjoyed their visit. 90% annually 90%

Sub-Program 1.4.4: National Historic Site Visitor Experience

Description

This program fosters opportunities for Canadians and international visitors to discover, experience, enjoy and develop a sense of personal connection to national historic sites administered by Parks Canada. This program includes a range of activities, services, and products associated with pre-visit planning, the on-site visit, and post-visit communications. It includes tourism marketing, trip planning information, reception, orientation, interpretation (e.g., period animation, demonstrations, guided walks, exhibits, audio-visual material, technology applications), recreational activities, special events, merchandise, compliance, visitor safety services, and visitor facilities (e.g., visitor reception centres, washrooms, trails). The program is supported by market and visitor analytics, trend analysis, and performance measurement. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
78,442,069 69,001,224 (9,440,845)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
609 483 (126)


Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Visitors at surveyed national historic sites enjoyed their visit. Average percentage of visitors that enjoyed their visit. 90% annually 96%
Visitors at surveyed national historic sites learned from experience and active participation. Average percentage of visitors that consider that they learned about the cultural heritage of the national historic site. 85% annually 95%
Condition of visitor experience assets in poor or very poor condition is improved to fair or good. Percentage of assets assessed to be in poor or very poor condition that have improved to fair or good. 100% by March 2020 12% - 26 out of 209
(On track)

Sub-Program 1.4.5: Heritage Canal Visitor Experience

Description

This program fosters opportunities for Canadians and international visitors to discover, experience, enjoy and develop a sense of personal connection to Canada's heritage canals. The nine heritage canals include the Trent-Severn Waterway and the Rideau, Lachine, Carillon, Chambly, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Saint-Ours, Sault Ste. Marie, and St. Peters canals. This program includes a range of land and water-based activities, services, and products associated with pre-visit planning, the on-site visit, and post-visit communications. It includes tourism marketing, trip planning information, reception, orientation, interpretation (e.g., exhibits, audio-visual material), recreation, compliance and visitor safety services, and visitor facilities (e.g., visitor reception centres, locks). The program is supported by market and visitor analytics, trend analysis, and performance measurement. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
95,607,304 45,547,589 (50,059,715)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
337 265 (72)


Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Boaters use heritage canals. Increase in the number of boats on heritage canals. 2% annually 14%
Condition of visitor experience assets in poor or very poor condition is improved to fair or good. Percentage of assets assessed to be in poor or very poor condition that have improved to fair or good. 100% by March 2020 9% - 8 out of 85
(On track)

Sub-Program 1.5.1: Townsite Management

Description

This program involves the provision of municipal services and the management of related infrastructure to support residents and visitors in the five townsites of Field (Yoho National Park), Lake Louise (Banff National Park), Wasagaming (Riding Mountain National Park), Waskesiu (Prince Albert National Park), and Waterton (Waterton Lakes National Park). Municipal services include drinking water, sewage treatment, road maintenance, snow removal, and garbage pick-up and disposal. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
11,142,263 8,133,845 (3,008,418)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
44 40 (4)


Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Five townsites operated by Parks Canada receive municipal services according to government standards. Percentage of drinking water and sewage effluent samples that meet quality standards. 100% annually 100%
Condition of townsite assets in poor or very poor condition is improved to fair or good. Percentage of assets assessed to be in poor or very poor condition that have improved to fair or good. 100% by March 2020 13% - 1 out of 8
(On track)

Sub-Program 1.5.2: Highway Management

Description

This program involves the management of the Trans-Canada and provincially numbered highways infrastructure within national parks and one national historic site. The operation, maintenance and improvement of these highways benefit Canadians and visitors to Parks Canada's heritage places and includes snow removal, inspections, repairs and replacement of highway surfaces, retaining walls, bridges and culverts. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
245,215,124 214,938,768 (30,276,356)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
208 130 (78)


Performance Results
Expected ResultPerformance IndicatorTargetActual Result
Condition of highways and highway bridges (including snow sheds, culverts and crossing structures) in poor or very poor condition is improved to fair or good. Percentage of assets assessed to be in poor or very poor condition that have improved to fair or good. 100% by March 2020 19% - 23 out of 120

(On track)

Sub-Program 1.5.3: Heritage Canal Management

Description

This program involves water management and the management of bridge and dam infrastructure at heritage canals for the benefit of Canadians. Water management encompasses maintaining navigation by managing the flow and level of water, mitigating flooding, supporting hydro where applicable, fostering recreational use and providing municipal water at the following five heritage canals: Trent-Severn Waterway, the Rideau, Lachine, Chambly, and Saint-Ours canals. The management of heritage canal infrastructure includes activities such as the operation, maintenance and improvement of bridges and dams at all nine heritage canals. The General Class Contribution Program is used to provide contribution funding.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16
Planned Spending
2015-16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
86,993,466 49,339,490 (37,653,976)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16
Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
71 121 50


Performance Results
Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargetsActual Results
Water levels, within the navigable portion of the canal or waterway that Parks Canada manages during the navigation season will meet the Agency's legal and/ or operational obligations. Percentage of time that water level gauge measurements are within prescribed ranges. 95% annually 91%
Condition of dams, marine assets (walls, breakwaters and navigation channels) and bridges (including culverts) in poor or very poor condition is improved to fair or good. Percentage of assets assessed to be in poor or very poor condition that have improved to fair or good. 100% by March 2020 37% - 53 out of 144
(On track)

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Overview of the Federal Government's Approach to Sustainable Development

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) 2013-16 presents the Government of Canada's sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Parks Canada supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities described in this supplementary information table.

This Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy presents the results for Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality, Theme III - Protecting Nature and Canadians, and Theme IV - Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Beginning with Government.

2. Themes I to III: Department- and Agency-Led Targets

FSDS GoalFSDS Performance IndicatorFSDS TargetFSDS Performance Status
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians - Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come. Ecological Integrity of national parks Target 4.4: Improving the Health of National Parks - Improve the condition of at least one ecological integrity indicator in 20 national parks by 2015. Parks Canada met its target of 20 national parks with at least one improved ecological integrity indicator in March 2015. In 2015-16, Parks Canada continued to achieve important conservation gains through its Conservation and Restoration Program.

3. Themes I to III: Implementation Strategies

Parks Canada has one implementation strategy under Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality and seven implementation strategies under Theme III - Protecting Nature and Canadians.

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Target 1.2: Climate Change Adaptation
Implementation Strategy
1.2.9: Improve understanding of climate-driven ecological change in Canada's North by using a combination of remote sensing techniques and working with park cooperative management boards to assess how ecological integrity and traditional land use may be affected by climate-driven changes in northern national parks.
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Goals and Targets
Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 1: Climate Change - In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.
Target 1.2: Climate Change Adaptation: Facilitate reduced vulnerability of individuals, communities, regions and economic sectors to the impacts of climate change through the development and provision of information and tools.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.2: Heritage Places Conservation
Sub Program 1.2.1: National Park Conservation
Description of the Implementation Strategy
Parks Canada contributes to the understanding of climate-driven ecological change in Canada's North by consulting with park co-operative management boards, conducting process-based ecosystem mapping, and completing scenarios modeling and reporting to help communities understand the risks to important country food, recognize the need for adaptation, and discuss options for action. Parks Canada also links key drivers to changing ecosystem composition and structure and discusses how these changes might impact other ecosystem components (such as caribou and other species) and the ecological integrity of parks. This activity supports communities in assessing the risks as well as opportunities arising from climate change, and provides them with options for adapting.
Performance Indicator
Ecotype mapping for Sirmilk and Quttinirpaaq National Parks is completed.
Performance Results for 2015-16
Through the implementation of the Understanding Climate-Driven Ecological Change in Canada's North Program, Parks Canada applied Inuit knowledge and advanced spatial modelling using remote sensing techniques to develop detailed ecological maps and predict how plants and animals may respond to climate change. In 2015-16, Parks Canada produced detailed ecological maps in two arctic parks (Sirmilk and Quttinirpaaq) as well as climate change vulnerability assessments in three representative parks.
Clean Air Agenda - Spending Information
Planned spending for 2015-16: $410,000
Actual spending for 2015-16: $396,654
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Target 4.1: Species at Risk
Implementation Strategy
4.1.9: Develop action plans for all protected areas with five or more species at risk by March 2016.
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Goals and Targets
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians - Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.1: Species at Risk: By 2020, populations of species at risk listed under federal law exhibit trends that are consistent with recovery strategies and management plans.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.2: Heritage Places Conservation
Sub Program 1.2.1: National Park Conservation
Description of the Implementation Strategy
Over half of Canada's endangered and threatened species can be found in the protected heritage areas administered by Parks Canada. Parks Canada will protect these species and their critical habitat in the Agency's heritage areas, and will support their recovery by leading the development and implementation of recovery strategies and action plans, monitoring species status, and conducting public awareness and engagement activities. Recovery planning is an obligation under the Species at Risk Act.
Performance Indicator
Number of action plans for national parks with five or more species at risk.
Performance Results for 2015-16
In 2015-16, seven action plans for national parks with five or more species at risk were completed. The site-based multi-species approach for action plans allows the Agency to prioritize conservation actions for the suite of species at risk found in Parks Canada's heritage places.


Target 4.3: Terrestrial Ecosystem and Habitat Stewardship
Implementation Strategy
4.3.13: Make demonstrable progress on a yearly basis towards establishing national parks in one unrepresented region.
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Goals and Targets
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.3: Terrestrial Ecosystem and Habitat Stewardship: Contribute to the proposed national target that by 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.1: Heritage Places Establishment
Sub Program 1.1.1: National Park Establishment and Expansion
Description of the Implementation Strategy
This strategy entails the establishment of at least one national park in each of Canada's 39 natural regions, in accordance with the National Parks System Plan. The completion of the system will protect representative examples of Canada's natural diversity, and provide opportunities for Canadians to experience, understand and appreciate these places. Five steps are involved in the process to establish a national park: identify areas representative of a natural region; select an optimum national park candidate from the list of representative areas; assess the feasibility of establishing the proposed park through studies and consultations; negotiate new park agreements, including any that may be required with Indigenous peoples or organizations; and formally establish the national park in legislation.
Performance Indicator
Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks.
Performance Results for 2015-16
Parks Canada exceeded its target and advanced the Government's priority to expand the national parks system by achieving demonstrable progress in three unrepresented regions.

The Qausuittuq National Park was added to Schedule 1 of the Canada National Parks Act effective September 1, 2015, legally protecting 11,008 square kilometres of Arctic lands and waters.

The land transfer process pursuant to the Mealy Mountains National Park was advanced through the completion of all survey products related to the final boundary and establishment agreements were signed with the Innu Nation and the Nunatukavut Community Council. This process followed the signing of a Memorandum of Agreement between the Federal Government and the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador in July 2015 creating Canada's 46th national park.

Parks Canada made demonstrable progress towards the establishment of one additional national park reserve in the Northwest Territories (the Thaidene Nene proposal). The Government announced a 14,000 square kilometre boundary for public consultation and Parks Canada initiated consultations with Indigenous communities, stakeholders, third-party interests and the public. Negotiated agreements-in-principle were initialled with the Lutsel K'e Dene First Nations and the Northwest Territory Métis Nation for this proposal.


Target 4.3: Terrestrial Ecosystem and Habitat Stewardship
Implementation Strategy
4.3.14: Increase the number of represented terrestrial natural regions from 28 in March 2012 to 30 of 39 by March 2015.
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Goals and Targets
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.3: Terrestrial Ecosystem and Habitat Stewardship: Contribute to the proposed national target that by 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.1: Heritage Places Establishment
Description of the Implementation Strategy
This strategy aims to establish national parks in order to conserve Canada's natural and cultural heritage and make it available to Canadians for their benefit and enjoyment, thus fostering a strong sense of connection to our natural heritage. This strategy also supports Canada's involvement in the internationally shared objective of protecting the best of the world's natural heritage. By establishing national parks in each of Canada's natural terrestrial regions, this strategy ensures the protection of representative examples of Canada's natural diversity. Establishment is achieved through feasibility studies, research, consulting with Indigenous peoples, stakeholders and the general public, negotiating with other governments and Indigenous organizations, and fulfilling legislative requirements.
Performance Indicator
Number of represented terrestrial natural regions in the system of national parks.
Performance Results for 2015-16
Parks Canada met its target of increasing the number of represented terrestrial regions to 30 in March 2015.


Target 4.4: Improving the Health of National Parks
Implementation Strategy
4.4.1: 80% of active management targets to improve ecological integrity are met by March 2015.
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Goals and Targets
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.4: Improving the Health of National Parks: Improve the condition of at least one Ecological Integrity Indicator in 20 national parks by 2015.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.2: Heritage Places Conservation
Sub Program 1.2.1: National Park Conservation
Description of the Implementation Strategy
This strategy aims to maintain or restore ecological integrity in national parks through protection, conservation, restoration or mitigation activities, as mandated under the Canada National Parks Act. To implement this strategy, Parks Canada carries out applied science, monitoring and reporting, ecological restoration, species recovery, environmental assessment, fire management and compliance activities. Some of these activities are done in collaboration with the general public, stakeholders, partners, local and Indigenous communities. This strategy also includes fulfilling legal responsibilities assigned to Parks Canada by the Species at Risk Act and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act.
Performance Indicator
Percentage of active management targets to improve ecological integrity that are met.
Performance Results for 2015-16
This indicator was revised in 2015-16 to "60% of active management targets have been met as part of Parks Canada's Conservation and Restoration Program". As of March 2016, projects under the Conservation and Restoration Program had led to the achievement of 59% of active management targets to enhance ecological integrity or the status of priority species at risk, thereby significantly improving national park conservation. Important conservation gains have been achieved by reconnecting aquatic ecosystems, restoring wildlife corridors, re-establishing ecological processes like fire, reintroducing species at risk, removing invasive species and managing hyperabundant wildlife populations.


Target 4.5: Marine Ecosystems
Implementation Strategy
4.5.6: Make demonstrable progress on a yearly basis towards establishing national marine conservation areas in two unrepresented regions.
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Goals and Targets
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.5: Marine Ecosystems: By 2020, 10% of coastal and marine areas are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.1: Heritage Places Establishment
Sub Program 1.1.2: National Marine Conservation Area Establishment
Description of the Implementation Strategy
This strategy aims to establish at least one national marine conservation area in each of Canada's 29 marine regions, in accordance with the National Marine Conservation Areas System Plan. The expansion and completion of the system will conserve representative examples of the diversity of Canada's oceans and Great Lakes, and provide opportunities for Canadians to experience, understand and appreciate these places. Five steps are involved in the process to establish a national marine conservation area: identify areas representative of a marine region; select an optimum national marine conservation area candidate from the list of representative areas; assess the feasibility of establishing the proposed marine conservation area through studies and consultations; negotiate new national marine conservation area agreements, including any that may be required with Indigenous peoples or organizations; and formally establish the national marine conservation area in legislation.
Performance Indicator
Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress in advancing through steps towards establishing national marine conservation areas.
Performance Results for 2015-16

In 2015-16, Parks Canada exceeded its target by making significant progress towards establishing national marine conservation areas in three unrepresented regions.

Progress on the Lancaster Sound proposal in Lancaster Sound marine region continued, including ongoing work on the feasibility assessment report and determination of a final boundary. The Steering Committee (Parks Canada, Government of Nunavut and Qikiqtani Inuit Association) undertook consultations with industry, environmental and conservation organizations, considered boundary options, and briefed concerned federal departments.

Progress on the Southern Strait of Georgia proposal in Strait of Georgia marine region focused on increasing program capacity, including the addition of a First Nations coordinator to engage the 19 First Nations in the region. The preliminary concept was significantly advanced in order to be presented to the Canada/British Columbia Steering Committee in 2016, in preparation for consultations with First Nations and stakeholders.

Parks Canada also advanced the establishment of Lake Superior National Marine Conservation Area. The Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act was amended to enable transfer of the lands from the Province of Ontario to Canada for the purpose of formally establishing the Lake Superior National Marine Conservation Area.



Target 4.7: Environmental Disasters, Incidents and Emergencies
Implementation Strategy
4.7.4: In accordance with mandated responsibilities, provide environmental and/or other information to reduce the risk of, and advice in response to, the occurrence of events such as polluting incidents, wildlife disease events or severe weather and other significant hydro-meteorological events as applicable.
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Goals and Targets
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.7: Environmental Disasters, Incidents and Emergencies: Environmental disasters, incidents and emergencies are prevented or their impacts mitigated.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program: Internal Services
Description of the Implementation Strategy
Provide equipment and human resources to assist in the response to environmental emergencies.
Performance Results for 2015-16

In coordination with Public Safety Canada, Parks Canada successfully managed a busy wildfire season with 122 wildfires at 27 sites with a total area of almost 460,000 hectares, over three times the 10 year average. Two high priority areas included multiple wildfire complexes in Wood Buffalo and associated impacts to surrounding communities, and a wildfire 13 km from the town of Jasper. Safety of visitors, staff and community residents was maintained through management practices including area closures and evacuations and traffic delays. Management teams worked with sites, communities and stakeholders to keep disruption at these sites to a minimum.

Note: Under the lead of Public Safety Canada, Parks Canada Agency supports the implementation of this strategy.

Target 4.8: Chemicals Management
Implementation Strategy
4.8.1: Implement the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and complete remediation and risk management activities at known high priority federal contaminated sites.
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Goals and Targets
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.8: Chemicals Management: Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment and human health posed by releases of harmful substances.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.2: Heritage Places Conservation
Description of the Implementation Strategy
Parks Canada is responsible for 477 sites registered in the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory as of March 31, 2016. With funding from the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, the Agency undertakes risk reduction activities (through remediation and/or risk management) at contaminated sites.
Expected Result
Mitigate risks to the environment and human health as well as reduce financial liability.
Performance Results for 2015-16
In 2015-16, Parks Canada closed two federal contaminated sites and undertook remediation and/or risk management activities at 27 other sites.
Note: Under the lead of Environment and Climate Change Canada, Parks Canada Agency supports the implementation of this strategy.

4. Theme IV: Targets and Implementation Strategies

Goal 6: GHG Emissions and Energy
Target 6.1: GHG Emissions Reduction

The Government of Canada will reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its buildings and fleets by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020.
Departmental Target
10.1% below 2005 levels by 2020
Scope and Context
Parks Canada will reduce GHG emissions generated by the consumption of energy from assets that are owned and operated by Parks Canada. This includes fleets and facilities where Parks Canada is directly paying for energy.
Financial Performance Expectations
Significant investments in Parks Canada infrastructure will result in increased energy efficiency of facilities.
Performance Measurement
Expected result
Reduce the carbon footprint and energy consumption of federal operations.
Performance indicatorPerformance level achieved
Updated GHG reduction implementation plan in place by March 31, 2015. Actual completion date: February 2015
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2005-06. 39.1 kt
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2015-16, not accounting for renewable power emission credits, if applicable 35.91 kt
Renewable power emission credits applied in fiscal year 2015-16 (kt CO2 equivalent). 0 kt
Percentage change in GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-06 to fiscal year 2015-16, inclusive of renewable power emission credits, if applicable. 8.1% decrease
Adjustments made to base year GHG emissions. No


Goal 7: Waste and Asset Management
Target 7.1: Real Property Environmental Performance

As of April 1, 2014, and pursuant to departmental Real Property Sustainability Frameworks, an industry recognized level of high environmental performance will be achieved in Government of Canada real property projects and operations.
Scope and Context
The Parks Canada Real Property Sustainability Framework applies to buildings over 1,000 square meters owned and managed by Parks Canada.
Performance Measurement
Expected result
An industry-recognized level of high environmental performance will be achieved in Government of Canada real property projects and operations.
Performance indicatorPerformance level achieved
A Real Property Sustainability Framework in place to improve the management of energy, waste and water in departmental real property assets by March 31, 2015. Actual completion date: February 2015
Total number of existing Crown-owned buildings (over 1000 m2) and new lease or lease renewal projects (over 1000 m2) where the Crown is the major lessee, assessed for environmental performance using an industry-recognized assessment tool, and associated floor space (m2). 17 out of 21 Crown-owned buildings
34,215 m2 / 42,840 m2
0 new lease or lease renewal projects
0 m2
Assessment tool used: BOMA Best
Total number of existing Crown-owned buildings, new construction, build-to-lease projects and major renovations projects achieving an industry recognized level of high environmental performance, and associated floor space (m2). 1 Crown-owned building
1046 m2
Performance level achieved: LEED Platinum
0 new construction projects
0 m2
Performance level achieved: N/A
0 build-to-lease projects
0 m2
Performance level achieved: N/A
0 major renovation projects
0 m2
Performance level achieved: N/A
Number of fit-up and refit projects achieving an industry-recognized level of high-environmental performance. 0 fit-up and refit projects
0 m2
Performance level achieved: N/A
Implementation strategy element or best practicePerformance level achieved
7.1.1.1. Achieve a level of performance that meets or exceeds the custodian's current commitment(s) to sustainable buildings using industry-recognized assessment and verification tool(s). "Achieved"
7.1.1.2. Conduct life-cycle assessments for major construction and renovation projects using an industry-recognized tool. "Achieved"
7.1.1.3. Develop plans to address environmental performance assessment recommendations for existing Crown-owned buildings. "On track"
7.1.1.4. Manage the collection, diversion and disposal of workplace waste in Crown-owned buildings in an environmentally responsible manner. "On track"
7.1.1.5. Manage construction, renovation and demolition waste in Crown-owned buildings in an environmentally responsible manner. "Achieved"
7.1.1.7. Develop an approach to training for building operators of Crown-owned buildings. "Achieved"


Target 7.2: Green Procurement

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.
Scope and Context
Parks Canada targets include Purchasing and Training and Evaluation.
Performance Measurement
Expected result
Environmentally responsible acquisition, use and disposal of goods and services.
Performance indicatorPerformance level achieved
Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place as of April 1, 2014. Completion date: November 2012

The Policy on Green Procurement has been implemented. All procurement activity involves the integration of environmental performance considerations ranging from the initial procurement planning, the acquisition, maintenance and final disposal if need be. The Parks Canada intranet site provides specific guidance and tools for the implementation of Green Procurement practices.
Number and percentage of procurement and/or materiel management specialists who completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course (C215) or equivalent, in fiscal year 2015-16. 32 of 35
91.4%
Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement, in fiscal year 2015-16. 6 of 6
100%
As part of their annual performance evaluation, procurement managers and functional heads are expected to adhere to and implement all government procurement policies and guidelines, this includes support and contribution towards green procurement.
Departmental green procurement target
1. As of March 31, 2017, 75% of vehicles purchased annually will be from the Parks Canada Preauthorized Vehicle List.
Performance indicatorPerformance level achieved
Percentage of vehicles purchased that were on the Parks Canada Preauthorized Vehicle List. 193 of 217
88.9%
"Achieved"
Departmental green procurement target
2. As of March 31, 2017, 95% of printers, photocopiers, and multi-functional devices will have environmental features such as duplex printing capability or automatic shutoff mode.
Performance indicatorPerformance level achieved
Number of printers, photocopiers, and multifunctional devices purchased or leased that has an environmental feature relative to total number purchased. 100%
10 of 10
"Achieved"
Departmental green procurement target
3. As of March 31, 2017, 100% of office computers will have a minimum lifespan of three years, to reduce electronic waste.
Performance indicatorPerformance level achieved
Average service life of office computers. 100%
Average service life of office computers is 3 years.
"Achieved"
Implementation strategy element or best practicePerformance level achieved
7.2.1.5. Leverage common use procurement instruments where available and feasible. "Achieved"
Parks Canada leverages the use of common procurement instruments whether they are mandatory or optional. In the case of optional use, Parks Canada encourages the use of existing Public Services and Procurement Canada Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements due to their ease of use and fast acquisition of the needed goods or services.
Best Practice
7.2.3. Train acquisition cardholders on green procurement.
"On Track"
This best practice remains a goal of Parks Canada to ensure green procurement awareness and understanding is incorporated in training for acquisition card holders.
Best Practice
7.2.4. Increase awareness of the Policy on Green Procurement among managers.
"Achieved"
All procurement training for Parks Canada staff includes a portion on green procurement and the use of common procurement instruments.


Target 7.3: Sustainable Workplace Operations

As of April 1, 2015, the Government of Canada will update and adopt policies and practices to improve the sustainability of its workplace operations.
Scope and Context
Parks Canada supports the establishment of local Green Teams.
Performance Measurement
Expected result
Departmental workplace operations have a reduced environmental impact.
Performance indicatorPerformance level achieved
An approach to maintain or improve the sustainability of the departmental workplace is in place as of March 31, 2015. Actual completion date: February 2015
Implementation strategy element or best practicePerformance level achieved
7.3.1.1. Engage employees in greening government operations practices. "Achieved"
7.3.1.2. Integrate environmental considerations into corporate policies, processes and practices in accordance with departmental refresh cycles. "Achieved"
7.3.1.3. Maintain or improve existing approaches to sustainable workplace practices (i.e., printer ratios, paper usage, and green meetings). "Achieved"
7.3.1.4. Minimize the ratio of information technology (IT) assets per employee. "Achieved"
7.3.1.5. Select and operate IT and office equipment in a manner that reduces energy consumption and material usage. "Achieved"
7.3.1.6. Dispose of e-waste in an environmentally sound and secure manner. "Achieved"
7.3.1.7. Reuse or recycle workplace materiel and assets in an environmentally sound and secure manner. "Achieved"
7.3.1.8. Minimize all non-hazardous solid waste generated, and leverage service offerings to maximize the diversion of waste. "Achieved"
7.3.1.9. Increase the population density in office buildings, and increase space utilization in special purpose buildings. "Achieved"
7.3.1.10. Maintain or improve sustainable fleet management. "Achieved"


Goal 8: Water Management
Target 8.1: Water Management

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will take further action to improve water management within its real property portfolio.
Scope and Context
This Framework applies to buildings owned and managed by Parks Canada.
Performance Measurement
Expected result
Water is managed sustainably in Government of Canada real property operations.
Performance indicatorPerformance level achieved
Approach to improving water management included in Real Property Sustainability Framework by March 31, 2016. Actual completion date: February 2015
Amount and percentage of floor space in buildings over 1000 m2 that includes water metering, in fiscal year 2015-16 (where feasible). 30 055 m2 existing Crown-owned
70%
0 m2 new Crown and built-to-lease
0%
0 m2 major renovations
0%
0 m2 leases
0%
Implementation strategy element or best practicePerformance level achieved
8.1.1.1. Conserve potable water. "Achieved"
8.1.1.2. Manage storm water run-off. "Achieved"
8.1.1.4. Meter the water usage in new projects. "Achieved"


5. Additional Departmental Sustainable Development Activities and Initiatives

In addition to its core implementation strategies, Parks Canada contributes to sustainable development through additional activities such as the engagement of Canadians through stakeholder and partner relationships and visitor experiences.

Partnering and Participation
Activity
Parks Canada will provide increased opportunities for Canadians to be involved with Parks Canada places in activities they consider meaningful and relevant.
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Themes
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.3: Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
Sub-Program 1.3.2: Partnering and Participation
Description of the Program
This program encourages the participation of partners and stakeholders and leads to new or expanded opportunities for Canadians to discover and develop a sense of connection to their protected heritage places. Partnering arrangements advance shared or complimentary goals and objectives, and result in a wide range of collaborative activities including program delivery, promotional campaigns, contests, scientific and academic research, learning tools and new products. Partners include private sector organizations as well as other government departments, NGO's, academic institutions, and Indigenous peoples, who in a number of places co-manage national heritage places. Stakeholders engage with Parks Canada through a wide variety of activities such as the Minister's Round Table, formal and informal consultation processes, and the national volunteer program. Stakeholders include individuals, groups and organizations that have an interest in Parks Canada and ensure that Canadians' needs and priorities are clearly expressed and inform Parks Canada's actions and direction.
Expected Result
Stakeholders and partners are engaged in the protection and presentation of Parks Canada's administered places.
Performance Indicators
  • Increase in the percentage of Parks Canada volunteers, 10% by March 2018.
  • Maintain or expand 75% of collaborative initiatives with five strategic corporate partners, by March 2018.
Performance Results for 2015-16
Parks Canada's success at facilitating increased opportunities for Canadians to connect with, learn about and be inspired by their natural and cultural heritage is shared with dedicated partners and stakeholders who play an active role in the development and implementation of these opportunities. The Agency maximizes its reach through an array of volunteer activities and by collaborating with a mix of partners on initiatives associated with mutual and complimentary objectives, such as connecting youth and families with nature and history, learning about biodiversity and conservation, and encouraging visitation. In 2015-16, Parks Canada attracted a total of 9,525 volunteers to contribute to Parks Canada's mandate representing a 25.8% increase from the baseline of 7,569.

Parks Canada also made progress on maintaining or expanding the number of collaborative initiatives with strategic partners. These relationships help strengthen support and grow further initiatives with current and new partners with whom Parks Canada hopes to collaborate. In 2015-16, the Agency continued to forge and leverage strategic partnerships to increase reach through broadcasting, mass media, social media, and presence at partner venues and key events in major urban centres. Some of the most notable partnerships that Parks Canada fostered this year were Google Street View, TV5, ARTE, tourism industry trade shows, and federal, provincial, Indigenous, heritage and educational organizations.


Visitor Experience
Activity
Parks Canada will facilitate a diverse range of opportunities in Parks Canada's protected heritage places for visitors to learn about, experience, and enjoy the spirit, wonder, and awe of Canada's network of heritage places.
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Themes
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.4: Visitor Experience
Description of the Program
This program fosters opportunities for Canadians and international visitors to discover, experience, enjoy and develop a sense of personal connection to Canada's national parks, national urban park, national historic sites administered by Parks Canada, national marine conservation areas, and heritage canals. This program includes a range of activities, services and products associated with pre-visit planning, the on-site visit, and post visit communications. It includes tourism marketing, trip planning information, reception, orientation, interpretation, recreation, special events, merchandise, compliance and visitor safety services, and visitor facilities. The program is supported by market and visitor analytics, trend analysis, and performance measurement.
Expected Result
Visitors at surveyed locations feel a sense of personal connection to the places visited.
Performance Indicators
  • Increase in the number of visits at Parks Canada administered places by 2% annually.
  • Average percentage of visitors that consider the place is meaningful to them, 85% annually.
  • Average percentage of visitors that are satisfied with their visit, 90% annually.
Performance Results for 2015-16
In 2015-16, Parks Canada welcomed over seven percent more visitors than the previous year—more than 23 million visitors. This increase follows targeted efforts undertaken by Parks Canada to facilitate opportunities for Canadians to visit and to develop their own personal connections with their natural and cultural heritage. Some of the strategic initiatives undertaken in 2015-16 to support this priority include the introduction of new products and activities at select heritage places for key target markets; participation in national and international tourism promotional events; successful promotion of events and initiatives; the expansion of the Xplorers and Learn to Camp programs; the piloting of new opportunities such as an urban campfire storytelling program, "mini" Learn to Camp events and other special activities in Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver.

In terms of visitor satisfaction, the Agency exceeded its performance targets related to the percentage of visitors at surveyed locations who were satisfied with their visit with a result of 95%. Nearly 82% of visitors at surveyed locations considered the place they visited meaningful to them.
6. Sustainable Development Management System

Parks Canada Sustainable Development Vision

The Federal Sustainable Development Act defines sustainable development as development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. It states that the Government of Canada "acknowledges the need to integrate environmental, economic and social factors in the making of all decisions by government."

Sustainable development is central to Parks Canada's mandate and vision. It is ingrained in all aspects of the Agency's activities from establishing and conserving national parks and national marine conservation areas to designating and commemorating national historic sites. Parks Canada is committed to ensuring that Canada's treasured natural and historic places remain unimpaired for the understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of present and future generations.

Parks Canada activities also contribute to the Canadian economy. The combined annual expenditures of Parks Canada and its millions of visitors make a substantial and widespread contribution to the Canadian economy, both directly through its facilities, locations and services, and indirectly in the surrounding communities through spending on accommodations, restaurants, and other tourism-related businesses. Parks Canada protected heritage places are significant economic drivers, with a contribution of over $3.3 billion annually to the Canadian economy, and to hundreds of communities across Canada, many in remote and rural areas.

Managing Sustainable Development

Sustainable development involves the consideration of environmental, economic and social objectives in the development and implementation of public policies and programs. The needs of the present as well as the needs of future generations are also taken into consideration. Integrated decision making and a long-term approach to planning are defining characteristics of sustainable development.

Parks Canada takes an integrated approach in managing its heritage places. For example, Parks Canada carries out conservation and restoration projects in national parks. These projects are designed in a manner that ensures the conservation of natural resources, while enhancing visitor experiences and engaging key audiences with a view to connecting Canadians to their heritage places. This integrated approach to the delivery of Parks Canada's mandate has strengthened the Agency's contribution to all aspects of sustainable development - environmental, social and economic.

Parks Canada's decision making and sustainable development practices include collaborating with groups that share its values and have an interest in its work. The establishment of national parks and national marine conservation areas, for example, requires a high level of engagement on the part of provincial governments and Indigenous peoples. The designation and commemoration of persons, places and events of historic significance equally demand the active participation of stakeholders, partners and community groups. The Agency recognizes that building and maintaining these collaborative relationships is essential to achieving its mandate of protecting and presenting Canada's natural and cultural heritage.

Moreover, Parks Canada promotes sustainable development practices by encouraging the use of analytical techniques that compare and integrate environmental, social, and economic objectives and that address multi-year or long-term concerns. For example, the Agency uses social science analytical and performance measurement tools to understand and engage Canadians, particularly certain segments of the population (e.g. urban, youth, new Canadians), in meaningful ways to ensure that its heritage places remain relevant for present and future generations.

Finally the Agency is engaged in several interdepartmental initiatives related to sustainable development, such as the Clean Air Agenda, Species at Risk, Federal Contaminated Sites, and Greening Government Operations.

7. Strategic Environmental Assessment

During the 2015-16 reporting cycle, Parks Canada considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, as part of its decision-making processes. Through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA) process, agency proposals were found to have positive effects on progress toward the 2013-16 FSDS goals and targets in Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality; Theme III - Protecting Nature and Canadians, and the FSDS 2013-16 for Theme IV - Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Beginning with Government.

Additional information on the results of the SEA(s) is available on the Parks Canada website.

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Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

Name of transfer payment program: Funding to Support the Trans Canada Trail Foundation's Fundraising Campaign

Voted

Start Date: March 25, 2014

End Date: April 1, 2017

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2013-14

Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.

Link to the organization's program(s):

  • Program 1.1: Heritage Places Establishment
  • Sub-Program 1.1.4: Other Heritage Places Designations

Description: The purpose of this grant is to fulfill the Government of Canada's commitment towards the completion of the Trans Canada Trail. The objective is to support the Trans Canada Trail Foundation in their efforts to raise funds to complete the Trans Canada Trail by 2017.

Results achieved: Not applicable

Comments on variances: Grant planned spending is an estimate; actual payments are based on fundraising results by the recipient during the period.

Audits completed or planned: Not applicable

Evaluations completed or planned: Not applicable

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Not applicable

Performance Information (dollars):
Type of Transfer Payment2013-14 Actual spending2014-15 Actual spending2015-16 Planned spending 2015-16 Total authorities available for use2015-16 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2015-16 actual minus 2015-16 planned)
Total grants 7,152,037 5,520,495 6,250,000 6,250,000 6,250,000 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 7,152,037 5,520,495 6,250,000 6,250,000 6,250,000 0

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Internal Audits and Evaluations

A. Internal Audits Completed in 2015-16
Title of Internal AuditInternal Audit TypeCompletion Date
Internal Audit of Financial and Administrative Processes - Western Newfoundland and Labrador Field Unit Financial management controls April 2015

Parks Canada Multi-Year Internal Audit Plan 2015-16 to 2018-19


B. Evaluations in Progress or Completed in 2015-16
Title of evaluationStatus Deputy head approval dateLink to the organization's program(s)
National Historic Site Designations Completed July 2015 Heritage Places Establishment
Other Heritage Places Designation and Conservation Completed July 2015 Heritage Places Establishment, Heritage Places Conservation
Twinning of the Trans-Canada Highway in Banff National Park Completed July 2015 Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management
Law Enforcement In progress October 2016 Heritage Places Conservation
Townsite Management In progress October 2016 Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management
General Class Contribution Program In progress October 2016 Across all programs
National Historic Site Conservation In progress October 2016 Heritage Places Conservation
National Historic Site Visitor Experience In progress October 2016 Visitor Experience
Horizontal Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation (Clean Air Agenda) In progress June 2016 Heritage Places Conservation
Horizontal Evaluation of Species at Risk Program In progress June 2017 Heritage Places Conservation

Parks Canada Multi-Year Evaluation Plan 2015-16 to 2019-20

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Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits

Response to parliamentary committees

There were no response to parliamentary committees in 2015-16.

Response to the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

Fall 2015 - Reports of the Auditor General of Canada

Report 3 - Implementing the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement

This audit focused on whether Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Parks Canada, and Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada were implementing selected obligations in the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement (LILCA) and two related side agreements, the Fiscal Financing Agreement and the Labrador Inuit Park Impacts and Benefits Agreement for the Torngat Mountains National Park Reserve of Canada (Labrador Inuit Park Impacts and Benefits Agreement).

The report concludes that federal government entities made progress implementing selected obligations. However, there are challenges that need to be resolved. Two recommendations were addressed to Parks Canada (see 3.68 and 3.98). The Agency has agreed to implement them.

Response to external audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages
There were no external audits of Parks Canada Agency in 2015-16.

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Status Report on Projects Operating with Specific Treasury Board Approval

Project name and project phaseOriginal estimated total cost (dollars)Revised estimated total cost (dollars)Actual total cost (dollars)2015-16 Main Estimates (dollars)2015-16 Planned spending (dollars)2015-16 Total authorities (dollars)2015-16 Actual spending (dollars)Expected date of close out
Link to the organization's program(s): Sub-Program 1.5.3: Heritage Canal Management
Trent Severn Waterway: Bolsover Dam at Lock 37 - Closing Phase. 18,760,174 34,720,246 27,448,765 - - 18,922,487 11,651,006 2016-17
Note: Dollar amounts exclude both the goods and services tax (GST) and the harmonized sales tax (HST).

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User Fees and Regulatory Charges (User Fees Act)

Fee NameFee TypeFee-setting AuthorityYear IntroducedYear Last Amended2015-16Planning Years
Forecast Revenue1 (dollars)Actual Revenue (dollars)Estimated Full Cost (dollars)Performance StandardPerformance ResultFiscal YearForecast Revenue2 & 3 (dollars)Estimated Full Cost (dollars)
Entry Fees Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act 1911 Increased in 2008. New fees added in 2010. 54,020,000 67,263,268 310,006,544 90% of visitors are satisfied. 95% of visitors are satisfied. 2016-17 57,846,411 363,122,501
2017-18 9,416,858 367,928,283
2018-19 67,263,268 356,370,337
Camping Fees Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act 1890 Increased in 2008. New fees added in 2010. 19,680,000 33,843,962 38,012,918 90% of visitors are satisfied. 94% of visitors are satisfied. 2016-17 33,843,962 44,863,011
2017-18 33,843,962 46,054,572
2018-19 33,843,962 45,098,020
Lockage Fees Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act 1972 Increased in 2008. New fees added in 2010. 1,450,000 1,483,548 33,393,758 90% of visitors are satisfied. 98% of visitors are satisfied. 2016-17 1,483,548 49,399,384
2017-18 - 57,946,260
2018-19 1,483,548 58,445,156
Municipal Services Other products and services Canada National Parks Act 1946 Water and sewer fees increased in 2001; remainder in 2003. Garbage fees increased in 1996. 3,920,000 3,871,377 8,121,845 100% of drinking water and sewage effluent samples meet quality standards. Garbage collection frequencies are established in consultation with Community Councils and the Business Community Standards were met. 2016-17 3,871,377 10,864,342
2017-18 3,871,377 13,260,860
2018-19 3,871,377 18,151,298
Other Revenues Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act 1965 Business licences increased in 1994. Other fees increased in 2008. New fees added in 2010. 2,850,000 3,426,633 4,499,331 90% of visitors are satisfied. 96% of visitors are satisfied. 2016-17 3,426,633 5,324,915
2017-18 3,426,633 5,383,010
2018-19 3,426,633 5,196,054
Total 81,920,000 109,888,788 394,034,396 2016-17 100,471,931 473,574,153
2017-18 50,558,830 490,572,985
2018-19 109,888,788 483,260,865

Notes:
1. Forecasted revenue numbers have been adjusted to reflect reporting instructions provided by Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) related to fees under the ambit of the User Fee Act (UFA) as well as those not under the ambit of the UFA.

2. Forecast revenue for future years were estimated by maintaining the same level of visitation as in 2015-16.

3. The decrease in revenue from entry fees and lockage fees is due to the free admission to all visitors to Canada's national parks, national marine conservation areas and national historic sites and free lockage on heritage canals in 2017 to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Confederation.

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External Fees (Policy on Service Standards for External Fees)

Fee NameService StandardPerformance ResultsStakeholder consultation in 2015-16 or prior fiscal yearsOther Information
Entry Fees 90% of visitors are satisfied 95% of visitors are satisfied Service standard description was included in the 2013 online fee consultation information. Free admission in 2017. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels.
Camping Fees 90% of visitors are satisfied 94% of visitors are satisfied Service standard description was included in the 2013 online fee consultation information. Camping fees will be kept in 2017. Occupancy rates may increase. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels and ensure clear communications on what is and isn't free.
Lockage Fees 90% of visitors are satisfied 98% of visitors are satisfied Service standard description was included in the 2013 online fee consultation information. Free lockage in 2017. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels.
Municipal Services 100% of drinking water and sewage effluent samples meet quality standards.

Garbage collection frequencies are established in consultation with Community Councils and Business Community.
Standards were met Parks Canada's standards for drinking water and sewage effluent quality are based on guidance documents published by Health Canada (Drinking Water) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (Sewage Effluent), both of which included public consultations as part of the development process.

Garbage collection standards have evolved over time in response to individual community needs and specific frequency of pickups is set in consultation with users.
No impact on this service category in light of free admission in 2017.
Other Revenues 90% of visitors are satisfied 96% of visitors are satisfied Service standard description was included in the 2013 online fee consultation information. Enhanced programs fees will be kept in 2017. Demand may increase. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels and ensure clear communications on what is and isn't free.
Mooring Fees 90% of visitors are satisfied 98% of visitors are satisfied Service standard description was included in the 2013 online fee consultation information. Mooring fees will be kept in 2017. Demand may increase. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels and ensure clear communications on what is and isn't free.
Heritage Presentation Special Program Fees 90% of visitors are satisfied 95% of visitors are satisfied Service standard description was included in the 2013 online fee consultation information. Heritage Presentation Special Program fees will be kept in 2017. Demand may increase. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels and ensure clear communications on what is and isn't free.
Pool Fees (Swimming Pools and Hot Springs) 90% of visitors are satisfied 97% of visitors are satisfied Service standard description was included in the 2013 online fee consultation information. Pool and Hot Springs fees will be kept in 2017. Demand may increase. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels and ensure clear communications on what is and isn't free.
Golf Fees 90% of visitors are satisfied No locations with this service were surveyed in 2015. Service standard description was included in the 2013 online fee consultation information. Golf fees will be kept in 2017. Demand may increase. Plans are in place to maintain visitor satisfaction levels and ensure clear communications on what is and isn't free.
Notes:

Parks Canada has been using visitor satisfaction at surveyed sites as a measure of performance since 1996. The 90% performance standard has been well established and communicated through the Agency's corporate planning and reporting documents since 2005. In 1998, Parks Canada also introduced a Quality Service Guarantee that applies to all visitor services for which fees are paid. This initiative ensures that visitors have an immediate recourse if they are not satisfied with the quality of service provided or do not believe that they received value for fees. Through the Guarantee, the concern is immediately addressed up to and including a refund of a portion or entire fee paid. This achieves the spirit of accountability for performance as contemplated by the User Fees Act, and exceeds the Act's requirements by refunding the user fee immediately to a dissatisfied client.

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