Departmental Performance Report 2013-14

Table of Contents

Foreword

Departmental Performance Reports are part of the Estimates family of documents. Estimates documents support appropriation acts, which specify the amounts and broad purposes for which funds can be spent by the government. The Estimates document family has three parts.

Part I (Government Expenditure Plan) provides an overview of federal spending.

Part II (Main Estimates) lists the financial resources required by individual departments, agencies and Crown corporations for the upcoming fiscal year.

Part III (Departmental Expenditure Plans) consists of two documents. Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) are expenditure plans for each appropriated department and agency (excluding Crown corporations). They describe departmental priorities, strategic outcomes, programs, expected results and associated resource requirements, covering a three-year period beginning with the year indicated in the title of the report. Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs) are individual department and agency accounts of actual performance, for the most recently completed fiscal year, against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in their respective RPPs. DPRs inform parliamentarians and Canadians of the results achieved by government organizations for Canadians.

Additionally, Supplementary Estimates documents present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or were subsequently refined to account for developments in particular programs and services.

The financial information in DPRs is drawn directly from authorities presented in the Main Estimates and the planned spending information in RPPs. The financial information in DPRs is also consistent with information in the Public Accounts of Canada. The Public Accounts of Canada include the Government of Canada Consolidated Statement of Financial Position, the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Accumulated Deficit, the Consolidated Statement of Change in Net Debt, and the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow, as well as details of financial operations segregated by ministerial portfolio for a given fiscal year. For the DPR, two types of financial information are drawn from the Public Accounts of Canada: authorities available for use by an appropriated organization for the fiscal year, and authorities used for that same fiscal year. The latter corresponds to actual spending as presented in the DPR.

The Treasury Board Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures further strengthens the alignment of the performance information presented in DPRs, other Estimates documents and the Public Accounts of Canada. The policy establishes the Program Alignment Architecture of appropriated organizations as the structure against which financial and non-financial performance information is provided for Estimates and parliamentary reporting. The same reporting structure applies irrespective of whether the organization is reporting in the Main Estimates, the RPP, the DPR or the Public Accounts of Canada.

A number of changes have been made to DPRs for 2013-14 to better support decisions on appropriations. Where applicable, DPRs now provide financial, human resources and performance information in Section II at the lowest level of the organization's Program Alignment Architecture.

In addition, the DPR's format and terminology have been revised to provide greater clarity, consistency and a strengthened emphasis on Estimates and Public Accounts information. As well, departmental reporting on the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy has been consolidated into a new supplementary information table posted on departmental websites. This new table brings together all of the components of the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy formerly presented in DPRs and on departmental websites, including reporting on the Greening of Government Operations and Strategic Environmental Assessments. Section III of the report provides a link to the new table on the organization's website. Finally, definitions of terminology are now provided in an appendix.

Minister's Message

Minister Leona Aglukkaq

As Minister responsible for Parks Canada, I am pleased to present the 2013-14 Performance Report on the many achievements that support the Agency's integrated mandate of environmental protection, education and outstanding visitor experiences, in support of Canada's National Conservation Plan.

Since 2006, our Government has demonstrated its commitment to protecting and presenting our natural and cultural places for the benefit of Canadians. Over this period, we have created two marine conservation areas, three marine protected areas, three national wildlife areas, two national parks, and one national historic site. Last year, Parks Canada expanded Canada's protected areas network with the creation of Sable Island as a national park reserve and the formal establishment of Gulf Islands National Park Reserve. Actions taken by Parks Canada in 2013 also led to the tabling of legislation in Parliament in Spring 2014 to create two new parks, Nááts'ihch'oh National Park Reserve and Rouge National Urban Park.

Since forming Government we have placed a priority on the North and on Canada’s Arctic Sovereignty. One of the many ways we focus on this priority is through Canada’s ongoing search for the lost Franklin Expedition. This search which is led by the Government of Canada has utilized a number of resources such as modern technology and, of course, Inuit oral history. Thanks to the leadership of the Government of Canada, on September 7, 2014, the ongoing search led to the monumental discovery of one of the Franklin ships, HMS Erebus. Franklin's ships are an important part of Canadian history given that his expeditions, which took place nearly 200 years ago, laid the foundations of Canada’s Arctic sovereignty. Although we still have part of the mystery to solve, it is important to note that we would not have gotten this far without the Inuit oral tradition passed down through generations.

Setting the stage for the celebration of the Anniversary of Confederation in 2017, Parks Canada continues to raise awareness, and attract youth and urban Canadians to the country's treasured places. Key contributions in 2013-14 included the commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812 and the celebration of the 300th anniversary of the Fortress of Louisbourg.

In support of the Government of Canada's Federal Tourism Strategy, innovative measures included new and enhanced winter recreational activities in Jasper National Park and the opening of the Trans Canada Trail through Fundy National Park.

As part of the Government of Canada's continued commitment to sustain Canada's national parks, Economic Action Plan 2014 announced $391.5 million over 5 years to enable the Agency to make improvements to highways, bridges and dams located in national parks and along historic canals. Through these investments this Government is demonstrating its ongoing commitment to job creation, economic growth and long-term prosperity.

This past year, Parks Canada built on its exemplary stewardship record and world-recognized conservation measures, while introducing dynamic new ways to connect Canadians with our treasured places. I invite you to learn more about these places that make up our vast natural and cultural heritage, an ever-renewing source of pride and inspiration.

Original signed by

The Honourable Leona Aglukkaq, P.C., M.P.
Minister of the Environment and Minister responsible for Parks Canada

Chief Executive Officer's Message

Chief Executive Officer for Parks Canada, Alan Latourelle

It is my pleasure to submit this 2013-14 Performance Report highlighting Parks Canada's accomplishments in the past year. I am proud of our team members' passionate dedication to conservation leadership at home and abroad, and to helping Canadians form strong bonds with our amazing natural and heritage places. I am also very proud of our team's exceptional work to control the impact of flooding on the Trent-Severn Waterway and in Waterton Lakes and Banff national parks.

Last year we launched an exciting partnership with Google Maps' Street View, enabling Canadians and the world to experience spectacular panoramic images of 50 of our national historic sites and parks from the comfort of their own homes. We also installed webcams in Grasslands, Ivvavik and Banff national parks so that people can witness our work with wildlife, and continued our creative use of social media, reaching Canadians every day with stories of our treasured places and conservation measures.

To realize maximum benefits in our conservation and education initiatives, we rely on our strong collaboration with partners nationwide. A symbolic event marking our special partnership with Aboriginal peoples occurred last year with the raising of the Gwaii Haanas Legacy Pole, celebrating 20 years of cooperative management between the Haida Nation and our Agency in Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve. A new partnership with the Champagne and Aishihik First Nation will bring Aboriginal history to life in Kluane National Park so that visitors can experience this world heritage site from a new dimension.

Through our work to protect our treasured places now and for future generations, we have completed important restoration projects across the country, such as the Cave and Basin National Historic Site, and we continue to invest in the restoration of Province House. Natural restoration highlights included aquatic system restoration in the Atlantic national parks and Banff National Park, and continued work to manage hyper-abundant species in Gros Morne and Terra Nova national parks.

By combining conservation and visitor experience programs, like the exciting Swimming with the Salmon program introduced last year, Canadians develop new levels of understanding about our special places. We also installed 125 "home-comfort" oTENTiks at campsites across Canada, and partnered with the airline industry to facilitate camping adventures to the remote and magical Ivavvik National Park.

In August 2008, the Governments of Canada and Nunavut, together with valued partners, launched a multi-year expedition to locate the ships of the ill-fated Franklin Expedition, lost since 1846. The Parks Canada-led search team demonstrated technology; know-how, based on science and Inuit knowledge; and the expertise to navigate the Arctic waters when it located the HMS Erebus in September 2014. This unprecedented discovery, in addition to the many achievements described in this report, testify to the hard work, dedication and passion of Parks Canada team members in fulfilling our Agency's mandate and vision, on behalf of Canadians.

Original signed by

Alan Latourelle
Chief Executive Officer
Parks Canada Agency

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Leona Aglukkaq, P.C., M.P.

Institutional Head: Alan Latourelle, Chief Executive Officer

Ministerial Portfolio: Environment

Enabling Instrument(s):

  • Parks Canada Agency Act; [i]
  • Canada National Parks Act; [ii]
  • Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act; [iii]
  • Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park Act; [iv]
  • Historic Sites and Monuments Act; [v]
  • Heritage Railway Stations Protection Act; [vi]
  • Historic Canal Regulations pursuant to the Department of Transport Act; [vii]
  • Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act; [viii] and
  • Species at Risk Act.[ix]

Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 1998

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

The Minister of the Environment is responsible for the Parks Canada Agency. Parks Canada protects and presents nationally significant examples of Canada's natural and cultural heritage, and fosters public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity [x] of these places for present and future generations. National parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas offer Canadians the opportunity to visit, meaningfully experience and personally connect with these heritage places. In carrying out its responsibilities, Parks Canada works in collaboration with a number of partners including Aboriginal peoples, stakeholders and neighbouring communities.

Mandate

On behalf of the people of Canada, we protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada's natural and cultural heritage, and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations.

Vision

Canada's treasured natural and historic places will be a living legacy, connecting hearts and minds to a stronger, deeper understanding of the very essence of Canada.

Responsibilities

As the first national park service in the world, Parks Canada is responsible to include representative examples of Canada's natural regions in a system of national parks [xi]. The system, which is over 70 percent complete, represents the diversity and natural regions and landscapes in Canada. Forty-four national parks represent 28 of Canada's 39 terrestrial regions, and protect approximately 306,700 square kilometres of Canada's lands. In managing national parks, Parks Canada is mandated to protect ecological integrity.

Canada's first national urban park, Rouge National Urban Park, in the Rouge Valley of the Greater Toronto Area, once established, will provide a unique opportunity to connect urban Canadians to their natural and cultural heritage.

The system of national marine conservation areas [xii], which is 17 percent complete, represents five of Canada's 29 marine regions, and protects approximately 14,800 square kilometres of Canada's marine and freshwater ecosystems. Canada's four national marine conservation areas span two oceans and the Great Lakes. The Agency works to foster the ecologically sustainable use of marine resources while protecting its key features.

The system of national historic sites [xiii] includes: 971 places of national historic significance, of which 167 are administered by Parks Canada; 672 national historic persons; and 453 events of national historic significance. The system is developed in collaboration with Canadians to define important aspects of Canada's history and contributes to the recognition and celebration of significant anniversaries. The long-term objective is a system which represents the breadth and diversity of Canadian history.

Parks Canada's Heritage Canals support commercial and recreational boating and include water management as well as management of bridge and dam infrastructure for the benefit of Canadians.

Additional programs focus on recommending nominations for formal heritage designations, including national historic sites, heritage railway stations, heritage lighthouses, federal heritage buildings, and Canadian Heritage Rivers.

Parks Canada demonstrates leadership in heritage conservation both nationally and internationally. In Canada, the Agency administers the National Historic Sites Cost-Sharing Program, a contribution program for non-federally-owned national historic sites of Canada. Internationally, the Agency represents Canada as State member for the World Heritage Convention and the International Union for Conservation of Nature, and through participation in other international organizations, conventions and agreements.

Today, our national heritage places offer Canadians a variety of recreational activities and learning experiences as well as unique opportunities to personally connect with these heritage places. There are more than 20 million visits annually to heritage places administered by Parks Canada.

More information on Parks Canada's mandate and responsibilities is available on its website [xiv].

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.

  • 1.1 Program: Heritage Places Establishment
    • 1.1.1 Sub-Program: National Park Establishment and Expansion
    • 1.1.2 Sub-Program: National Historic Site Designations
    • 1.1.3 Sub-Program: National Marine Conservation Area Establishment
    • 1.1.4 Sub-Program: Other Heritage Places Designations

  • 1.2 Program: Heritage Resources Conservation
    • 1.2.1 Sub-Program: National Parks Conservation
      • 1.2.1.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Species at Risk
    • 1.2.2 Sub-Program: National Historic Sites Conservation
    • 1.2.3 Sub-Program: National Marine Conservation Areas Sustainability
    • 1.2.4 Sub-Program: Other Heritage Places Conservation
      • 1.2.4.1 Sub-Sub-Program: National Historic Sites Cost-Sharing

  • 1.3 Program: Public Appreciation and Understanding
    • 1.3.1 Sub-Program: Public Outreach Education and External Communications
    • 1.3.2 Sub-Program: Stakeholder and Partner Engagement

  • 1.4 Program: Visitor Experience
    • 1.4.1 Sub-Program: Market Research and Promotion
    • 1.4.2 Sub-Program: National Parks Interpretation
    • 1.4.3 Sub-Program: National Parks Visitor Service Offer
      • 1.4.3.1 Sub-Sub-Program: Visitor Safety
    • 1.4.4 Sub-Program: National Historic Sites Interpretation
    • 1.4.5 Sub-Program: National Historic Sites Visitor Service Offer
    • 1.4.6 Sub-Program: National Marine Conservation Areas Interpretation
    • 1.4.7 Sub-Program: National Marine Conservation Areas Visitor Service Offer

  • 1.5 Program: Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure
    • 1.5.1 Sub-Program: Townsite Management
    • 1.5.2 Sub-Program: Through Highway Management
    • 1.5.3 Sub-Program: Through Waterway Management

  • Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

Organizational Priorities
Priority Type [xv] Strategic Outcome(s) [and/or] Program(s)
Establishing National Parks and National Marine Conservation Areas Ongoing Heritage Places Establishment
Summary of Progress
Sable Island National Park Reserve was formally protected under the Canada National Parks Act. In addition, Parks Canada continued to make demonstrable progress toward establishing national parks in four unrepresented terrestrial natural regions through ongoing negotiation of establishment agreements and consultations with provinces/territories and Aboriginal groups for the Qausuittuq (Bathurst Island), Mealy Mountains, Thaidene Nene (East Arm of Great Slave Lake) and Manitoba Lowlands proposals. Parks Canada also made demonstrable progress in establishing national marine conservation areas by advancing feasibility assessments in three unrepresented marine regions with the Lancaster Sound, Southern Strait of Georgia and les Îles-de-la-Madeleine proposals. Through the establishment of national parks and national marine conservation areas, Parks Canada is conserving Canada's lands and waters and providing additional opportunities for Canadians to connect with nature through their heritage places.


Priority Type Strategic Outcome(s) [and/or] Program(s)
Conserving Canada's Heritage Places Ongoing Heritage Resources Conservation
Summary of Progress

Parks Canada's Conservation and Restoration program achieved tangible outcomes in support of restoring Canada's ecosystems by addressing priority ecological integrity issues in national parks, while providing opportunities for Canadians to connect with nature, and for stakeholders and partners, including aboriginal partners, to work with Parks Canada. Examples of projects currently underway include: re-introducing wood turtles in La Mauricie National Park; improving stream connectivity in the Atlantic national parks; and working with private landowners and Aboriginal peoples to improve and create Bison habitat in Prince Albert National Park, all of which contribute to improving ecological integrity.

Parks Canada has focused its cultural resource conservation efforts and investments on the most urgently needed work. Examples include urgent work at Point Clark Lighthouse National Historic Site where the deteriorated core of the masonry wall is being stabilized. Conservation work at Province House National Historic Site began in 2011, focusing on the preservation of the period masonry to prepare it as the backdrop for 2014 celebrations. There were also some structural upgrades to the building, and measures were taken to make the building weather-tight.



Priority Type Strategic Outcome(s) [and/or] Program(s)
Increasing Canadians' Connection with Parks Canada Places Ongoing Public Appreciation and Understanding
Summary of Progress
Due to the Agency's constant presence in the day-to-day lives of Canadians, Parks Canada has experienced growth in the level of support for the protection and presentation of its heritage places by two percent over its 2008-09 baseline. Working with partners and supporters such as Air Canada, Universal Music, Canadian Geographic, the Toronto Zoo, the Vancouver Aquarium, Google and Mountain Equipment Co-op, Parks Canada connected millions of Canadians to their natural and historic treasures through a variety of initiatives. These included multi-platform and television broadcast projects, increased social media presence, proactive media relations, urban outreach events at festivals and partner venues, family and youth-oriented trip contests, youth ambassadors and university clubs, an innovative music concert, and online imagery of Parks Canada places and wildlife through Google Streetview and wildlife cameras.


Priority Type Strategic Outcome(s) [and/or] Program(s)
Increasing Visitation Ongoing Visitor Experience
Summary of Progress
In 2012-13, Parks Canada succeeded in ending a 15-year declining trend in visitation. The Agency's efforts in 2013-14 helped maintain visitation at 20.7 million. Parks Canada undertook targeted initiatives to enhance the appeal of Canada's natural and historic places as travel destinations for Canadians to connect with and enjoy. These initiatives included special events to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the Fortress of Louisbourg and the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, targeted multi-media promotions to inspire visitation, participation at domestic and international travel trade shows, expansion of overnight accommodations and onsite technology applications, capital investments in visitor infrastructure, and upgrades to the Agency's campground reservation system.


Priority Type Strategic Outcome(s) [and/or] Program(s)
Asset Management Ongoing Heritage Resources Conservation
Visitor Experience
Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure
Summary of Progress

Parks Canada continued to invest its resources in assessing and improving the condition of its aging infrastructure, with a focus on high priority cultural resources and visitor facilities, and its significant portfolio of dams, bridges and highways. Through these investments, including an additional $19 million announced by the Government of Canada's Economic Action Plan 2013 to address critical improvements to highways and bridges, the Agency continued to ensure resources were allocated to the highest priorities and risk areas across the organization.

The Agency undertook a National Asset Review in 2012, which was subsequently validated by an independent third-party review in December 2013, thereby confirming that the Agency is well positioned to ensure resources are allocated to the highest priorities and risk areas across the organization.



Priority Type Strategic Outcome(s) [and/or] Program(s)
One Team, One Vision, One Voice Ongoing Internal Services
Summary of Progress

In 2013-14, Parks Canada put in place many mechanisms encouraging collaboration, team work and employee engagement driven by the Agency's One Team, One Vision, One Voice initiative. For example, Blueprint 2020 consultations brought together over 700 Parks Canada team members allowing for an open dialogue promising to set the groundwork in achieving profound, lasting and positive change.

Parks Canada also advanced an action plan for the engagement of the Agency's middle managers community. Through the lens of this action plan, the Agency is aiming for a united and engaged middle managers community. The community shares senior management responsibilities and promotes integration, collaboration and participation of all in achieving the Agency's priorities and objectives while strengthening the Parks Canada team.

Risk Analysis

Key Risks

Each year, Parks Canada reviews and updates its Corporate Risk Profile. In 2013-14, the Agency maintained the four key corporate risks identified in 2012-13: Competitive Position, Environmental Forces, Asset Management and Natural Disasters, and added Workforce Management as its fifth key corporate risk. A summary of these risks and planned risk responses were included in the Agency's 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities [xvi].

Parks Canada's efforts at mitigating its key corporate risks are presented in the following table and narrative section.

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Competitive Position

Parks Canada programs, services and experiences may be less attractive or less of an interest to Canadians compared to alternative leisure activities.

The key response to this risk continued to be product enhancement, strategic event planning, proactive media relations and working with partners to raise awareness of Canada's national treasures, nurture interest in them, and inspire Canadians to visit them. Targeted initiatives linked to Louisbourg 300 celebrations resulted in a 36 percent increase in visitation to the Fortress of Louisbourg National Historic Site. As a result of continued Agency-wide mitigation efforts, visitation was 20.7 million in 2013-14 which is on par with 2012-13.

Strategic Outcome

Visitor Experience

Public Appreciation and Understanding

Environmental Forces

Environmental forces may limit the Agency's ability to make improvements in ecological integrity in national parks and meet legal requirements related to Species at Risk.

The key response to this risk continues to be the implementation of the Conservation and Restoration program, which includes projects for the recovery of species at risk.

Heritage Resources Conservation

Natural Disasters

Natural disasters may damage infrastructure and lead to expenses, injury, loss of life and the loss of assets of national significance.

The key response to this risk continues to be to:

  • establish, maintain and test emergency and business continuity plans; and

  • ensure that operational requirements regarding emergency events are attached to leases and licenses with partners, share information on risk and hazards with partners and promote risk reduction in decision making, particularly in asset investment.

Heritage Resources Conservation

Visitor Experience

Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure

Asset Management

Assets are continuing to deteriorate with the result that almost half of the Agency's built assets are in poor to very poor condition.

The Agency is responding to this risk by ensuring that existing capital investments are allocated to the highest priority assets. The overall condition of the Agency's aging infrastructure was confirmed by an independent third party.

The Agency is reviewing its asset holdings and developing strategies for achieving sustainability.

As part of Economic Action Plan 2014, the Government of Canada announced $391.5 million over 5 years to invest in improvements to the Agency's highest risk assets.

The Agency will continue to focus its efforts on high-risk assets such as dams, bridges and highways; ensuring public safety remains a top priority.

Heritage Resources Conservation

Visitor Experience

Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure

Workforce Management

The Agency's ability to sustain a sufficient and representative workforce with the appropriate competencies within the current fiscal and demographic realities could lead to challenges in delivery of all programs and support functions.

Many new initiatives and strategies were initiated to ensure that the Agency retains and attracts a sufficient and representative workforce with the appropriate competencies. Examples include: a Northern Resourcing Strategy, and the development of a new course for managers and supervisors on people management.

Internal Services


Competitive Position

In the 15-year period to 2011-12, overall visitation to Parks Canada's heritage places had dropped by approximately 20 percent before the decline was halted by a 3 percent increase in 2012-13 and continued stability in 2013-14. The decline translated into reduced revenues, less economic contribution and lost opportunities to connect Canadians to their natural and cultural heritage. Over time, further reduced visitation and revenues would erode the quality of Parks Canada programs and could risk the sustainable delivery of the mandate. Nonetheless, Parks Canada protected heritage places are significant economic drivers, with a contribution of over $3.3 billion annually to the Canadian economy, and to over 400 communities across Canada.

The Canadian tourism industry, however, is challenged on a number of fronts. In 2013, large multi-million dollar marketing campaigns targeted Canadians to travel outside the country. Canada's tourism deficit highlights the continued decline in international arrivals to the country and the growing overseas travel by Canadians. Advancements in technology and related infrastructure to support promotion and trip planning require nimble responses to remain competitive.

To mitigate its competitive position risk, Parks Canada continued to make concerted efforts to improve its position in the tourism market by actively pursuing strategies with the tourism industry and other partners to significantly increase visitation and revenues to support its ongoing mandate and Canada's Federal Tourism Strategy. Targeted investments in tourism media and promotions, cross promotion, trip planning tools, product enhancements, and capital investments in visitor-related assets continued to be made and partnering arrangements were sought for visitor facilities and services that support revenue generation and provide a broader range of options to appeal to travelers. Focused and targeted efforts to connect with, and attract urban and new Canadians, as well as youth and young adults continued. The Agency continues to integrate national strategies to prioritize resources in a consistent and targeted way in support of improving its competitive positioning.

Environmental Forces

Parks Canada recognizes that its ability to maintain or improve ecological integrity in national parks and meet legal requirements related to species at risk may be hindered by external environmental forces such as climate change, invasive species and habitat loss or degradation. These environmental forces are the result of various complex processes with significant inter-relationships including globalization, urbanization and industrial development. To mitigate this risk in 2013-14, Parks Canada continued to implement the Conservation and Restoration program, including projects to restore ecological processes and connectivity, to control invasive species (e.g. crested wheat grass in Grasslands National Park and a variety of shrubs, grasses and forbs in Garry oak ecosystems in Gulf Islands National Park Reserve) and hyper-abundant species (e.g. moose in Gros Morne National Park) and to reintroduce species at risk. The Agency also continued site-based action planning for species at risk in 14 protected heritage areas. Parks Canada also continued to participate in environmental assessments for major projects adjacent to protected heritage areas, which may have potential negative impacts.

Natural Disasters

National parks and national historic sites border on three oceans and encompass a vast array of landforms including mountains, plains, forests and grasslands. This geographic dispersion lends itself to weather patterns that range from numbing cold to unrelenting heat waves and seemingly endless rain storms. The possibilities of severe weather and geological events are a constant reality and, on a more and more frequent basis, affect Canadians and cause damage to property and the environment to the extent that an event is classified as a natural disaster.

In June 2013, Western Canada experienced flooding that washed out Parks Canada administered highways, secondary roads, bridges and trails. Parts of the Trans-Canada Highway were completely severed in Banff National Park. Within a week the Trans-Canada Highway was re-opened, popular trails were re-linked and secondary roads became accessible. The cost to effect priority work in 2013-14 was $18.5M and the estimated cost to complete the work in 2014-15 is $13M for a total cost of $31.5M. These events impose unforeseen expenses and result in funds being diverted from other program areas. They can also have significant impacts on the Agency's revenue generating capacity as a result of decreased visitation due to inaccessible roads and facility closures.

Parks Canada's efforts to manage this risk continued to focus on mitigation measures to ensure the ongoing safety of visitors and staff as well as the sustainability of operations. For example, Parks Canada expanded its departmental security team, ultimately enabling increased development and testing of operational business continuity plans. Additionally, progress continued to be made towards completing Dam Safety Reviews of 39 high-risk dams by the end of 2015. These reviews are inclusive of flood plain analysis in the event of a significant flood and continue to inform corresponding emergency preparedness and response plans. This analysis also informed related collaborative efforts with partners including law enforcement, public safety and emergency response agencies. Parks Canada continued its practice of ensuring that roles and responsibilities associated with required responses to emergency events were embedded in lease and licenses with high-risk activity commercial operators (e.g. ski hills).

Asset Management

Parks Canada is one of the largest federal custodians, managing a diverse portfolio of contemporary and cultural assets, with an estimated current replacement value of $16 billion.

To ensure resources are being allocated to the highest priorities and risk areas across the organization, the Agency undertook a National Asset Review in the fall of 2012 to evaluate the condition of the assets under its responsibility. An independent third-party assessment completed in 2013 validated the results of the 2012 Review.

The assessment confirmed that over 40 percent by current replacement value, of cultural resource assets (including historic buildings and fortifications) are rated in poor condition. Close to 40 percent by current replacement value, of Parks Canada visitor facilities that support meaningful visitor experiences and revenue generation are rated in poor condition. Finally, more than half of the Agency's asset portfolio is made up of dams, highways and bridges, of which over 60 percent by current replacement value is rated in poor condition.

To mitigate the condition of highways and bridges that pass through Terra Nova, Banff, Jasper, Kootenay, Yoho and Glacier national parks, critical work was undertaken in 2013-14 through $19 million of funding from the Government of Canada's Economic Action Plan 2013. This funding and the Agency's ongoing investment program allowed projects such as paving, stabilization of rock and soil slopes, replacement and repair of highway retaining walls and culverts, and repairs to bridges.

The Agency will continue to mitigate risks related to highway and dam high-risk situations to ensure public safety remains a top priority. Temporary closures for emergency repairs and reduced levels of service to address health and safety concerns (such as load restrictions on bridges) are being implemented. The Agency is reviewing its asset holdings and developing strategies for achieving sustainability. In the Economic Action Plan 2014, the Government of Canada announced $391.5 million over five years to further enable Parks Canada to make improvements to highways, bridges and dams located in national parks and along historic canals.

Workforce Management

Parks Canada launched a Corporate Transformation initiative integrating government-wide changes aimed at modernizing and streamlining human resource and financial management business processes. These changes include a training strategy; an internal communication strategy; and broad staff engagement. These efforts will ensure that Parks Canada is well prepared not only to support and implement whole-of-government corporate consolidation efforts, but also to facilitate transformation and training, mitigate negative impacts and encourage cohesive internal communications.

As part of the Government of Canada Blueprint 2020 initiative, Parks Canada launched Innovation Labs to discover new ideas to improve the operations and the quality of the workplace. Innovation Labs provide an exceptional opportunity for Parks Canada team members to develop creative and actionable solutions, to collaborate with colleagues from across the country, and to personally contribute to improving the workplace.


Actual Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013-14
Actual Spending
(authorities used)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
597,035,269 693,728,457 834,826,794 690,941,356 (2,787,101)
*Throughout this document, totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

The Agency's 2013-14 planned spending represented the amount approved by Parliament through the Main Estimates plus other adjustments known at the time of publishing the 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities, and included funding for the development and operation of the Rouge National Urban Park as well as funds carried over from 2012-13. In addition, throughout the year, new and renewed funding added a total of $141.1 million to planned spending, increasing total authorities to $834.8 million. The main items contributing to this increase include funding received for the costs of maternity and severance benefits, funding for urgent improvements to highways and bridges in national parks, funding carried over from 2012-13 and funding for a grant to support the Trans Canada Trail foundation.

The actual spending of $690.9 million is slightly lower than planned spending and reflects the Agency expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])*
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
4,278 3,939 (339)
*Throughout this document, totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Parks Canada utilized 3,939 FTEs in 2013-14, a decrease of 339 FTEs (7.9%) over planned FTEs of 4,278. This difference is mainly a result of achieving streamlining and efficiency measures one year sooner than planned.

Budgetary Performance Summary for Strategic Outcome(s) and Program(s)(dollars)*
Strategic Outcome(s), Program(s) and Internal Services 2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2013-14 Total Authorities Available for Use 2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)*
2012-13
Actual Spending (authorities used)*
2011-12
Actual Spending (authorities used)*
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.
Heritage Places Establishment 15,193,527 47,391,527 30,674,153 43,364,400 54,648,539 27,859,372 14,874,251 14,167,678
Heritage Resources Conservation 157,140,717 172,078,146 173,512,215 171,346,018 170,790,773 140,659,981 146,398,627 158,761,481
Public Appreciation and Understanding 39,473,115 39,963,357 42,091,031 39,574,601 47,013,272 43,793,272 52,372,806 52,880,244
Visitor Experience 226,350,936 235,484,436 249,407,783 258,525,233 293,025,793 263,655,992 239,572,389 262,896,567
Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure 93,211,526 132,511,526 156,120,362 211,876,081 164,264,871 118,681,423 91,782,776 104,365,103
Subtotal 531,369,821 627,428,992 651,805,544 724,683,333 729,743,248 594,650,040 545,000,849 593,071,073
Internal Services Subtotal 65,665,448 66,299,465 65,633,392 63,230,554 105,083,546 96,291,316 85,546,742 84,940,832
Total 597,035,269 693,728,457 717,438,936 787,913,887 834,826,794 690,941,356 630,547,591 678,011,905
* Totals may differ within and between tables due to rounding of figures.

Actual spending increased in 2013-14 in comparison with prior year's spending. This is mainly due to non-recurring salary-related benefits paid out in 2013-14 as well as increased investment in the Agency's assets.

Planned spending increases in future years reflect funding announced as part of the Government of Canada's Economic Action Plan 2014.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2013-14 Actual Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework [xvii] (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2013-14 Actual Spending
Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations. Heritage Places Establishment Social Affairs A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage 27,859,372
Heritage Resources Conservation Economic Affairs A clean and healthy environment 140,659,981
Public Appreciation and Understanding Social Affairs A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage 43,793,272
Visitor Experience Social Affairs A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage 263,655,992
Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 118,681,423

Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending Total Actual Spending
Economic Affairs 172,078,146 140,659,981
Social Affairs 455,350,846 453,990,059
International Affairs - -
Government Affairs - -

Departmental Spending Trend

The following graph depicts the Agency's spending trend over a six-year period. For the period from 2011-12 to 2013-14, actual spending represents the actual expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts. For the period from 2014-15 to 2016-17, the planned spending reflects funding approved by Treasury Board including funding announced as part of the Government of Canada's Economic Action Plan 2014 to support the Agency's critical assets.

In 2012-13, the Agency implemented significant streamlining and efficiency measures and supported its staff through significant change. As a result, actual spending was lower than 2011-12, and these funds were carried forward into 2013-14 for project delivery.

Actual spending increased in 2013-14 in comparison with prior year's spending. This is mainly due to non-recurring salary-related benefits paid out in 2013-14 as well as increased investment in the Agency's assets.

Planned spending increases in future years reflect funding announced as part of the Government of Canada's Economic Action Plan 2014.

Estimates by Vote

For information on Park Canada's organizational Votes and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2014 [xviii] on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website.

Section II: Analysis of Program(s) by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome

Parks Canada has a single Strategic Outcome which reads as follows:

Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.

PROGRAM 1.1: HERITAGE PLACES ESTABLISHMENT

Description

This program includes systems planning, completing feasibility assessments, research, consulting with Aboriginal peoples, stakeholders and the public, negotiating with other governments and Aboriginal organizations and obtaining Ministerial approval, resulting in established national parks and national marine conservation areas and designated national historic sites of Canada and other heritage places. Canada's national parks and national marine conservation areas, as well as the persons, places and events of national historic significance to Canada are symbols to the world and are part of the nation's heritage. Preservation of Canada's natural and cultural heritage and making it available to Canadians for discovery and enjoyment is of key importance. Establishing heritage places is essential to enhancing pride, encouraging stewardship and giving expression to our identity as Canadians, and involving Canada in the internationally shared objective of protecting and commemorating the best of the world's natural and cultural heritage.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
15,193,527 47,391,527 54,648,539 27,859,372 (19,532,155)


Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
64 57 (7)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Represented regions in the systems of national parks and national marine conservation areas; the system of national historic sites represents the breadth and diversity of Canada's history. Number of represented terrestrial natural regions in the system of national parks. Increase the number of represented terrestrial natural regions from 28 in March 2012 to 30 of 39 by March 2015. 28
Percentage of annual commemorations for under-represented themes in Canada's history. 33% of annual commemorations are for under-represented themes in Canada's history. 33%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
Increasing the representation of terrestrial natural regions

The national parks system currently consists of 44 national parks and national park reserves representing 28 of the 39 terrestrial natural regions. One national park was formally protected under the Canada National Parks Act in 2013-14, Sable Island National Park Reserve in Nova Scotia. Parks Canada worked towards increasing the number of represented terrestrial natural regions to 30 by furthering the Qausuittuq - Bathurst Island and Mealy Mountains proposals, which are currently in the negotiation phase. Once final establishment agreements are signed for these two areas, 30 of 39 regions will be represented.

Commemoration of under-represented themes in Canada's history

Of the 9 commemorations of persons, places and events of national significance that took place in 2013-14, three were related to under-represented themes in Canada's history, meeting the target of 33 percent of the total number of commemorations. For more details on commemorations, please visit the Parks Canada website. [xix]

By meeting its commemorations target, Parks Canada continues to ensure the system of national historic sites reflects Canada's rich history. Heritage designations are proposed by Canadians, are relevant to Canadians, and help to foster a strong sense of connection in their hearts and minds thereby helping to ensure that these places are protected in ways that allow present and future generations to enjoy them.

Variances in 1.1 - Heritage Places Establishment

Actual spending for Heritage Places Establishment is $19.5 million lower than the 2013-14 planned spending. This is due to delays in the completion of activities related to the establishment of new parks. This was offset by funding received during the year to provide a grant to the Trans Canada Trail Foundation (TCIF) to match new non-federal funding raised by the TCIF to complete the Trans Canada Trail.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.1.1: NATIONAL PARK ESTABLISHMENT AND EXPANSION

Description

This program involves the completion of the national parks system in accordance with the National Parks System Plan. Canada is divided into 39 distinct natural regions based on unique physiographic and vegetative characteristics and Parks Canada's goal is to have at least one national park representative of each natural region. The completion of the system will protect outstanding examples of Canada's natural diversity and provide Canadians with opportunities to experience, understand and appreciate that diversity. Five steps are involved in the process to establish a national park: identify areas representative of a natural region; select an optimum national park candidate from the list of representative areas; assess the feasibility of establishing the proposed park through studies and consultations; negotiate new park agreements, including any that may be required with Aboriginal peoples or organizations; and formally establish the national park in legislation.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
41,314,116 16,049,389 (25,264,727)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
14 12 (2)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
National parks are created in unrepresented regions and some existing national parks are completed or expanded. Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress in advancing through steps towards establishing national parks. Make demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks in 1 unrepresented region. 4
Number of unfinished national parks with increased targeted land holdings. Increase the targeted land holdings in 3 unfinished national parks within available resources. Nil
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada met its target by making demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks in four unrepresented natural regions: East Coast Boreal in Newfoundland and Labrador (Mealy Mountains proposal), Western High Arctic in Nunavut (Qausuittuq - Bathurst Island proposal), Northwestern Boreal Uplands in the Northwest Territories (Thaidene Nene in the East Arm of Great Slave Lake proposal) and Manitoba Lowlands in Manitoba (Manitoba Lowlands proposal). This includes ongoing negotiation of establishment agreements, including impact and benefit agreements and consultations with provinces/territories and Aboriginal groups. Details on the progress made on these proposals can be found on the Parks Canada website. [xx]

The legislation to protect Sable Island National Park Reserve under the Canada National Parks Act came into force on December 1, 2013.

Parks Canada's continued progress on park establishment can be attributed to the positive and productive relationships it has developed with local residents and groups that have the strongest interest and involvement in its work. The establishment of national parks also requires building trust through a high level of engagement on the part of provincial and territorial governments and Aboriginal peoples.

No lands were acquired in 2013-14 in any of the three unfinished national parks: Bruce Peninsula National Park, Grasslands National Park or Gulf Islands National Park Reserve.

Progress towards establishing Rouge National Urban Park

In 2013-14, Parks Canada continued to engage provincial, regional, municipal, Aboriginal, agricultural, and community partners and stakeholders towards the establishment of Rouge National Urban Park, Canada's first national urban park. Following a successful public engagement program in 2012, progress has been made on interim park operations and the drafting of the Rouge National Urban Park's first Management Plan. In the same period, both the federal government and the provincial government signed agreements indicating their intention to transfer land to Parks Canada as part of the establishment process. In addition, Parks Canada made significant progress on land assembly agreements with the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, and regional and local municipalities.

Variances in 1.1.1 - National Park Establishment and Expansion

Actual spending for National Park Establishment and Expansion is $25.3 million lower than the 2013-14 planned spending. This is due to delays in the completion of negotiation of agreements with third parties and finalization of plans, where consultations are required, for which the timetable is not under the complete control of the Agency.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.1.2: NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE DESIGNATIONS

Description

This program involves the implementation of The National Historic Sites of Canada System Plan. Designations under the National Historic Sites System Plan safeguard and chronicle the determination and ingenuity of Canadians and the contributions they have made. The long-term strategy is to enhance the commemoration of places, persons, and events of national historic significance. Implementation of the plan involves Parks Canada, the public, who make most of the nominations for designation, the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, which reviews all submissions and recommends the designation of places, persons and events, and the Minister of the Environment, who makes the final designations. The System of National Historic Sites respects the significance and irreplaceable historical legacy reflecting Canada's values and identity.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
3,038,705 2,392,004 (646,701)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
38 34 (4)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Places, persons and events designated are commemorated and communicated to Canadians. Research reports are submitted for the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada's consideration for each eligible place, person and event nominated by the public. One research report is submitted for the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada's consideration for each eligible place, person and event nominated by the public. 23
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Every year, new subjects of potential national historic significance are nominated by the public for consideration, and research reports for those subjects that meet the basic criteria are prepared for consideration by the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada (HSMBC) [xxi].

In 2013-14, Parks Canada met its target by submitting 23 research reports to the HSMBC in support of nominations for places, persons and events of national historic significance.

Parks Canada continues to align its work with key commemoration priorities, such as the 150th anniversary of the Charlottetown and Québec Conferences and the Centennial of the start of the First World War. This demonstrates that the Agency remains nimble and responsive to the commemoration and communication of places, persons and events of national historic significance, while providing increased opportunities for Canadians to enjoy their rich history.

Parks Canada continues to attribute much of its success in this area to the positive and productive relationships it has developed with the many Canadians engaged in the nomination process. In fostering public participation, Parks Canada continues to meet its expected result of having designated places, persons and events commemorated and communicated to Canadians.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.1.3: NATIONAL MARINE CONSERVATION AREA ESTABLISHMENT

Description

This program involves the expansion and ultimate completion of the national marine conservation areas system in accordance with the National Marine Conservation Areas System Plan entitled Sea to Sea to Sea. Canada is divided into 29 distinct marine regions based on unique oceanographic and biological characteristics and Parks Canada's goal is to protect and present a representative example of each of the 29 regions. The completion of the system will protect outstanding examples of the diversity of Canada's oceans and Great Lakes and provide Canadians with opportunities to experience, understand, and appreciate that diversity. Five steps are involved in the process to establish a national marine conservation area: identify areas representative of a marine region; select an optimum national marine conservation area candidate from the list of representative areas; assess the feasibility of establishing the proposed marine conservation area through studies and, consultations; negotiate new national marine conservation area agreements, including any that may be required with Aboriginal peoples or organizations; and formally establish the national marine conservation area in legislation.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,671,288 1,242,364 (428,924)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
10 9 (1)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
National marine conservation areas are created in unrepresented regions. Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress in advancing through steps towards establishing national marine conservation areas. Make demonstrable progress towards establishing national marine conservation areas in 2 unrepresented regions. 3
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, Parks Canada exceeded its target towards establishing national marine conservation areas by making important progress in three unrepresented marine regions: Lancaster Sound in Nunavut (Lancaster Sound proposal); Strait of Georgia in British Columbia (Southern Strait of Georgia proposal); and Magdalen Shallows in Quebec (les Îles-de-la-Madeleine proposal). All three feasibility assessments were advanced. In the case of the Lancaster Sound and Southern Strait of Georgia proposals, consultations with communities, Aboriginal groups and key stakeholders were undertaken. For the Îles de la Madeleine proposal, all studies stipulated under the accord with the province of Quebec have been completed. Further details can be found on the Parks Canada website [xxii] .

Underlying Parks Canada's ability to make progress towards the establishment of new national marine conservation areas is the fact that other governments and Aboriginal organizations also share the objective to conserve Canada's marine heritage. As with national park establishment, much of Parks Canada's success with national marine conservation area establishment can be attributed to the positive and productive relationships it has developed with local residents and groups that have the strongest interest and involvement in its work.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.1.4: OTHER HERITAGE PLACES DESIGNATIONS

Description

This program involves commemorating or designating federal heritage buildings, Canadian Heritage Rivers and heritage railway stations. Parks Canada is the lead federal agency for the implementation of the World Heritage Convention in Canada, and plays a role in other international programs such as UNESCO's Man and the Biosphere program. World Heritage Sites represent natural and cultural heritage of outstanding universal value and Biosphere Reserves put into practice principles of sustainable development and serve as sound examples in conservation and education. Parks Canada works with other government departments, other levels of government and a wide range of partners to increase the number of these designations in Canada.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,367,417 8,175,615 6,808,198


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
2 2 0


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Heritage places not administered by Parks Canada are identified. Average number of federal buildings evaluated to identify buildings with historic value. On average over 3 years, evaluate 400 federal buildings per year to identify buildings that have an historic value. 404
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada exceeded its three year target of evaluating 400 federal buildings per year, on average, over the past three years by evaluating 404 through the work of Parks Canada's Federal Heritage Buildings Review Office (FHBRO).

The main focus of this program is the work of the FHBRO. Under the Treasury Board Policy on Management of Real Property, departments must ensure that buildings 40 years of age or older are submitted to Parks Canada's Federal Heritage Buildings Review Office for evaluation to determine their heritage character. Also, under the Parks Canada Agency Act, it is in the national interest that Parks Canada protects the heritage character of federal heritage buildings. The FHBRO meets this mandate by managing the evaluation of federal buildings, advising on the heritage conservation of federal heritage buildings and guiding custodians on requirements for disposing of federal heritage buildings.

The World Heritage Committee inscribed Red Bay Basque Whaling Station on the World Heritage List as Canada's 17th World Heritage site. This inscription resulted from a project that Parks Canada led over several years, bringing together the Town of Red Bay and the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Variances in 1.1.4 - Other Heritage Places Designations

Actual spending for Other Heritage Places Designations is $6.8 million higher than the 2013-14 planned spending. This is due to funding received during the year to provide a grant to the Trans Canada Trail Foundation (TCIF) to match new non-federal funding raised by the TCIF to complete the Trans Canada Trail.

PROGRAM 1.2: HERITAGE RESOURCES CONSERVATION

Description

This program includes maintenance or restoration of ecological integrity in national parks through protection of natural resources and natural processes; ensuring the commemorative integrity of national historic sites managed by Parks Canada and influencing the commemorative integrity of those managed or owned by third parties; the protection and management of cultural resources under the administration of Parks Canada; and, the ecologically sustainable use of national marine conservation areas including protection of unique marine ecosystems. This program also includes fulfilling legal responsibilities assigned to Parks Canada by the Species at Risk Act and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. The protection of Canada's most special natural and cultural resources ensures that current and future generations will enjoy a system of protected heritage places.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
157,140,717 172,078,146 170,790,773 140,659,981 (31,418,165)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
990 879 (111)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Management actions result in improvements to ecological integrity indicators in national parks, and the state of cultural resources of national significance (level 1) in national historic sites is improved. Number of national parks with one improved ecological integrity indicator. 20 national parks improve one ecological integrity indicator by March 2015. 15
Percentage of national historic sites where the condition of cultural resources of national significance (level 1) rated as poor in their initial assessment that are improved. 60% of the national historic sites where the condition of cultural resources of national significance rated as poor in their initial assessment are improved by March 2014. 69%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
Improving ecological integrity

In the fall 2013 Report of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development, Chapter 7- Ecological Integrity in National Parks, the Commissioner concluded that: "Parks Canada is fulfilling its key responsibilities for maintaining or restoring ecological integrity in Canada's national parks".

Improvements in ecological integrity indicators may be realized in one of three ways by: improving the condition of the indicator (e.g. fair to good); improving the trend of the indicator (e.g. declining to stable); or by meeting active management targets (e.g. ratio of native grasses to exotic grasses improved by 15 percent in the restoration area).

In 2013-14, through its Conservation and Restoration program, Parks Canada continued to invest significantly in active management and ecological restoration efforts to address some of the most pressing ecological integrity issues in targeted national parks. Monitoring continued to be a priority for the Agency for reporting on the health of parks and for knowledge-based decision making with regards to improving ecological integrity.

By meeting active management targets, management actions have resulted in improvements to at least one ecological integrity indicator in 15 national parks.

Improving condition of cultural resources of national significance

The national policy framework for cultural resources management was renewed to better identify and address the most critical cultural resource issues in support of priority setting and investment decision making.

Of the 13 national historic sites that received a poor rating as part of their initial assessment (beginning in 2001-02), nine of those sites (69 percent) have demonstrated an improved rating to either fair or good by March 2014, including Battle of the Windmill, Fort Henry, Kingston Fortifications, Carillon Canal, Bar-U Ranch, HMCS Haida, Jasper Park Information Centre, Twin Falls Teahouse, and Fort McNab. For more information, please visit the Parks Canada website. [xxiii]

Variances in 1.2 - Heritage Resources Conservation

Actual spending for Heritage Resources Conservation is $31.4 million lower than the 2013-14 planned spending. This is primarily related to delays in the implementation of projects associated with the Agency's Conservation and Restoration program, the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan Program, and a smaller than average fire season in 2013-14. These funds will continue to be available for use in 2014-15 to invest in the initiatives underway.

The reduction in FTEs is mainly a result of achieving streamlining and efficiency measures one year sooner.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.2.1: NATIONAL PARKS CONSERVATION

Description

Parks Canada has responsibilities under the Canada National Parks Act to protect and conserve nationally significant representative natural areas on behalf of the people of Canada for their benefit, education and enjoyment and to ensure National Parks are maintained and made use of as to leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations. National Parks Conservation includes maintenance or restoration of ecological integrity through: ecological research and monitoring to gain a better understanding of the state of health, natural ecological processes and biodiversity of parks; and the impact of stressors on ecosystems. Protection and conservation occurs through scientific research, planning, reporting, public consultation, negotiation with stakeholders and others to influence actions that occur on lands located adjacent to protected heritage areas, cooperative management agreements, adaptive management and restoration of ecosystem processes and biodiversity. Protection and conservation also occurs through specific activities such as prevention, law enforcement, and fire management. This program also includes activities to manage cultural resources in parks and townsites, and environmental management to reduce the environmental impact of operations, townsites and highways.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
119,925,551 93,977,090 (25,948,461)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
720 639 (81)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Ecosystem conservation is improved through active management and the condition of priority heritage buildings administered by Parks Canada in townsites is maintained or improved. Percentage of active management targets to improve ecological integrity that are met. 80% of active management targets to improve ecological integrity are met by March 2015. 44%
Percentage of townsite priority heritage buildings conservation targets that are met. 100% of townsite priority heritage buildings conservation targets are met. 96%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
Natural Resource Conservation

In 2013-14, through the Conservation and Restoration program, Parks Canada continued to implement active management and restoration projects to address some of the most pressing ecological integrity issues in targeted national parks.

Examples of projects undertaken and issues being addressed include: construction of wildlife underpasses and fenced wildlife areas to decrease wildlife mortality on roads in Kootenay National Park; eradication of invasive rats in Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site; increasing savannah ecosystems in Point Pelee National Park; planting rare pines to increase forest regeneration in Waterton Lakes National Park; and initiating new caribou conservation actions in Jasper National Park.

Though Parks Canada's long-term goal revolves around maintaining or improving the status and trend of indicators, the success of an intervention is assessed by active management targets. To date, 44% of the targets have been met, up from 23% in 2012-13. For the remaining targets, steady progress is being made.

Parks Canada continued to reintroduce fire as a natural process in support of the maintenance or restoration of ecological integrity, with 14 prescribed burns carried out in eight national parks. In addition, the Agency coordinated suppression efforts for 96 wildfires affecting 15 national parks to ensure public safety and to protect infrastructure in and around national parks.

Townsite Priority Heritage Buildings

The townsite heritage buildings conservation target was established in 2006 for 52 priority heritage buildings owned by Parks Canada within seven townsite communities [xxiv] . At that time, 48 percent of townsite heritage buildings were in good or fair condition, 19 percent were in poor condition, and 33 percent were unrated. Since 2006, the Agency has undertaken improvements and condition assessments on heritage assets. By March 2014, rating assessments have been completed for all 52 buildings; 96 percent were in good or fair condition, 2 percent were in poor condition. Investment in the two heritage buildings in poor condition will remain an Agency priority to ensure the condition of priority heritage buildings administered by Parks Canada in townsites is maintained or improved.

Variances in 1.2.1 National Parks Conservation

Actual spending for National Parks Conservation is $25.9 million lower than the 2013-14 planned spending. This is related to delays in the implementation of projects associated with the Agency's Conservation and Restoration program, the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan Program, and a smaller than average fire season in 2013-14. These funds will continue to be available for use in 2014-15 to invest in initiatives underway.

SUB-SUB-PROGRAM 1.2.1.1: SPECIES AT RISK
Description

Over half of Canada's endangered and threatened species can be found in the protected heritage areas administered by Parks Canada. Parks Canada will protect these species and their critical habitat in the Agency's heritage areas, and will support their recovery by leading the development and implementation of recovery strategies, surveying and monitoring their status, and conducting public education programs. Recovery planning is an obligation under the Species at Risk Act.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
12,196,000 10,191,679 (2,004,321)
Note: To ensure consistency in reporting, Sub-Sub-Program performance information (Planned Spending, Actual Spending and FTEs) throughout this document are included in the respective Sub-Program total.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
35 35 0


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Species at risk action plans are developed for species under Parks Canada's jurisdiction. Number of protected heritage areas with 5 or more species at risk that have developed an action plan. All protected heritage areas with 5 or more species at risk have developed an action plan by March 2016. Nil
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14 Parks Canada entered a new phase in the implementation of the Species at Risk Act (SARA) focusing on action planning and taking tangible recovery actions. Since 2011-12, Parks Canada has completed drafts for two of the seven site-based multi-species action plans targeted for completion by March 2016 and continued the development of other action plans. Parks Canada has posted 99% of the 76 recovery documents for which it is responsible, of which 15 were posted in the 2013-14 fiscal year. These documents provide directions to implement recovery actions.

Variances in 1.2.1.1 - Species at Risk

Actual spending for Species at Risk is $2.0 million lower than the 2013-14 planned spending. Changes in staffing levels and vacancies Agency-wide affected the Agency's ability to spend dedicated SARA resources and resulted in projects having to be delayed. Any unspent monies will be invested in the SARA program in subsequent years.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.2.2: NATIONAL HISTORIC SITES CONSERVATION

Description

This program reflects Parks Canada's mandate to ensure the commemorative integrity of national historic sites on Parks Canada lands. It includes the inventory and evaluation of resources to determine cultural and historic value; the consideration of historic value in actions affecting cultural resources; and the monitoring and review of ongoing activities. Key activities reflect the management regime for national historic sites: preparation of commemorative integrity statements, evaluations of the state of commemorative integrity, management planning, and conservation actions to improve the condition of cultural resources, the effectiveness of communications, and practices which support good cultural resource management.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
45,147,793 40,412,745 (4,735,048)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
239 212 (27)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The condition of cultural resources of national significance (level 1) administered by Parks Canada is maintained or improved. Percentage of national historic sites where the condition of historic buildings and structures of national significance that are rated as poor in their initial assessment are improved. 60% of national historic sites where the condition of historic buildings and structures of national significance rated as poor in their initial assessment are improved by March 2014. 69%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The target of 60% has been surpassed for this multi-year performance indicator. For more information, please visit the Parks Canada website. [xxv] As of March 2014, nine of 13 national historic sites (69 percent), where the condition of historic buildings and engineering works of national significance rated as poor in their initial assessment (beginning in 2001-02), have demonstrated an improved rating to either fair or good, including Signal Hill and HMCS Haida.

Reporting on the condition of cultural resources of national historic significance and conducting streamlined commemorative integrity assessments in the future will continue to provide strategic, relevant and timely data to assist Parks Canada in addressing the most urgent built heritage conservation deficiencies.

Variances in 1.2.2 National Historic Sites Conservation

Actual spending for National Historic Sites Conservation is $4.7 million lower than the 2013-14 planned spending. This is mainly related to delays in the implementation of cultural resource conservation projects. These funds will continue to be available for use in 2014-15 to invest in the initiatives underway.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.2.3: NATIONAL MARINE CONSERVATION AREAS SUSTAINABILITY

Description

Parks Canada has responsibilities under the Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act to protect and conserve representative marine areas for the benefit, education and enjoyment of the people of Canada and the world. These areas are to be managed and used in an ecologically sustainable manner that meets the needs of present and future generations without compromising the structure and function of the ecosystems with which they are associated. The management of marine conservation areas involves agencies other than Parks Canada that have legislated mandates respecting activities such as fishing and marine navigation, activities that will continue subject to shared understandings that respect the principle of ecologically sustainable use. National Marine Area Sustainability includes ecological research and monitoring to gain a better understanding of the state of health, natural ecological processes and biodiversity of national marine conservation areas. These areas are managed through scientific research, planning, reporting, public consultation, negotiation with other involved management agencies, stakeholders and others to influence actions that occur in areas adjacent to protected heritage areas, cooperative management agreements, adaptive management and restoration of ecosystem processes and biodiversity. Conservation also is achieved through specific activities such as public education, compliance, and law enforcement.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,885,642 1,687,878 (197,764)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
9 8 (1)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
TBD TBD TBD n/a
Note: Performance measurement under development.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, progress was made on the development of a policy framework to inform the management and use of national marine conservation areas for the lasting benefit of Canadians and coastal communities. This framework will provide guidance with regards to the assessment and management of ecologically sustainable use; the development of monitoring and reporting plans; and zoning to facilitate a wide spectrum of ecologically sustainable use while ensuring the protection of sensitive natural or cultural features.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.2.4: OTHER HERITAGE PLACES CONSERVATION

Description

This program involves providing advice and recommendations on appropriate conservation measures to owners/operators of national historic sites not administered by Parks Canada and for other protected heritage areas (Federal Heritage Buildings, Heritage Railway Stations, Gravesites of Canadian Prime Ministers, Canadian Heritage Rivers). Parks Canada lends its protection expertise and contributes to ensuring that global heritage and biodiversity are protected and Canada's significant examples of national or international natural and cultural heritage are safeguarded for current and future generations. Parks Canada's involvement in World Heritage is governed by an international convention to which Canada is a signatory.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
5,119,160 4,582,268 (536,892)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
22 20 (2)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Parks Canada programs support the conservation of cultural resources at historic places administered by others. Percentage of Parks Canada advice that promotes the conservation of significant cultural resources at historic places administered by others and is targeted to areas most in need. 100% of Parks Canada's advice promotes the conservation of significant cultural resources at historic places administered by others and is targeted to areas most in need. 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, Parks Canada continued to provide advice and recommendations on appropriate conservation measures to owners of other protected heritage places. Conservation advice was provided to custodians of important Federal Heritage Buildings such as Blocks 1, 2, 3 of the Parliamentary Precinct and the former War Museum in Ottawa. Recommendations were made to administrators and owners of Heritage Railway Stations such as the Gare centrale in Montreal and Union Station in Winnipeg. Advice and recommendations provided comply with the Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada and thus ensure that the heritage value of national historic sites not administered by Parks Canada and of other heritage places is protected.

Lessons learned include providing advice and recommendations in a timely manner and ensuring consistency of recommendations. This is to enable work to occur within a reasonable time period after recommendations are made while protecting the heritage value of these places in a consistent way.

SUB-SUB-PROGRAM 1.2.4.1: NATIONAL HISTORIC SITES COST-SHARING
Description

Parks Canada has directly engaged Canadians in helping to preserve non-federally administered national historic sites by contributing funds toward conservation and presentation projects on a cost-shared basis to a maximum of one million dollars. Parks Canada supports a limited number of cost-share agreements to assist with modest conservation projects for emergency stabilization or repairs, at sites experiencing growing threat or impairment. Eligible recipients are non-profit organizations, Aboriginal organizations, and provinces, territories and municipalities. Individuals and for-profit corporations are ineligible.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,283,943 1,233,117 (50,826)
Note: To ensure consistency in reporting, Sub-Sub-Program performance information (Planned Spending, Actual Spending and FTEs) throughout this document are included in the respective Sub-Program total.


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
2 2 0


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Funded cost-share projects in the conservation of national historic sites not owned by the government. Percentage of cost-sharing agreements that contribute to the conservation of cultural resources of national significance (level 1) within national historic sites administered by others. 100% of cost-sharing agreements contribute to the conservation of cultural resources of national significance (level 1) within national historic sites administered by others. 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada focuses its efforts to help other administrators of heritage places through its cost-sharing program where it provides funds and advice to promote conservation of cultural resources of national significance.

In 2013-14, Parks Canada entered into contribution agreements with 17 National Historic Sites of Canada in order to contribute to the conservation of these important Canadian cultural resources. All of the agreements (100 percent) were completed successfully. These projects were selected from all applicants based in part on the level of threat to the nationally significant resources. All work under the agreements was carried out in accordance with the Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada [xxvi], thus ensuring the commemorative integrity of the sites.

PROGRAM 1.3: PUBLIC APPRECIATION AND UNDERSTANDING

Description

This program aims to increase Canadians' understanding, appreciation, support and engagement with respect to the natural and historical heritage of Parks Canada administered places. This is accomplished by reaching Canadians in their daily lives when they are in their communities through relevant and effective communication and public outreach education initiatives as well as by engaging many stakeholders and partners in the development and implementation of the Agency's future direction.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
39,473,115 39,963,357 47,013,272 43,793,272 3,829,915


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
373 327 (46)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results*
Canadians appreciate the significance of heritage places administered by Parks Canada and support their protection and presentation. Percentage of Canadians that appreciate the significance of heritage places administered by Parks Canada. 60% of Canadians appreciate the significance of heritage places administered by Parks Canada by March 2014. 52%
Percentage of Canadians that support the protection and presentation of places administered by Parks Canada. 80% of Canadians support the protection and presentation of places administered by Parks Canada by March 2014. 69%
* Source: Parks Canada's National Survey of Canadians (telephone survey of 3,764 people). Measured in 2013-14.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada has experienced growth in the level of support from Canadians (from the baseline of 67 percent in 2008-09 to 69 percent in 2013-14) and maintained relatively stable levels of appreciation (from the baseline of 53 percent in 2008-09 to 52 percent in 2013-14) over the last five years. [xxvii] Many things compete for the time and attention of Canadians, and when movement in levels of appreciation and support requires influencing social values, these results remain an accomplishment.

Connecting with Canadians in their communities by facilitating opportunities for them to learn about and be inspired by their natural and historical heritage is important for fostering appreciation and support of Canada's heritage places. In 2013-14, Parks Canada undertook proactive and targeted outreach initiatives, many with partners, such as:

  • Partnering with Google to bring Canada's heritage places to Canadians via Google Map's Street view's 360 degree panoramic imagery;
  • Partnering with Universal Music, Sennheiser, Banff Centre and Banff Lake Louise Tourism to deliver the "Quietest Concert Ever" in Banff National Park, featuring well known Canadian band Hedley;
  • Feature stories and locations in mainstream television productions ("Aventure Grandeur Nature" and the "George Stroumboulopoulos Show");
  • Partnering with Air Canada and Mountain Equipment Co-op for trip-oriented contests;
  • Participating in prominent urban festivals and venues in Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver; and,
  • Delivering a second year of Parks Canada's "1812 On Tour", participating in 39 events and connecting personally with approximately 90,000 Canadians to date.

Parks Canada continues to recognize that it is the cumulative, long-term impact of its public presence and public interactions that are critical to helping the Agency reach its objectives to increasing Canadians' appreciation and support for Canada's heritage places.

Variances in 1.3 - Public Appreciation and Understanding

Actual spending for Public Appreciation and Understanding is $3.8 million higher than the 2013-14 planned spending. The increased spending is a result of the 2012-13 carry-forward which was reinvested in pro-active and targeted outreach initiatives.

The reduction in FTEs is mainly a result of achieving streamlining and efficiency measures one year sooner.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.3.1: PUBLIC OUTREACH EDUCATION AND EXTERNAL COMMUNICATIONS

Description

Public outreach education and external communications focuses on facilitating opportunities for Canadians to understand and learn the natural and historical heritage of Parks Canada's administered places. These opportunities are provided through targeted initiatives, responsive and relevant to audiences' needs and interests informed by social science research. Public and media relations form the cornerstone of the external communications activities, maximising positive coverage in news and mass media, and mobilising public opinion for Parks Canada's mandate and activities. Public outreach education mobilises a diversity of learning contexts available to Canadians and results in initiatives such as: exhibits featuring Parks Canada places in urban museums, zoos and aquariums; learning opportunities on the Web, in print media, through television, films and new media. The reach and relevance of these initiatives are enhanced through collaborations with audiences, stakeholders and partners.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
26,688,813 29,066,156 2,377,344


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
273 239 (34)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results*
Canadians learn about the heritage of Parks Canada's administered places and understand that these places are protected and presented on their behalf. Increased percentage of Canadians that consider that they learned about the heritage of Parks Canada's administered places. Increase the percentage of Canadians that consider that they learned about the heritage of Parks Canada's administered places by March 2014. 38%
Increased percentage of Canadians that understand that nationally significant places that are administered by Parks Canada are protected and presented on their behalf. Increase the percentage of Canadians that understand that nationally significant places that are administered by Parks Canada are protected and presented on their behalf by March 2014. 91%
* Source: Parks Canada's National Survey of Canadians (telephone survey of 3,764 people). Measured in 2013-14.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The baselines for learning and understanding were measured in 2011-12. The year 2011 marked Parks Canada's centennial celebrations and involved additional special events and promotions, resulting in heightened public presence. Outreach initiatives undertaken in 2013-14 were also diverse and extensive, and produced learning results (38 percent) that were close to those achieved in 2011 (42 percent). Results associated with level of understanding (91 percent) remained consistent with 2011-12 baseline results (90 percent).

Parks Canada undertook a number of proactive and targeted outreach initiatives in 2013-14 to maintain its presence, including:

  • Launching a book about the search for the HMS Investigator, "Lost Beneath the Ice", which received extensive media coverage;
  • Supporting the Royal Canadian Geographic Society's work to deliver "Places and Spaces for Everyone," a giant floor map for teaching elementary school students about heritage places;
  • Collaborating with Earth Rangers and Owl Kids to bring the stories of Canada's treasured places to children/youth;
  • Launching a third annual "Canada's Coolest School Trip Contest" in collaboration with Canadian Geographic Education, Nature Canada, Historica-Dominion Institute, and Air Canada; and,
  • Collaborating with National Geographic and the US National Park Service to publish "1812, A Traveler's Guide to the War that Changed a Continent" in English and French.

Parks Canada also reached Canadians through:

  • Positive earned media at the national, regional and local levels across various media platforms;
  • Two youth ambassadors, who helped inspire young people to explore heritage places;
  • The establishment of eight pilot Parks Canada campus clubs at post-secondary institutions; and,
  • Special feature articles in Archaeology, Canadian Geographic, Diver, l'Actualité, Nature Sauvage, and Terra Sauvage magazines.

Parks Canada continues to appreciate and learn that inspiring Canadians to learn about heritage places requires a proactive and constant approach involving a diverse mix of platforms, content, venues and partners, in order to reach Canadians in ways that are meaningful to them.

Variances in 1.3.1 - Public Outreach Education and External Communications

Actual spending for Outreach Education and External Communications is $2.4 million higher than the 2013-14 planned spending. The increased spending is a result of the 2012-13 carry-forward which was reinvested in proactive and targeted outreach initiatives.

The reduction in FTEs is mainly a result of achieving streamlining and efficiency measures one year sooner.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.3.2: STAKEHOLDER AND PARTNER ENGAGEMENT

Description

The support and involvement of Parks Canada's stakeholders and partners is essential to Parks Canada's program delivery and continued relevance. Parks Canada's stakeholders represent all sectors of Canadian society, and include individuals, groups and organizations that have an interest in the Agency's actions and direction. Stakeholder engagement activities ensure that Canadians' needs and priorities are clearly expressed to the Agency and that these interests inform and influence Parks Canada's actions and direction. Stakeholders engage with Parks Canada through a wide variety of activities at all levels of the organization and in ways that are relevant to them, such as the Minister's Round Table on Parks Canada; formal and informal consultation processes, and the national volunteer program. Parks Canada also has partnering arrangements with a broad range of organizations to further shared goals and objectives. Partners in the not-for-profit sector include other government departments, NGOs, various academic institutions as well as cooperating associations. Parks Canada also has some strategic partners in the for-profit sector. Stakeholder and partner engagement supports results in all program activities and leads to new or expanded opportunities for Canadians to discover and develop a sense of connection to their protected heritage places.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
13,274,302 14,727,116 1,452,813


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
100 88 (12)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results*
Stakeholders and partners are engaged in the protection and presentation of Parks Canada's administered places. Increased percentage of stakeholders and partners that support the protection and presentation of Parks Canada's administered places. Increase the percentage of stakeholders and partners that support the protection and presentation of Parks Canada's administered places by March 2014. Not measured in 2013-14
Increased percentage of stakeholders and partners that feel that they have opportunities to influence and contribute to Parks Canada's activities. Increase the percentage of stakeholders and partners that feel that they have opportunities to influence and contribute to Parks Canada's activities by March 2014. Not measured in 2013-14
* Source:Parks Canada's Stakeholder and Partner Engagement Survey (online survey via invitation, 781 participants). Not Measured in 2013-14.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada established baselines for its performance targets through the 2009-10 Stakeholder and Partner Engagement Survey. [xxviii] The survey revealed that 82 percent of stakeholders and partners support the protection and presentation of Parks Canada's administered places, and that 41 percent feel that they have opportunities to influence and contribute to Parks Canada's activities. The Agency did not measure these performance targets in 2013-14 to assess progress.

To reach and engage Canadians in the discovery, appreciation and support for Canada's natural and historic places, Parks Canada appreciates that it needs to work closely with partners. To extend and maximize its reach in 2013-14, Parks Canada collaborated with a mix of partners on initiatives associated with mutual and complimentary objectives, such as connecting youth and families with nature and history, learning about biodiversity and conservation, and encouraging visitation.

Parks Canada continues to learn that there is substantial value and benefit in integrating Parks Canada content into and leveraging the programs and platforms of others. This approach continues to foster new and exciting opportunities to bring the stories and experiences of Parks Canada's places to Canadians in a multitude of exciting ways.

Variances in 1.3.2 - Stakeholder and Partner Engagement

Actual spending for Stakeholder and Partner Engagement is $1.5 million higher than the 2013-14 planned spending. The increased spending is a result of the 2012-13 carry-forward which was reinvested in proactive and targeted outreach initiatives.

The reduction in FTEs is mainly a result of achieving streamlining and efficiency measures one year sooner.

PROGRAM 1.4: VISITOR EXPERIENCE

Description

This program supports the opportunities provided for approximately 20 million person visits that are made annually to Canada's national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas by Canadians and international visitors. The visitor experience is the sum total of a visitor's personal interaction with the protected heritage place that helps them create meaning and establish connection with the place. The experience begins with awareness of the site, followed by planning the visit, travelling to, and welcoming and orientation upon arrival. During the visitor's time on site, it includes participation in recreational and interpretive activities and the use of accommodation, trails, facilities, services and supporting infrastructure. This is followed by departure and the post-visit relationship. Investments in the different stages of the visitor experience cycle facilitate opportunities for enjoyment and learning, leading to a sense of personal connection and the continued relevance of Canada's protected heritage places for Canadians.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
226,350,936 235,484,436 293,025,793 263,655,992 28,171,556


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
2,090 1,923 (167)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results*
Visitors at surveyed locations feel a sense of personal connection to the places visited. Average percentage of visitors that consider the place is meaningful [xxix] to them. On average, 85% of visitors at all surveyed locations consider the place meaningful to them. 84%
Average percentage of visitors that are satisfied [xxx] with their visit. On average, 90% of visitors at surveyed locations are satisfied with their visit. 94%
Average percentage of visitors that are very satisfied with their visit. On average, 50% of visitors are very satisfied with their visit. 71%
* Source:Parks Canada's Visitor Information Program (visitor survey, 4,274 returned surveys from across 11 places). Measured in 2013-14.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, Parks Canada mostly met or exceeded its performance targets related to the percentage of visitors at surveyed locations who considered the place they visited meaningful to them, and who were satisfied or very satisfied with their visit. [xxxi] Overall, 82 percent of visitors to surveyed locations in 2013-14 were Canadian and 69 percent of visitors were visiting for the first time.

The Agency continued to build on its past successes to inspire Canadians to visit and revisit, and help them connect with their heritage places. The Agency continued to promote national parks and national historic sites at strategic times of the year. Trip planning tools were updated with visitor needs in mind, and trip planning information was more targeted and made available earlier in the year to inspire Canadians to consider Canada's natural and historic places as destinations of choice when planning holidays. Parks Canada expanded its diversified accommodation program, continued to host special events, and continued its popular activities and programs to enhance visitor experience and to facilitate the creation of personal connection with Parks Canada places (e.g., "Xplorers", "Learn-to", "Heritage Chocolate"). Parks Canada was also recognized by Trip Advisor with their 2013 Traveller's Choice Attraction Award (for the Fortress of Louisbourg National Historic Site, Signal Hill National Historic Site, and Halifax Citadel National Historic Site).

The significance engrained in the fabric of the place, the opportunities to indulge recreational or learning interests, the splendour of the natural environment, the pride in Canada's conservation efforts, and family traditions are among the many reasons and/or experiences that leave enduring impressions of Canada's natural and historic treasures in the hearts and minds of Canadians. Parks Canada must continue to appeal to a wide range of interests, needs, and expectations resulting in meaningful and satisfying experiences for generations to come.

Variances in 1.4 - Visitor Experience

Actual spending for Visitor Experience is $28.2 million higher than the 2013-14 planned spending. This is mainly due to increased investments in the Agency's visitor service and interpretation assets.

The reduction in FTEs is mainly a result of achieving streamlining and efficiency measures one year sooner.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.4.1: MARKET RESEARCH AND PROMOTION

Description

This program aims at improving the knowledge and understanding of visitor and potential visitor needs and expectations through social science monitoring and analytics to improve the quality, timeliness and effectiveness of decision making about Parks Canada's service and product offer. This includes monitoring the changing social landscape to understand and respond to emerging and evolving trends in tourism, recreation, leisure and to understand Canadian attitudes toward, and knowledge of, protected heritage areas. Also included are domestic and international tourism promotion activities conducted to inform and attract visitors through targeted communications and through industry relationship building.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
20,945,880 19,738,742 (1,207,138)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
147 135 (12)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results*
Canadians visit Parks Canada administered places. Number of visits at Parks Canada administered places. 22.4 million visits at Parks Canada administered places by March 2015. 20.7 million
* Source:Parks Canada's attendance statistics. Measured in 2013-14. Approximately 230,000 fewer visits were recorded in 2013-14 (compared to 2012-13) due to facility closures (e.g., for renovation) and operational changes. Approximately 679,000 fewer visits can be accounted for through similar events since 2008-09.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada's 2015 target is still within reach. Visitation to Canada's treasured places was 20.7 million in 2013-14, statistically on par with 2012-13 (20.6M). The relatively stable visitation occurred in a year of shortened operating seasons at most Parks Canada administered places and short-term closures of Banff National Park and others in the region due to the Alberta floods in June. The results continue to suggest that the continued cumulative impact of Parks Canada's research-informed initiatives, targeted tourism promotion across media platforms, capital investments in visitor-oriented infrastructure, and its industry relations are helping to reverse the previous downward trend in visitation.

The Government of Canada's investments in the 300th anniversary of the founding of Louisbourg ("Louisbourg 300") had positive effects on visitation in the Cape Breton region of Nova Scotia. Visitation to the Fortress of Louisbourg increased 36 percent over 2012-13. Cape Breton Highlands National Park also benefited from the Louisbourg 300 celebrations; its attendance increased 18 percent over the previous year.

Parks Canada places are important components of Canada's tourism industry, bringing economic benefits to communities across the country. In 2013-14, the Agency was recognized in the Atlantic region for its collaborative efforts to encourage visitation. Parks Canada was honoured with the 2013 Travel Industry Association of New Brunswick's Tourism Partnership Award (Fundy National Park).

Parks Canada continues to recognize that there are Canadians who have yet to visit Canada's treasured places and to experience what millions of their fellow Canadians who love and cherish these places already know. To inspire Canadians to visit their national heritage places, Parks Canada will continue to take a strategic and proactive approach to promote Canada's natural and historic places and the products, services and experiences they offer.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.4.2: NATIONAL PARKS INTERPRETATION

Description

This program aims to ensure that visitors are provided with opportunities to discover, learn about, appreciate and enjoy the national park they are visiting and its natural and cultural resources, and understand their significance to Canada. Included are both personal programs provided by Parks Canada staff or partners such as guided walks and non-personal programs provided on-site such as exhibits, publications, audio-visual and new media, to ensure their visit is meaningful and answers their learning needs and interests.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
9,530,265 11,100,955 1,570,690


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
132 121 (11)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results*
Visitors at surveyed national parks learned from experience and active participation. Average percentage of visitors that consider that they learned about the natural heritage of the place. On average, 60% of visitors at surveyed national parks consider that they learned about the natural heritage of the place. 79%
*Source: Parks Canada's Visitor Information Program (visitor survey, 802 returned surveys from across 2 places). Measured in 2013-14.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, Parks Canada exceeded its performance target related to the percentage of visitors at surveyed national parks who considered that they learned about the natural heritage of the place. On average, 79 percent of visitors felt they learned about the heritage of the national park they were visiting. [xxxii] Furthermore, 79 percent of visitors were satisfied with the learning activities available to them in 2013-14 which included printed material, self-guided tours, one-on-one interaction with staff, exhibits, interpretation panels, staff guided walks, and presentations.

Learning through experience and active participation helps people develop personal connections with the national parks they visit. Parks Canada recognizes that the interests of Canadians are varied as are the ways people learn and want to experience a place. Some people prefer learning on their own through passive activities, while others prefer to learn through interactions with others. Therefore, the Agency continues to provide visitors with a mix of opportunities to discover, learn about, appreciate and enjoy the national park they are visiting. Parks Canada offered its "Xplorers" program again at national parks in 2013-14. The program involves games, puzzles and prizes, and is designed to be a fun and interactive way for children aged 6 to 11 to learn about, explore and discover Parks Canada's natural places with their families. Quality interpretative information, guided walks, and exhibits continued to be provided in 2013-14 as part of the national park service offer.

Parks Canada understands that learning is personal. Visitors decide what they take away from their experience and what mechanisms are important to them in learning something new about the place they are visiting. Facilitating a mix of meaningful opportunities to accommodate a diverse mix of visitors therefore continues to be a valuable contribution of Parks Canada.

Variances in 1.4.2 - National Parks Interpretation

Actual spending for National Parks Interpretation is $1.5 million higher than the 2013-14 planned spending. This is due to increased investments in initiatives to attract new visitors and provide new service offers.

The reduction in FTEs is mainly a result of achieving streamlining and efficiency measures one year sooner.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.4.3: NATIONAL PARKS VISITOR SERVICE OFFER

Description

This program supports approximately 12 million visits that are made annually to Canada's national parks by Canadians and international visitors. The visitor experience in a national park aims to encourage discovery and enjoyment. Based on the visitor experience cycle, activities and services include the provision of high quality pre- and on-site trip planning information, reception and orientation, campgrounds, trails, visitor facilities, recreational activities, special events, and the ongoing post-visit relationship, as well as prevention and law enforcement related to visitor experience.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
130,621,413 144,422,448 13,801,035


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
991 912 (79)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results*
Visitors at surveyed national parks enjoyed their visit. Average percentage of visitors that enjoyed their visit. On average, 90% of visitors at surveyed national parks enjoyed their visit. 93%
* Source: Parks Canada's Visitor Information Program (visitor survey, 802 returned surveys from across 2 places). Measured in 2013-14.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, Parks Canada exceeded its performance target for enjoyment. On average 93 percent of visitors at surveyed national parks enjoyed their visit. [xxxiii] Furthermore, 85 percent of visitors to surveyed national parks were happy with the quality of activities, the quality of services, and the value for entry fee, while 82 percent were satisfied with the recreational offer and 96 percent with the welcome upon arrival. These results show positive contributions to the overall expected result of the visitor experience program, which aims to personally connect visitors to the places they visit.

To encourage discovery and enjoyment of Canada's national parks, Parks Canada undertook a number of targeted initiatives in 2013-14:

  • Updated the campground reservation system, providing enhanced visitor information and opportunities to reserve activities and accommodations;
  • Continued offering alternative overnight accommodations, such as yurts, tepees, rustic cabins and oTENTiks;
  • Partnered with Parkbus to bring visitors from Greater Toronto to the national parks in the Georgian Bay region of Ontario;
  • Updated trip-planning publications to include activities offered for youth and families;
  • Hosted special events;
  • Hosted "Learn to Camp" sessions, which provided families, new Canadians and others, a safe place to learn the technical skills and fun associated with camping; and,
  • Continued partnered programs to provide free entry for Grade 8 and secondary 2 students and run the "Coolest School Trip" contest.

Parks Canada continues to recognize that a consistent base offer that appeals to a diverse range of Canadians is necessary to encourage growth in visitation. To ensure continued success, the Agency must offer high quality programs and services and make it easy for Canadians to plan their visit to them. Parks Canada has learned that partners are invaluable in facilitating opportunities to engage Canadians and encourage visitation. Targeted promotion, quality programs and services, easy trip planning tools, and strategic partnerships will help inspire Canadians to come and enjoy a national park as part of their vacation plans or weekend adventures in the years to come.

Variances in 1.4.3 - National Parks Visitor Service Offer

Actual spending for National Parks Visitor Service Offer is $13.8 million higher than the 2013-14 planned spending. This is due to increased investments in the Agency's visitor service and interpretation assets.

The reduction in FTEs is mainly a result of achieving streamlining and efficiency measures one year sooner.

SUB-SUB-PROGRAM 1.4.3.1: VISITOR SAFETY
Description

This program strives to pro-actively reduce the probability of visitor safety incidents through a comprehensive risk management approach and appropriate response. Parks Canada works closely with other departments, non-government organizations and service providers to coordinate planning and response initiatives.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
8,969,396 9,917,073 947,677
Note: To ensure consistency in reporting, Sub-Sub-Program performance information (Planned Spending, Actual Spending and FTEs) throughout this document are included in the respective Sub-Program total.


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
58 53 (5)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Visitor safety is ensured. n/a n/a n/a
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, progress was made on the implementation of the requirements identified in the Directive on Visitor Safety for all places administered by Parks Canada. These requirements include guidance related to: prevention programs, hazard assessments, risk assessments, levels of service and training requirements, and visitor safety plans. Once implementation is completed, it will help to reduce the number and severity of incidents requiring a search and rescue response.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.4.4: NATIONAL HISTORIC SITES INTERPRETATION

Description

This program aims to ensure that visitors are provided with opportunities to discover, learn about, appreciate and enjoy the national historic site they are visiting and its cultural resources, and understand their national historical significance to Canada. Included are both personal programs provided by Parks Canada staff or partners such as period animation and guided tours and non-personal programs provided on-site such as exhibits, publications, audio-visual and new media, to ensure their visit is meaningful and answers their learning needs and interests.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
25,513,497 29,718,394 4,204,897


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
367 338 (29)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results*
Visitors at surveyed national historic sites learned from experience and active participation. Average percentage of visitors that consider that they learned about the cultural heritage of the place. On average, 85% of visitors at surveyed national historic sites consider that they learned about the cultural heritage of the place. 91%
* Source: Parks Canada's Visitor Information Program (visitor survey, 3,472 returned surveys from across 9 places). Measured in 2013-14.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, Parks Canada exceeded its performance target related to the percentage of visitors at surveyed national historic sites who considered that they learned about the cultural heritage of the place. [xxxiv] On average, 91 percent of visitors felt they learned about the heritage of the national historic site they were visiting. Furthermore, 86 percent of visitors to national historic sites were satisfied with the learning activities available to them which included printed material, self-guided tours, one-on-one interaction with staff, exhibits, interpretation panels, staff guided walks, presentations and demonstrations.

Parks Canada recognizes that the interests of Canadians are varied as are the ways people learn and want to experience a place. Some people prefer learning on their own through passive activities, while others prefer to learn through interactions with others. Therefore, the Agency provides visitors with a mix of opportunities to discover, learn about, appreciate and enjoy the national historic site they are visiting. Parks Canada offered its "Xplorers" program again at national historic sites in 2013-14. The program involves games, puzzles and prizes, and is designed to be a fun and interactive way for children aged 6 to 11 to learn about, explore and discover Parks Canada's cultural places with their families. The GPS-based interactive learning tool "Explora" was expanded and offered at additional national historic sites. Quality interpretative information, guided walks, and exhibits continued to be provided in 2013-14 as part of the service offer at national historic sites.

Learning through experience and active participation helps people develop personal connections with the national historic sites they visit. Visitors decide what they take away from their experience and what mechanisms are important to them in learning something new about the place they are visiting. Facilitating a mix of meaningful opportunities to accommodate a diverse mix of visitors therefore continues to be a valuable contribution provided by Parks Canada.

Variances in 1.4.4 - National Historic Sites Interpretation

Actual spending for National Historic Sites Interpretation is $4.2 million higher than the 2013-14 planned spending. This is mainly due to the implementation costs of moving to self-guided interpretation in a number of national historic sites.

The reduction in FTEs is mainly a result of achieving streamlining and efficiency measures one year sooner.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.4.5: NATIONAL HISTORIC SITES VISITOR SERVICE OFFER

Description

This program supports approximately 8 million visits that are made annually to Canada's national historic sites by Canadians and international visitors. The visitor experience in a national historic site aims to encourage discovery and enjoyment. Based on the visitor experience cycle, activities and services include the provision of high quality pre- and on-site trip planning information, reception and orientation, trails, visitor facilities, recreational activities, special events, and the ongoing post-visit relationship, as well as prevention and law enforcement related to visitor experience.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
46,801,441 56,262,035 9,460,594


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
439 404 (35)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results*
Visitors at surveyed national historic sites enjoyed their visit. Average percentage of visitors that enjoyed their visit. On average, 90% of visitors at surveyed national historic sites enjoyed their visit. 94%
* Source: Parks Canada's Visitor Information Program (visitor survey, 3,472 returned surveys from across 9 places). Measured in 2013-14.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013-14, Parks Canada exceeded its performance target related to the percentage of visitors at surveyed national historic sites who enjoyed their visit. On average, 94 percent of visitors at surveyed national historic sites enjoyed their visit. [xxxv] Furthermore, 86 percent of visitors to surveyed national historic sites in 2012-13 were happy with the quality of activities, 91 percent with the quality of services, 92 percent with the value for entry, 97 percent with the welcome upon arrival and 98 percent with service in the language of their choice.

To encourage discovery and enjoyment of Canada's national historic sites, Parks Canada undertook a number of targeted initiatives in 2013-14:

  • Updated trip-planning publications with activities offered for youth and families;
  • Hosted special events, many inspired by the War of 1812 and Parks Day;
  • Continued hosting "Learn to Camp" sessions at a number of historic sites, an activity normally associated with parks. These events provided families, new Canadians and others interested in camping, a safe place to learn the technical skills involved and a chance to experience the fun associated with camping while surrounded by history;
  • Continued its "Heritage Chocolate" program; and,
  • Continued partnered programs to provide free entry for Grade 8 and secondary 2 students and run the "Coolest School Trip" contest.

Visitors to national historic sites enjoy their visit, but to ensure continued success, Parks Canada must offer high quality programs and services and make it easy for Canadians to plan their visit to them. Partners are also invaluable in facilitating opportunities to engage Canadians and encourage visitation. Targeted promotion, quality programs and services, easy trip planning tools, and strategic partnerships will help inspire Canadians to come and enjoy national historic sites as part of their vacation plans or weekend adventures in the years to come.

Variances in 1.4.5 - National Historic Sites Visitor Service Offer

Actual spending for National Historic Sites Visitor Service Offer is $9.5 million higher than the 2013-14 planned spending. This is mainly due to increased investments in the Agency's visitor service and interpretation assets.

The reduction in FTEs is mainly a result of achieving streamlining and efficiency measures one year sooner.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.4.6: NATIONAL MARINE CONSERVATION AREAS INTERPRETATION

Description

This program aims to ensure that visitors are provided with opportunities to discover, learn about, appreciate and enjoy the national marine conservation area they are visiting and its marine natural and cultural resources, and understand their significance to Canada. Included are both personal programs provided by Parks Canada staff or partners such as guided tours and non-personal programs provided on-site such as exhibits, publications, audio-visual and new media, to ensure their visit is meaningful and answers their learning needs and interests.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
887,338 1,033,581 146,243


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
3 3 0


Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Visitors at surveyed national marine conservation areas learned from experience and active participation. TBD TBD n/a
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada's national marine conservation areas program is in the development phase. Currently, there are only two national marine conservation areas with a fully developed interpretation offer: Saguenay-St. Lawrence and Fathom Five national marine parks. There are no results for this program in 2013-14 as neither marine park was surveyed.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.4.7: NATIONAL MARINE CONSERVATION AREAS VISITOR SERVICE OFFER

Description

This program supports the visits that are made to Canada's national marine conservation areas by Canadians and international visitors. The visitor experience in a national marine conservation area aims to encourage discovery and enjoyment. Based on the visitor experience cycle, activities and services include the provision of high quality pre- and on-site trip planning information, reception and orientation, trails, visitor facilities, recreational activities, special events, and the ongoing post-visit relationship, as well as prevention and law enforcement related to visitor experience.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,184,601 1,379,836 195,235


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
11 10 (1)


Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Visitors at surveyed national marine conservation areas enjoyed their visit. Average percentage of visitors that enjoyed their visit. On average, 90% of visitors at surveyed national marine conservation areas enjoyed their visit. n/a
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada's national marine conservation areas program is in the development phase. Currently, there are only two national marine conservation areas with a fully developed visitor service offer: Saguenay-St. Lawrence and Fathom Five national marine parks. There are no results for this program in 2013-14 as neither marine park was surveyed.

PROGRAM 1.5: TOWNSITE AND THROUGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE

Description

This program involves managing, operating and providing municipal services to five townsites [xxxvi] within Canada's national parks. It also involves the operation of provincial and inter-provincial highways [xxxvii] and waterways [xxxviii] that connect communities and pass through national parks and national historic sites.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
93,211,526 132,511,526 164,264,871 118,681,423 (13,830,103)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
250 236 (14)


Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Condition of contemporary infrastructure for townsites and waterways is maintained or improved, and through highways are open to traffic. Percentage of townsite contemporary assets that are maintained, and percentage of townsite contemporary assets rated as poor or fair that are improved. The condition rating of 75% of townsite contemporary assets is maintained, and the condition rating of 10% of assets rated as poor or fair in March 2010 is improved by March 2015.

88%

14%

Percentage of waterway contemporary assets that are maintained, and percentage of waterway contemporary assets rated as poor or fair that are improved. The condition rating of 75% of waterway contemporary assets is maintained, and the condition rating of 10% of assets rated as poor or fair in March 2010 is improved by March 2015.

82%

13%

Number of days of closure of through highways due to asset condition. Zero (0) days of closure of through highways due to asset condition. Zero (0)
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Agency undertook a National Asset Review in the fall of 2012 to evaluate the condition of the assets under its responsibility. A 2013 independent third-party assessment of the National Asset Review results provided further validation of the deteriorated state of the Agency's built assets. As a result of both initiatives, the Agency was better positioned to ensure resources were allocated to the highest priorities and risk areas across the organization.

In 2013-14, Parks Canada invested approximately $85.2 million dollars to maintain or improve the condition of townsite and throughway infrastructure. This included $19 million provided through the Government of Canada's Economic Action Plan 2013 for improvements to highways and associated bridges that pass through Terra Nova, Banff, Jasper, Kootenay, Yoho and Glacier national parks.

Through these investments, Canadians will continue to have safe and reliable road access to parks and other protected areas, and federal infrastructure will continue to play a critical role in the safe and efficient movement of people and goods, in creating employment opportunities in many communities and in supporting economic growth.

Townsite Contemporary Assets

The overall condition of townsite contemporary assets has remained relatively stable over the past five years. In 2013-14, Parks Canada invested $3 million to maintain or improve the condition of its townsite contemporary assets. Since 2010 the condition of 88 percent of townsite contemporary assets has been maintained. Of the 57 percent (189 of 332) of townsite contemporary assets in fair or poor condition, 14 percent have been improved.

Waterway Contemporary Assets

The Agency continued to conduct dam safety reviews to assess overall status, condition and functionality, and to identify recapitalization requirements to ensure public safety and compliance with direction provided by the Canadian Dam Association. In 2013-14, Parks Canada invested $18.9 million to maintain or improve the condition of these assets. Since 2010 the condition of 82 percent of waterway contemporary assets has been maintained. Of the 84 percent (141 of 168) of waterway contemporary assets in fair or poor condition, 13 percent have been improved.

Highway Contemporary Assets

In 2013-14, Parks Canada invested $63.3 million to maintain or improve the condition of its through highway infrastructure thereby ensuring highways remained open to traffic.

Variances in 1.5 - Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure

Actual spending for Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure is $13.8 million lower than the 2013-14 planned spending. This is mainly due to the completion of work related to the twinning of the Trans-Canada Highway within scope, schedule and under budget.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.5.1: TOWNSITE MANAGEMENT

Description

This program involves the operation of five townsites within Canada's national parks. It includes the provision of municipal services such as drinking water, snow removal, garbage pick-up and disposal, sewage treatment, road and street maintenance, and fire services to support residents and visitors. Townsites are important staging areas for visitors to national parks and national historic sites, home to businesses and residents and administrative centers for Parks Canada's operations.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
7,268,122 9,254,124 1,986,002


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
37 35 (2)


Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Townsite targets for growth and sewage effluent quality are met. Percentage of townsite targets for legislated limits to growth. 100% of townsite targets for legislated limits to growth are met. 100%
Percentage of townsite targets for sewage effluent quality that are met. 100% of townsite targets for sewage effluent quality are met. 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Parks Canada manages and provides a number of municipal and related services to the townsite communities of Field in Yoho National Park, Lake Louise in Banff National Park, Wasagaming in Riding Mountain National Park, Waskesiu in Prince Albert National Park, and Waterton in Waterton Lakes National Park. The focus of the Agency's performance measurement for these communities is meeting targets for commercial growth limits and sewage effluent quality.

As of March 31, 2014, all townsites within national parks were within the legislated growth limits established for each community. Commercial growth limits for each community are required by the Canada National Parks Act and have been defined and fixed in each community plan. Although the limits are specific to each community, they are based on common principles of modest, controlled growth, impact on community character, provision of essential services and impact on ecological integrity.

Stringent Parks Canada Leadership Targets for sewage effluent quality are applied in Field and Lake Louise while the voluntary targets from the Guidelines for Effluent Quality and Wastewater Treatment at Federal Establishments (1976) are applied in Wasagaming, Waskesiu and Waterton. In 2013-14, 25 of 25 targets were met resulting in 100 percent of townsite targets for sewage effluent quality being met.

Effective January 1, 2015, townsite wastewater treatment facilities will be required to meet new federal targets under Environment Canada's Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations (2013) replacing the voluntary targets set out under the Guidelines. Parks Canada is well prepared to meet these new regulations.

Variances in 1.5.1 - Townsite Management

Actual spending for Townsite Management is $2.0 million higher than the 2013-14 planned spending. This is mainly due to the increased investments in the Agency's assets.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.5.2: THROUGH HIGHWAY MANAGEMENT

Description

This program involves the operation, maintenance and repair of provincial and inter-provincial highways and bridges that connect communities and pass through national parks and national historic sites. Parks Canada is responsible for approximately 1,151 kilometres of provincial and inter-provincial highways, including six sections of the Trans-Canada and Yellowhead highways.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
105,092,828 85,935,133 (19,157,695)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
169 159 (10)


Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Condition of critical assets on through highways is maintained. Percentage of critical assets (bridges, culverts and snow sheds) on through highways that are at least in fair condition. 45% of critical assets (bridges, culverts and snow sheds) on through highways are at least in fair condition. 57%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Of the 235 critical assets on through highways (bridges, culverts and snow sheds), 57 percent are in good or fair condition.

Critical interventions on highways and associated bridges that pass through Terra Nova, Banff, Jasper, Kootenay, Yoho and Glacier national parks were undertaken in 2013-14 which included investments of $19 million provided to Parks Canada through the Government of Canada's Economic Action Plan 2013. As a result of this funding and the Agency's ongoing investment in its highways, risks were mitigated through paving, stabilization of rock and soil slopes, replacement and repair of retaining walls and culverts, and repair of bridges.

The Agency will continue to focus its investments on high-risk assets such as dams, bridges and highways; ensuring public safety remains a top priority.

Variances in 1.5.2 - Through Highway Management

Actual spending for Through Highway Management is $19.2 million lower than the 2013-14 planned spending. This is mainly due to the completion of work related to the twinning of the Trans-Canada Highway within scope, schedule and under budget.

SUB-PROGRAM 1.5.3: THROUGH WATERWAY MANAGEMENT

Description

This program involves the water control aspect of operations for nine national historic canals/waterways including the Trent-Severn Waterway, the Rideau, Lachine and Chambly canals. This includes more than 650 kilometres of waterway and 25,000 square kilometres of drainage basin.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
20,150,576 23,492,166 (3,341,590)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
44 42 (2)


Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Effective water level management. Number of dam safety reviews for high risk dams that are completed by the end of 2015. 39 4
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Parks Canada Dam Safety Program is in place to deliver on our commitment to the safe management of Parks Canada dams and water-retaining structures. This program establishes a consistent approach to the management of dams including the type and frequency of inspections, and how to support public safety around dams.

Dam safety reviews are an integral part of Parks Canada's Dam Safety Program. They provide a systematic review of all aspects that affect a dam's safety and help inform Parks Canada's asset investments. Parks Canada has invested resources to complete 39 dam safety reviews on priority dams in Ontario and Quebec, to be completed by the end of December 2015. As of March 2014, 4 of the 39 dam safety reviews have been completed and the remaining 35 dam safety reviews are currently underway.

Variances in 1.5.3 - Through Waterway Management

Actual spending for Through Waterway Management is $3.3 million higher than the 2013-14 planned spending. This is mainly due to increased investments to recapitalize dams and locks along the Trent-Severn Waterway.

INTERNAL SERVICES

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.


Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013-14
Main Estimates
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013-14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
65,665,448 66,299,465 105,083,546 96,291,316 29,991,851

Human Resources (FTEs)
2013-14
Planned
2013-14
Actual
2013-14
Difference
(actual minus planned)
511 517 6
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
Management and Oversight Services

In 2013-14, Parks Canada introduced a Mandate Letter for Executives as part of its new strategic management cycle. The Mandate Letter is a foundation piece that sets out senior management accountability for delivering on Agency priorities. It integrates key processes including risk management, investment planning, business planning and performance management into one streamlined process. In the Agency's 2013-14 Management Accountability Framework (MAF) assessment, Treasury Board identified the Mandate Letter as a notable practice in the Integrated Risk Management Area of Management.

As part of the Government of Canada Blueprint 2020 initiative, Parks Canada launched Innovation Labs to discover new ideas to improve the operations and the quality of the workplace. Innovation Labs provide an exceptional opportunity for Parks Canada team members to develop creative and actionable solutions, to collaborate with colleagues from across the country, and to personally contribute to improving the workplace.

Departmental Security

Parks Canada developed new security and contracting procedures, personnel screening procedures, and implemented a new national personnel security screening management system. Parks Canada conducted threat and risk assessments at five sites across the country, developed a security design brief for its office spaces to ensure that assets and information are safeguarded, and collaborated with Public Safety Canada on its draft Strategic Emergency Management Plan.

Human Resources Management Services

In 2013-14, Parks Canada developed an overarching framework for people management and governance. In addition, Parks Canada accomplished preliminary steps towards the design of a national human resources strategy incorporating aspects of retention, recruitment and learning to ensure a sufficient and representative workforce.

Certain self-service components of PeopleSoft were developed during the year giving all employees access to certain of their own human resources data such as the training summary and the Second Language Evaluation (SLE) results.

Financial Management Services

Parks Canada continued implementation of the Agency's action plan to strengthen internal controls, including completion of an internal control framework, and internal controls for accounts payable, environmental liabilities and asset accounting. In addition, the Agency implemented the new Guideline on Chief Financial Officer Attestation for Cabinet Submissions.

Information Management Services

In accordance with the Treasury Board Directive on Recordkeeping, Parks Canada business units continue to make good progress identifying and documenting Information Resources of Business Value (IRBV) that support and inform the Agency's core decision‐making processes and management of programs.

Variances in Internal Services

Variances in financial resources are mainly due to funding received throughout the year but not reflected in the planned spending. This is mainly as a result of the cash out of severance payments.


Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Statements Highlights

Parks Canada Agency's unaudited financial statements are prepared in accordance with the Government's accounting policies, which are based on Canadian public sector accounting standards (accrual accounting principles) and, therefore, are different from appropriation-based reporting, which is reflected in Sections I and II of this report. Sections I and II are prepared on a modified cash basis rather than an accrual basis. A reconciliation between the parliamentary appropriations used (modified cash basis) and the net cost of operations (accrual basis) is set out in note 17 of the financial statements.

Parks Canada Agency
Condensed Statement of Operations and Net Financial Position (unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2014
(dollars)
2013-14
Planned
Results
2013-14
Actual
2012-13
Actual
Difference (2013-14 actual minus 2013-14 planned) Difference (2013-14 actual minus 2013-14 actual)
Total expenses 689,281,000 665,575,049 655,822,172 (23,705,951) 9,752,877
Total revenues 120,543,000 117,822,385 115,314,743 (2,720,615) 2,507,642
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 568,738,000 547,752,664 540,507,429 (20,985,336) 7,245,235
Net financial position 1,853,627,000 1,829,260,855 1,760,550,513 (24,366,145) 68,710,342


Parks Canada Agency
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)
As at March 31, 2014
(dollars)
2013-14 2012-13 Difference (2013-14 minus 2012-13)
Total net liabilities 136,381,363 162,192,195 (25,810,832)
Total net financial assets 98,574,318 81,332,785 17,241,533
Net debt 37,807,045 80,859,410 (43,052,365)
Total non-financial assets 1,867,067,900 1,841,409,923 25,657,977
Net financial position 1,829,260,855 1,760,550,513 68,710,342


Graphs and Analysis

Liabilities

See notes 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 of the financial statements

Total net liabilities were $136.4 million at March 31, 2014, decreasing from $162.2 million at March 31, 2013. The decrease is mainly due to $43.0 million in benefits paid during the year to employees resulting in a reduction in the allowance for Employee future benefits.

The remaining variance is attributable to the increase in Accounts payable and accrued liabilities which is mainly composed of payments to external parties. Accounts payable and accrued liabilities are the largest component of the total net liabilities representing 60% at March 31, 2014.


Assets

See notes 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 of the financial statements

The total book value of assets of $1,965.7 million includes net financial assets of $98.6 million and non-financial assets of $1,867.1 million. The overall assets have increased by $43.0 million, primarily due to the increase in tangible capital assets.

Tangible capital assets represent the most important component of the Agency's financial statements as they account for 94% of the total assets.


Expenses by Program

See note 18 of the financial statements

Total expenses for 2013-14 is $665.6 million which represent a slight increase of $9.8 million from 2012-13. Salaries and employee benefit expenses have decreased by $40.0 million as a result of the implementation of previous years' restraint measures, while urgent repairs following exceptional flooding has contributed to the increase in operating expenses during the fiscal year.

Visitor Experience and Heritage Resources Conservation programs account for more than half of the total expenses at 53%.

Variance of $23.7 million between planned and actual expenses is mainly due to a higher than expected decline in salary and employee benefits.


Revenues by Major Classification

See note 18 of the financial statements

Operating revenues of the Agency have increased from $115.3 million in 2012-13 to $117.8 million in 2013-14. The variance between actual and planned revenues is $2.7 million.

The majority of revenue is derived from entrance fees and recreational fees, which together represent 71% of total revenues.

Financial Statements

To view a full set of the Agency's unaudited financial statements, please refer to the endnotes for their location on the Parks Canada website [xxxix] .

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2013-14 Departmental Performance Report can be found on the Parks Canada website [xl].

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations [xli] publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.


Section IV:Organizational Contact Information

General Inquiries:
Parks Canada National Office
30 Victoria Street
Gatineau, Quebec
Canada
J8X 0B3

General Inquiries:
888-773-8888

General Inquiries (International):
819-420-9486

Teletypewriter (TTY):
866-787-6221

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation: 
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures: 
Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report: 
Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

full-time equivalent: 
Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada outcomes: 
A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure: 
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures: 
Include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance: 
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator: 
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting: 
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending: 
For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

plans: 
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priorities: 
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program: 
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

results: 
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

Program Alignment Architecture: 
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities: 
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Strategic Outcome: 
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program: 
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target: 
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

whole-of-government framework: 
Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Endnotes

[i] Parks Canada Agency Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/P-0.4/

[ii] Canada National Parks Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/N-14.01/

[iii] Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-7.3/

[iv] Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/S-1.3/

[v] Historic Sites and Monuments Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/H-4/

[vi] Heritage Railway Stations Protection Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/H-3.5/

[vii] Historic Canals Regulations pursuant to the Department of Transport Act, http://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-93-220/

[viii] Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/H-3.4/

[ix] Species at Risk Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/S-15.3/

[x] Definition of the concept of Ecological Integrity and the Definition of the concept of Commemorative Integrity

[xi] The System of National Parks of Canada

[xii] The System of National Marine Conservation Areas of Canada

[xiii] National Historic Sites of Canada administered by Parks Canada

[xiv] Parks Canada website

[xv] Type is defined as follows: previously committed to-committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing-committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new-newly committed to in the reporting year of the RPP or DPR. If another type that is specific to the department is introduced, an explanation of its meaning must be provided.

[xvi] 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities

[xvii] Whole-of-government framework, http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ppg-cpr/frame-cadre-eng.aspx

[xviii] Public Accounts of Canada 2014, http://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/recgen/cpc-pac/index-eng.html

[xix] More details on commemorations

[xx] Details on the progress made on park establishment proposals

[xxi] The mandate of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada is to advise the Government of Canada, through the Minister of the Environment, on the commemoration of nationally significant aspects of Canada's history.

[xxii] Details on progress in establishing national marine conservation areas

[xxiii] Results of National Historic Sites Whose Initial Assessment Rated Red (Poor)

[xxiv] The seven townsite communities include: Banff and Lake Louise in Banff National Park, Field in Yoho National Park, Jasper in Jasper National Park, Wasagaming in Riding Mountain National Park, Waskesiu in Prince Albert National Park, and Waterton in Waterton Lakes National Park.

[xxv] Results of National Historic Sites Whose Initial Assessment Rated Red (Poor)

[xxvi] Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada

[xxvii] The National Survey of Canadians (NSC) is a telephone survey of a representative sample of Canadians. The survey was last conducted in February 2014 and 3,764 respondents completed the survey, resulting in a response rate of four percent - the industry standard for telephone surveys today. The results of the survey are considered accurate 19 times out of 20 (95% level of confidence). The next NSC is planned for February 2016.

[xxviii] The Stakeholder and Partner Engagement Strategy is an online survey of a representative sample of Parks Canada's stakeholders and partners. The survey was last administered in November 2009. In total, 2,538 stakeholders and partners were invited to participate in the study, 781 of whom completed the survey, representing a response rate of 31 percent. The results of the survey are considered accurate 19 times out of 20 (95% level of confidence).

[xxix] Meaningful is a subjective measure of personal connection and is based on an individual's internalization of his or her experiences at a particular heritage place. Experiences important to fostering personal connection vary by visitor.

[xxx] Satisfaction is a subjective measure of overall experience. Services, activities, and interactions with staff are among the many things that contribute to a visitor's level of satisfaction. The mix of factors important to an individual varies by visitor.

[xxxi] Visitor Information Program results for visitor satisfaction and meaningfulness of visit

[xxxii] Visitor Information Program results for visitor enjoyment and learning

[xxxiii] Visitor Information Program results for visitor enjoyment and learning

[xxxiv] Visitor Information Program results for visitor enjoyment and learning

[xxxv] Visitor Information Program results for visitor enjoyment and learning

[xxxvi] Townsite communities include Field in Yoho National Park, British Columbia; Lake Louise in Banff National Park, Alberta; Wasagaming in Riding Mountain National Park, Manitoba; Waskesiu in Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan; and Waterton in Waterton Lakes National Park, Alberta. Two other townsites, Banff and Jasper, are self-governed since 1990 and 2002, respectively. Parks Canada retains authority for community plans and by-laws in Banff, and for community plans, land-use planning and development in Jasper.

[xxxvii] Highways managed by Parks Canada consist of 1,151 two-lane kilometres of highways including 360 two-lane kilometres of the Trans-Canada Highway through Banff, Yoho, Glacier, Mount Revelstoke and Terra Nova National Parks, 791 two-lane kilometres of highways through 8 provinces and one territory including the Cabot Trail on Cape Breton Island, and 235 highway bridges.

[xxxviii] Waterways, which support commercial and recreational boating as well as other recreational activities, include the Trent-Severn Waterway, the Rideau and Sault Ste. Marie canals in Ontario; the Carillon, Chambly, Lachine, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue and Saint-Ours canals in Quebec; and the St. Peters Canal in Nova Scotia.

[xxxix] Parks Canada Agency Unaudited Financial Statements

[xl] Supplementary tables

[xli] Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication, http://www.fin.gc.ca/purl/taxexp-eng.asp