Departmental Performance Report 2013-14 - Companion Document

Companion Document: Additional Program Results and Performance Information

Foreword

Due to the limit of 350 words per program summary instituted by Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS), some of the program highlights that were previously included in the Departmental Performance Report (DPR) have been moved to this companion document. The information in this document will not be tabled in Parliament. In the electronic version of the 2013-14 DPR, users will be able to click on embedded links to bring them to sections of the companion document, hosted on the public website, to access additional performance information and results tables at the program and sub program levels.

Section II: Analysis of Program(s) by Strategic Outcome

PROGRAM 1.1: HERITAGE PLACES ESTABLISHMENT

Parks Canada's target for commemorations is that 33% of yearly commemorations be in one of the three under-represented themes of ethnocultural communities, women, and Aboriginal history Ministerial commemorations in 2013-14 by type and by under-represented theme are shown in the table below. Two of the commemorations were related to ethnocultural communities' history and one to Aboriginal history.

Ministerial commemorations in 2013-14 by type and by under-represented theme
TOTAL COMMEMORATIONS UNDER-REPRESENTED THEMES
Type Number Ethnocultural communities Women Aboriginal history Total Percentage
Places 3 1 0 0 1 33%
Persons 0 0 0 0 0 N/A
Events 6 1 0 1 2 33%
Total 9 2 0 1 3 33%

SUB PROGRAM 1.1.1: NATIONAL PARK ESTABLISHMENT AND EXPANSION

Progress of proposals to establish and expand national parks
TERRESTRIAL NATURAL REGION AND NATIONAL PARK AREA OF INTEREST PROGRESS STATEMENT IN 2013-14

Atlantic Coast Uplands (represented)

SABLE ISLAND (NS)

Establishment in Legislation (Step 5)

In February, 2013 Bill S-15, the Expansion and Conservation of Canada's National Parks Act, was tabled in the Senate. The Bill will formally protect Sable Island National Park Reserve under the Canada National Parks Act. The Bill implements the October 17, 2011 agreement signed by the Minister of the Environment and the Premier of Nova Scotia to designate Sable Island as a national park reserve under the Canada National Parks Act. As part of the agreement, the two governments are required to amend their respective offshore petroleum legislation to prohibit drilling on the island and out to one nautical mile. Several permits held by petroleum companies were amended to give this prohibition effect within their license areas.

Mackenzie Mountains (represented)

NÁÁTS'IHCH'OH (NT)

Negotiation of Agreements (Step 4)

Following the signing of the national park reserve establishment agreement (i.e. the Impact and Benefit Plan) in March 2012, and the announcement of the park's creation in August 2012, Parks Canada completed negotiations to acquire third party interests in order to protect the park reserve under the Canada National Parks Act. Parks Canada secured the necessary authority to draft a bill to protect the national park reserve under the Act. In addition, it undertook work and federal - territorial consultations on an amendment to the announced 2012 boundary for the purpose of extending the boundary to O'Grady Lake at the request of the Sahtu Dene and Métis.

East Coast Boreal (unrepresented)

MEALY MOUNTAINS (NL)

Negotiation of Agreements (Step 4)

Parks Canada and the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador continued to make significant progress in negotiation of a land transfer agreement to establish a national park reserve in the Mealy Mountains. Working collaboratively, both governments completed a legal description of the final external boundary while working to resolve several other surveying issues. The Agency concluded and initialed a Park Impact and Benefit Agreement with the Innu Nation. Consultations with the NunatuKavut Community Council and the Quebec Innu continued.

Western High Arctic (unrepresented)

QAUSUITTUQ

BATHURST ISLAND (NU)

Negotiation of Agreements (Step 4)

Parks Canada and the Qikiqtani Inuit Association (QIA) completed the negotiation of and initialled an Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreement to establish a national park on northern Bathurst Island. Such an agreement is required under the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement for any new national park in Nunavut. Work was then initiated to secure the support of the new Nunavut government for the park and to ratify the agreement by the QIA. Work was also initiated to renew the interim land withdrawal which is scheduled to expire in 2014.

Northwestern Boreal Uplands (unrepresented)

THAIDENE NENE IN THE EAST ARM OF GREAT SLAVE LAKE (NT)

Feasibility Assessment (Step 3) / Negotiation of Agreement (Step 4)

Parks Canada and the Łutsel K'e Dene First Nation completed negotiation of and initialled a national park establishment agreement. In addition, a contribution agreement was signed between Parks Canada and the Northwest Territory Métis Nation that initiated negotiation of a national park establishment agreement. Parks Canada and the Government of the Northwest Territories (GNWT) initiated discussions on how they would work collaboratively with the devolution agreement coming into force in April 2014. The interim land withdrawal was renewed in March 2014 by the federal government in advance of devolution, but with the support of the GNWT.

Manitoba Lowlands (unrepresented)

MANITOBA LOWLANDS (MB)

Feasibility Assessment (Step 3)

Parks Canada, the Government of Manitoba and Misipawistik Cree Nation (MCN) continued to work together under their Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), sharing information and reviewing issues that will lead to a decision by MCN on whether to establish a national park in the vicinity of Grand Rapids. MCN began a process of working with and consulting other First Nations in the region about the national park proposal.

SUB PROGRAM 1.1.3: NATIONAL MARINE CONSERVATION AREA ESTABLISHMENT

Progress of proposals to establish National Marine Conservation Areas
MARINE REGION AND NATIONAL MARINE CONSERVATION AREA OF INTEREST PROGRESS STATEMENT IN 2013-14

Lancaster Sound (unrepresented)

LANCASTER SOUND (NU)

Feasibility Assessment (Step 3)

Significant progress was made in 2013-14 on the Government of Canada's 2010 commitment to conclude studies and consult on its proposed 44,300 km2 national marine conservation area in Lancaster Sound. The ecological values and non-renewable resource studies required by ministers in 2010 were released and the traditional knowledge study was significantly advanced. All three studies are critical elements for final boundary considerations. A tourism study initiated in 2012-13 was also completed. A second round of community consultation was undertaken by representatives of Parks Canada, the Government of Nunavut and the Qikiqtani Inuit Association to present the various studies and request input on potential boundaries for a Lancaster Sound National Marine Conservation Area.

Strait of Georgia (unrepresented)

SOUTHERN STRAIT OF GEORGIA (BC)

Feasibility Assessment (Step 3)

In October 2011, the Ministers of the Environment for the Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia announced a proposed 1,400 km2 boundary for consultation with local First Nations, local government and key marine stakeholders and tenure holders. Over the course of 2013-14, significant progress was made engaging and consulting key and potentially affected sectors, and working on a detailed economic impact assessment continued. Efforts to maintain engagement with the 19 local First Nations Groups were undertaken. Subsequent to direction from the Canada - British Columbia Steering Committee, work was initiated to refine a national marine conservation area concept for the Southern Strait of Georgia to clarify potential impacts on stakeholders.

Magdalen Shallows (unrepresented)

LES ÎLES-DE-LA-MADELEINE (QC)

Feasibility Assessment (Step 3)

In December 2011, the Government of Canada and the Government of Quebec signed an accord to conduct a study on the creation of a marine protected area in Iles de la Madeleine. Over 2013-14, significant progress was made on the study, through the completion of a number of ecological, economic and cultural reports. In addition, discussions have been advanced with local stakeholders and regional First Nations interests concerning the study process.

PROGRAM 1.2: HERITAGE RESOURCES CONSERVATION

Results of National Historic Sites Whose Initial Assessment Rated Red (Poor)

Performance Expectation: 60% of national historic sites where the condition of cultural resources of national significance rated as poor in their initial assessment are improved by March 2014.

Result: 9 of 13 (69%) sites have improved their rating from 'Red' to 'Yellow' or 'Green' between 2001-02 and 2011-12.

Condition of Resources Directly Related to Designation (National Significance)
NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE BASELINE YEAR AND RATING1 REASSESSMENT YEAR AND RATING
Levis Forts 2004-05 (Red) 2009-10 (Red)
Fortress of Louisbourg 2005-06 (Red) 2010-11 (Red)
Dredge No. 4 2006-07 (Red) No update (Red)2
Grosse-Ile and Irish Memorial 2007-08 (Red) 2011-12 (Red)
Battle of the Windmill 2002-03 (Red) 2008-09 (Yellow)
Fort Henry 2002-03 (Red) 2008-09 (Yellow)
Kingston Fortifications 2002-03 (Red) 2008-09 (Yellow)
Carillon Canal 2002-03 (Red) 2008-09 (Yellow)
Bar-U Ranch 2004-05 (Red) 2009-10 (Yellow)
HMCS Haida 2005-06 (Red) 2010-11 (Yellow)
Jasper Park Information Centre 2001-02 (Red) 2007-08 (Green)
Twin Falls Teahouse 2002-03 (Red) 2008-09 (Green)
Fort McNab 2007-08 (Red) 2010-11 (Green)

SUB-PROGRAM 1.2.2: NATIONAL HISTORIC SITES CONSERVATION

Results of National Historic Sites Whose Initial Assessment Rated Red (Poor)

Performance Expectation: 60% of national historic sites where the condition of historic buildings and structures of national significance rated as poor in their initial assessment are improved by March 2014.

Result: 9 of 13 (69%) sites have improved their rating from 'Red' to 'Yellow' or 'Green' between 2001-02 and 2011-12.

Condition of Buildings and Structures of National Significance
NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE BASELINE YEAR AND RATING3 REASSESSMENT YEAR AND RATING
Lachine Canal 2007-08 (Red) No update (Red)4
Grosse-Ile and Irish Memorial 2007-08 (Red) 2011-12 (Red)
Levis Forts 2004-05 (Red) 2009-10 (Red)
Dredge No. 4 2006-07 (Red) No update (Red)5
Battle of the Windmill 2002-03 (Red) 2008-09 (Yellow)
Fort Henry 2002-03 (Red) 2008-09 (Yellow)
Kingston Fortifications 2002-03 (Red) 2008-09 (Yellow)
Bar-U Ranch 2004-05 (Red) 2009-10 (Yellow)
HMCS Haida 2005-06 (Red) 2010-11 (Yellow)
Jasper Park Information Centre 2001-02 (Red) 2007-08 (Green)
Twin Falls Teahouse 2002-03 (Red) 2008-09 (Green)
Fort McNab 2007-08 (Red) 2010-11 (Green)
Signal Hill 2003-04 (Red) 2011-12 (Green)

PROGRAM 1.4: VISITOR EXPERIENCE

The Visitor Information Program (VIP) uses a standard questionnaire to provide information to managers of national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas about their visitors, including their use of products and services, their satisfaction with products and services, and other aspects of their visit. Selection of individual protected places to participate in the Visitor Information Program each year is aligned, as much as possible, with the timing of management planning and reporting requirements. The national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas that participate in the VIP over a five-year cycle account for the majority of the total recorded visits to heritage places administered by Parks Canada.

In 2013-14, 11 locations conducted the survey during the peak survey period of June to September 2013. Specific annual results and Agency averages for specific performance expectations were as follows:

Satisfaction: Ten of 11 locations surveyed exceeded the target of 90 percent of visitors satisfied, and all 11 locations exceeded the target of 50 percent of visitors very satisfied with their visit. The overall Agency averages are 95 percent and 70 percent, respectively.

Meaningful: Four of 11 surveyed locations met or exceeded the target of 85 percent, while seven locations mostly met the target. The overall Agency average is 83 percent.

Detailed results are in the following table.

Percentage of visitors who were satisfied and very satisfied with their visit and who considered the park/site meaningful
LOCATION SURVEYED SATISFIED VERY SATISFIED MEANINGFUL
Bellevue House NHS 98% 84% 81%
Bethune Memorial House NHS 96% 75% 92%
Bruce Peninsula NP 93% 66% 84%
Cape Spear NHS 94% 69% 84%
Cave and Basin NHS 91% 61% 71%
Fort Langley NHS 87% 60% 79%
Fort Rodd Hill / Fisgard Lighthouse NHS 97% 74% 82%
Fort Walsh NHS 98% 81% 88%
Grasslands NP 96% 68% 91%
Green Gables Heritage Place 92% 61% 75%
HMCS Haida NHS 100% 86% 95%
Average (2013-14 ) 94% 71% 84%
Overall average (Agency)* 95% 70% 83%
Source: Parks Canada's Visitor Information Program, 2013. * Visitor Information Program, 2000 to 2013

Note: Satisfaction is a subjective measure of a visitor's overall experience. Services, activities, and interactions with staff are among the many things that contribute to a visitor's level of satisfaction. The mix of factors that is important varies by visitor and can, to some degree, vary by place.

Note: Meaningful is a subjective measure of personal connection and is based on an individual's internalization of his or her experiences at a particular national park or historic site. The mix of experiences that are important for personal connection varies by visitor.

SUB-PROGRAMS 1.4.2, 1.4.3, 1.4.4, 1.4.5: NATIONAL PARKS AND NATIONAL HISTORIC SITES INTERPRETATION AND VISITOR SERVICE OFFER

Enjoyment: Nine of 11 surveyed locations met or exceeded the target of 90 percent, and two mostly met it. The overall Agency average is 95 percent.

Learning: Two of two national parks exceeded the target of 60 percent learned something. As for surveyed national historic sites, seven exceeded the performance target of 85 percent, while the remaining two mostly met the target. The overall Agency average is 82%.

Detailed results are in the following table.

Percentage of visitors who enjoyed their visit and learned something about the heritage of the place
LOCATION SURVEYED ENJOYED LEARNED
Bellevue House NHS 97% 98%
Bethune Memorial House NHS 94% 95%
Bruce Peninsula NP 90% 68%
Cape Spear NHS 95% 79%
Cave and Basin NHS 83% 87%
Fort Langley NHS 88% 92%
Fort Rodd Hill / Fisgard Lighthouse NHS 97% 90%
Fort Walsh NHS 97% 95%
Grasslands NP 96% 89%
Green Gables Heritage Place 92% 83%
HMCS Haida NHS 99% 97%
Average (2013-14 ) 93% 88%
Overall average (Agency)* 95% 82%
Source: Parks Canada's Visitor Information Program, 2013. * Visitor Information Program, 2000 to 2013

Other Items of Interest

Métis Reconciliation - 2013-14 Accomplishments

The Government of Canada is committed to building strong and mutually beneficial working relationships with Métis and other Aboriginal groups. A multi-departmental strategy to implement programs related to the reconciliation and management of Métis Aboriginal rights was approved in 2010, led by Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada. Under this strategy, Parks Canada will receive a total of $5.12 million spread equally over five years; the first year of funding was 2010-11. Five projects were completed under the Métis program funding before 2013-14 began.

Work continued during 2013-14 on 10 projects in Western Canada and one through national office. Specifically, the greatest efforts went to relationship building and engagement efforts in areas with significant Métis populations: three national parks, Wood Buffalo (N. Alberta and NWT), Jasper (Alberta) and Riding Mountain (Manitoba), and two national historic sites, Rocky Mountain House (Alberta) and Fort Walsh (Saskatchewan).

Another six projects continued interpretation efforts to give voice to the Métis in national historic sites:

  • at Rocky Mountain House for management of the heritage camping offer and other Métis products and coordination of the annual pow-wow on site;
  • at Fort Walsh on a heritage trail, a bridge, cabins and panels explaining the history of the Métis in this area;
  • in Winnipeg for a summer student at the Forks, interpretive panels at the site of the Battle of Seven Oaks and production of a travelling exhibit for Riel House; and
  • in Heritage Conservation and Commemoration at national office, for work on a travelling exhibit of Métis artifacts and images.

Several of these projects will continue into next year, either as ongoing (five-year) projects or to completion.

In addition, a number of new projects were undertaken, including a celebration of Métis culture in Fort St. James in recognition of a new exhibit on the Carrier People, some exhibit translations, replacement of an Aboriginal Day tent, and promotion of the heritage camping at Rocky Mountain House. At national office, the production of cultural awareness training modules began, as did preparations for the filming of Métis project accomplishments at national parks and historic sites during the summer of 2014.

Planning was completed in the field for another eleven small projects, to be executed in 2014-15. These consist of the production of several books, celebrations of Métis life, website content development, a tourism package at Batoche and a virtual tour of Fort Walsh.


1 Carleton Martello Tower NHSC baseline rating Yellow in 2001-02. Rated Red in 2008-09. Fort Mississauga NHSC baseline rating Yellow in 2003-04. Rated Red in 2011-12. Sites not included here as initial assessment were Yellow.

2 The Dredge No. 4 Stabilization and Protection work is a multi-year project beyond 2013-14. Only until the work is mostly complete will the rating be expected to move from Red.

3 Carleton Martello Tower NHSC baseline rating Yellow in 2001-02. Rated Red in 2008-09. Fort Mississauga NHSC baseline rating Yellow in 2003-04. Rated Red in 2011-12. Sites not included here as initial assessment were Yellow.

4 Lachine Canal is expected to be reassessed in 2014-15.

5 The Dredge No. 4 Stabilization and Protection work is a multi-year project beyond 2013-14. Only until the work is mostly complete will the rating be expected to move from Red.