Parks Canada's Departmental Performance Report 2013-14

Parks Canada Agency’s 2013-14 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy - Supplementary Information Tables

1. Overview of the Federal Government's Approach to Sustainable Development

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) 2013-16, tabled on November 4, 2013, guides the Government of Canada's sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA). In keeping with the objectives of the FSDA, to make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, the Parks Canada Agency supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities found in this Agency strategy.

Accordingly, this Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) presents the results for commitments for Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality and Theme- Protecting Nature and Canadians, within the context of the 2013-16 FSDS. This DSDS also provides the results for Theme- Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Beginning with Government based on the 2010-13 FSDS.

2. Themes I-III: Department/Agency-led Targets

FSDS Goal FSDS Performance Indicators FSDS Target FSDS Performance Status
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians Ecological Integrity of national parks Target 4.4: Improving the Health of National Parks - Improve the condition of at least one ecological integrity indicator in 20 national parks by 2015

In 2013-14, through its Conservation and Restoration program, Parks Canada continued to invest significantly in active management and ecological restoration efforts to address some of the most pressing ecological integrity issues in targeted national parks.

By meeting active management targets, management actions have resulted in improvements to at least one ecological integrity indicator in 15 national parks.

3. Themes I-III: Implementation Strategies

The majority of Parks Canada Agency's 2013-16 implementation strategies are based on the 2010-13 FSDS, including updates to reflect modifications in the Agency's Performance Measurement Framework.

Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Target 1.2 Climate Change Adaptation
Implementation Strategy
1.2.9 Improve understanding of climate-driven ecological change in Canada's North by using a combination of remote sensing and working with park cooperative management boards to assess how ecological integrity and traditional land use may be affected by climate-driven changes in northern national parks. (Note: Reported last year under the "Additional Sustainable Development Activities" section)
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Goals and Targets
Theme I Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 1 Climate Change - In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.
Target 1.2 Climate Change Adaptation: Facilitate reduced vulnerability of individuals, communities, regions and economic sectors to the impacts of climate change through the development and provision of information and tools.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.
Program 1.2 Heritage Resources Conservation
Sub Program 1.2.1 National Parks Conservation
Description of the Implementation Strategy
Parks Canada contributes to the understanding of climate-driven ecological change in Canada's North by consulting with park co-operative management boards, conducting process-based ecosystem mapping, and completing scenarios modeling and reporting to help communities understand the risks to important country food, recognize the need for adaptation, and discuss options for action. Parks Canada also links key drivers to changing ecosystem composition and structure and discusses how these changes might impact other ecosystem components (such as caribou and other species) and the ecological integrity of parks. This activity supports communities in assessing the risks as well as opportunities arising from climate change, and provides them with options for adapting.
Performance Results for 2013-14
  • National Park managers and aboriginal partners in Western Arctic and Nunavut were consulted through cooperative management board meetings (i.e., Auyuittuq), community meetings (i.e., Ukkusiksalik) and various internal Parks Canada meetings with park managers across the Arctic.
  • Ecotype maps were completed for Aulavik, Nahanni* and Ukkusiksalik.
  • The strategy for climate change vulnerability assessments was updated and the process deferred to begin in 2014-15.
  • Established over 30 new ground and remote-sensing protocols to monitor ecological health in Canada's northern national parks in the context of assessing responses to climate change.

* Due to operational priorities Nahanni replaced Kluane in the schedule.

Clean Air Agenda - Spending Information

Planned spending for 2013-14: $517,531
Actual spending for 2013-14: $509,831


Theme III Protecting Nature and Canadians
Target 4.1: Species at Risk
Implementation Strategy
4.1.9 Develop action plans for all protected areas with five or more species at risk by March 2016. (Note: Updated from target 5.17 in the 2010-13 FSDS)
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Goals and Targets
Theme III Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4 Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.1 Species at Risk: By 2020, populations of species at risk listed under federal law exhibit trends that are consistent with recovery strategies and management plans.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.
Program 1.2 Heritage Resources Conservation
Sub Program 1.2.1 National Parks Conservation
Sub Sub Program 1.2.1.1 Species at Risk
Description of the Implementation Strategy

Over half of Canada's endangered and threatened species can be found in the protected heritage areas administered by Parks Canada. Parks Canada will protect these species and their critical habitat in the Agency's heritage areas, and will support their recovery by leading the development and implementation of recovery strategies, surveying and monitoring their status, and conducting public education programs. Recovery planning is an obligation under the Species at Risk Act.

Performance Indicator

Number of action plans for national parks with 5 or more species at risk

Performance Results for 2013-14

In 2013-14 Parks Canada entered a new phase in the implementation of the Species at Risk Act focusing on action planning and taking tangible recovery actions. Parks Canada has completed drafts for 2 of the 7 site-based multi-species action plans targeted for completion by March 2016 and continued the development of other action plans. Parks Canada has posted 99% of the 76 recovery documents for which it is responsible, of which 15 were posted in the 2013-14 fiscal year. These documents provide directions to implement recovery actions.



Target 4.3: Terrestrial Ecosystem and Habitat Stewardship
Implementation Strategy
4.3.13 Make demonstrable progress on a yearly basis towards establishing national parks in one unrepresented region.

(Note: Updated from target 6.1.13 in the 2010-13 FSDS)
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Goals and Targets
Theme III Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4 Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come .
Target 4.3 Terrestrial Ecosystem and Habitat Stewardship: Contribute to the proposed national target that by 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.
Program 1.1 Heritage Places Establishment
Sub Program 1.1.1 National Parks Establishment and Expansion
Description of the Implementation Strategy

This strategy involves the completion of the national parks system in accordance with the National Parks System Plan. Canada is divided into 39 distinct natural regions based on unique physiographic and vegetative characteristics and Parks Canada's goal is to have at least one national park representative of each natural region. The completion of the system will protect outstanding examples of Canada's natural diversity, and provide Canadians with opportunities to experience, understand and appreciate that diversity. Five steps are involved in the process to establish a national park: identify areas representative of a natural region; select an optimum national park candidate from the list of representative areas; assess the feasibility of establishing the proposed park through studies and consultations; negotiate new park agreements, including any that may be required with Aboriginal peoples or organizations; and formally establish the national park in legislation.

Performance Indicator

Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress in advancing through steps towards establishing national parks

Performance Results for 2013-14

Parks Canada met its target by making demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks in four unrepresented natural regions: East Coast Boreal in Newfoundland and Labrador (Mealy Mountains proposal), Western High Arctic in Nunavut (Qausuittuq - Bathurst Island proposal), Northwestern Boreal Uplands in the Northwest Territories (Thaidene Nene in the East Arm of Great Slave Lake proposal) and Manitoba Lowlands in Manitoba (Manitoba Lowlands proposal). This includes ongoing negotiation of establishment agreements, including impact and benefit agreements, and consultations with provinces/territories and Aboriginal groups.



Target 4.3: Terrestrial Ecosystem and Habitat Stewardship
Implementation Strategy
4.3.14 Increase the number of represented terrestrial natural regions from 28 in March 2012 to 30 of 39 by March 2015.

(Note: Updated from target 6.1.13 in the 2010-13 FSDS)
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Goals and Targets
Theme III Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4 Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.3 Terrestrial Ecosystem and Habitat Stewardship: Contribute to the proposed national target that by 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.
Program 1.1 Heritage Places Establishment
Description of the Implementation Strategy

This strategy includes systems planning, completing feasibility assessments, research, consulting with Aboriginal peoples, stakeholders and the public, negotiating with other governments and Aboriginal organizations and obtaining Ministerial approval, resulting in established national parks and national marine conservation areas and designated national historic sites of Canada and other heritage places. Canada's national parks and national marine conservation areas, as well as the persons, places and events of national historic significance to Canada are symbols to the world and are part of the fabric of the nation. Preservation of Canada's natural and cultural heritage and making it available to Canadians for discovery and enjoyment is of key importance. Establishing heritage places is essential to enhancing pride, encouraging stewardship and giving expression to our identity as Canadians, and involving Canada in the internationally shared objective of protecting and commemorating the best of the world's natural and cultural heritage.

Performance Indicator

Number of represented terrestrial natural regions in the system of national parks

Performance Results for 2013-14

The national parks system currently consists of 44 national parks and national park reserves representing 28 of the 39 terrestrial natural regions. One national park was formally protected under the Canada National Parks Act in 2013-14, Sable Island National Park Reserve in Nova Scotia. Parks Canada worked towards increasing the number of represented terrestrial natural regions to 30 by furthering the Qausuittuq - Bathurst Island and Mealy Mountains proposals, which are currently in the negotiation phase. Once final establishment agreements are signed for these two areas, 30 of 39 regions will be represented.



Target 4.4: Improving the Health of National Parks
Implementation Strategy
4.4.1 80% of active management targets to improve ecological integrity are met by March 2015.

(Note: Updated from target 6.1.12 in the 2010-13 FSDS. Target 6.1.12 was used to form the new Target 4.4. in the 2013-16 FSDS.)
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Goals and Targets
Theme III Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4 Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.4 Improving the Health of National Parks: Improve the condition of at least one Ecological Integrity Indicator in 20 national parks by 2015.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.
Program 1.2 Heritage Resources Conservation
Sub Program 1.2.1 National Parks Conservation
Description of the Implementation Strategy

Parks Canada has responsibilities under the Canada National Parks Act to protect and conserve nationally significant representative natural areas on behalf of the people of Canada for their benefit, education and enjoyment and to ensure National Parks are maintained and made use of as to leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations. National Parks Conservation includes maintenance or restoration of ecological integrity through: ecological research and monitoring to gain a better understanding of the state of health, natural ecological processes and biodiversity of parks; and the impact of stressors on ecosystems. Protection and conservation occurs through scientific research, planning, reporting, public consultation, negotiation with stakeholders and others to influence actions that occur on lands located adjacent to protected heritage areas, cooperative management agreements, adaptive management and restoration of ecosystem processes and biodiversity. Protection and conservation also occurs through specific activities such as prevention, law enforcement, and fire management.

Performance Indicator

Percentage of active management targets to improve ecological integrity that are met

Performance Results for 2013-14

In 2013-14, through the Conservation and Restoration program, Parks Canada continued to implement active management and restoration projects to address some of the most pressing ecological integrity issues in targeted national parks. Though Parks Canada's long term goal revolves around maintaining or improving the status and trend of indicators, the success of an intervention is assessed by the achievement of active management targets. To date, 44% of the targets have been met, up from 23% in 2012-13. For the remaining targets, steady progress is being made.



Target 4.5: Marine Ecosystems
Implementation Strategy
4.5.6 Make demonstrable progress on a yearly basis towards establishing national marine conservation areas in two unrepresented regions.

(Note: Updated from target 6.3.8 in the 2010-13 FSDS)
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Goals and Targets
Theme III Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4 Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.5 Marine Ecosystems: By 2020, 10% of coastal and marine areas are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.
Program 1.1 Heritage Places Establishment
Sub Program 1.1.3 National Marine Conservation Area Establishment
Description of the Implementation Strategy

This strategy involves the expansion and ultimate completion of the national marine conservation areas system in accordance with the National Marine Conservation Areas System Plan entitled Sea to Sea to Sea. Canada is divided into 29 distinct marine regions based on unique oceanographic and biological characteristics and Parks Canada's goal is to protect and conserve a representative example of each of the 29 regions. The completion of the system will protect outstanding examples of the diversity of Canada's oceans and Great Lakes and provide Canadians with opportunities to experience, understand, and appreciate that diversity. Five steps are involved in the process to establish a national marine conservation area: identify areas representative of a marine region; select an optimum national marine conservation area candidate from the list of representative areas; assess the feasibility of establishing the proposed marine conservation area through studies and, consultations; negotiate new national marine conservation area agreements, including any that may be required with Aboriginal peoples or organizations; and formally establish the national marine conservation area in legislation.

Performance Indicator

Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress in advancing through steps towards establishing national marine conservation areas

Performance Results for 2013-14

In 2013-14, Parks Canada exceeded its target towards establishing national marine conservation areas in three unrepresented marine regions: Lancaster Sound in Nunavut (Lancaster Sound proposal); Strait of Georgia in British Columbia (Southern Strait of Georgia proposal); and Magdalen Shallows in Quebec (les Îles-de-la-Madeleine proposal). All three feasibility assessments were advanced. In the case of the Lancaster Sound and Southern Strait of Georgia proposals, consultations with communities, Aboriginal groups and key stakeholders were undertaken. For the Îles de la Madeleine proposal, all studies stipulated under the accord with the province of Quebec have been completed.



Target 4.7: Environmental Disasters, Incidents and Emergencies
Implementation Strategy
4.7.4. In accordance with mandated responsibilities, provide environmental and/or other information to reduce the risk of, and advice in response to, the occurrence of events such as polluting incidents, wildlife disease events or severe weather and other significant hydro-meteorological events as applicable.

(Note: New target in the 2013-16 FSDS)
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Goals and Targets
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.7: Environmental Disasters, Incidents and Emergencies: Environmental disasters, incidents and emergencies are prevented or their impacts mitigated.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.
Program: Internal Services
Description of the Implementation Strategy
Provide equipment and human resources to assist in the response to environmental emergencies.
Performance Results for 2013-14

Although there were no requests for assistance in environmental emergencies from other governmental departments or external organizations, Parks Canada remained ready to provide equipment and human resources to assist upon request.

Note: shares responsibility for this implementation strategy with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC), Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO), Environment Canada (EC), Health Canada (HC), Industry Canada (IC), Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC), Public Safety Canada (PS) and Transport Canada (TC).


Target 4.8: Chemicals Management
Implementation Strategy
4.8.1. Implement the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and complete remediation and risk management activities at known high priority federal contaminated sites.

(Note: New target in the 2013-16 FSDS)
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Goals and Targets
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.8: Chemicals Management: Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment and human health posed by releases of harmful substances.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.
Program 1.2: Heritage Places Conservation
Description of the Implementation Strategy

Parks Canada is responsible for 473 sites registered in the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory as of March 31, 2013. With funding from the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, the Agency undertakes risk reduction activities (through remediation and/or risk management) at its high-priority contaminated sites.

Expected Result

Mitigate risks to the environment and human health as well as reduce financial liability.

Performance Results for 2013-14

In 2013-14, Parks Canada closed two federal contaminated sites and undertook remediation and/or risk management activities at 26 other sites.

Note: shares responsibility for this implementation strategy with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC), Correctional Service of Canada (CSC), Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO), DND, Environment Canada (EC), National Research Council (NRC), Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC), Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and Transport Canada (TC).

4.Theme IV: Implementation Strategies

Green Building Targets
As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, new construction and build-to-lease projects, and major renovation projects, will achieve an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance.[1]
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Number of completed new construction, build-to-lease, and major renovation projects in the given fiscal year, according to the departmental strategic framework. 0
Number of completed new construction, build-to-lease, and major renovation projects that have achieved an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance in the given fiscal year, according to the departmental strategic framework. 0
Existence of a strategic framework. Yes: completed March 31, 2012

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Minimum level of environmental performance: LEED® Gold for new construction and LEED® Silver for major renovations, or equivalent.
  2. Minimum floor area: 1,000m2
  3. Minimum dollar value: $1 million for major renovations only.
  4. Applicable building types: All of Parks Canada buildings excluding heritage buildings
  5. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: A strategic framework was completed in 2011-12 and the Green Building Directive was updated and approved in March 2012 to incorporate the requirements for this target. There was no planned/completed new construction or major renovation projects identified in the strategic framework in 2013-14.
  6. The Parks Canada Green Building Directive (2012) requires that:
    1. Construction of new buildings greater than 1,000 m2 must meet Gold level of the applicable LEED® Canada rating system or equivalent and must be registered and certified by the Canada Green Building Council, or equivalent.
    2. Major renovations of existing buildings (excluding heritage buildings) over 1,000 m2 and of project value greater than one million dollars must meet the Silver level of the applicable LEED® Canada rating system, or equivalent, and must be registered and certified by the Canada Green Building Council, or equivalent.

As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, existing crown buildings over 1000 m2 will be assessed for environmental performance using an industry-recognized assessment tool. [2] (Target 8.2 from 2010-13 FSDS)
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Number of buildings over 1000 m2, according to the departmental strategic framework. 21
Percentage of buildings over 1000 m2 in the given fiscal year that have been assessed using an industry-recognized assessment tool, according to the departmental strategic framework. 0%
Existence of a strategic framework. Yes: completed March 31, 2012

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Minimum level of assessment: BOMA BESt Practices.
  2. Minimum floor area: The office/operations, public use or heated storage floor space combined is greater than 1,000 square metres.
  3. Applicable building types: Buildings used for operations, administration and/or public use; occupied by staff year-round; and built prior to the year 2000.
  4. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: A strategic framework was completed in 2011-12 and the Green Building Directive was updated and approved in March 2012 to incorporate the requirements for this target. A thorough review of Parks Canada buildings was completed and it was found that only 21 buildings were eligible for assessment under BOMA BESt. A contract has been signed with for the assessment of these buildings.
  5. Parks Canada Green Building Directive (2012) requires that existing buildings over 1,000m2 that meet the following criteria be assessed over a five-year period beginning in 2012-13:
    • The building is used for operations, administration and/or public use;
    • The office/operations, public use or heated storage floor space combined is greater than 1,000 m2;
    • The building is occupied by staff year-round;
    • The building was built prior to the year 2000.

As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, new lease or lease renewal projects over 1000 m2, where the Crown is the major lessee, will be assessed for environmental performance using an industry-recognized assessment tool. [3] (Target 8.3 from 2010-13 FSDS)
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status N/A
Number of completed lease and lease renewal projects over 1000 m2 in the given fiscal year, according to the departmental strategic framework. N/A
Number of completed lease and lease renewal projects over 1000 m2 that were assessed using an industry-recognized assessment tool in the given fiscal year, according to the departmental strategic framework. N/A
Existence of a strategic framework. N/A

Strategies and/or Comments

All building space leases over 1,000m2 are managed by Public Works and Government Services Canada so this target is not applicable to the Parks Canada Agency.


As of April 1, 2012, and pursuant to departmental strategic frameworks, fit-up and refit projects will achieve an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance. [4] (Target 8.4 from 2010-13 FSDS)
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Number of completed fit-up and refit projects in the given fiscal year, according to the departmental strategic framework. 0
Number of completed fit-up and refit projects that have achieved an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance in the given fiscal year, according to the departmental strategic framework. 0
Existence of a strategic framework. Yes: completed March 31, 2012

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Minimum level of assessment: LEED® Silver
  2. Minimum dollar value: $1 Million
  3. Applicable building types: All Parks Canada buildings, excluding heritage buildings
Greenhouse Gas Emissions Target
The federal government will take action now to reduce levels of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from its operations to match the national target of 17% below 2005 by 2020. (Target 8.5 from 2010-13 FSDS)
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status On track
Departmental reduction target: Percentage of absolute reduction in GHG emissions by fiscal year 2020-21, relative to fiscal year 2005-06. 10.1%
Departmental GHG emissions in fiscal year 2005-06, in kilotons of CO2 equivalent. 37.9
Departmental GHG emissions in the given fiscal year, in kilotons of CO2 equivalent. 35.1
Change in departmental GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005-06 to the end of the given fiscal year, expressed as a percentage. 7.3% reduction
Existence of an implementation plan to reduce GHG emissions. Yes: Completed in 2011

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Targeted emissions include GHG emissions from energy consumed by facilities and fleet owned and operated by Parks Canada.
  2. Targets have been issued to each business unit. Progress reports have been developed for each business unit and are shared annually.
  3. Base year adjustments: The Department's base year GHG emission levels (fiscal year 2005-06) have been recalculated using emission factors from the latest electricity intensity tables published by Environment Canada. These factors, which are used to calculate the Department's emissions from purchased electricity, have been updated due to changes in Environment Canada's methodology for quantifying emissions from electricity generation in Canada.
  4. The Parks Canada Master Plan for the Reduction of Greenhouse Gases outlines strategies to improve the energy efficiency of the fleet and facilities, to implement the use of renewable fuels and renewable energy systems, and to engage employees.
  5. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected:
    1. A comprehensive emission tracking system is currently in place.
    2. The Parks Canada Master Plan for the Reduction of Greenhouse Gases has been developed and communicated to staff.
    3. The GHG emissions are on a clear downward trend.
  6. Weather conditions have a significant influence over the quantity of energy Parks Canada consumes in a given year.
Surplus Electronic and Electrical Equipment Target
By March 31, 2014, each department will reuse or recycle all surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) in an environmentally sound and secure manner. (Target 8.6 from 2010-13 FSDS)
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Existence of an implementation plan for the disposal of all departmentally generated EEE. Yes; Completed March 31, 2012
Total number of departmental locations with an EEE implementation plan fully implemented, expressed as a percentage of all locations, by the end of the given fiscal year. 100%

Strategies and/or Comments

i. Definition of location: 33 business units and the national office.

ii. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: Parks Canada approved the Parks Canada Guidelines for the Disposal of Electronic and Electrical Equipment in March 2012. These guidelines have been distributed and implemented in each location and posted on the Parks Canada Intranet.

Printing Unit Reduction Target
By March 31, 2013, each department will achieve an 8:1 average ratio of office employees to printing units. Departments will apply the target where building occupancy levels, security considerations, and space configuration allow. (Target 8.7 from 2010-13 FSDS)
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units in fiscal year 2010-11, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow. (Optional) N/A
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units at the end of the given fiscal year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow. 8:1

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Definition of printing unit: Parks Canada Agency defines "printing unit" as networked printers and multi-functional devices.
  2. Scope: Due to the operational structure of Parks Canada, some buildings have a lower ratio due to building occupancy and space configurations. These will be scoped out of the target.
  3. Method used for determining the number of printing units: IT equipment inventory and Network Discovery Tool, with validation by local IT Managers.
  4. Method used for determining the number of office employees: active network accounts (in scope), with validation by local IT Managers.
  5. Number of employees subject to the target is 2263.
  6. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: Target status has been set to "Achieved" because the target ratio was met in the specified timeframe.
  7. Environmental benefits: longer-term reduction of e-waste, reduce paper/toner consumption, energy conservation.
  8. Plans/Strategies: Developing a directive on the use of technology which includes printing, and ultimately limiting and minimizing the use of desktop printers.
  9. Roles and responsibilities: Chief of Environmental Management in collaboration with the IT section.
Paper Consumption Target
By March 31, 2014, each department will reduce internal paper consumption per office employee by 20%. Each department will establish a baseline between 2005-06 and 2011-12, and an applicable scope. (Target 8.8 from 2010-13 FSDS)
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Number of sheets of internal office paper purchased or consumed per office employee in the selected baseline year, according to the departmental scope. 1357 sheets per office employee in 2013-14
Cumulative reduction (or increase) in paper consumption per office employee in the given fiscal year, expressed as a percentage, relative to the selected baseline year. 36% reduction

Strategies and/or Comments

Baseline: 2120 sheets per office employee

  1. Scope: Parks Canada has defined its "office employee" as all full-time equivalent employees
  2. Method used for determining paper consumption: Public Works and Government Services Canada standing offer data
  3. The number of sheets consumed (normalized to letter-size equivalent): 7,648,000
  4. Method used for determining the number of office employees: Human Resources report
  5. The number of employees subject to the target is 5634.
  6. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: Parks Canada Agency has surpassed the set target of a 20% reduction in paper consumption by March 31, 2014.
Green Meetings Target
By March 31, 2012, each department will adopt a guide for greening meetings. (Target 8.9 from 2010-13 FSDS)
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Presence of a green meetings guide. Yes: Adopted March 31, 2012

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Definition of "adoption": The guide was considered to have been adopted when the guide was:
    1. approved by the Chief Administrative Officer;
    2. communicated across the Agency via memo; and
    3. posted on the Parks Canada Intranet.
  2. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: Parks Canada has adopted a green meeting guide.
  3. Key Components: Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Energy Consumption and Waste/ Reduce Paper Consumption / Hospitality / Procurement / Location.
Green Procurement Targets
As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish at least three SMART green procurement targets to reduce environmental impacts. (Target 8.10 from 2010-13 FSDS)

1. As of March 31, 2017, 75% of vehicles purchased annually will be from the Parks Canada Preauthorized Vehicle List.
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Percentage of vehicles purchased that were on the Parks Canada Preauthorized Vehicle List. 76%

Strategies and/or Comments

  • Why This Self Selected Target is SMART:
    1. Specific: Refers to specific type of commodity and purchasing mechanism;
    2. Measurable: Information available from Public Works and Government Services Canada and basic analysis;
    3. Achievable: Consistent with Parks Canada direction;
    4. Relevant: Promotes cost savings and greenhouse gas reduction;
    5. Time-bound: Date established for baseline, target implementation and completion.
  • Other Reporting Considerations:
    1. Scope: vehicles purchased and operated by Parks Canada.
    2. The Parks Canada Preauthorized Vehicle List includes vehicles that meet criteria (including fuel efficiency) stated in the Parks Canada Light Fleet Vehicle Management Directive.
    3. Rationale for the traffic light indicator selected: Parks Canada has achieved its set target and Parks Canada Light Fleet Vehicle Management Directive will ensure the target is maintained.
    4. The total number of vehicles purchased was 150; of these, 114 were purchased from the Preauthorized Vehicle List.
    5. Roles and responsibilities: National Fleet Advisor is the target lead.
    6. Estimated environmental benefits: reduced GHG emissions, improved vehicle efficiency and lifespan.
    7. The baseline of 67% was determined by using the average percentage of vehicles purchased from 2004-05 to 2009-10 that were on the Parks Canada Preauthorized Vehicle List.

2. As of March 31, 2017, 95% of printers, photocopiers, and multi-functional devices will have environmental features such as duplex printing capability or automatic shutoff mode.
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Number of printers, photocopiers and multifunctional devices purchased or leased that has an environmental feature relative to total number purchased. 89 of 89 (100%)

Strategies and/or Comments

  • Why This Self Selected Target is SMART:
    1. Specific: Refers to a specific type of commodity and purchasing mechanism;
    2. Measurable: Information available from financial records and inventory systems;
    3. Achievable: Consistent with Parks Canada direction;
    4. Relevant: Promotes cost savings, greenhouse gas reduction or reduced paper consumption;
    5. Time-bound: Target date established.
  • Other Reporting Considerations:
    1. Scope: printers, photocopiers, and multifunctional devices purchased during the 2013-14 fiscal year.
    2. Environmental features include duplex printing capability, automatic shutoff/sleep mode, etc.
    3. Internal policies have been reviewed and communicated as required.
    4. Processes / reporting requirements: Printers are tracked using the report provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada and by Parks Canada financial records.
    5. All printers and copiers on the National Master Standing Offer have obligatory environmental certifications.
    6. Roles and responsibilities: Chief of Environmental Management in collaboration with the IT section.

3. As of March 31, 2017, all office computers will have a minimum lifespan of three years, to reduce electronic waste.
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Average service life of office computers. Average life span of office computers is 3 years

Strategies and/or Comments

  • Why This Self Selected Target is SMART:
    1. Specific: Refers to a specific type of commodity;
    2. Measurable: Information available from inventory systems;
    3. Achievable: Consistent with Parks Canada direction;
    4. Relevant: Promotes cost savings and electronic waste reduction;
    5. Time-bound: Target date established.
  • Other Reporting Considerations:
    1. Internal policies have been reviewed and communicated as required.
    2. Inventory system has been refined to ensure a tracking process is in place.
    3. Yearly computer replacement plan identifies and suggests computers that need replacement based on life cycle (3 to 5 years).
    4. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: target status has been set to "Achieved" based on the actual life cycle applied to the complete inventory of office computers at Parks Canada.
    5. Roles and responsibilities: Chief of Environmental Management in collaboration with thesection.

As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish SMART targets for training, employee performance evaluations, and management processes and controls, as they pertain to procurement decision making. Target 8.11 from 2010-13 FSDS)

Training for select employees
By April 1, 2012, 75% of procurement and contracting personnel will receive green procurement training.
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Number of procurement and contracting personnel with formal green procurement training, relative to total number of procurement and contracting personnel. 23 of 26 (88%)

Strategies and/or Comments

  • Why This Self Selected Target is
    1. Specific: Achievement level of 75%, type of employee and type of training;
    2. Measurable: Information available from Human Resources and Canada School of Public Service;
    3. Achievable: Procurement and contracting goal of all existing and new employees to take Green Procurement training;
    4. Relevant: Targets all relevant employees;
    5. Time-bound: Date established for target completion.
  • Other Reporting Considerations:
    1. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: Department has exceeded the self-selected target.
    2. 23 of the total 26 procurement and contracting personnel have completed the online green procurement training by March 31, 2012.
    3. This target has been achieved by means of an online course offered through the Canada School of Public Service Campus Direct Course C215.
    4. All new and existing functional specialist staff were asked to take the training within a specified time frame.
    5. Data has been collected directly from functional specialists and is available from either Human Resources or the Canada School Public Service.
    6. Roles and Responsibilities: Manager, Procurement and Contracting is the target lead.
    7. vii. Opportunities for continuous improvement: 100% of employees are targeted and will be pursued.
    8. Plans for engagement: Email dissemination of departmental guidance regarding green procurement training.

Employee performance evaluations for managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management.
By April 1, 2012, environmental considerations will be incorporated into the performance evaluations of all managers and functional leads of procurement and contracting.
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Number of performance evaluations of managers and functional leads of procurement and contracting that incorporate environmental considerations, relative to the total number of performance evaluations of managers and functional leads. 6 of 6 managers
(100%)

Strategies and/or Comments

  • Why This Self Selected Target is SMART:
    1. Specific: Achievement level of 100% and type of employee;
    2. Measurable: Information available from Human Resources;
    3. Achievable: Procurement and contracting goals of all existing and new managers and functional leads include environmental considerations in their performance evaluations;
    4. Relevant: Targets all relevant employees;
    5. Time-bound: Date established for target completion.
  • Other Reporting Considerations:
    1. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: Department has achieved the self-selected target.
    2. Methodology: Each manager and functional leads will have an objective included in his appraisal to ensure environmental considerations are taken into account in all procurement activities.
    3. Results: Each person has identified environmental considerations within their respective performance evaluations.
    4. Roles and Responsibilities: Manager, Procurement and Contracting is the target lead.
    5. Plans for engagement: Inclusion in Employee Performance Management Agreements.

Management processes and controls.
By April 1, 2013, 75% of identified management processes and controls, relating to procurement and contracting will incorporate environmental considerations.
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Number of departmental procurement and contracting processes and controls that incorporate environmental considerations, relative to total number of departmental procurement and contracting processes and controls that should address environmental considerations. 100%

Strategies and/or Comments

  • Why This Self Selected Target is SMART:
    1. Specific: Achievement level of 75% of identified processes and controls;
    2. Measurable: Information available within procurement and contracting community;
    3. Achievable: Dedicated employees responsible for target;
    4. Relevant: Decision making authority for purchases decentralized;
    5. Time-bound: Date established for target implementation.
  • Other Reporting Considerations:
    1. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: Department has already achieved the self-selected target.
    2. Examples include: Various procurement directives and guidance documentation, information management process, contracting controls and processes.
    3. Methodology I: Parks Canada will continue to explore the integration of environmental considerations into planning, acquisition, use and disposal, which can improve the purchasing of green products, reduce the in-use costs and ensure disposal is in accordance with environmental standards. This will include the purchasing of greener products, whether more energy efficient, less harmful or containing a higher percentage of recycled material, which can make a significant impact.
    4. Methodology II: Internal policies on procurement and material management will be reviewed and updated to integrate environmental considerations in decision making, from the procurement through to the disposal process.
    5. Parks Canada staff uses Public Works and Government Services Canada procurement instruments as a priority for all procurements (goods and services) first before seeking an alternate solution.
    6. Roles and responsibilities: Manager, Procurement and Contracting is the target lead.
    7. Parks Canada uses, in addition to its own, processes and controls established by Public Works and Government Services Canada for a large part of its acquisitions.
Reporting on the Purchase of Offset Credits
Mandatory reporting on the purchase of greenhouse gas emissions offset credits, according to the Policy Framework for Offsetting Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Major International Events .
Performance Measure Performance Status
Quantity of emissions offset in the given fiscal year. N/A

Strategies and/or Comments
N/A


Voluntary Reporting on Any Other Greening Government Operations Initiative
By March 31, 2014, carbon emissions resulting from airline business travel will be reduced by 25%.
Performance Measure Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Percentage of absolute reduction in carbon emissions by fiscal year 2013-14, relative to fiscal year 2008-09. 25%
Departmental carbon emissions in fiscal year 2008-09, in tonnes. 2,640

Strategies and/or Comments

  • Why This Self Selected Target is SMART:
    1. Specific: Direct reduction of carbon emissions resulting from airline business travel, relative to a base year;
    2. Measurable: Information recorded annually by AMEX travel services;
    3. Achievable: Parks Canada has implemented a green meeting guide and travel directive that aims to reduce business travel;
    4. Relevant: Reduced airline business travel will result in environmental and financial benefits;
    5. Time-bound: Date established for target implementation and completion.
  • Other Reporting Considerations:
    1. Scope: Departmental carbon emission resulting from airline business travel.
    2. Baseline year has been established as 2008-09.
    3. Parks Canada adopted a green meetings guide in March of 2012, which recommends the use of tele/video/web-conferencing options instead of travel.
    4. Carbon emissions relating to air travel totalled 1,990 tonnes in 2013-14.

[1] High environmental performance is demonstrated by achieving NC Silver, Green Globes Design 3 Globes, or equivalent.

[2] Industry-recognized assessment tools areBESt, Green Globes, or equivalent.

[3] Industry-recognized assessment tools areBESt, an appropriately tailoredInternational Green Lease Standard, or equivalent.

[4] High environmental performance is demonstrated by achievingCI Silver, Green Globes Fit-Up 3 Globes, or equivalent.

5. Additional Agency Sustainable Development Activities and Initiatives

In addition to its core implementation strategies, Parks Canada contributes to sustainable development through additional activities such as the engagement of Canadians through stakeholder and partner relationships and visitor experiences.

Stakeholder and Partner Engagement
Activity
Parks Canada will provide increased opportunities for Canadians to be involved with Parks Canada places in activities they consider meaningful and relevant including consultations, open doors and an increasing array of volunteer activities.
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Themes
Theme III Protecting Nature and Canadians
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.
Program 1.3 Public Appreciation and Understanding
Sub Program 1.3.2 Stakeholder and Partner Engagement
Description of the Program
The support and involvement of Parks Canada's stakeholders and partners is essential to Parks Canada's program delivery and continued relevance. Parks Canada's stakeholders represent all sectors of Canadian society, and include individuals, groups and organizations that have an interest in the Agency's actions and direction. Stakeholders engage with Parks Canada through a wide variety of activities at all levels of the organization and in ways that are relevant to them, such as formal and informal consultation processes, and the national volunteer program. Stakeholder and partner engagement supports results in all program activities and leads to new or expanded opportunities for Canadians to discover and develop a sense of connection to their protected heritage places.
Performance Results for 2013-14

Expected Result: Stakeholders and partners are engaged in the protection and presentation of Parks Canada's administered places.

Performance Expectations:

Increase the % of stakeholders and partners that support the protection and presentation of Parks Canada's administered places by March 2014.

Increase the % of stakeholders and partners that feel that they have opportunities to influence and contribute to Parks Canada's activities by March 2014.

Results: Our success at bringing Parks Canada to Canadians and facilitating opportunities for them to learn about and be inspired about their natural and historical heritage is shared with dedicated partners and stakeholders who play an active role in the development and implementation of these opportunities. In 2013, Parks Canada maximized its reach by collaborating with a mix of partners on initiatives associated with mutual and complimentary objectives, such as connecting youth and families with nature and history, learning about biodiversity and conservation, and encouraging visitation. These initiatives included urban outreach events, family and youth oriented contests, web and social media applications, publications, and enhanced youth programming.

In terms of the performance expectations, Parks Canada established preliminary baselines in 2010 for Stakeholder and Partner Engagement. In 2010, 82 percent of stakeholders and partners supported the protection and presentation of Parks Canada administered places and 41 percent of stakeholders and partners felt they had opportunities to influence and contribute to the Agency's activities. The Agency did not measure these performance targets in 2013-14 to assess progress.



Visitor Experience
Activity
Parks Canada will facilitate a diverse range of opportunities in Parks Canada's protected heritage places for visitors to learn about, experience, and enjoy the spirit, wonder, and awe of Canada's network of heritage places.
Link to FSDS 2013-16 Themes
Theme III Protecting Nature and Canadians
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.
Program 1.4 Visitor Experience
Description of the Program

"Visitor experience" refers to a visitor's interactions with Parks Canada in the context of their visit to a national park, national historic site, or national marine conservation area. This program supports the opportunities provided for more than 20 million person visits that are made annually to Parks Canada's protected heritage places. The visitor experience is the sum total of a visitor's personal interaction with the protected heritage place that helps them create meaning and establish connection with the place. The visitor experience program facilitates opportunities for enjoyment and learning, leading to a sense of personal connection and the continued relevance of Canada's protected heritage places for Canadians.

Performance Results for 2013-14

Expected Result: Visitors at surveyed locations feel a sense of personal connection to the places visited.

Performance Expectations:

On average, 85% of visitors' at all surveyed locations consider the place meaningful to them.

On average, 90% of visitors at surveyed locations are satisfied and on average, 50% are very satisfied with their visit.

Results: Canada's natural and historic treasures leave enduring impressions in the hearts and minds of Canadians for many reasons. For some, the significance ingrained in the fabric of the place nurtures a sense of connection, while for others it is indulging in recreational or learning interests, enjoying the splendor of the natural environment and/or participating in family traditions. In 2013-14, Parks Canada continued to nurture its popular youth and family programs, held learn-to-camp events for families across the country, expanded its overnight accommodation options, and celebrated the 300th anniversary of the founding of the Fortress of Louisbourg with special events and programs. On average, 84 percent of visitors to surveyed locations in 2013-14 considered the place meaningful to them. The overall Agency running average is 83 percent. On average 94% of visitors to surveyed locations in 2013-14 were satisfied with their visit, and 71% were very satisfied.

6.Sustainable Development Management System

Parks Canada Sustainable Development Vision

The Federal Sustainable Development Act defines sustainable development as development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. It states that the Government of Canada "acknowledges the need to integrate environmental, economic and social factors in the making of all decisions by government."

Sustainable development is central to Parks Canada's mandate and vision. It is ingrained in all aspects of the Agency's activities from establishing and conserving national parks and national marine conservation areas to designating and commemorating national historic sites. Parks Canada is committed to ensuring that Canada's treasured natural and historic places remain unimpaired for the understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of present and future generations.

Parks Canada activities also contribute to the Canadian economy. The combined annual expenditures of Parks Canada and its millions of visitors make a substantial and widespread contribution to the Canadian economy, both directly through its facilities, locations and services, and indirectly in the surrounding communities through spending on accommodations, restaurants, and other tourism-related businesses. Parks Canada places contribute $3.3 billion annually to the Canadian economy, sustaining more than 41,000 jobs in hundreds of communities across the country.

Managing Sustainable Development

Sustainable development involves the consideration of environmental, economic and social objectives in the development and implementation of public policies and programs. The needs of the present as well as the needs of future generations are also taken into consideration. Integrated decision-making and a long-term approach to planning are defining characteristics of sustainable development.

Parks Canada takes an integrated approach in managing its heritage places. For example, Parks Canada carries out active management and restoration projects in national parks. These projects are designed in a manner that ensures the conservation of natural resources, while engaging key audiences and enhancing visitor experiences. This integrated approach to the delivery of Parks Canada's mandate has strengthened the Agency's contribution to all aspects of sustainable development - environmental, social and economic.

Parks Canada's decision-making and sustainable development practices include collaborating with groups that share its values and have an interest in its work. The establishment of national parks and national marine conservation areas, for example, requires a high level of engagement on the part of provincial governments and Aboriginal peoples. The designation and commemoration of persons, places and events of historic significance equally demands the active participation of stakeholders, partners and community groups. The Agency recognizes that building and maintaining these collaborative relationships is essential to achieving its mandate of protecting and presenting Canada's natural and cultural heritage.

Moreover, Parks Canada promotes sustainable development practices by encouraging the use of analytical techniques that compare and integrate environmental, social, and economic objectives and that address multi-year or long-term concerns. For example, the Agency uses social science analytical and performance measurement tools to understand and engage Canadians, particularly certain segments of the population (e.g. urban, youth, new Canadians), in meaningful ways to ensure that its heritage places remain relevant for present and future generations.

Finally the Agency is engaged in several interdepartmental initiatives related to sustainable development, such as the Clean Air Agenda, Species at Risk, Federal Contaminated Sites, and Greening Government Operations.

7. Strategic Environmental Assessment

During 2013-14 reporting cycle, Parks Canada Agency considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals as part of its decision-making processes. Through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA) process, agency proposals were found to have positive effects on the 2013-16 FSDS goals and targets, particularly with respect to Theme III - Protecting Nature and Canadians, Goal 4 - Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians.

Additional information on the results of the SEAs is available on the Parks Canada website: http://www.pc.gc.ca/progs/eie-eia/itm4.aspx).




Details on Transfer Payment Programs

1. Name of transfer payment program: General Class Contribution Program (GCCP)

Start date: 1995-96

End date: Ongoing

Description: The objective of the program is to assist recipients in conducting activities and delivering projects that will support the Agency in fulfilling its mandate to preserve and protect nationally significant examples of Canada's natural and cultural heritage and present and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations.

Strategic outcome(s): Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.

Results achieved: (dollars)
2011-12 Actual
spending
2012-13 Actual
spending
2013-14 Planned
spending
2013-14 Total
authorities
2013-14 Actual
spending
Variance
Program:
Heritage Places Establishment 791,702 1,197,844 788,474 636,907 636,907 151,567
Heritage Resources Conservation 1,374,054 2,545,749 1,269,486 2,811,691 2,811,691 -1,542,205
Public Appreciation And Understanding 3,528,066 7,544,439 859,678 1,457,893 1,457,893 -598,215
Visitor Experience 3,820,086 724,408 702,540 409,955 409,955 292,585
Townsite And Throughway Infrastructure 246,153 198,578 114,122 12,000 12,000 102,122
Total Contribution 9,760,061 12,211,018 3,734,300 5,328,446 5,328,446 -1,594,146

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add up to totals shown.

Comments on variances: The increase in actual spending in 2013-14 is primarily the result of contribution payments deferred from 2012-13, increased funding received for the implementation of Canada's Copenhagen Accord, and additional contributions sourced from operating funding.

Audits completed or planned: n/a

Evaluations completed or planned: n/a

Engagement of applicants and recipients: n/a

2. Name of transfer payment program: Funding to Support the Trans Canada Trail Foundation's (TCTF) Fundraising Campaign

Start date: 2013-14

End date: March 31, 2017

Description: The purpose of this grant is to fulfill the Government of Canada's commitment towards the completion of the Trans Canada Trail. The objective is to support the TCTF in their efforts to raise funds to complete the Trans Canada Trail by 2017.

Strategic outcome(s): Canadians have a strong sense of connection, through meaningful experiences, to their national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are enjoyed in ways that leave them unimpaired for present and future generations.

Results achieved:

(dollars)
2011-12 Actual
spending
2012-13 Actual
spending
2013-14 Planned
spending
2013-14 Total
authorities
2013-14 Actual
spending
Variance
Program
Heritage
Places Establishment
0.0 0.0 0.0 12,500,000 7,152,037 7,152,037
Total Grant 0.0 0.0 0.0 12,500,000 7,152,037 7,152,037

Comments on variances: The Grant was not approved at the time of publishing the 2013-14 Report on Plans and Priorities and therefore was not included in the planned spending.

Audits completed or planned: n/a

Evaluations completed or planned: n/a

Engagement of applicants and recipients: n/a


Internal Audit and Evaluations 2013-14

Internal Audits (2013-14)

Name of internal audit Internal audit type Status Completion date
Key Financial and Administrative Processes Assurance audit on financial controls
Postponed to 2014-15
Management of Staff Housing Assurance audit on Parks Canada's (PC) Staff Housing initiative Audit Report will be tabled to Audit Committee (AC) in November 2014
Office of the Comptroller General (OCG) Horizontal Audit of Financial Forecasting Assurance audit: Field work conducted by Office of Internal Audit and Evaluation (OIAE) in support to OCG Reporting Completed September 2013

Evaluations (2013-14)

Name of evaluation Program Status Completion date
National Park Establishment and Expansion Heritage Places Establishment Completed June 10, 2014
National Parks Conservation Heritage Resources Conservation Completed June 13, 2014
National Historic Site Designations Heritage Places Establishment In progress December 2014
Other Heritage Places Designations and Conservation Heritage Places Establishment and Heritage Places Conservation In progress December 2014

Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits

Response to parliamentary committees

Report(s)
Urban Conservation Practices in Canada - Report of the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development (April 2013)

Government Response
As part of the government response Parks Canada initiatives were highlighted:

  • The Government is also leading work on the establishment of the Rouge National Urban Park, which will significantly enhance the Government's reach with urban Canadians as almost 20 percent of the Canadian population lives within a one-hour drive of the park. The Rouge National Urban Park will also provide an urban window on Canada's protected places, offering memorable experiences and educational programs and activities which introduce urban Canadians to other national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas.
  • The Government also delivers other programs that target urban Canadians, such as Parks Canada's Learn to Camp program, or that reach out to Canadians where they live, such as the My Parks Pass program.

Government Response
Progress in 2013-14 (as stated in the Departmental Performance Report)
In 2013-14, Parks Canada continued to engage provincial, regional, municipal, Aboriginal, agricultural, and community partners and stakeholders towards the establishment of Rouge National Urban Park, Canada's first national urban park. Following a successful public engagement program in 2012, progress has been made on interim park operations and the drafting of the Rouge National Urban Park's first Management Plan. In the same period, both the federal government and the provincial government signed agreements indicating their intention to transfer land to Parks Canada as part of the establishment process. In addition, Parks Canada made significant progress on land assembly agreements with the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, and regional and local municipalities.

Response to the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

The Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development conducted an audit of Recovery Planning for Species at Risk, examining whether Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and Parks Canada have established the required recovery strategies, actions plans and management plans in accordance with the Species at Risk Act. The audit focused on species declared at risk for which a recovery document was due as of March 31, 2013. The results of the audit form Chapter 6 of the Fall 2013 Report of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development.

The report concludes that Environment Canada, Fisheries and Ocean Canada, and Parks Canada have not met their legal requirements for establishing recovery documents under the Species at Risk Act, but recognises that Parks Canada has made notable progress in completing the majority of the recovery strategies for which it is responsible.

The report includes one recommendation which the Agency has agreed to implement.

The report can be found at:
2013 Fall Report of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development - Chapter 6: Recovery Planning for Species at Risk

The Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development conducted an audit of Ecological Integrity in National Parks, examining whether Parks Canada had fulfilled its key responsibilities for maintaining or restoring ecological integrity in national parks and national park reserves. The audit covered the period between January 2006 and June 2013. The results of the audit form Chapter 7 of the Fall 2013 Report of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development.

The report concludes that Parks Canada is fulfilling its key responsibilities for maintaining or restoring ecological integrity in Canada's national parks and that the Agency has carried out significant work in every area examined.

The report includes two recommendations. The Agency agreed with one of the recommendations but only partially agreed with the other.

The report can be found at:
2013 Fall Report of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development - Chapter 7: Ecological Integrity in National Parks

External audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages
There were no external audits of Parks Canada Agency in 2013-14.

Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue

Respendable Revenue

Respendable revenue consists of certain non-tax revenues where authorities from Parliament have been received to finance directly related expenditures.

Program 2011-12 Actual
(dollars)
2012-13 Actual
(dollars )
2013-14 (dollars)
Main
Estimates
Planned
Revenue
Total
Authorities
Actual
Visitor Experience
Entry Fees 52,936,227 54,819,434 52,500,000 52,500,000 54,953,329 54,953,329
Front Country Camping Fees 17,285,966 17,722,522 16,500,000 16,500,000 18,578,948 18,578,948
Backcountry Camping Fees 1,583,200 1,582,478 1,615,000 1,615,000 2,146,192 2,146,192
Lockage Fees 1,553,100 1,558,613 1,490,000 1,490,000 1,326,597 1,326,597
Mooring and Docking Fees 901,700 960,876 920,000 920,000 830,763 830,763
Heritage Presentation Program 715,995 737,349 730,000 730,000 667,774 667,774
Hot Springs 3,940,000 4,248,079 3,790,000 3,790,000 3,951,262 3,951,262
Swimming Pool Admission Fees 0 19,017 20,000 20,000 21,204 21,204
Golf Fees 875,315 1,015,354 1,035,000 1,035,000 989,696 989,696
Other Recreational Fees 305,181 297,645 400,000 400,000 292,074 292,074
Subtotal 80,096,684 82,961,367 79,000,000 79,000,000 83,757,839 83,757,839
Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure
Municipal Service Fees 3,793,580 3,279,986 3,100,000 3,100,000 2,990,498 2,990,498
Subtotal 3,793,580 3,279,986 3,100,000 3,100,000 2,990,498 2,990,498
Other Revenue
Real Property Rentals and Business Fees 26,414,908 25,724,757 20,900,000 20,900,000 26,447,770 26,447,770
Miscellaneous 7,866,591 6,044,702 8,000,000 8,000,000 5,863,937 5,863,937
Subtotal 34,281,499 31,769,459 28,900,000 28,900,000 32,311,707 32,311,707
Total Respendable Revenue 118,171,763 118,010,812 111,000,000 111,000,000 119,060,044 119,060,044

Note: Totals may not agree due to rounding. Respendable Revenue Table has been adjusted to reflect categories used in the User Fees Table.



Status Report on Projects Operating with Specific Treasury Board Approval

Project Original estimated total cost
($ millions)
Revised estimates total cost
($ millions)
Actual cost total
($ millions)
2013-14 ($ millions) Expected date of close-out
Main Estimates Planned spending Total authorities Actual
Heritage Resources Conservation
Banff National Park of Canada - Cave and Basin Redevelopment 8.4 8.4 8.2 0.0 0.7 0.7 0.6 2013-14
Visitor Experience
Banff National Park of Canada - Cave and Basin Redevelopment 5.5 5.5 5.6 0.0 0.4 0.4 0.4 2013-14
Townsite and Throughway Infrastructure
Banff National Park of Canada - Trans-Canada Highway twinning (Gateway and Borders Crossing Fund) 100.0 100.0 88.1 0.0 12.1 12.1 0.2 2013-14
Banff National Park of Canada - Trans-Canada Highway twinning (Budget 2009/Canada's Economic Action Plan) 50.0 130.0 111.2 5.0 38.0 38.0 19.2 2013-14
Trent Severn Waterway -Bolsover Dam at Lock 37 18.8 34.7 8.7 24.7 24.7 32.8 6.8 2016-17

Note: Totals may not agree due to rounding


User Fees Reporting

User Fees and Regulatory Charges (User Fees Act)

User Fee Fee Type Fee- setting Authority Date Last Modified 2013-14 Planning Year
Forecast Revenue 2 (dollars) Actual Revenue (dollars) Estimated Full Cost 1 (dollars) Performance Standard Performance Result Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue 2 (dollars) Estimated Full Cost 1 (dollars)
Entry Fees Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act Increased in 2008. New fees added in 2010. 54,000,000 54,953,329 152,190,189 85% of visitors are satisfied 100% of sampled locations exceed the standard 2014/15 56,310,000 143,217,671
2015/16 56,310,000 147,900,517
2016/17 56,310,000 139,935,856
Camping Fees Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act Increased in 2008. New fees added in 2010. 18,615,000 20,725,140 36,380,385 85% of visitors are satisfied 100% of sampled locations exceed the standard 2014/15 20,219,556 34,235,545
2015/16 22,759,556 35,354,958
2016/17 22,759,556 33,451,042
Lockage Fees Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act Increased in 2008. New fees added in 2010. 1,490,000 1,326,596 16,915,070 85% of visitors are satisfied For the 2013 cycle, no locations with this service were surveyed. 2014/15 1,490,000 15,917,826
2015/16 1,490,000 16,438,297
2016/17 1,490,000 15,553,071
Municipal Services Other products and services Canada National Parks Act Water and sewer fees increased in 2001; remainder in 2003. Garbage fees increased in 1996. 3,100,000 2,990,498 9,216,319 For water, the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality (2010 & 2012) are the current standard. For waste water, Parks Canada will meet federal guidelines (1976) for effluent quality and in Field BC and Lake Louise AB will meet Parks Canada Leadership Targets. Garbage collection frequencies will be established in consultation with Community Councils and the Business Community, based on minimum standards established for each community and required to ensure the health and safety of both humans and wildlife. Water quality Guidelines are met or exceeded; wastewater effluent quality Guidelines are met or exceeded. 2014/15 3,100,000 7,953,257
2015/16 3,100,000 7,834,751
2016/17 3,100,000 6,863,810
Other Revenues Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act Business licences increased in 1994. Other fees increased in 2008. New fees added in 2010. 3,760,000 3,430,678 20,346,059 85% of visitors are satisfied 100% of sampled locations exceed the standard * 2014/15 3,835,342 19,155,323
2015/16 3,835,342 19,776,149
2016/17 3,835,342 18,703,257
Total 80,965,000 83,426,241 235,048,022 2014/15 84,954,897 220,479,621
2015/16 87,494,897 227,304,672
2016/17 87,494,897 214,507,036

Notes:
1. Fees have been adjusted to reflect reporting instructions provided by Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) related to fees under the ambit of the User Fees Act (UFA) as well as those not under ambit of UFA.
2 Forecasted revenue numbers have been adjusted to reflect reporting instructions provided by TBS related to fees under the ambit of the User Fees Act (UFA) as well as those not under the ambit of the UFA.

* The performance results are only for fees that were increased in 2008 and/or 2010 and exclude business licences, which were last increased in 1994, before the existence of the UFA.

External Fees (Policy on Service Standards for External Fees)

External Fee Service Standard Performance Result Stakeholder Consultation
Entry Fees 85% of visitors are satisfied 100% of sampled locations exceed the standard Service standard description was included in the 2013 fee consultation information. There were no comments from the public related to the service standard.
Camping Fees 85% of visitors are satisfied 100% of sampled locations exceed the standard Service standard description was included in the 2013 fee consultation information. There were no comments from the public related to the service standard.
Lockage Fees 85% of visitors are satisfied For 2013 no locations with thisservice were surveyed. Service standard description was included in the 2013 fee consultation information. There were no comments from the public related to the service standard.
Municipal Services For water, the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality (2010 & 2012) are the current standard. For wastewater, Parks Canada will meet Federal Guidelines (1976) for effluent quality and in Field, British Columbia and Lake Louise, Alberta will meet Parks Canada's Leadership Targets that are based on the receiving waters of each community. Garbage collection frequencies will be established in consultation with Community Councils and Business Community. Water quality Guidelines are met or exceeded; wastewater effluent quality Guidelines are met or exceeded. Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality (2010 & 2012). Federal guidelines for wastewater effluent were established in 1976 and Parks Canada Leadership Targets established in 1997. The Leadership Targets are used as the basis for consultation with communities. Garbage collection standards have evolved over time in response to individual community needs and specific frequency of pickups is set in consultation with users.
Other Revenues 85% of visitors are satisfied 100% of sampled locations exceed the standard Information about service standard was part of the 2013 fee consultation package. There were no comments from the public related to the service standard.
Mooring Fees 85% of visitors are satisfied 100% of sampled locations exceed the standard Service standard description was included in the 2013 fee consultation information. There were no comments from the public related to the service standard.
Heritage Presentation Special Program Fees 85% of visitors are satisfied 100% of sampled locations exceed the standard Service standard description was included in the 2013 fee consultation information. There were no comments from the public related to the service standard.
Pool Fees (Swimming Pools and Hot Springs) 85% of visitors are satisfied 100% of sampled locations exceed the standard Service standard description was included in the 2013 fee consultation information. There were no comments from the public related to the service standard.
Golf Fees 85% of visitors are satisfied For the 2013 cycle, no locations with this service were surveyed. Service standard description was included in the 2013 fee consultation information. There were no comments from the public related to the service standard.

Notes:
Fees have been adjusted to reflect reporting instructions provided by Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) related to fees under the ambit of the User Fees Act (UFA) as well as those not under the ambit of UFA.

Parks Canada has been using visitor satisfaction at surveyed sites as a measure of performance since 1996. The 85% performance standard has been well established and communicated through the Agency's corporate planning and reporting documents since 2005. In 1998, Parks Canada also introduced a Quality Service Guarantee that applies to all visitor services for which fees are paid. This initiative ensures that visitors have an immediate recourse if they are not satisfied with the quality of service provided or do not believe that they received value for fees. Through the Guarantee, the concern is immediately addressed up to and including a refund of a portion or entire fee paid. This achieves the spirit of accountability for performance as contemplated by the User Fees Act, and exceeds the Act's requirements by refunding the user fee immediately to a dissatisfied client.

Parks Canada is aligning its satisfaction survey cycle to ensure that performance results will be included for each type of user fee each year. This will be fully implemented for the 2014-15 fiscal year.