2.0 Review and Authorization of Proposed Interventions

A heritage railway station cannot be destroyed, removed, disposed of or altered, nor can its heritage features be altered, without the authorization of the Governor in Council. Alterations to meet an emergency, or the disposal of a station to a railway company to which the Act also applies, do not require authorization.


2.1
A railway company that proposes an intervention to a heritage railway station must give written public notice of such intention.


2.2
Parks Canada will review proposed interventions in accordance with established criteria in order to determine their impact, if any, on the heritage railway station or on any of its heritage features. Parks Canada may give advice to railway companies in this regard.


2.3
An individual, group or government may signify its objection to proposed interventions by filing a notice with the Minister, setting out the reasons for objection and the pertinent facts on which the objection is based.


2.4
When a notice of objection has been filed with the Minister, the Minister may refer the matter to the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada.


2.5
In reviewing objections, the Board may convene a public meeting to give all interested persons a reasonable opportunity to make representations to it.


2.6
Upon receipt of the results of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada review, the Minister will recommend to the Governor in Council approval or rejection of the proposed intervention, or approval of a modified intervention, and will inform the railway company, the relevant provincial or territorial government and interested members of the public.


2.7
If the recommendation is approved, the Governor in Council may authorize the railway company to carry out the proposed or modified intervention, under such terms and conditions as the Governor in Council deems appropriate.


2.8
Parks Canada will provide technical advice to meet an emergency situation when requested to do so by a railway company.


2.9
When a designated railway station is sold to a party not subject to the Railway Act, the province or territory within which the station is situated will be asked to apply its historic resource protection legislation to the station.