2005-2006

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • General Information
  • Context and Responsibilities of the Parks Canada Agency
  • Summary of Main Results Achieved
  • Detailed Status Report


    General Information:


    Federal department/agency:

    Parks Canada Agency

    Address:

    National Office
    25 Eddy Street, 6 th Floor
    Gatineau Quebec
    K1A 0M5

    Web Site:

    www.pc.gc.ca

    Minister responsible:

    Honourable Rona Ambrose – Minister of the Environment

    Senior Official(s) responsible for implementation of Part VII of the OLA

    Alan Latourelle- Chief Executive Officer – PCA

    Contact: Michel Latreille – Champion - Official Languages

    Office of the Chief Human Resources
    25 Eddy Street
    (25-15-N) 15th floor
    Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0M5

    (819) 997-2975

    Mandate of federal institution

    On behalf of the people of Canada, we protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure their ecological and commemorative integrity for present and future generations.”

    National coordinator responsible for implementation of Section 41:

    Diane Lépine

    Advisor, Retention & Official Languages
    Resourcing Strategies and Programs

    Human Resources National Office

    (819) 997-0105

    Exact title:

     

    Postal Address:

    25 Eddy Street
    (25-15-O) 15th floor
    Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0M5

    E-mail:

    Diane.Lépine@pc.gc.ca

    Regional coordinators (if any):

    TBD

    Exact titles:

     

    Postal Addresses:

     

    E-mails:

     

    Context and Responsibilities of the Parks Canada Agency

    Mandate To the top

    “On behalf of the people of Canada, we protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure their ecological and commemorative integrity for present and future generations.”

    The federal strategy to support official language minority communities includes an accountability framework that requires departments and agencies to play a role in the following areas: awareness of linguistic duality and official language minority community (OLMC) priorities or new initiatives; communications with OLMCs about programs and services; coordination and liaison with other federal/provincial/municipal government bodies; accountability and production of an action plan for the implementation of section 41 (Part VII) of the Official Languages Act.

    Parks Canada protects, preserves and presents a magnificent system of national parks, national marine conservation areas and national historic sites all across this country. By working with minority-language communities, it assists in promoting another aspect of section 41 of the Official Languages Act, which reads:

    The Government of Canada is committed to enhancing the vitality of English and French linguistic minority communities in Canada and supporting and assisting their development; and fostering the full recognition and use of both English and French in Canadian society.

    The measures outlined in this report are aimed at developing and enhancing the vitality of official language minority communities. To ensure these goals are met, Parks Canada actions are based on the achievement of three objectives:

    1. Develop and put in place heritage presentation programs that take into account the presence of official language minority communities.
    2. Work jointly with representatives of official language minority communities for the development of local, regional and national tourism infrastructures.
    3. Working jointly with local and national leaders to encourage and support the expression of Canadian linguistic duality.
  • Public consultation is an essential element of the national park and national historic site management plan process. These consultations provide an opportunity to consult with minority-language communities.

    Summary of Main Results Achieved: To the top

    The Parks Canada Agency Official Languages Action Plan 2005-2008 sets out the Agency’s plans for meeting program objectives and commitments. Parks Canada has demonstrated leadership and commitment in achieving the objectives of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act.

    Highlights of the Agency’s progress with respect to the measures proposed in the Action Plan include six particular areas of focus outlined in the following summary. A detailed status report and communication plan are also included.
    Awareness To the top

    In March 2006, the Parks Canada Official Languages (OL) champion encouraged all employees across the country to participate in the Rendez-vous de la Francophonie 2006 festivities. He also informed all senior managers of the adoption of Bill S-3 and provided the second edition of the Francophone and Acadian Community Profiles of Canada, a useful tool for our relations with linguistic minority communities.

    The Manitoba Field Unit encouraged its staff to participate in the official languages minority community (OLMC) awareness tour organized by the Manitoba Federal Council’s OL Coordinators’ Network offered during the Public Service Week. They also promoted staff awareness of the Prix Ronald Duhamel Award, which recognizes a federal or provincial public servant or group of public servants that has provided service to the Francophone community of Manitoba.

    Consultation To the top

    Many fields units have consulted with official language minority communities on their management plans:

    • The Cape Breton Field Unit with the Acadian Consultative Committee
    • The Atlantic Service Centre with la Fédération Acadienne de la Nouvelle-Écosse
    • Mainland Nova Scotia Field Unit with the Acadian community
    • The Gaspesie Field Unit with CASA (Committee for Anglophone Social Action)
    • The Northern New Brunswick Field Unit (Kouchibouguac National Park of Canada) with local Francophone communities
    • The Western Newfoundland and Labrador Field Unit with the Port-au-Port communities and their Francophone association (Port-au-Choix National Historic Site of Canada and Gros Morne National Park of Canada)
    • The Prince Edward Island Field Unit with La Société St-Thomas d’Aquin (Port-La-Joye—Fort Amhert National Historic Site)

    Western Newfoundland and Labrador Field Unit senior management has directed the field unit’s Official Languages Coordinator to establish a relationship with the minority French community that exists on the Port-au-Port Peninsula. They have put together a Parks Canada team that is supporting this community in the areas of tourism and human resource development and have involved the community in management planning for the national historic sites and national parks of Canada. The Field Unit is often promoted in the province by the Department of Canadian Heritage for its best practices in working with the Francophone community and in meeting its OL priorities.

    Communications To the top

    As reported by many field units from across the country, press releases, notices for public consultation, tourism information, program notices, paid advertisements, contracts for development of new programming and community relations ads are posted in local minority newspapers.

    Field units across the country place bilingual job postings with Francophone community centres, advertise in local minority newspapers, employment centres and Francophone/Anglophone recruitment agencies. It is also common practice to contact provincial and local Francophone/Anglophone associations to publicize job postings.

    The Manitoba Field Unit placed a paid advertisement in the Société franco-manitobaine’s directory of French services and has contributed to the Conseil de développement économique des municipalités bilingues du Manitoba’s (CDEM) provincially focussed Francophone tourism promotion campaign Joie de Vivre.

    Many of our field units provide translation support to our parks and sites partners to ensure that their public information is displayed in both official languages.

    Across Canada, field units are encouraging commercial tenants leasing properties in Parks Canada to comply with the OL provisions of their leases and to provide services to the public in both official languages.
    Coordination and Liaison To the top

    Many field units maintain an active presence on several federal councils and federal councils official languages subcommittees (see list below). They support and encourage the councils’ efforts by attending monthly meetings, by providing input on official languages matters, and by exchanging best practices regarding communications with the public and the advancement of English and French.

    • Alberta Federal Council
    • Alberta Federal Council, Interdepartmental Network of Official Languages Coordinators
    • Alberta Federal Council, Linguistic Duality Network
    • Manitoba Federal Council, Manitoba Interdepartmental Network of Official Languages Coordinators
    • Manitoba Federal Council, Official Languages Subcommittee, OL Learning and Training Committee
    • New Brunswick Federal Council, New Brunswick Human Resources Interdepartmental Subcommittee
    • New Brunswick Federal Council, Official Languages Subcommittee
    • Newfoundland and Labrador Federal Council, Official Language Subcommittee
    • Nova Scotia Federal Council
    • Prince Edward Island Federal Council
    • Québec, Conseils régionaux des cadres supérieurs fédéraux
    • Saskatchewan Federal Council, Language Retention Subcommittee
    • Saskatchewan Network of Interdepartmental Official Languages
    • Saskatchewan, Conseil des hauts-fonctionnaires fédéraux

    In Alberta, the Western and Northern Canada Official Languages Specialist participated in the October 2005 federal government interdepartmental meeting with the Alberta Francophone Community. This event, organized by the Department of Canadian Heritage, provided the Francophone community the opportunity to voice its ideas and concerns directly to the federal departments and agencies and provided the Alberta OL coordinators an opportunity to network and share resources.

    The Manitoba Field Unit maintained an ongoing dialogue with the Conseil de développement économique des municipalités bilingues du Manitoba (CDEM) regarding participation in Francophone tourism promotion initiatives such as “le Corridor touristique de l’ouest” as well as consultation with la Société historique de Saint-Boniface, which is in the process of developing a new education program for Riel House National Historic Site of Canada.

    The National Coordinator for Official Languages, Section 41, regularly participates in the National Coordinators meetings organized by Canadian Heritage.

    Funding and Program Delivery To the top

    Across Parks Canada, field units are actively supporting OLMC by:

    • Providing services to local chambers of commerce such as developing and distributing a directory of businesses that offer service in French. (Jasper Field Unit)
    • Developing a bilingual guidebook for the community and supporting a marketing initiative via the Tourism Advisory Board. (Southwest Northwest Territories Field Unit)
    • Supplying the Conseil de développement économique des municipalités bilingues du Manitoba (CDEM) and the Conseil touristique francophone de l’ouest with the shipping and printing of promotional materials (vacation planners and lure cards) for use in tourism trade shows. (Manitoba Field Unit)
    • Providing translation and revision services to some of their Friends and Cooperating Associations and contractors for texts of 200 words or less to ensure all information is available in both official languages. (Western and Northern Canada Service Centre)

    The Western Newfoundland and Labrador Field Unit entered into a partnership with the Department of Education of Newfoundland and Labrador on a pilot project concerning a new resource for the Grade 9 core French course in the province. This project will include Parks Canada messages in the Grade 9 core French course throughout the province and will strengthen Parks Canada’s partnership with the Department of Education, in addition to allowing Parks Canada to fulfill its obligations under the Official Languages Act. It could also curb the stream of students who decide to stop studying French after Grade 9, the last year French is a compulsory subject in the province’s school program. The project would also allow Parks Canada to offer summer jobs to local bilingual students.

    School outreach and programs highlight Parks Canada’s dedication to ensure that our present and future generations understand, appreciate and enjoy our national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas. Across Canada, field units work formally with representatives from school districts (Anglophone and Francophone) with a view to determining how Parks Canada may best be used as a resource for French and English language instruction in their classrooms. The following are a few initiatives:

    • The Bureau d'éducation française included the Manitoba Field Unit in a departmental presentation to Senior 2 (Grade 10) teachers in Géographie française and French immersion. Parks Canada resources were highlighted and linked to this age group and this specific course.
    • The Manitoba Field Unit also participated in “Le f estival des mots”, a Division Scolaire franco-manitobaine (DSFM) educational event, with an information kiosk, which made programming and online resource information available to approximately 20 DSFM teachers and over 200 students and parents attending the event.

    Many fields units worked in conjunction with local associations and groups to help them with projects, events and product development such as:

    • Providing a venue for special events such as “À la Cabane à Sucre” (Mount Revelstoke National Park of Canada)
    • The Franco-Ontario Quilt Festival ( Southwest Ontario Field Unit)
    • Collaboration on the distribution and promotion of books written by members of the Anglophone Irish Community in Québec (Québec Field Unit)
    • Relocation of the Acadian Deportation Cross to Horton Landing in consultation and collaboration with the Acadian community (Mainland Nova Scotia Field Unit)

    The Jasper Field Unit has signed an agreement with the local French Association. The Association is provided with free office space in exchange for free French language training for Parks Canada employees. This initiative ensures that employees serving the public retain and improve their second language skills and foster good relationships with the OLMC.

    At the Prince Edward Island Field Unit:

    • The Acadian Community is consulted on interpretive programming to foster knowledge of Acadian and French history.
    • Staff work with and assist local Francophone community groups with the heritage presentation of French settlements on Prince Edward Island such as Roma Site, Doucet House, Farms Bank, Société St-Thomas d’Aquin.
    • An animated theatre-type presentation is delivered (in both English and French) in partnership with the Conseil Acadian du Rustico and the Friends of the Farmer's Bank National Historic Site on the French and Acadian History of Rustico. This program was delivered as part of the Rendez-Vous Rustico community special event, whose sponsoring partners include the Department of Canadian Heritage. There were approximately 100 spectators at each presentation, for a total of 200 visitors.

    The Quebec Field Unit developed a project to rehabilitate the Anglican chapel at Grosse Île and the Irish Memorial National Historic Site of Canada, in cooperation with the Irish Benevolent Society.

    Field units work jointly with the tourism and the travel sectors to promote both official languages. Example of initiatives:

    • The Manitoba Field Unit coordinated/hosted an information reception for ten Francophone tour operators (Quebec, New Brunswick and France) who were participating in a familiarization tour organized by the Conseil de développement écomonique des municipalités bilingues du Manitoba (CDEM) and Travel Manitoba.
    • Coastal British Columbia Field Unit cooperates on an ongoing basis with the Francophone Tourism Association and distributes Francophone Tourism Association publications at parks and sites.
    • The Quebec Field Unit participates in awareness sessions, receptions for Anglophone organizers from Quebec, Anglophone Canadians and Americans, to inform them about historic sites and determine their specific needs and expectations.
    • Northern Ontario Field Unit offered new tours to the travel trade market in both official languages.
    • Via the Nunavut Tourism Task Force, the Nunavut Field Unit communicates with the local Francophone Association about Parks Canada activities in Nunavut. They communicate and consult with them regularly on Nunavut Field Unit activities to promote tourism in their national parks.

    The Manitoba Field Unit worked in consultation with la Société historique de Saint-Boniface (SHSB) to establish bilingual t erms of reference for the new Heritage Advisory Committee for Riel House National Historic Site of Canada, which will be established in 2006-2007.

    The External Relations and Visitor Experience Directorate participates, and is featured in the production of the television series CG Kids, which is broadcast on several English language networks across Canada. In 2005-2006, Parks Canada convinced the producers to create a series of 10 interstitials (type of advertising) in French to be broadcast on French language networks, to present the same Parks Canada messages to Francophone communities.

    In Nunavut, all pre-trip planning materials including vacation planners, are provided in three languages (French, English and Inuktitut) for each of the four National Parks; Auyuittuq, Quttinirpaaq, Sirmilik and Ukkusiksalik. Over the past year, there has been an increase in tours from tour operations based in Quebec and France with tour operators and guides led primarily by the Franchophone Association.

    Accountability To the top

    Senior officials from the National Office, field units and service centres demonstrate leadership and commitment with respect to the Official Languages Program (OLP) by responding to a call letter every year and reporting on their accomplishments, monitoring activities and efforts to improve results.

    No complaints were received from the office of the Commissioner of Official Languages in 2005-2006 regarding the implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act.

    Detailed Status Report

    A. AWARENESS To the top

    Main expected results for the period covered by the action plan Main activities carried out for the year covered by the status report Progress (results) achieved for the year covered by the status report

    Employees and senior managers are aware of the importance of promoting the bilingual character of Canada

    Management Units are informed about linguistic duality and OLMC’s and understand their responsibilities to OLMC’s.

    Research undertaken by the Agency yields conclusions pertaining to OLMC’s (for example; in the bringing forward of designation proposals to the Historic Sites and Monuments Board.

    Organization of activities for the Rendez-vous de la francophonie.

    Active role played by official languages champion in promoting official languages and OLMC’s within the Agency.

    • In March 2006, the Parks Canada Official Languages (OL) champion encouraged all employees across the country to participate in the Rendez-vous de la Francophonie 2006 festivities. Again this year, t he Jasper Field Unit has been participating in the setup of the Rendez-vous de la Francophonie in Jasper.
    • The Parks Canada Official Languages champion also informed all senior managers of the adoption of Bill S-3 and provided the second edition of the Francophone and Acadian Community Profiles of Canada, a useful tool for our relations with the linguistic minority communities.
    • In 2005-2006, coordination of Part VII and parts IV, V and VI of the Official Languages Act was carried out by the same person, and an additional full-time position was assigned to support OL initiatives at Parks Canada.
    • The Atlantic Service Centre supports staff participation in the Nova Scotia Federal Council’s biannual Official Languages Forum and the Atlantic Symposium on Part VII of the Official Languages Act.
    • The Manitoba Field Unit promoted the participation of its staff in the Official Languages Minority Community (OLMC) awareness tour organized by the Manitoba Federal Council’s OL Coordinators’ Network and offered during Public Service Week.
    • Newsletters such as Coup de Pouce, Bulletin 41-42 and information arising from Federal Regional Councils Official Languages committees are distributed to management and staff in many field units across the country.
    • The Manitoba Field Unit promoted staff awareness of the Prix Ronald Duhamel Award, which recognizes a federal or provincial public servant or group of public servants that has provided service to the Francophone community of Manitoba.
    B. CONSULTATION To the top

    Main expected results for the period covered by the action plan Main activities carried out for the year covered by the status report Progress (results) achieved for the year covered by the status report

    The Agency’s programs and policies take into account the priorities of the OLMC’s.

    The OLMC’s have an opportunity to make their needs known and to explain the obstacles to accessing the Agency’s programs.

     

    Participation in various formal and informal consultations with the OLMC’s, other departments and central agencies.

    • The New Brunswick South Field Unit participates in a Francophone regional association in Saint John (l’Association régionale de la communauté francophone de Saint John) dedicated to the well being of the francophone community in Saint John.
    • Many Fields Units have consulted on their management plans with official language minority communities:
      • The Cape Breton Field Unit with the Acadian Consultative Committee
      • The Atlantic Service Centre with la Fédération Acadienne de la Nouvelle-Écosse
      • Mainland Nova Scotia with the Acadian Community
      • The Gaspesie Field Unit with CASA (Committee for Anglophone Social Action)
      • The Northern New Brunswick Field Unit (Kouchibouguac National Park of Canada) with local Francophone communities
      • The Western Newfoundland and Labrador Field Unit with the Port-au-Port communities and their Francophone association (Port au Choix National Historic Site of Canada and Gros Morne National Park of Canada)
      • The Prince Edward Island Field Unit with La Société St-Thomas d’Aquin (Port-La-Joye—Fort Amhert National Historic Site)
    • The Jasper Field Unit Language Specialist sits on the French Association Board of Jasper and serves as a liaison between the association and Parks Canada.
    • The Yukon Field Unit is involved with the French Language Services division of the Canada Winter Games to inform volunteers of the government services offered in French in Whitehorse.
    • Western Newfoundland and Labrador Field Unit senior management has directed the field unit’s Official Languages Coordinator to establish a relationship with the minority French community that exists on the Port-au-Port Peninsula. They have put together a Parks Canada team that is supporting this community in the areas of tourism and human resource development and have involved the community in management planning of the national historic sites and national parks of Canada. The Field Unit is often promoted in the province by the department of Canadian Heritage for its best practices in working with the Francophone community, and in meeting its OL priorities.
    C. COMMUNICATIONS To the top

    Main expected results for the period covered by the action plan Main activities carried out for the year covered by the status report Progress (results) achieved for the year covered by the status report

    Media purchases include acquisition of antenna time and advertising space in OLMC media.

    OLMCA’s are receiving up-to-date information on the federal department’s/agency’s programs and services.

    OLMCA’s are able to obtain information on the Agency’s programs and services from its Web site.

    Making communications advisors at National Office, SCs and FU’s aware of the issues of promoting linguistic duality and developing OLMCA’s.

    Use of the Agency’s information sources such as Internet to inform OLMC’s.

    Placing of advertising by PCA in minority language publications contribute to their financial sustainability.

    • As reported by many field units from across the country, p ress releases, notices for public consultation, tourism information, program notices, paid advertisements, contracts for development of new programming and community relations ads are posted in local minority newspapers.
    • The Western Quebec, Mainland Nova Scotia, Gaspesie, and Western Newfoundland and Labrador Field Units use different types of media to reach the official languages minority communities (OLMC). Some examples are maintaining a list of Anglophone and Francophone local communities , publishing job postings on bilingual Web sites and producing/distributing tourist information and guidebooks in a bilingual format.
    • The Québec Field Unit encourages new Anglophone residents to visit their national historic sites by publishing a promotional piece in an English Speaker’s guide to living in Greater Québec.
    • The Northern Ontario and Southwest Ontario field units develop relationships and conduct interviews with Radio-Canada representatives as well as broadcast live media spots with French-language radio stations.
    • Field units across the country place bilingual job postings with Francophone community centres, advertise in local minority newspapers, employment centres and Francophone/Anglophone recruitment agencies. It is also common practice to contact provincial and local Francophone / Anglophone associations to publicize job postings.
    • The Yukon Field Unit translates and submits a monthly community newsletter to the Association Franco-Yukonnaise publication.
    • The Société franco-manitobaine’s (SFM) 233-ALLÔ telephone & email information service is used to promote bilingual programs, services and events.
    • The Southwest Ontario Field Unit distributes media packages to 25 French-language media outlets.
    • The Gwaii Haanas Field Unit community newsletter’s French-language edition is mailed to Francophone organizations within British Columbia.
    • The Northern Ontario Field Unit posts bilingual promotional posters for park events in the local community of Marathon.
    • The Manitoba Field Unit placed a paid advertisement in the SFM’s directory of French services, and another is forthcoming for the Conseil de développement écomonique des municipalités bilingues du Manitoba’s (CDEM) provincially focused Francophone tourism promotion campaign Joie de Vivre.
    • The Northern Prairies Field Unit invites stakeholder groups to post information on their Web site in both official languages and translate any stakeholder information in order to provide services to OLMC.
    • Many of our field units provide translation support to our Parks and Sites partners to ensure that public information is displayed in both official languages.
    • Across Canada field units are encouraging commercial tenants leasing properties in Parks Canada to comply with the OL provisions of their leases and to provide services to the public in both official languages.
    D. COORDINATION AND LIAISON To the top

    Main expected results for the period covered by the action plan Main activities carried out for the year covered by the status report Progress (results) achieved for the year covered by the status report

    National and regional coordinators are using the best practices that have been presented at meetings of national coordinators responsible for the implementation of section 41 of the OLA.

    The Agency is working with multiple partners to meet the priorities of the OLMC’s.

    Participation in the work of federal councils and their official languages sub-committees.

    Participation in the network of official languages champions.

    • The National Coordinator for Official Languages, Section 41, regularly participates in the National Coordinators meetings organized by Canadian Heritage.
    • The Western and Northern Canada Service Centre Field Unit’s Official Languages Specialist assisted in establishing and participated on the Alberta Federal Council’s Interdepartmental Network of Official Languages Coordinators of Alberta. The OL Specialist served as a resource person on teleconferences.
    • The Manitoba Field Unit Official Languages Program Coordinator is a member of the Manitoba Interdepartmental Network of Official Languages Coordinators (MINOLC) and has been active in the Network’s initiatives since it’s establishment in 1998.
    • Many field units maintain an active presence on the federal councils and federal councils Official Languages subcommittees (see list below). They support and encourage the Councils’ efforts by attending monthly meetings. Members also provide input to the federal councils on official languages matters, exchange best practices regarding communications with the public and the advancement of English and French. Another good example of participation is a presentation that Western and Northern Canada Service Centre Corporate Services Manager made, at the Official Languages Subcommittee’s March 1, 2006 Lunch and Learn series, entitled “ The Western and Northern French Language Self-Study Program”.
      • Alberta Federal Council
      • Alberta Federal Council, Interdepartmental Network of Official Languages Coordinators
      • Alberta Federal Council, Linguistic Duality Network
      • Manitoba Federal Council, Manitoba Interdepartmental Network of Official Languages Coordinators
      • Manitoba Federal Council, Official Languages Subcommittee, OL Learning and Training Committee
      • New Brunswick Federal Council, New Brunswick Human Resources Interdepartmental Subcommittee
      • New Brunswick Federal Council, Official Languages Subcommittee
      • Newfoundland and Labrador Federal Council, Official Language Subcommittee
      • Nova Scotia Federal Council
      • Prince Edward Island Federal Council
      • Québec, Conseils régionaux des cadres supérieurs fédéraux
      • Saskatchewan Federal Council, Language Retention Subcommittee
      • Saskatchewan Network of Interdepartmental Official Languages
      • Saskatchewan, Conseil des hauts-fonctionnaires fédéraux
    • The Mainland Nova Scotia Field Unit worked closely with the Mainland Nova Scotia organizations for the Acadie 2003–2005 celebrations.
    • In Alberta, the Western and Northern Canada Official Languages Specialist participated in the October 2005 federal government interdepartmental meeting with the Alberta Francophone Community. This event, organized by the Department of Canadian Heritage provided the Francophone community the opportunity to voice its ideas and concerns directly to the federal departments and agencies and provided the Alberta OL coordinators an opportunity to network and share resources.
    • The Manitoba Field Unit in 2005-2006 maintained an ongoing dialogue with the Conseil de développement économique des municipalités bilingues du Manitoba (CDEM) regarding participation in Francophone tourism promotion initiatives such as “le Corridor touristique de l’ouest” as well as consultation with la Société historique de Saint-Boniface, which is in the process of developing a new education program for Riel House, National Historic Site of Canada.
    • The Northern Ontario Field Unit attended a round table, « Le regroupement du developpement économique et de l’employabilité de l’Ontario (RDEE) ».
    • The Manitoba Field Unit attended a forum, ConverGence 2006, a two-day event sponsored by the Manitoba Federal Council, the Manitoba French Language Services Secretariat and Société franco-manitobaine (SFM), to encourage federal and provincial departments/agencies to better understand the needs of the Francophone community and to assess these within their respective mandates.
    E. FUNDING AND PROGRAM DELIVERY To the top

    Main expected results for the period covered by the action plan Main activities carried out for the year covered by the status report Progress (results) achieved for the year covered by the status report

    The OLMC’s have access to the Agency’s programs and are among its regular clientele.

    The agency takes into account the geographical dispersionof the OLMCs in delivering its programs.

    Lending services for OLMC activities.

    Participation in the Interdepartmental Partnership with the Official-Language Communities (IPOLC).

    Funding of OLMC activities.

    • The Western Newfoundland and Labrador Field Unit entered into a partnership with the Department of Education of Newfoundland and Labrador on a pilot project concerning a new resource for the Grade 9 core French course in the province. This project will include Parks Canada messages in the Grade 9 core French course throughout the province and will strengthen Parks Canada’s partnership with the Department of Education, in addition to allowing Parks Canada to fulfill its obligations under the Official Languages Act. It could also curb the stream of students who decide to stop studying French after Grade 9, the last year French is a compulsory subject in the province’s school program. The project would also allow Parks Canada to offer summer jobs to local bilingual students.
      • Across Parks Canada, field units are actively supporting OLMC by:
      • Providing services to local chambers of commerce such as developing and distributing a directory of businesses that offer service in French. (Jasper Field Unit)
      • Developing a bilingual guidebook for the community and supporting a marketing initiative via the Tourism Advisory Board. (Southwest Northwest Territories Field Unit)
      • Supplying the Conseil de développement économique des municipalités bilingues du Manitoba (CDEM) and the Conseil touristique francophone de l’ouest with the shipping and printing of promotional materials (vacation planners and lure cards) for use in tourism trade shows. (Manitoba Field Unit)
    • Providing translation and revision services to some of their Friends and Cooperating Associations and contractors for texts of 200 words or less to ensure all information is available in both official languages. (Western and Northern Canada Service Centre)
    • School outreach and programs highlight Parks Canada’s dedication to ensure that our present and future generations understand, appreciate and enjoy our national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas. Across Canada, field units work formally with representatives from school districts (Anglophone and Francophone) with a view to determining how Parks Canada may best be used as a resource for French and English language instruction in their classrooms.
    • The Manitoba Field Unit is actively involved with the local schools. Among their initiatives, there are a few that stand above the rest, for example: the Bureau d'éducation française included the Field Unit in a departmental presentation to Senior 2 (Grade 10) Géographie Française and French immersion teachers. Parks Canada resources were highlighted and linked to this age group and this specific course.
    • The Manitoba Field Unit also participated in “Le f estival des mots”, a Division scolaire franco-manitobaine (DSFM) educational event, with an information kiosk, which made programming and online resource information available to approximately 20 DSFM teachers and over 200 students and parents attending the event.
    • The Jasper Field Unit School Program Coordinator works with the local French school to establish what the Field Unit can provide to the students such as interpretation that would fit the school curriculum. Presentations have already been offered and a more formal process (through a survey) has been undertaken to determine what the Field Unit can provide.
    • The Riding Mountain Field Unit’s School Outreach Program “Take Heart Park” was first tested in a minority French school in the area. They also had Katimavik participants, who have language training in their program, help out with the activities.
    • The Gaspesie Field Unit provided financial assistance for events such as the Multicultural Exposition planned for la Maison Dolbel.
    • The Western and Northern Canada Service Centre provided financial assistance for products such as supplementary funding of $10K to complete the review of an additional 100 avalanche terms in an effort to complete the Lexicon. The avalanche bulletin/lexicon project indirectly supports members of the local Francophone community by providing important public safety information.
    • Many field units worked in conjunction with local associations and groups to help them with projects, events and product development such as:
      • Providing a venue for special events such as “À la Cabane à Sucre” (Mount Revelstoke National Park of Canada)
      • The Franco-Ontario Quilt Festival (Southwest Ontario Field Unit)
      • Collaboration on the distribution and promotion of books written by members of the Anglophone Irish Community in Québec (Quebec Field Unit)
      • Relocation of the Acadian Deportation Cross to Horton Landing in consultation and collaboration with the Acadian community (Mainland Nova Scotia Field Unit)
    • The Jasper Field Unit was a main contributor in the production of the Jasper Survival Guide. This bilingual guide is intended for the newly arrived young adult in Jasper. It covers all types of information, including a complete section on bilingualism in the park and town (e.g. services offered, organizations in place, etc. how to reach them and how to get involved). Parks Canada provides the translation of the guide and contributes financially to the production of the publication.
    • The Riding Mountain National Park Field Unit takes part in the Tour de Plaine bike race, which is conducted in French and organized by a local French school. We help with an educational hike in French into the park for those who are unable to participate in the bike race.
    • Southwest Northwest Territories Field Unit provided support to the Fort Smith Francophone association by loaning a tent and providing staff to help to set it up for a “sugar shack” as part of community celebrations at Wood Buffalo National Park of Canada.
    • Coastal British Columbia Field Unit loaned barrels, furs and traps from Fort Langley National Historic Site of Canada to the Francophone Scouts at the Festival du bois in Coquitlam.
    • The Jasper Field Unit has signed an agreement with the local French Association. The Association is provided with free office space in exchange for free French language training for Parks Canada employees. This initiative ensures that employees serving the public retain and improve their second language skills and foster good relationships with the OLMC.
    • At the Prince Edward Island Field Unit:
      • The Acadian Community is consulted on interpretive programming to foster knowledge of Acadian and French history.
      • Staff work with and assist local Francophone community groups with the heritage presentation of French settlements on Prince Edward Island such as Roma Site, Doucet House, Farms Bank, Société St-Thomas d’Aquin.
      • An animated theatre-type presentation is delivered (in both English and French) in partnership with the Conseil Acadian du Rustico and the Friends of the Farmer's Bank National Historic Site on the French and Acadian History of Rustico. This program was delivered as part of the Rendez-Vous Rustico community special event whose sponsoring partners include the Department of Canadian Heritage. There were approximately 100 spectators at each presentation, for a total of 200 visitors.
    • In the Western Newfoundland and Labrador Field Unit, t he Francophone community has access to field unit interpretation specialists and other professionals, as required, for consultation on heritage tourism matters important to them. Their involvement in this process has also put them into contact with outside community groups who have an interest in further developing Francophone historical themes.
    • At the Manitoba Field Unit:
      • Extensive new efforts were made this year by the Manitoba Field Unit Education Specialist and Heritage Presentation staff to inform education professionals both in the Francophone school Division scolaire franco-manitobaine (DSFM) and immersion programs about the Parks Canada educational resources available to them.
      • Collaboration took place with Entreprise Riel and the Conseil de développement écomonique des municipalités bilingues du Manitoba (CDEM) in the development and production of a Passe-partout Riel Passport to encourage visitation to attractions, including Riel House, in the Francophone districts of Winnipeg (Saint-Boniface, Saint-Vital, Saint-Norbert).
    • At the Mainland Nova Scotia Field Unit, the 2005 re-enactment and commemorative events at Port Royal National Historic Site of Canada included consultation with the Acadian community about these events to promote and recognize the importance of early French colonization and the shared experience between the French colonists and the Mi’kmaq.
    • The Quebec Field Unit developed a project to rehabilitate the Anglican chapel at Grosse Île and the Irish Memorial National Historic Site of Canada, in cooperation with the Irish Benevolent Society.
    • Field units work jointly with the tourism and the travel sectors to promote both official languages. Example of initiatives:
      • The Manitoba Field Unit coordinated/hosted an information reception for ten Francophone tour operators (Quebec, New Brunswick and France) who were participating in a familiarization tour organized by the Conseil de développement écomonique des municipalités bilingues du Manitoba (CDEM) and Travel Manitoba.
      • Coastal British Columbia Field Unit cooperates on an ongoing basis with the Francophone Tourism Association and distributes of Francophone Tourism Association publications at parks and sites.
      • The Quebec Field Unit participates in awareness sessions, receptions for Anglophone organizers from Quebec, Anglophone Canadians and Americans, to inform them about historic sites and determine their specific needs and expectations.
      • Northern Ontario Field Unit offered new tours to the travel trade market in both official languages.
      • Via the Nunavut Tourism Task Force, the Nunavut Field Unit communicates with the local Francophone Association about Parks Canada activities in Nunavut. They communicate and consult with them regularly on Nunavut Field Unit activities to promote tourism in their national parks.
    • The Manitoba Field Unit worked in consultation with la Société historique de Saint-Boniface (SHSB) to establish bilingual t erms of reference for the new Heritage Advisory Committee for Riel House National Historic Site of Canada which will be established in 2006-2007.
    • The External Relations and Visitor Experience Directorate participates in, and is featured in the production of the television series CG Kids, which is broadcast on several English language networks across Canada. In 2005-2006, Parks Canada convinced the producers to create a series of 10 interstitials (type of advertising) in French to be broadcast on French language networks, to present the same Parks Canada messages to Francophone communities.
    • The Saskatchewan Field Unit works with the Conseil de la Coopération de la Saskatchewan (CCS) to help promote Francophone attractions and those able to offer bilingual services such as the national parks and national historic sites. The Field Unit placed an ad in the 2006 edition of the tourism guide, “Saskatchewan et ses attraits”, provided editorial content and provided lure cards and vacation planners for use at trade shows.
    • The Manager of the New Brunswick South Field Unit is an active member of the Albert County Tourism Association and promotes the use of both official languages in local tourism operations.
    F. ACCOUNTABILITY To the top

    Main expected results for the period covered by the action plan Main activities carried out for the year covered by the status report Progress (results) achieved for the year covered by the status report

    Systematic evaluations and regular internal audits may be considered, as appropriate and may include criteria pertaining to the way policies, programs and services have affected OLMC’s.

    Incorporation of the implementation of section 41 of the OLA in the Agency’s accountability mechanisms (Management Plans).

    Prepare status report on the years achievements in order to track progress and identify possible future actions.

    • Senior officials from the National Office, field units and service centres demonstrate leadership and commitment with respect to the Official Languages Program (OLP) by responding to a call letter every year and reporting on their accomplishments, monitoring activities and efforts to improve results.
    • No complaints were received in 2005-2006 regarding the implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act.

    Communication Plan: To the top

    External Distribution list:

    • Members of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Official Languages
    • Members of the Senate Standing Committee on Official Languages
    • The Commissioner of Official Languages
    • Minister of the Environment
    • Canadian Public (Parks Canada Internet)

    Internal Distribution list:

    • Champion - Official Languages, Parks Canada
    • Parks Canada Senior Managers
    • Parks Canada Employees (Parks Canada Intranet)


    Parks Canada Agency Action Plan 2002-2005