Photo of the Terry Fox plaque unveiling
Plaque unveiling ceremony for Terry Fox National Historic Person (1958-1981), Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, 2012.

Terry Fox was designated a national historic person in 2008.

Historical importance: An enduring icon, the qualities of both the man and his "Marathon of Hope" captivated the country and resonated deeply with Canadians

Commemorative plaque: Multiple plaque locations Footnote 1

Plaque location 1: Terry Fox Monument at Mile 0, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador

While in remission from cancer, Terry Fox set out to run across Canada to raise money for cancer research. Despite having lost his right leg to the disease, this determined athlete ran 5,373 kilometres —nearly a marathon a day for 143 straight days—before being forced to stop when his cancer returned. His “Marathon of Hope,” which began in St. John’s on April 12, 1980, captivated Canadians with its bold humanitarianism, transformed our vocabulary about personal courage, and revolutionized fund-raising. To date, hundreds of millions of dollars have been raised by Fox and in his name to the benefit of cancer sufferers around the world. The heroic nature and tragic interruption of his run have made Terry Fox an enduring Canadian icon.

Plaque location 2: Terry Fox Scenic Lookout, Highway 11/17, 7.5 km east of its intersection with Highway 102, Thunder Bay, Ontario

While in remission from cancer, Terry Fox set out to run across Canada in 1980 to raise money for cancer research. Despite having lost his right leg to the disease, this determined athlete ran 5,373 kilometres—nearly a marathon a day for 143 straight days—before being forced to stop east of this spot in the community of Shuniah when his cancer returned. His “Marathon of Hope” captivated Canadians with its bold humanitarianism, transformed our vocabulary about personal courage, and revolutionized fund-raising. To date, hundreds of millions of dollars have been raised by Fox and in his name to the benefit of cancer sufferers around the world. The heroic nature and tragic interruption of his run have made Terry Fox an enduring Canadian icon.

Up close picture of a plaque
Details of a commemorative plaque for Terry Fox in Thunder Bay Ontario.
Photo of a plaque on a pathway
Commemorative plaque for Terry Fox in Thunder Bay Ontario.

Plaque location 3: 2580 Shaughnessy Street, near City Hall, Port Coquitlam, British Columbia

While in remission from cancer, Terry Fox set out to run across Canada in 1980 to raise money for cancer research. Despite having lost his right leg to the disease, this determined Port Coquitlam athlete ran 5,373 kilometres—nearly a marathon a day for 143 straight days—before being forced to stop when his cancer returned. His “Marathon of Hope” captivated Canadians with its bold humanitarianism, transformed our vocabulary about personal courage, and revolutionized fund-raising. To date, hundreds of millions of dollars have been raised by Fox and in his name to the benefit of cancer sufferers around the world. The heroic nature and tragic interruption of his run have made Terry Fox an enduring Canadian icon.

 

Statue of Terry Fox running
Terry Fox Memorial, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, date unknown.
Marathon of Hope stamp
Terry Fox, Marathon of Hope stamp. In honour of his accomplishments regarding cancer research.
© Canada Post, 1982. Library and Archives / Accession number: 1989-565 CPA

 

Related information about this designation:

The National Program of Historical Commemoration relies on the participation of Canadians in the identification of places, events and persons of national historic significance. Any member of the public can nominate a topic for consideration by the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada.

Get information on how to participate in this process