Chiefswood was designated a national historic site in May 1953.

Heritage value: Chiefswood National Historic Site of Canada was designated because it speaks to the Johnson family's role as intermediaries between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal cultures.

Commemorative plaque: Highway 54, Ohsweken, Six Nations Grand River Reserve, Ontario

Completed in 1856, Chiefswood owes its importance to its architecture and the prominence of the people who lived here. Derived from the popular Italianate style of the Picturesque movement, the grandeur of the house reflects the status of its builder and owner, Chief George H.M. Johnson, a Mohawk chief of Six Nations and an intermediary with non-Aboriginal society. His daughter, the celebrated poet Pauline Johnson, drew inspiration from the years she spent in this house.

Chiefswood National Historic Site
Front
© Parks Canada, 2003
Chiefswood National Historic Site
Front
© Parks Canada, 2003

 

Other national historic designation associated with this one:

The National Program of Historical Commemoration relies on the participation of Canadians in the identification of places, events and persons of national historic significance. Any member of the public can nominate a topic for consideration by the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada.

Get information on how to participate in this process