Introduction

Parks Canada is committed to creating a representative workforce and to developing an inclusive, welcoming and barrier-free environment supportive of all Parks Canada team members.

In compliance with the requirements of the Employment Equity Act, this report highlights the initiatives undertaken from April 1, 2019 to March 31, 2020. It also highlights statistical information required by the Act for women, Aboriginal peoples Footnote1, persons with disabilities and members of visible minority groups. It presents initiatives and networking activities undertaken during 2019-2020 that aimed at creating a diverse and inclusive workplace for all team members. The report also highlights Parks Canada’s ongoing progress in implementing Employment Equity among the Agency.


Mandate

Parks Canada is an agency of the Government of Canada with the status of a separate employer. Its mandate is:

“On behalf of the people of Canada, we protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure their ecological and commemorative integrity for present and future generations.”

Parks Canada has a worldwide reputation as one of the most competent and knowledgeable ecological and cultural heritage conservation organizations, and is a key leader in sustainable tourism. Across Canada, it manages:

  • 47 national parks;
  • 1 national urban park;
  • 5 national marine conservation areas;
  • 171 national historic sites including 9 historic canals; and
  • has either full or shared responsibilities for the management of 12 of Canada's 20 World Heritage sites.

The Agency has 450 000 km² of protected areas with countless unique experiences to suit the needs of its visitors.


Organizational structure and key responsibilities

Organizational structure

Parks Canada reports to Parliament through the Minister of Environment and Climate Change. Parks Canada’s Operations Directorate is grouped into six regions: British Columbia and Yukon; Alberta; Prairies and Northwest Territories; Ontario & Waterways; Quebec and Nunavut; and Atlantic.

There are a total of 34 field units geographically located across Canada with a large majority located in rural areas. Field units are groupings of national parks/national park reserves, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas that deliver programs including on-site services to visitors.

On March 31, 2020, Parks Canada had a total workforce of 5,559 indeterminate and determinate employees Footnote2, the majority of whom are located outside the National Capital Region. Due to the seasonal nature of much of Parks Canada’s operations, close to 50% of its workforce is comprised of seasonal and term employees during the high operational season.

Key responsibilities of Parks Canada

i. National park and national marine conservation areas

As the first national park service in the world, Parks Canada has played and continues to play a vital role in the development and management of a system of national parks. The parks are representative of various Canadian geographical regions and landscapes. In managing national parks, Parks Canada is mandated to protect ecological integrity, while in national marine conservation areas, it supports the ecologically sustainable use of marine resources while protecting key features. In carrying out its responsibilities, Parks Canada works in collaboration with Indigenous peoples, stakeholders and neighbouring communities.

ii. National historic sites

Parks Canada develops and maintains historic sites that are of national interest to Canadians and of profound importance to understanding Canada’s history. Each site tells its own story in commemorating places, persons and events of national historic significance. The Agency strives to ensure the system of national historic sites is developed in collaboration with Canadians to define important aspects of our history.

iii. Heritage conservation – Canada

Additionally, where mandated, Parks Canada provides support for the conservation and presentation of designated heritage properties that are managed by others. These include national historic sites, heritage railway stations, heritage lighthouses, federal heritage buildings, archaeological sites, the gravesites of Canadian Prime Ministers, and Canadian heritage rivers.

iv. Heritage conservation – international

The Agency also contributes to international heritage conservation. It provides leadership through participation in international conventions, programs, and agreements, notably as a State Member for the World Heritage Convention and for the International Union for Conservation of Nature.


Parks Canada’s approach to employment equity, diversity and inclusion

The Human Resources and Employee Wellness Directorate plays an important part in assisting managers and team members in fostering a representative workforce and inclusive workplace. The Diversity and Inclusion team within the Directorate plays an important functional leadership role in creating a representative workforce and an inclusive workplace through the development of directives, guidelines and tools. The Diversity and Inclusion team promotes the creation of an inclusive, representative, diverse, respectful and meaningful work environment for all Parks Canada team members by collaborating with employees, managers, clients, partners and Champions, to ensure the success of its programs and initiatives.

In 2019-2020, in light of the continued evolving diversity and inclusion context, the Diversity and Inclusion team continued its progress towards the development of Parks Canada’s Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, which aims to foster a high-performing, diverse workforce, and optimize a safe, healthy, inclusive and respectful workplace.

Last year, the team established a shared governance for the strategy, where the Human Resources and Employee Wellness Directorate provides the coordination and framework for the various initiatives within the Agency, in collaboration and consultation with the various clients, stakeholders and partners, including the diversity and inclusion champions and employee networks, as well as the Consultative committee on employment equity and the diversity and inclusion working group. The team also initiated discussions and actions with all seven of the Strategy’s target themes, which include the four employment equity designated groups, youth, accessibility, reconciliation, GBA+, official languages and LGBTQ2. The strategy will link to the employment equity objectives set out in the Agency’s renewed employment equity plan for 2021-2024, for which the development is underway.

As a concrete action stemming from the Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, last year, the team established a key partnership with a local non-profit organization, LiveWorkPlay, to increase the recruitment and inclusion of persons with intellectual disabilities and autism, as an initial pilot in the National Capital Region. The Agency made its first hire in March 2020 within the Diversity and Inclusion team, and through the promotion of the talented candidates available for hire through LiveWorkPlay, as well as the support the organization provides, the Agency hopes to expand the hiring of candidates in various field units and directorates, and hopes this first hire will be the first of many!

In addition, through the established partnership with LiveWorkPlay, an interactive two-hour inclusion workshop was offered to over thirty Parks Canada team members in the National Capital Region. During the workshop, team members learned strategies to increase a culture of inclusion in the workplace. The Diversity and Inclusion team is working with LiveWorkPlay to offer additional workshops in its various locations.


Parks Canada’s employment equity and diversity champions

Parks Canada believes in a participative and integrative approach to achieving a representative workforce and to nurturing the well-being of its employees. In 2019-2020, in order for the Agency to continue to foster a positive and inclusive work environment for all team members, the Agency initiated the review of its existing champions and employee networks structure.

The existing structure includes four separate champions for each of the four employment equity groups. The objective of this review is to strengthen and realign the champions and employee networks with the Public Service’s approach to diversity and inclusion, therefore ensuring an element of sustainability to the renewed structure.


Parks Canada’s employment equity and diversity employee networks

Parks Canada has worked for many years to improve opportunities for all team members across the Agency. At Parks Canada, the opportunity to join designated employee networks is valued. The Agency believes this is a way for team members to create a sense of belonging, to expand their networks, to take part in awareness-raising activities and consultations. All Parks Canada team members who belong to a group or who are interested in a topic that affects their group, or for whom the cause is of interest to them, can take part in the employee networks.

Historically, employee engagement in the various Employment Equity and Diversity networks was fairly high. Over the years, this engagement has unfortunately seen a significant decrease. Along with the renewal of the champion structure, it is also the Agency’s objective to review its employee engagement model, to foster and support the active participation of employees in the various employment equity and diversity networks.

With the strengthened champion and employee network structure and support in place, the Agency hopes to see an increased footprint of employee networks in 2020-2021 and beyond.

Although the majority of employee networks were inactive in 2019-2020, below are some key activities that took place by the networks:

First launched in 2019, the Parks Inclusive online blog, hosted by the Champion for Visible Minorities and Multiculturalism at Parks Canada, continued to provide opportunities for team members across the country to engage in an ongoing dialogue on diversity, gender equality, multiculturalism, and related issues. Among the topics discussed by Parks Canada team members via this tool in 2019-20 were new guidance from the Public Service Commission for supporting diversity and employment equity in hiring practices, the use of specific terminology in our communications and day-to-day work, and events that celebrated diversity such as International Women’s Day and the Federal Black Employee Caucus’ second annual meeting.

The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Two-Spirit Employee (LGBTQ2) Employee Network provides support and a coherent voice to Parks Canada LGBTQ2 team members across the country. Its members and allies support the recognition of diversity, both within the public service and the LGBTQ2 communities, and express the view that more needs to be done to make the workplace an inclusive environment where all public servants can feel included, supported and accepted. The LGBTQ2 Network works towards making Parks Canada a welcoming and inclusive employer and service provider to the LGBTQ2 communities.

From Halifax to Whitehorse, Parks Canada team members once again organized and participated in outreach and on-site events for Pride 2019 in nine cities across the country. Parks Canada’s presence at these events was an opportunity to demonstrate the Agency’s spirit of inclusiveness, and wholeheartedly welcome and encourage all Canadians to visit our treasured places. The Parks Canada National Celebrations’ team also created and provided Parks Canada pride flags to all field and business units.

The many members of the LGBTQ2 network not only organize and participate in outreach events, but have achieved many great results that are not just innovative for Parks Canada, but for the Government of Canada.

On May 17th, 2019, the International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia, the Agency launched Parks Canada's Trans People Integration Guide, a collaboration between the LGBTQ2 Employee Network and the Human Resources and Employee Wellness General Directorate. The guide covers federal laws and Parks Canada’s Values and Ethics Code, and presents practical information on how to craft a transition plan, including the changes to documentation, announcement, facilities, uniforms and time off. It also includes sections on understanding gender, becoming an ally and transgender etiquette, along with a comprehensive glossary.

To highlight the 50th anniversary of the partial decriminalization of homosexuality in Canada, the LGBTQ2 Network collaborated with the National Celebrations’ team to publish a series of 10 testimonies over a 10-week period on its intranet, detailing individual experiences of coming out at work. Many of the stories became one of the most visited pages on the intranet that week.

The LGBTQ2 Network also produced and distributed through its intranet a document entitled Pronouns Sharing at Parks Canada: A Few Answers to Your Questions explaining why sharing pronouns is a gender-friendly thing to do. A one-pager Understanding Gender complemented the information shared to all team members. Pronouns Sharing was by far the most popular content on the intranet during its publication week early March 2020 with over 1,000 hits.


Key employment equity and diversity initiatives 2019-2020

i. Parks Canada leadership in relationships with Indigenous communities

Parks Canada recognizes that building positive, respectful and collaborative relationships with Indigenous peoples and partners is fundamental to successfully implementing its mandate. Further, the Agency acknowledges that ensuring a workforce representative of Indigenous peoples from entry level to senior management positions is critical to its work, particularly efforts to strengthen relationships with Indigenous groups whose traditional territories include lands and waters administered by Parks Canada as protected heritage places.

In 2019-2020, the Indigenous Affairs Branch undertook a variety of initiatives to support the Agency’s ongoing work with Indigenous communities:

  • Four Indigenous Awareness Events were marked nationally including: International Year of Indigenous Languages, Indigenous Awareness Week, National Indigenous People’s Day and Orange Shirt Day.
  • Many Agency-wide network calls were held to specifically support national heritage places’ efforts to engage Indigenous partners in areas such as Indigenous knowledge, Indigenous languages, Indigenous employee perspectives on working for government, branding, best practices for building relationships, and policy updates. This included a three day face-to-face Indigenous Relations Community of Practice meeting that took place in September 2019, which provided employees who play a key role in Indigenous relations within their business unit (field unit or directorate) an opportunity to network with others in similar, specialised roles across the country.
  • The Branch continued to work with other Parks Canada Directorates to support initiatives to ensure that Indigenous voices are respectfully engaged and meaningfully contribute to the management, conservation, restoration, and sharing of natural and cultural heritage in Canada. Examples include the Stories of Canada program, and the Conservation and Restoration program.
  • In addition to the work undertaken by the Indigenous Affairs Branch, many field units have initiatives underway to foster relationships with Indigenous communities. For example, places throughout the Agency work with Indigenous partners to weave together Indigenous and western science knowledge systems to care for heritage places in conservation projects such as Bring Back the Boreal in collaboration with the Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia in Cape Breton Highlands National Park, and Chiixuu Tll iinasdll: Nurturing Seafood to Grow in the kelp forests of Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve, and Haïda Heritage Site in collaboration with the Council of the Haïda Nation and other partners.

ii. Fostering a culture of reconciliation within Parks Canada

Among federal departments and agencies, Parks Canada is uniquely positioned to demonstrate leadership in renewing and strengthening the relationship with Indigenous peoples, due in part to the Agency’s role as a manager of a significant amount of federal lands and waters – nearly all of which have been traditionally used by Indigenous peoples.

Mapping Change: Fostering a Culture of Reconciliation within Parks Canada, is a work plan aimed at ensuring the Agency’s policies and practices support work with Indigenous partners across the country and that key challenges and obstacles to progress are addressed. This work plan was released in 2019-20, and is aimed at identifying specific internal actions to advance relationships with Indigenous partners, address barriers faced by Indigenous staff, and coordinate and promote the transformational work required for progress towards reconciliation.

iii. Consultation with union representatives

Business units consult with their respective local union representatives on employment equity strategies, training, accommodation and disability management processes as well as targeted recruitment initiatives. In addition, employment equity is a standing item at meetings of the National Labour-Management Consultation Committee (NLMCC). In 2019-2020, employment equity was discussed at both NLMCC meetings held.

iv. Recruitment initiatives

Designated group representatives on selection boards

Business units are strongly encouraged to have representatives of employment equity designated groups on selection boards. Selection board members are trained on bias-free selection and those who may have limited experience are provided additional expertise and support by including a human resources team member or another experienced manager on the board. For example, when recruiting for key Indigenous Relations positions, field units include Indigenous partners on the selection board.

External recruitment advertising

Recruitment posters and job advertisements routinely brand Parks Canada as an inclusive employer that encourages candidates from employment equity groups to apply.

Certain regions share posters of interest to various employment equity group partners to promote possible job opportunities within the Agency. Promotional materials such as brochures, posters, student employment posters and web content represent culturally diverse groups.

Parks Canada career fairs, student and youth Programs

Most business units participate in career fairs, student and youth programs in order to:

  • inform students and youth of the academic and experience requirements of different career options at Parks Canada; and
  • attract young applicants from employment equity designated groups.

Several targeted career fairs take place throughout Canada to recruit students as the Agency recognizes that they are the workforce of tomorrow. Several career fairs target students from employment equity designated groups. Below are a few examples of career fairs, student and youth programs that took place in 2019-2020:

Youth Employment and Skills Strategy (YESS)

Parks Canada is one of eleven participating departments in the YESS Strategy led by Employment and Social Development Canada. YESS is an integrated program, which aims to provide flexible and holistic services to support all young Canadians in developing skills, and gaining paid work experience to successfully transition into the labour market. In 2019-2020, the YESS was redesigned to respond to a range of labour market challenges faced by youth, particularly for those facing barriers to employment. It is intended to serve all youth, but with a particular focus on serving youth facing employment barriers, as well as under-represented youth.

Youth Employment Opportunity (YEO) Program

Parks Canada participated in the pilot project led by Treasury Board Secretariat, which involved the hire of youth facing barriers to employment. In June 2019, Parks Canada hired 7 youth in the NEET category (not in employment, education or training) to work at its Rouge National Urban Park in the Greater Toronto Area and at its National Office in Gatineau, for a one-year term at the CR-04 level. The goal of the program is to develop employability skills and competencies through meaningful work experience within the public service.

Soaring – Indigenous Youth Empowerment Gathering

For a second year in a row, Parks Canada participated in Soaring: Indigenous Youth Empowerment Gathering. At this event, Indigenous high school students from across Canada learn about career and post-secondary education options by participating in career workshops and visiting tradeshow booths. They also learn more about financial support and meet Canada’s top employers. This year’s event, which was held in Ottawa on March 5, was attended by over 600 Indigenous students and their chaperones. Parks Canada held a tradeshow booth where students were provided with information on the Agency’s various student employment opportunities.

v. Self-identification form

Self-identification forms are routinely sent with every letter of offer to new hires. The rate of return is monitored and follow-up action is taken as appropriate. Since 2010-2011, Parks Canada has provided team members the option to update their profile using an electronic employee self-identification form. In 2019-2020, the return rate for the self-identification survey was 93.5%, consistent with the high return rate in past years.

vi. Workplace accommodation and employee wellness

Workplace accommodation

As a standard practice, information on advertisements for job opportunities indicate that Parks Canada invites candidates to inform the Agency of any accommodation needs required during the recruitment process. The Parks Canada Workplace Accommodation Policy is available to all team members via the Agency’s Intranet site. The type of accommodation measures taken by field units may include flexible work hours, telework, adaptive equipment, ergonomic assessments, modified duties, workplace modifications and special efforts to integrate employees experiencing an illness, injury or disability limiting the ability to work.

The Agency also has a Disability Management Program. The Program includes a Disability Management Policy and guidelines, a toolkit and a governance framework. The Program, which is accessible to all Parks Canada team members on the Agency’s Intranet, is based on a comprehensive, proactive workplace health strategy that incorporates prevention, early intervention, accommodation and rehabilitation. These measures support the continued employment and promotion of employees experiencing an illness, injury or disability limiting the ability to work.

Employee wellness

Employment equity, diversity and inclusion go together hand in hand with employee wellness. Parks Canada’s greatest asset is its employees. Supporting workplace well-being is therefore one of the Agency’s priorities.

As such, the Agency has taken a proactive lead in creating and supporting a healthy and safe workplace by establishing a Workplace wellness training plan to equip individual employees with the knowledge and skills they need to effectively support a psychologically safe and healthy workplace. In 2019-2020, a Wellness Ambassadors’ Network has been created across Canada as part of an integrated approach to implementing the Federal Mental Health Strategy. The creation of this network will raise awareness and increase engagement in a safe, healthy and inclusive workplace at the Agency. There are currently seven certified employees who are delivering The Working Mind and The Working Mind First Responders training. In 2020-2021, an additional 20 ambassadors will be certified to deliver the training across Canada.

In 2019-2020, the Vice President of Human Resources’ title was changed to “Vice President of Human Resources and Employee Wellness”, to reflect the importance of the Agency’s employees’ wellness. As such, the Agency’s President & CEO, and the Vice President of Human Resources and Employee Wellness frequently demonstrate their engagement towards employee wellness with communications with Parks Canada team members. As such, the Agency promotes workplace mental health and well-being events, programs, services, resources and support available to its team members on a regular basis. The communications provide areas for consideration to help team members, supervisors and managers improve their workplace and encourage breaking down the stigmas around mental health. The Agency promotes national events and encourages its team members to participate.

In addition, in 2019-2020, Parks Canada enhanced the service offers of the Employee and Family Assistance Program (EFAP). As such, the number of consultation hours with a professional has been increased from 8 to 12 hours per situation and per individual for employees and their immediate family members.

vii. Training initiatives

General awareness training for Parks Canada team members

Parks Canada encourages all team members to increase their awareness of employment equity and diversity. Team members have access to tools on the Agency’s Intranet such as the Employment Equity Policy, the Workplace Accommodation Policy, and the Toward a Harassment-Free Workplace Policy. New team members are required to complete the online training course: Evolving Workplace: Everybody Wins, which is an online session with the objective of informing Parks Canada team members of employee and manager responsibilities in creating a more welcoming, respectful and fair workplace. The session provides an overview of the Employment Equity Policy, the Workplace Accommodation Policy and the Toward a Harassment-Free Workplace policies. As of March 31, 2020, a total of 2,498 Parks Canada team members completed the training. The Bias-Free Selection training is comprised of four online training modules which presents an overview of the issues, concerns, and potential strategies that can and should be implemented to ensure a bias-free appointment process. As of March 31, 2020, a total of 617 Parks Canada team members completed the training.

Indigenous consultation and accommodation training

Parks Canada’s Indigenous Affairs Branch continues to offer a two-day course on Indigenous Consultation and Accommodation to employees and managers across Canada on an as-requested basis. It presents tools, knowledge and leading practices on Indigenous consultations to contribute to a common understanding across Parks Canada on the Crown’s legal duty to consult, and to create, promote and sustain long-term relationships for the mutual benefit of the Agency and Indigenous partners.

Parks Canada KAIROS blanket exercise

In an effort to support the Agency’s commitment towards reconciliation, the Indigenous Affairs Branch provides KAIROS Blanket Exercise training opportunities as a powerful learning tool to support team members’ understanding of the historic and contemporary relationships between the Crown and Indigenous peoples in Canada. By the end of 2019-2020, Parks Canada has trained over 1,775 employees through the KAIROS Blanket Exercise since the internal program was initiated in 2016. Over 20 sessions were offered across the Agency during the fiscal year, in both official languages.

Indigenous relations training

Parks Canada continues to offer Indigenous Relations training, available to teams on an as-requested basis. During the two two-hour modules, topics covered include Crown-Indigenous history, Parks Canada’s approach to working with Indigenous peoples as well as consultation and accommodation.

Indigenous employee training fund

In 2019-20, the Indigenous Employee Training Fund ran for a second year, in response to one of four objectives addressing learning, development and career advancement concerns identified in the report Many Voices One Mind: A Pathway to Reconciliation. Indeterminate Indigenous employees were invited to apply for funding of up to $5,000 towards training outlined in an approved learning plan. Twenty-eight of fifty-three applications received funding for diverse training needs, and $80,000 was allocated to support training through the fund. The fund placed a focus on Indigenous language acquisition for the International Year of Indigenous Languages. Of the $80,000 fund, over $17,000 went towards Indigenous language training for employees.

viii. Parks Canada collaboration with Indigenous peoples

Working together with many Indigenous groups across Canada, Parks Canada and Indigenous peoples are partners in conserving, restoring, and sharing Canada’s natural and cultural heritage. Parks Canada is committed to a system of national heritage places that honours the contributions of Indigenous peoples, their histories and cultures, as well as the relationship Indigenous peoples have with their traditional territories. Some examples of the work that Parks Canada does in collaboration with Indigenous partners includes:

  • Continuing to work with Indigenous partners through the Stories of Canada Program, such as working with the Pays Plat First Nation (Pawgwasheemg) who share their stories, teachings and language in the Lake Superior National Marine Conservation Area region; and supporting the building of an authentic Sahtú Dene cultural camp in collaboration with the community of Délı̨nę, creating opportunities for elders, knowledge keepers, youth and community to come together to celebrate their culture;
  • Recognizing Indigenous responsibilities to lands and waters though programs such as the seven Indigenous guardians programs that were either underway or in development in 2019;
  • Progress to establish and cooperatively manage heritage places including: the creation of Thaïdene Nene National Park Reserve where healthy ecosystems sustain the cultures and livelihoods of the Łutsël K’e Dene First Nation, Akaitcho First Nations, Northwest Territories Métis Nation and other Indigenous peoples; and the signing of the collaborative management agreement at Obadjiwan–Fort Témiscamingue National Historic Site with the Anishnabe community of Timiskaming First Nation.
New Indigenous workforce strategies team

A new team, Indigenous Workforce Strategies, was created in 2019 to support the recruitment, retention, and advancement of Indigenous employees at the Agency. The team is a new function within the Human Resources and Employee Wellness Directorate. The work of the team will contribute to and fully support Parks Canada’s core responsibilities to realize a workforce of shared leadership with Indigenous peoples of Parks Canada places.

ix. List of commemorative events

The following events were promoted at Parks Canada in 2019-2020 to all team members:

  • International year of Indigenous Languages (2019)
  • International Day of Pink – April 10, 2019
  • International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia: Justice and Protection for All – May 17, 2019
  • Indigenous Awareness Week – May 21-24, 2019
  • National Indigenous Peoples Day –– June 21, 2019
  • 50th anniversary of the partial decriminalization of homosexuality in Canada – August to October 2019
  • Gender Equality Week – September 22-28, 2019
  • Gender-based Analysis Plus (GBA+) Awareness Week – September 23-27, 2019
  • Women’s History Month – October 2019
  • Celebrating Indigenous Peoples Day with APTN (Aboriginal Peoples Television Network) – December 9-13, 2019
  • 16 Days of Action against Gender-Based Violence – November 25-December 10, 2019
  • National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence against Women – December 6, 2019
  • Celebrate Black History Month – February 2020
  • International Women’s Day 2020– March 8, 2020

Workforce profile and employment equity designated groups representation – Highlights 2019-2020

Workforce analysis

On March 31, 2020, Parks Canada employed 5,559 employees in 14 employment equity occupational groups. The Agency hired 1,471 external employees and had 1,493 separations, which were comprised of indeterminate and term (greater than three months) employees.

Semi-professionals and technicians continued to be the largest employment equity occupational group at Parks Canada, with a representation of 1,420 employees, followed by the Professionals category at 1,220 employees, Other Sales and Service Personnel at 553 employees and Other Manual Workers at 550 employees.

As a whole, the Agency is exceeding the Labour Market Availability (LMA) for women (49.6% compared to 46.1% LMA) and Indigenous peoples (7.7% compared to 7.6% LMA). However, representation continues to be low for visible minorities and persons with disabilities (5.1% for visible minorities and 3.2% for persons with disabilities) and remains well below the LMAs for these groups (12.3% for visible minorities and 8.4% for persons with disabilities).


Women

Representation

  • Parks Canada’s representation rate for women slightly increased in 2019-2020 to 49.6%, compared to 48.8% in 2018-2019, and remains above the labour market availability of 46.1%.
  • Similar to 2018-2019, the representation rate of women in 2019-2020 was greater than the labour market availability in eight out of the fourteen employment equity occupational groups, including the Senior Managers, Middle and other Managers, Professionals, and Supervisors groups.
  • In 2019-2020, the largest representation of women was seen in the Clerical Personnel group, representing 84.6% of women at the Agency, and the Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel group, representing 79.3% of women at the Agency. This is a shift from 2018-2019, where the largest representation of women was seen in the Professionals and Semi-professionals and technicians groups.

Promotions

  • 53.7% of all employees who received promotions were women which is a decrease from 58.6% in 2018-2019. However, the promotion rate of women was higher than their representation rate of 49.6%.

External recruitment

  • The external recruitment rate for women was 54.4%, an increase from 51.9% in 2018-2019 and higher than the labour market availability rate of 49.6%.

Separations

  • Women accounted for 53.9% of all separations, which is higher than their representation rate of 49.6%.

Salary

  • 23.2% of women earned below $49,999 and 76.8% earned $50,000 or more. Similarly, 19.7% of all Parks Canada employees earned below $49,999 and 80.3% earned $50,000 or more.

Indigenous peoples

Representation

  • Parks Canada’s representation rate for Indigenous peoples remained at 7.7% in 2019-2020 and was above the labour market availability of 7.6%, which also remained the same as 2018-2019.
  • The representation of Indigenous peoples was greater than the labour market availability in six of the fourteen employment equity occupational groups, a decrease from seven in 2018-2019. This includes Senior Managers, Middle and other Managers, Professionals, and Semi-professionals and technicians.

Promotions

  • 6.1% of all employees who received promotions were Indigenous peoples, which is a decrease of 2.0% since 2018-19. The promotion rate of Indigenous peoples was lower than the representation rate of 7.7%.

External recruitment

  • The external recruitment rate for Indigenous peoples was 7.1% and was slightly lower than the labour market availability rate of 7.6%.

Separations

  • The separation rate for Indigenous peoples was 7.2%, slightly lower than the representation rate of 7.7%.

Salary

  • 24.4% of Indigenous peoples earned below $49,999 and 75.6.8% earned $50,000 or more. In comparison, 19.7% of all employees earned $49,999 or less and 80.3% earned more than $50,000.

Members of visible minority groups

Representation

  • The representation rate of members of visible minority groups very slightly increased to 5.1% in 2019-2020, while the labour market availability rate remained the same as 2018-2019 at 12.3%.
  • In 2019-2020, members of visible minority groups were at or above labour market availability in two of the fourteen employment equity occupational groups, compared to one in 2018-19.

Promotions

  • Promotions for members of visible minorities doubled in 2019-2020, from 4.3% to 8.5%. The promotion rate for members of visible minority groups is higher than the representation rate of 5.1%.

External recruitment

  • The external recruitment rate for members of visible minority groups was 6.5%, an increase from 6.0% in 2018-2019, but remains much lower than the labour market availability rate of 12.3%.

Separations

  • The separation rate for members of visible minority groups was 5.5%, which was similar to the 5.6% in 2018-2019. The separation rate was slightly higher than the representation rate of 5.1%.

Salary

  • 19.6% of members of visible minority groups in the workforce earned below $49,999 and 80.4% earned $50,000 or more. In comparison, 19.7% of all employees earned $49,999 or less and 80.3% earned more than $50,000.

Persons with disabilities

Representation

  • The representation rate of persons with disabilities increased slightly from 3.1% in 2018-2019 to 3.2% in 2019-2020. However, it remains well below the labour market availability rate of 8.4%.
  • In addition, the representation of persons with disabilities are at or above labour market availability in only one of the fourteen employment equity occupational groups (Intermediate Sales and Services), the same as 2018-2019.

Promotions

  • 2.2% of all Parks Canada employees who received promotions were persons with disabilities, a decrease of 1.1% from 2018-19. However, the promotion rate for persons with disabilities remained higher than the representation rate of 3.2%.

External recruitment

  • Persons with disabilities accounted for 2.4% of all external hiring. Their rate of hiring is much lower than their labour market availability rate of 8.4%.

Separations

  • The separation rate for persons with disabilities was 2.1% in 2019-2020, a decrease of 1.0%since 2018-2019. The separation rate was lower than their representation rate of 3.2%.

Salary

  • 19.2% of persons with disabilities earned below $49,999 and 80.8% earned $50,000 or more. In comparison, 19.7% of all employees earned $49,999 or less and 80.3% earned more than $50,000.

Conclusion

In 2019-2020, Parks Canada continued to nationally meet employment equity representation targets for women and Indigenous peoples, but continued to lag in terms of visible minorities and persons with disabilities representation. In addition, there remains representation gaps in employment equity occupational groups for each designated group.

The Agency continued to engage in and promote various initiatives and networking activities that aim to foster a diverse and inclusive workplace for all team members. In 2019-2020, the Agency continued to make progress towards the development of Parks Canada’s Diversity and Inclusion Strategy by establishing its governance, and initiating key actions such as the establishment of a partnership with LiveWorkPlay. The objectives established in the Strategy will link to the employment equity objectives set out in the Agency’s employment equity plan for 2021-2024.


The tables that follow denote Parks Canada’s findings and analysis on the representation of women, Indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minority groups in the Agency’s workforce as of March 31, 2020, as well as their rates of external recruitment, separation and promotion and their earnings for the year.


Table A

Representation of designated group members in Parks Canada and Canadian labour market availability (LMA) by province, all types of employment.

As of March 31, 2020

Representation of designated group members in Parks Canada and Canadian labour market availability (LMA) by province, all types of employment
Representation Total # of Employees Women Indigenous Peoples Members of Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities
Indeterminate (Full-time & Seasonal) and Determinate > 3 Months Parks Canada Labour Market Availability Parks Canada Labour Market Availability Parks Canada Labour Market Availability Parks Canada Labour Market Availability
Province # # % % # % % # % % # % %
Prince Edward Island 88 40 45.4% 48.5% 6 6.8% 2.6% * * 9.0% * * 8.2%
New Brunswick 207 94 45.4% 43.9% 23 11.1% 5.3% * * 5.4% 11 5.3% 8.2%
Nova Scotia 490 230 47.0% 47.0% 25 5.1% 6.0% 14 2.8% 6.7% 19 3.9% 8.3%
Ontario 775 324 41.8% 42.3% 57 7.4% 4.4% 50 6.5% 12.4% 24 3.1% 8.4%
Quebec 620 286 46.1% 42.3% 10 1.6% 3.1% 19 3.1% 11.8% 10 1.6% 8.3%
Newfoundland and Labrador 258 116 44.9% 47.7% 32 12.4% 10.6% * * 4.1% 9 3.5% 8.3%
Alberta 1062 504 47.5% 47.8% 25 2.4% 7.3% 67 6.3% 14.1% 27 2.6% 8.8%
British Columbia 620 333 53.7% 46.6% 61 9.8% 8.5% 40 6.5% 15.2% 15 2.4% 8.4%
Manitoba 238 115 48.3% 46.6% 43 18.1% 14.2% 10 4.2% 12.5% 14 5.9% 8.2%
Nunavut 57 34 59.7% 35.7% 28 49.1% 37.1% * * 10.5% * * 7.8%
Saskatchewan 209 113 54.1% 46.2% 32 15.3% 13.4% * * 9.6% 8 3.8% 8.4%
Northwest Territories 118 59 50.0% 41.1% 41 34.7% 39.0% * * 9.1% 12 10.2% 7.9%
Yukon 117 68 58.1% 41.5% 22 18.8% 18.0% * * 8.3% * * 7.8%
National Capital Region** 700 439 62.7% 52.5% 20 2.9% 2.8% 62 8.9% 19.4% 19 2.7% 8.4%
Total Canada 2019-2020 5559 2755 49.6% 46.1% 425 7.7% 7.6% 286 5.1% 12.3% 177 3.2% 8.4%
Total Canada 2018-2019 5372 2624 48.8% 45.9% 413 7.7% 7.6% 267 5.0% 12.3% 165 3.1% 8.4%
Total Canada 2017-2018 5475 2675 48.9% 46.1% 406 7.4% 6.5% 243 4.4% 9.8% 166 3.0% 4.8%

Sources:

Parks Canada workforce data generated from PeopleSoft. Data for Canadian labour market availability is derived from the 2016 Census and data for persons with disabilities is based on the 2017 Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD). The indicators for each group were calculated according to the NOC or EEOG levels, the area of recruitment and the location of the population at Parks Canada.

Notes:

Data includes employees who are indeterminate, full-time/part-time or seasonal, and determinate with three or more months of continuous service. Data does not include students, or determinate employees with fewer than three months of continuous service.

* Data suppressed for confidentiality reasons

** National Capital Region is counted separately from the Ontario and Quebec numbers of employees.


Table B

Representation of designated group members in Parks Canada and Canadian labour market availability (LMA) by employment equity occupational group, all types of employment.

As of March 31, 2020

Representation of designated group members in Parks Canada and Canadian labour market availability (LMA) by employment equity occupational group, all types of employment
Representation Total # of Employees Women Indigenous Peoples Members of Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities
Indeterminate (Full-time & Seasonal) and Determinate > 3 Months Parks Canada Labour Market Availability Parks Canada Labour Market Availability Parks Canada Labour Market Availability Parks Canada Labour Market Availability
EE Occupational Group # # % % # % % # % % # % %
1 Senior Managers** 77 45 58.4% 27.6% * * 3.2% * * 11.5% 15 3.2% 5.0%
2 Middle and Other Managers** 392 187 47.7% 39.4% 26 6.6% 2.7% 19 4.8% 17.6%
3 Professionals 1220 763 62.5% 52.9% 63 5.2% 2.4% 95 7.8% 22.3% 42 3.4% 8.9%
4 Semi-professionals and technicians 1420 653 46.0% 45.4% 135 9.5% 9.1% 61 4.3% 10.3% 47 3.3% 7.6%
5 Supervisors 7 * * 63.1% 0 0.0% 6.4% * * 7.3% 0 0.0% 27.5%
6 Supervisors: Crafts and Trades 57 * * 9.6% * * 5.7% * * 7.8% * * 10.1%
7 Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 314 249 79.3% 82.1% 20 6.4% 5.5% 30 9.6% 9.6% 11 3.5% 10.0%
8 Skilled Sales and Service Personnel * 0 0.0% 40.0% 0 0.0% 6.6% 0 0.0% 12.0% 0 0.0% 8.0%
9 Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 166 * * 3.9% 11 6.6% 7.0% * * 7.4% 7 4.2% 7.8%
10 Clerical Personnel 415 351 84.6% 72.4% 36 8.7% 9.9% 29 7.0% 7.5% 11 2.7% 9.3%
11 Intermediate Sales and Services 11 * * 75.0% * * 7.3% 0 0.0% 3.0% * * 10.8%
12 Semi-Skilled Manual Workers 376 63 16.8% 16.9% 26 6.9% 8.7% 6 1.6% 6.4% 9 2.4% 10.3%
13 Other Sales and Service Personnel 553 367 66.4% 61.1% 32 5.8% 12.8% 29 5.2% 10.4% 14 2.5% 10.7%
14 Other Manual Workers 550 64 11.6% 20.0% 66 12.0% 13.3% 8 1.5% 5.1% 16 2.9% 6.8%
Total Canada 2019-2020 5559 2755 49.6% 46.1% 425 7.7% 7.6% 286 5.1% 12.3% 177 3.2% 8.4%
Total Canada 2018-2019 5372 2624 48.8% 45.9% 413 7.7% 7.6% 267 5.5% 12.3% 165 3.1% 8.4%
Total Canada 2017-2018 5475 2675 48.9% 46.1% 406 7.4% 6.5% 243 4.4% 9.8% 166 3.0% 4.8%

Sources:

Parks Canada workforce data generated from PeopleSoft. Data for Canadian labour market availability is derived from the 2016 Census and data for persons with disabilities is based on the 2017 Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD).

Notes:

Data include employees who are indeterminate, full-time/part-time or seasonal, and determinate with three or more months of continuous service. Data do not include students, or determinate employees with fewer than three months of continuous service.

* Data suppressed for confidentiality reasons

** Senior managers in Parks Canada occupy PCX positions, which bridge both "Senior Managers" and a portion of "Middle and Other Managers" employment equity occupational groups. The total representation of PCX as at March 31, 2019 is: 58% for women; 4.3% for Indigenous people, 4.3% for visible minorities and 1.4% for persons with disabilities.

+ Indicates where PCA representation is lower than the Labour Market Availability.


Table C (I)

Promotion of designated group members in Parks Canada by province, all types of employment.

As of March 31, 2020

Promotion of designated group members in Parks Canada by province, all types of employment
Promotion Total # of promotions Women Indigenous Peoples Members of Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities
Indeterminate (Full-time & Seasonal) and Determinate > 3 Months
Province # # % # % # % # %
Prince Edward Island 9 * * * * * * * *
New Brunswick 15 10 66.7% * * 0 0.0% * *
Nova Scotia 31 12 38.7% 0 0.0% * * 0 0.0%
Ontario 33 19 57.6% * * * * 0 0.0%
Quebec 37 16 43.2% 0 0.0% * * 0 0.0%
Newfoundland and Labrador 9 * * * * 0 0.0% 0 0.0%
Alberta 80 39 48.8% * * 9 11.3% 0 0.0%
British Columbia 58 33 56.9% 6 10.3% 0 0.0% * *
Manitoba 22 11 50.0% * * * * * *
Nunavut * * * 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 0 0.0%
Saskatchewan 15 * * * * * * 0 0.0%
Northwest Territories 10 6 60.0% * * 0 0.0% * *
Yukon * * * 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 0 0.0%
National Capital Region** 82 55 67.1% * * 11 13.4% * *
Total Canada 2019-2020 410 220 53.7% 25 6.1% 35 8.5% 9 2.2%
Total Canada 2018-2019 210 123 58.6% 17 8.1% 9 4.3% 7 3.3%
Total Canada 2017-2018 220 114 51.8% 20 9.1% 7 3.2% 8 3.6%

Sources:

Parks Canada workforce data generated from PeopleSoft

Notes:

Data include employees who are indeterminate, full-time/part-time or seasonal, and determinate with three or more months of continuous service. Data do not include students, or determinate employees with fewer than three months of continuous service.

* Data suppressed for confidentiality reasons

** National Capital Region is counted separately from the Ontario and Quebec numbers of employees.


Table C (II)

Promotion of designated group members in Parks Canada by employment equity occupational group for all types of employment.

As of March 31, 2020

Promotion of designated group members in Parks Canada by employment equity occupational group for all types of employment
Employment Equity Occupational Group Total # of Employees Women Indigenous Peoples Members of Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities
# # % # % # % # %
01 Senior Managers** 9 6 66.7% 0 0.0% * * 0 0.0%
02 Middle and Other Managers** 31 15 48.4% * * * * * *
03 Professionals 128 88 68.8% 7 5.5% 14 10.9% * *
04 Semi-professionals and technicians 115 51 44.3% 10 8.7% * * * *
05 Supervisors * * * 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 0 0.0%
06 Supervisors: Crafts and Trades 10 * * 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 0 0.0%
07 Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 36 24 66.7% * * 7 19.4% * *
09 Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 6 * * 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 0 0.0%
10 Clerical Personnel 21 18 85.7% 0 0.0% * * 0 0.0%
12 Semi-Skilled Manual Workers 22 * * * * * * 0 0.0%
13 Other Sales and Service Personnel 14 8 57.1% * * * * 0 0.0%
14 Other Manual Workers 17 * * * * * * 0 0.0%
Total Canada 2019-2020 410 220 53.7% 25 6.1% 35 8.5% 9 2.2%
Total Canada 2018-2019 210 123 58.6% 17 8.1% 9 4.3% 7 3.3%
Total Canada 2017-2018 220 114 51.8% 20 9.1% 7 3.2% 8 3.6%

Sources:

Parks Canada workforce data generated from PeopleSoft. Data for Canadian labour market availability is derived from the 2016 Census and data for persons with disabilities is based on the 2017 Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD).

Notes:

Data include employees who are indeterminate, full-time/part-time or seasonal, and determinate with three or more months of continuous service. Data do not include students, or determinate employees with fewer than three months of continuous service.

* Data suppressed for confidentiality reasons

** Senior managers in Parks Canada occupy PCX positions, which bridge both "Senior Managers" and a portion of "Middle and Other Managers" employment equity occupational groups.


Table D (I)

Designated group external recruitment into Parks Canada, by province, all types of employment.

As of March 31, 2020

Designated group external recruitment into Parks Canada, by province, all types of employment
Hire Total # of Hires Women Indigenous Peoples Members of Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities
Indeterminate (Full-time & Seasonal) and Determinate > 3 Months Parks Canada Labour Market Availability Parks Canada Labour Market Availability Parks Canada Labour Market Availability Parks Canada Labour Market Availability
Province # # % % # % % # % % # % %
Prince Edward Island 35 18 51.4% 48.5% * * 2.6% * * 9.0% * * 8.2%
New Brunswick 48 21 43.8% 43.9% 0 0.0% 5.3% 0 0.0% 5.4% 0 0.0% 8.2%
Nova Scotia 100 43 43.0% 47.0% 9 9.0% 6.0% 8 8.0% 6.7% 6 6.0% 8.3%
Ontario 184 93 50.5% 42.3% 12 6.5% 4.4% 18 9.8% 12.4% 8 4.3% 8.4%
Quebec 114 55 48.2% 42.3% * * 3.1% * * 11.8% 0 0.0% 8.3%
Newfoundland and Labrador 53 29 54.7% 47.7% 8 15.1% 10.6% * * 4.1% 0 0.0% 8.3%
Alberta 461 273 59.2% 47.8% 17 3.7% 7.3% 38 8.2% 14.1% 10 2.2% 8.8%
British Columbia 207 111 53.6% 46.6% 14 6.8% 8.5% 8 3.9% 15.2% * * 8.4%
Manitoba 47 26 55.3% 46.6% 13 27.7% 14.2% * * 12.5% * * 8.2%
Nunavut 16 8 50.0% 35.7% 9 56.3% 37.1% 0 0.0% 10.5% 0 0.0% 7.8%
Saskatchewan 50 25 50.0% 46.2% * * 13.4% * * 9.6% * * 8.4%
Northwest Territories 38 18 47.4% 41.1% 10 26.3% 39.0% * * 9.1% * * 7.9%
Yukon 28 19 67.9% 41.5% * * 18.0% 0 0.0% 8.3% 0 0.0% 7.8%
National Capital Region** 90 61 67.8% 52.5% * * 2.8% 11 12.2% 19.4% * * 8.4%
Total Canada 2019-2020 1471 800 54.4% 46.1% 105 7.1% 7.6% 96 6.5% 12.3% 35 2.4% 8.4%
Total Canada 2018-2019 1521 789 51.9% 45.9% 110 7.2% 7.6% 91 6.0% 12.3% 34 2.2% 8.4%
Total Canada 2017-2018 1387 729 52.6% 46.1% 33 2.4% 6.5% 42 3.0% 9.8% 14 1.0% 4.8%

Sources:

Parks Canada workforce data generated from PeopleSoft

Notes:

Data include employees who are indeterminate, full-time/part-time or seasonal, and determinate with three or more months of continuous service. Data do not include students, or determinate employees with fewer than three months of continuous service.

* Data suppressed for confidentiality reasons

** National Capital Region is counted separately from the Ontario and Quebec numbers of employees.


Table D (II)

Designated group external recruitment into Parks Canada by employment equity occupational group, all types of employment.

As of March 31, 2020

Designated group external recruitment into Parks Canada by employment equity occupational group, all types of employment
Representation Total # of Employees Women Indigenous Peoples Members of Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities
Indeterminate (Full-time & Seasonal) and Determinate > 3 Months Parks Canada Labour Market Availability Parks Canada Labour Market Availability Parks Canada Labour Market Availability Parks Canada Labour Market Availability
EE Occupational Group # # % % # % % # % % # % %
01 Senior Managers** 6 * * 27.6% * * 3.2% 0 0.0% 11.5% 0 0.0% 5.0%
02 Middle and Other Managers** 17 9 52.9% 39.4% * * 2.7% * * 17.6% * *
03 Professionals 131 85 64.9% 52.9% 10 7.6% 2.4% 6 4.6% 22.3% * * 8.9%
04 Semi-professionals and technicians 369 207 56.1% 45.4% 39 10.6% 9.1% 19 5.1% 10.3% 8 2.2% 7.6%
06 Supervisors: Crafts and Trades * 0 0.0% 9.6% 0 0.0% 5.7% 0 0.0% 7.8% 0 0.0% 10.1%
07 Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 33 25 75.8% 82.1% * * 5.5% * * 9.6% * * 10.0%
09 Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 11 * * 3.9% 0 0.0% 7.0% 0 0.0% 7.4% * * 7.8%
10 Clerical Personnel 112 90 80.4% 72.4% 11 9.8% 9.9% 19 17.0% 7.5% * * 9.3%
11 Intermediate Sales and Services * * * 75.0% 0 0.0% 7.3% 0 0.0% 3.0% 0 0.0% 10.8%
12 Semi-Skilled Manual Workers 137 37 27.0% 16.9% 7 5.1% 8.7% 8 5.8% 6.4% * * 10.3%
13 Other Sales and Service Personnel 471 309 65.6% 61.1% 22 4.7% 12.8% 33 7.0% 10.4% 11 2.3% 10.7%
14 Other Manual Workers 177 31 17.5% 20.0% 12 6.8% 13.3% * * 5.1% * * 6.8%
Total Canada 2019-2020 1471 800 54.4% 46.1% 105 7.1% 7.6% 96 6.5% 12.3% 35 2.4% 8.4%
Total Canada 2018-2019 1521 789 51.9% 45.9% 110 7.2% 7.6% 91 6.0% 12.3% 34 2.2% 8.4%
Total Canada 2017-2018 1387 729 52.6% 46.1% 33 2.4% 6.5% 42 3.0% 9.8% 14 1.0% 4.8%

Sources:

Parks Canada workforce data generated from PeopleSoft. Data for Canadian labour market availability is derived from the 2016 Census and data for persons with disabilities is based on the 2017 Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD).

Notes:

Data include employees who are indeterminate, full-time/part-time or seasonal, and determinate with three or more months of continuous service. Data do not include students, or determinate employees with fewer than three months of continuous service

* Data suppressed for confidentiality reasons.

** Senior managers in Parks Canada occupy PCX positions, which bridge both "Senior Managers" and a portion of "Middle and Other Managers" employment equity occupational groups.


Table E (I)

Separation of designated group members from Parks Canada by province, all types of employment.

As of March 31, 2020

Separation of designated group members from Parks Canada by province, all types of employment
Separation Total number of separations Women Indigenous Peoples Members of Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities
Indeterminate (Full-time & Seasonal) and Determinate > 3 Months
Province # # % # % # % # %
Prince Edward Island 38 22 57.9% * * * * * *
New Brunswick 42 19 45.2% 0 0.0% 0 0.0% * *
Nova Scotia 108 50 46.3% 8 7.4% 7 6.5% * *
Ontario 173 90 52.0% 15 8.7% 11 6.4% 9 5.2%
Quebec 127 60 47.2% 0 0.0% * * 0 0.0%
Newfoundland and Labrador 44 16 36.4% * * * * 0 0.0%
Alberta 460 265 57.6% 19 4.1% 30 6.5% 8 1.7%
British Columbia 195 100 51.3% 13 6.7% 6 3.1% * *
Manitoba 50 32 64.0% 9 18.0% * * * *
Nunavut 15 * * 6 40.0% 0 0.0% 0 0.0%
Saskatchewan 54 26 48.1% 6 11.1% * * * *
Northwest Territories 32 18 56.3% 12 37.5% 0 0.0% 0 0.0%
Yukon 35 20 57.1% 7 20.0% * * * *
National Capital Region** 120 82 68.3% 6 5.0% 13 10.8% * *
Total Canada 2019-2020 1493 804 53.9% 107 7.2% 82 5.5% 31 2.1%
Total Canada 2018-2019 1605 848 52.8% 120 7.5% 90 5.6% 50 3.1%
Total Canada 2017-2018 1411 744 51.4% 9 0.6% 11 0.8% -5 0.3%

Sources:

Parks Canada workforce data generated from PeopleSoft.

Notes:

Data include employees who are indeterminate, full-time/part-time or seasonal and determinate with three or more months of continuous service. Data do not include students, or determinate employees with  fewer than  three months of continuous service.

* Data suppressed for confidentiality reasons.

** National Capital Region is counted separately from the Ontario and Quebec numbers of employees.


Table E (II)

Separation of designated group members in Parks Canada by employment equity occupational group for all types of employment.

As of March 31, 2020

Separation of designated group members in Parks Canada by employment equity occupational group for all types of employment
Employment Equity Occupational Group Total # of Employees Women Indigenous Peoples Members of Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities
# # % # % # % # %
01 Senior Managers** 18 12 66.7% 0 0.0% 0 0.0% * *
02 Middle and Other Managers** 27 17 63.0% * * * * 0 0.0%
03 Professionals 155 90 58.1% 9 5.8% 12 7.7% * *
04 Semi-professionals and technicians 374 204 54.5% 33 8.8% 12 3.2% 6 1.6%
05 Supervisors * * * 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 0 0.0%
06 Supervisors: Crafts and Trades * 0 0.0% * * 0 0.0% 0 0.0%
07 Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel 37 28 75.7% * * * * * *
09 Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers 10 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 0 0.0%
10 Clerical Personnel 102 86 84.3% 12 11.8% 10 9.8% * *
11 Intermediate Sales and Services * * * * * 0 0.0% 0 0.0%
12 Semi-Skilled Manual Workers 131 36 27.5% 7 5.3% 6 4.6% 6 4.6%
13 Other Sales and Service Personnel 459 297 64.7% 18 3.9% 33 7.2% 8 1.7%
14 Other Manual Workers 168 30 17.9% 18 10.7% 7 4.2% * *
Total Canada 2019-2020 1493 804 53.9% 107 7.2% 82 5.5% 31 2.1%
Total Canada 2018-2019 1605 848 52.8% 120 0.0% 90 0.0% 50 0.0%
Total Canada 2017-2018 1411 744 52.7% 9 0.6% 11 0.8% 5 0.3%

Sources:

Parks Canada workforce data generated from PeopleSoft. Data for Canadian labour market availability is derived from the 2011 Census and data for persons with disabilities is based on the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS)

Notes:

Data include employees who are indeterminate, full-time/part-time or seasonal, and determinate with three or more months of continuous service. Data do not include students, or determinate employees with fewer than three months of continuous service.

* Data suppressed for confidentiality reasons

** Senior managers in Parks Canada occupy PCX positions, which bridge both “Senior Managers” and “Middle and Other Managers” employment equity occupational groups.


Table F

Salary ranges of designated group members

As of March 31, 2020

Salary ranges of designated group members
Salary Ranges Total % of Employees Women Indigenous Peoples Members of Visible Minorities Persons with Disabilities
% % % % %
Less than 30,000 1.0% 1.3% 0.9% 2.1% 1.7%
30000-34,999 0.3% 0.5% 0.9% 0.4% 0.0%
35000-39,999 1.2% 1.4% 1.2% 0.7% 1.1%
40000-44,999 4.1% 5.3% 6.1% 4.5% 2.8%
45000-49,999 13.1% 14.7% 15.3% 11.9% 13.6%
50000-54,999 16.5% 14.0% 21.2% 9.4% 14.7%
55000-59,999 13.1% 12.4% 13.9% 10.1% 10.2%
60000-64,999 9.4% 10.1% 9.6% 10.5% 14.7%
65000-69,999 10.7% 10.4% 11.5% 13.3% 9.0%
70000-74,999 9.3% 8.9% 5.2% 7.7% 12.4%
75000-79,999 1.7% 1.2% 1.4% 3.5% 2.3%
80000-84,999 4.3% 4.3% 4.0% 3.8% 5.1%
85000-89,999 4.9% 4.9% 3.5% 6.3% 5.1%
90000-94,999 1.2% 1.7% 0.0% 3.5% 2.3%
95000-99,999 1.9% 2.0% 0.9% 4.2% 0.0%
100,000 & above 7.4% 7.1% 4.2% 8.0% 5.1%
Total Canada 2019-2020 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%
Total Canada 2018-2019 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%
Total Canada 2017-2018 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%

Sources:

Parks Canada workforce data generated from PeopleSoft.

Notes:

Data include employees who are indeterminate, full-time/part-time or seasonal, and determinate with three or more months of continuous service. Data do not include students, or determinate employees with fewer than three months of continuous service.