Supplementary Information Tables

Parks Canada Agency’s 2016–17 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Overview of the Federal Government’s Approach to Sustainable Development

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) 2013–16 presents the Government of Canada’s sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, the Parks Canada Agency supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities in this supplementary information table.

This Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) presents the planned contributions and expected results for Theme I – Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality, Theme III – Protecting Nature and Canadians, and Theme IV – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government.

2. Themes I to III: Department and Agency-Led Targets

FSDS GoalFSDS Performance IndicatorsFSDS Target
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians Ecological Integrity of national parks Target 4.4: Improving the Health of National Parks – Improve the condition of at least one ecological integrity indicator in 20 national parks by 2015

Note: Since target 4.4 was set to be achieved in March 2015, it will not be part of the planning exercise for the 2016–17 DSDS. The final results of this target were reported in the Agency’s 2014–15 DSDS Report.

3. Themes I-III: Implementation Strategies

Parks Canada has one implementation strategy under Theme I – Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality and seven implementation strategies under Theme III – Protecting Nature and Canadians.

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Target 1.2: Climate Change Adaptation
Implementation Strategy
1.2.9: Improve understanding of climate-driven ecological change in Canada’s North by using a combination of remote sensing techniques and working with park cooperative management boards to assess how ecological integrity and traditional land use may be affected by climate-driven changes in northern national parks.
Link to FSDS 2013–16 Goals and Targets
Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
Goal 1: Climate Change – In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts.
Target 1.2: Climate Change Adaptation: Facilitate reduced vulnerability of individuals, communities, regions and economic sectors to the impacts of climate change through the development and provision of information and tools.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals, and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.2: Heritage Places Conservation
Sub Program 1.2.1: National Park Conservation
Description of the Implementation Strategy
Parks Canada contributes to the understanding of climate-driven ecological change in Canada’s North by consulting with park co-operative management boards, conducting process-based ecosystem mapping, and completing scenarios modeling and reporting, to help communities understand the risks to important country food, recognize the need for adaptation, and discuss options for action. Parks Canada also links key drivers to changing ecosystem composition and structure and discusses how these changes might impact other ecosystem components (such as caribou and other species) and the ecological integrity of parks. This activity supports communities in assessing the risks as well as opportunities arising from climate change, and provides them with options for adapting.
Implementation Strategy completed in 2015–16
Since this Implementation Strategy was set to be achieved by March 2016, it will not be part of the planning exercise for the 2016–17 DSDS. The final results will be reported in the Agency’s 2015–16 DSDS Report.

Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians

Target 4.1: Species at Risk
Implementation Strategy
4.1.9: Develop action plans for all protected areas with five or more species at risk by March 2016.
Link to FSDS 2013–16 Goals and Targets
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.1: Species at Risk: By 2020, populations of species at risk listed under federal law exhibit trends that are consistent with recovery strategies and management plans.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals, and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.2: Heritage Places Conservation
Sub Program 1.2.1: National Park Conservation
Description of the Implementation Strategy
Over half of Canada’s endangered and threatened species can be found in the protected heritage areas administered by Parks Canada. Parks Canada protects these species and their critical habitat in the Agency’s heritage areas, and supports their recovery by leading the development and implementation of recovery strategies and action plans, surveying and monitoring their status, implementing conservation and restoration projects, and facilitating public awareness and stewardship activities. Recovery planning is an obligation under the Species at Risk Act.
Implementation Strategy completed in 2015–16
Since this Implementation Strategy was set to be achieved by March 2016, it will not be part of the planning exercise for the 2016–17 DSDS. The final results will be reported in the Agency’s 2015–16 DSDS Report.
Target 4.3: Terrestrial Ecosystem and Habitat Stewardship
Implementation Strategy
4.3.13: Make demonstrable progress on a yearly basis towards establishing national parks in one unrepresented region.
Link to FSDS 2013–16 Goals and Targets
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.3: Terrestrial Ecosystem and Habitat Stewardship: Contribute to the proposed national target that by 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals, and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.1: Heritage Places Establishment
Sub Program 1.1.1: National Park Establishment
Description of the Implementation Strategy
This strategy entails the establishment of at least one national park in each of Canada’s 39 natural regions, in accordance with the National Parks System Plan. The completion of the system will protect representative examples of Canada’s natural diversity, and provide opportunities for Canadians to experience, understand and appreciate these places. Five steps are involved in the process to establish a national park: identify areas representative of a natural region; select an optimum national park candidate from the list of representative areas; assess the feasibility of establishing the proposed park through studies and consultations; negotiate new park agreements, including any that may be required with Indigenous peoples or organizations; and formally establish the national park in legislation.
Expected Result
National parks are created in unrepresented regions.
Performance Indicator
Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks.


Implementation Strategy
4.3.14: Increase the number of represented terrestrial natural regions from 28 in March 2012 to 30 of 39 by March 2015.
Link to FSDS 2013–16 Goals and Targets
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.3: Terrestrial Ecosystem and Habitat Stewardship: Contribute to the proposed national target that by 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals, and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.1: Heritage Places Establishment
Description of the Implementation Strategy
This strategy aims to establish national parks in order to conserve Canada’s natural and cultural heritage and make it available to Canadians for their benefit and enjoyment, thus fostering a strong sense of connection to our natural heritage. This strategy also supports Canada’s involvement in the internationally shared objective of protecting the best of the world’s natural heritage. By establishing national parks in each of Canada’s natural terrestrial regions, this strategy ensures the protection of representative examples of Canada’s natural diversity. Establishment is achieved through feasibility studies, research, consulting with Indigenous peoples, stakeholders and the general public, negotiating with other governments and Indigenous organizations, and fulfilling legislative requirements.
Implementation Strategy completed in 2014–15
Since this Implementation Strategy was achieved in March 2015, it will not be part of the planning exercise for the 2016–17 DSDS. The final results were reported in the Agency’s 2014–15 DSDS Report.
Target 4.4: Improving the Health of National Parks
Implementation Strategy
4.4.1: 80% of active management targets to improve ecological integrity are met by March 2015.
Link to FSDS 2013–16 Goals and Targets
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.4: Improving the Health of National Parks: Improve the condition of at least one Ecological Integrity Indicator in 20 national parks by 2015.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.2: Heritage Places Conservation
Sub Program 1.2.1: National Park Conservation
Description of the Implementation Strategy
This strategy aims to maintain or restore ecological integrity in national parks through protection, conservation, restoration or mitigation activities, as mandated under the Canada National Parks Act. To implement this strategy, Parks Canada carries out applied science, monitoring and reporting, ecological restoration, species recovery, environmental assessment, fire management and compliance activities. Some of these activities are done in collaboration with the general public, stakeholders, partners, local and Indigenous communities. This strategy also includes fulfilling legal responsibilities assigned to Parks Canada by the Species at Risk Act and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act.
Implementation Strategy completed in 2014–15
Since this Implementation Strategy was set to be achieved in March 2015, it will not be part of the planning exercise for the 2016–17 DSDS. The final results were reported in the Agency’s 2014–15 DSDS Report.
Target 4.5: Marine Ecosystems
Implementation Strategy
4.5.6: Make demonstrable progress on a yearly basis towards establishing national marine conservation areas in two unrepresented regions.
Link to FSDS 2013–16 Goals and Targets
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.5: Marine Ecosystems: By 2020, 10% of coastal and marine areas are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals, and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.1: Heritage Places Establishment
Sub Program 1.1.2: National Marine Conservation Area Establishment
Description of the Implementation Strategy
This strategy aims to establish at least one national marine conservation area in each of Canada’s 29 marine regions, in accordance with the National Marine Conservation Areas System Plan. The expansion and completion of the system will conserve representative examples of the diversity of Canada’s oceans and Great Lakes, and provide opportunities for Canadians to experience, understand and appreciate these places. Five steps are involved in the process to establish a national marine conservation area: identify areas representative of a marine region; select an optimum national marine conservation area candidate from the list of representative areas; assess the feasibility of establishing the proposed marine conservation area through studies and consultations, including the development of an interim management plan; negotiate new national marine conservation area agreements, including any that may be required with Indigenous peoples or organizations; and formally establish the national marine conservation area in legislation.
Expected Result
National marine conservation areas are created in unrepresented regions.
Performance Indicator
Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national marine conservation areas.
Target 4.7: Environmental Disasters, Incidents and Emergencies
Implementation Strategy
4.7.4: In accordance with mandated responsibilities, provide environmental and/or other information to reduce the risk of, and advice in response to, the occurrence of events such as polluting incidents, wildlife disease events or severe weather and other significant hydro-meteorological events as applicable.
Link to FSDS 2013–16 Goals and Targets
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.7: Environmental Disasters, Incidents and Emergencies: Environmental disasters, incidents and emergencies are prevented or their impacts mitigated.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals, and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program: Internal Services
Description of the Implementation Strategy
Finalize and implement a national standard on the management of environmental emergencies and work with federal partners on the delivery of training for responding to aquatic environmental emergencies.
Note: Under the lead of Public Safety Canada, Parks Canada Agency supports the implementation of this strategy with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Health Canada, Industry Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Public Services and Procurement Canada, and Transport Canada.

Target 4.8: Chemicals Management
Implementation Strategy
4.8.1: Implement the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and complete remediation and risk management activities at known high priority federal contaminated sites.
Link to FSDS 2013–16 Goals and Targets
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians: Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come.
Target 4.8: Chemicals Management: Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment and human health posed by releases of harmful substances.
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals, and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.2: Heritage Places Conservation
Description of the Implementation Strategy
Parks Canada is responsible for 475 sites currently registered in the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory. With funding from the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, the Agency undertakes risk reduction activities (through remediation and/or risk management) at its high-priority contaminated sites.
Expected Result
Mitigate risks to the environment and human health.
Performance Indicator
Number of contaminated sites where risk to the environment and/or human health has been assessed and/or reduced.
Note: Under the lead of Environment and Climate Change Canada, Parks Canada Agency collaborates with other federal departments and agencies, including Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, Correctional Service of Canada, Fisheries and Oceans, and Canadian Coast Guard, National Defense, National Research Council, Public Services and Procurement Canada, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and Transport Canada to implement this strategy.

4. Theme IV: Targets and Implementation Strategies

Goal 6: Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions and Energy

Target 6.1: GHG Emissions Reduction

The Government of Canada will reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its buildings and fleets by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020.
Departmental Target
10.1% below 2005 by 2020
Scope and Context
Targeted emissions include GHG emissions from energy consumed by facilities and fleet owned and operated by Parks Canada.
Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals, and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program: Internal Services
Performance Measurement
Expected result
Reduce the carbon footprint and energy consumption of federal operations.
Performance indicatorTargeted performance level
Updated GHG reduction implementation plan in place by March 31, 2015. The Parks Canada Master Plan for the Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions was updated as of March 31, 2015.
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2005–06. 39.1 kt
GHG emissions (kt CO2 equivalent) in fiscal year 2016–17, not accounting for renewable power emission credits, if applicable 36.7 kt
Renewable power emission credits applied in fiscal year 2016–17 (kt CO2 equivalent). 0 kt
Percentage change in GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005–06 to fiscal year 2016−17, inclusive of renewable power emission credits, if applicable. -6.1%
Adjustments made to base year GHG emissions. No

Goal 7: Waste and Asset Management

Target 7.1: Real Property Environmental Performance

As of April 1, 2014, and pursuant to departmental Real Property Sustainability Frameworks, an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance will be achieved in Government of Canada real property projects and operations.

Scope and Context
Existing buildings with area greater than 1,000 square metres and new construction building projects over $1M with area greater than 1,000 square metres.
Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals, and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program: Internal Services
Performance Measurement
Expected result
An industry-recognized level of high-environmental performance will be achieved in Government of Canada real property projects and operations.
Performance indicatorTargeted performance level
Real Property Sustainability Framework in place to improve the management of energy, waste and water in departmental real property assets by March 31, 2015. Parks Canada had this Real Property Sustainability Framework in place as of March 31, 2015.
Total number of existing Crown-owned buildings (over 1000 m2) and new lease or lease renewal projects (over 1000 m2) where the Crown is the major lessee,assessed for environmental performance using an industry-recognized assessment tool, and total associated floor space (m2). 11 Crown-owned buildings
22 790 m2
0 new lease or lease renewal projects
0 m2
Planned assessment tool to be used: BOMA BESt
Total number of existing Crown-owned buildings, new construction, build-to-lease projects and major renovations projects achieving an industry‑recognized level of high-environmental performance, and total associated floor space (m2). 0 Crown-owned buildings
0 m2
Targeted performance level: LEED Gold
0 new construction projects
0 m2
Targeted performance level: LEED Gold
0 build-to-lease projects
0 m2
Targeted performance level: LEED Gold
0 major renovation projects
0 m2
Targeted performance level: LEED Gold
Number of fit-up and refit projects achieving an industry-recognized level of high-environmental performance. 0 fit-up and refit projects
0 m2
Planned performance level: LEED Silver
Implementation strategy element or best practiceTargeted performance level
7.1.1.1. Achieve a level of performance that meets or exceeds the custodian’s current commitment(s) to sustainable buildings using industry-recognized assessment and verification tool(s). Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
7.1.1.2. Conduct life-cycle assessments for major construction and renovation projects using an industry-recognized tool. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
7.1.1.3. Develop plans to address environmental performance assessment recommendations for existing Crown-owned buildings. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
7.1.1.4. Manage the collection, diversion and disposal of workplace waste in Crown-owned buildings in an environmentally responsible manner. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
7.1.1.5. Manage construction, renovation and demolition waste in Crown-owned buildings in an environmentally responsible manner. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
7.1.1.7. Develop an approach to training for building operators of Crown-owned buildings. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
Target 7.2: Green Procurement

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.

Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals, and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program: Internal Services
Performance Measurement
Expected result
Environmentally responsible acquisition, use, and disposal of goods and services.
Performance indicatorTargeted performance level
Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place as of April 1, 2014. Parks Canada had this departmental approach in place as of April 1, 2014.
Number and percentage of procurement and/or materiel management specialists who completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course (C215) or equivalent, in fiscal year 2016–17. 27 of 30

90%
Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement, in fiscal year 2016–17. 8 of 8

100%
Departmental green procurement target
As of March 31, 2017, 75% of vehicles purchased annually will be selected from the Parks Canada Preauthorized Vehicle List.
Performance indicatorTargeted performance level
Percentage of vehicles purchased that were on the Parks Canada Preauthorized Vehicle List. 75% of vehicles purchased

Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
Departmental green procurement target
As of March 31, 2017, 95% of printers, photocopiers, and multi-functional devices will have environmental features such as duplex printing capability or automatic shutoff mode.
Performance indicatorTargeted performance level
Number of printers, photocopiers, and multifunctional devices purchased or leased that have an environmental feature relative to total number purchased. 95% of printers, photocopiers, and multifunctional devices

Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
Departmental green procurement target
As of March 31, 2017, 100% of office computers will have a minimum lifespan of three years, to reduce electronic waste.
Performance indicatorTargeted performance level
Average service life of office computers. 100% of computers
Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
Implementation strategy element or best practiceTargeted performance level
7.2.1.5. Leverage common-use procurement instruments where available and feasible. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
Best Practice
7.2.3. Train acquisition cardholders on green procurement.
Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
Best Practice
7.2.4. Increase awareness of the Policy on Green Procurement among managers.
Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
Target 7.3: Sustainable Workplace Operations

As of April 1, 2015, the Government of Canada will update and adopt policies and practices to improve the sustainability of its workplace operations.

Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals, and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program: Internal Services
Performance Measurement
Expected result
Departmental workplace operations have a reduced environmental impact.
Performance indicatorTargeted performance level
Approach to maintain or improve the sustainability of the departmental workplace in place as of March31, 2015. Parks Canada implemented a strategy which outlines this approach to maintain or improve the sustainability of the workplace as of March 31, 2015.
Implementation strategy element or best practiceTargeted performance level
7.3.1.1. Engage employees in greening government operations practices. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
7.3.1.2. Integrate environmental considerations into corporate policies, processes and practices in accordance with departmental refresh cycles. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
7.3.1.3. Maintain or improve existing approaches to sustainable workplace practices (printer ratios, paper usage, and green meetings). Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
7.3.1.4. Minimize the ratio of information technology (IT) assets per employee. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
7.3.1.5. Select and operate IT and office equipment in a manner that reduces energy consumption and material usage. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
7.3.1.6. Dispose of e-waste in an environmentally sound and secure manner. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
7.3.1.7. Reuse or recycle workplace materiel and assets in an environmentally sound and secure manner. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
7.3.1.8. Minimize all non-hazardous solid waste generated, and leverage service offerings to maximize the diversion of waste. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
7.3.1.9. Increase the population density in office buildings, and increase space utilization in special purpose buildings. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
7.3.1.10. Maintain or improve sustainable fleet management. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.

Goal 8: Water Management

Target 8.1: Water Management

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will take further action to improve water management within its real property portfolio.

Scope and Context
Existing buildings with area greater than 1,000 square metres and new construction building projects over $1M with area greater than 1,000 square metres.
Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals, and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program: Internal Services
Performance Measurement
Expected result
Water is managed sustainably in Government of Canada real property operations.
Performance indicatorTargeted performance level
Approach to improving water management included in Real Property Sustainability Framework in place by March31, 2015. Parks Canada’s Real Property Sustainability Framework, including an approach to improving water management, was in place as of March 31, 2015.
Amount and percentage of floor space in buildings over 1000 m2 that includes water metering, in fiscal year 2016–17 (where feasible). 42,840 m2 existing Crown-owned
100%
0 m2 new Crown built-to-lease
0%
0 m2 major renovations
0%
0 m2 leases
0%
Implementation strategy element or best practiceTargeted performance level
8.1.1.1. Conserve potable water. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
8.1.1.2. Manage storm water run-off. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.
8.1.1.4. Meter the water usage in new projects. Parks Canada is seeking to reach “Achieved” status.

5. Additional Agency Sustainable Development Activities and Initiatives

In addition to its core implementation strategies, Parks Canada contributes to sustainable development through additional activities such as the engagement of Canadians through stakeholder and partner relationships and visitor experiences.

Stakeholder and Partner Engagement

Activity
Parks Canada will provide increased opportunities for Canadians to be involved with Parks Canada places in activities they consider meaningful and relevant.
Link to FSDS 2013–16 Themes
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals, and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.3 Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
Sub Program 1.3.2: Partnering and Participation
Description of the Program
This program encourages the participation of partners and stakeholders and leads to new or expanded opportunities for Canadians to discover and develop a sense of connection to their protected heritage places. Partnering arrangements advance shared or complimentary goals and objectives, and result in a wide range of collaborative activities including program delivery, promotional campaigns, contests, scientific and academic research, learning tools and new products. Partners include private sector organizations as well as other government departments, NGO’s, academic institutions, and Indigenous peoples, who in a number of places co-manage national heritage places. Stakeholders engage with Parks Canada through a wide variety of activities such as the Minister’s Round Table, formal and informal consultation processes, and the national volunteer program. Stakeholders include individuals, groups and organizations that have an interest in Parks Canada and ensure that Canadians’ needs and priorities are clearly expressed and inform Parks Canada’s actions and direction.
Expected Result
Stakeholders and partners are engaged in the protection and presentation of Parks Canada’s administered places.
Performance Indicator
  • Increase in the percentage of Parks Canada volunteers.
  • Percentage of collaborative initiatives with five national strategic partners that are maintained or expanded.

Visitor Experience

Activity
Parks Canada will facilitate a diverse range of opportunities in Parks Canada’s protected heritage places for visitors to learn about, experience, and enjoy the spirit, wonder, and awe of Canada’s network of heritage places.
Link to FSDS 2013–16 Themes
Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians
Link to Parks Canada Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic Outcome: Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals, and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Program 1.4: Visitor Experience
Description of the Program
This program fosters opportunities for Canadians and international visitors to discover, experience, enjoy and develop a sense of personal connection to Canada’s national urban park, national parks, national historic sites administered by Parks Canada, national marine conservation areas, and heritage canals. This program includes a range of activities, services and products associated with pre-visit planning, the on-site visit, and post visit communications. It includes tourism marketing, trip planning information, reception, orientation, interpretation, recreation, special events, merchandise, compliance and visitor safety services, and visitor facilities. The program is supported by market and visitor analytics, trend analysis, and performance measurement.
Expected Result
Canadians and International visitors visit Parks Canada’s administered places and visitors at surveyed locations feel a sense of connection to these places.
Performance Indicators
  • Increase in the number of visits at Park Canada’s administered places.
  • Average percentage of visitors that consider the place is meaningful to them.
  • Average percentage of visitors that are satisfied with their visit.

6. Sustainable Development Management System

Parks Canada Sustainable Development Vision

The Federal Sustainable Development Act defines sustainable development as development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. It states that the Government of Canada “acknowledges the need to integrate environmental, economic and social factors in the making of all decisions by government.”

Sustainable development is central to Parks Canada’s mandate and vision. It is ingrained in all aspects of the Agency’s activities from establishing and conserving national parks and national marine conservation areas to designating and commemorating national historic sites. Parks Canada is committed to ensuring that Canada’s treasured natural and historic places remain unimpaired for the understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of present and future generations.

Parks Canada activities also contribute to the Canadian economy. The combined annual expenditures of Parks Canada and its millions of visitors make a substantial and widespread contribution to the Canadian economy, both directly through its facilities, locations and services, and indirectly in the surrounding communities through spending on accommodations, restaurants, and other tourism-related businesses. Parks Canada protected heritage places are significant economic drivers, with a contribution of over $3.3 billion annually to the Canadian economy, and to hundreds of communities across Canada, many in remote and rural areas.

Managing Sustainable Development

Sustainable development involves the consideration of environmental, economic and social objectives in the development and implementation of public policies and programs. The needs of the present as well as the needs of future generations are also taken into consideration. Integrated decision making and a long-term approach to planning are defining characteristics of sustainable development.

Parks Canada takes an integrated approach in managing its heritage places. For example, Parks Canada carries out conservation and restoration projects in national parks. These projects are designed in a manner that ensures the conservation of natural resources, while enhancing visitor experiences and engaging key audiences with a view to connecting Canadians to their heritage places. This integrated approach to the delivery of Parks Canada’s mandate has strengthened the Agency’s contribution to all aspects of sustainable development - environmental, social and economic.

Parks Canada’s decision making and sustainable development practices include collaborating with groups that share its values and have an interest in its work. The establishment of national parks and national marine conservation areas, for example, requires a high level of engagement on the part of provincial governments and Indigenous peoples. The designation and commemoration of persons, places and events of historic significance equally demand the active participation of stakeholders, partners and community groups. The Agency recognizes that building and maintaining these collaborative relationships is essential to achieving its mandate of protecting and presenting Canada’s natural and cultural heritage.

Moreover, Parks Canada promotes sustainable development practices by encouraging the use of analytical techniques that compare and integrate environmental, social, and economic objectives and that address multi-year or long-term concerns. For example, the Agency uses social science analytical and performance measurement tools to understand and engage Canadians, particularly certain segments of the population (e.g. urban, youth, new Canadians), in meaningful ways to ensure that its heritage places remain relevant for present and future generations.

Finally the Agency is engaged in several interdepartmental initiatives related to sustainable development, such as the Species at Risk, Federal Contaminated Sites, and Greening Government Operations.

7. Strategic Environmental Assessment

Parks Canada Agency will continue to ensure that its decision-making process includes consideration of the FSDS goals and targets through the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) process. A SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the given proposal on the environment, including on the FSDS goals and targets. The results of Parks Canada Agency’s SEA are made public when an initiative is announced. The purpose of the public statement is to demonstrate that the environmental effects, including the impacts on achieving the FSDS goals and targets, of the approved policy, plan or program have been appropriately considered during proposal development and decision making.


Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPP) of $5 Million or More

Name of transfer payment program Funding to Support the Trans Canada Trail Foundation’s (TCTF) Fundraising Campaign

Voted
Start date March 25, 2014
End date April 1, 2017
Type of transfer payment Grant
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2013–14
Strategic Outcome Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture Program 1.1: Heritage Places Establishment; and
Sub-Program 1.1.4: Other Heritage Places Designations
Description The purpose of this grant is to fulfill the Government of Canada’s commitment towards the completion of the Trans Canada Trail.
Expected results The objective is to support the TCTF in their efforts to raise funds to complete the Trans Canada Trail by 2017.
Fiscal year of last completed evaluation n/a
Decision following the results of last evaluation n/a
Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation n/a
General targeted recipient groups n/a
Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients n/a


Planning Information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment2015–16
Forecast
spending
2016–17
Planned
spending
2017–18
Planned
spending
2018–19
Planned
spending
Total grants 6,250,000 5,800,000 0 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total program 6,250,000 5,800,000 0 0



Disclosure of Transfer Payment Programs (TPP) Under $5 Million

Name of transfer payment programEnd date Type of transfer paymentType of appropriation Link to department’s Program Alignment ArchitectureMain ObjectivePlanned spending for 2016–17Fiscal year of last completed evaluationGeneral targeted recipient group
Grant to the International Peace Garden

(Voted)
Ongoing Grant Appropriated annually through Estimates Program 1.2: Heritage Places Conservation; Sub-Program 1.2.5: Other Heritage Places Conservation To help defray the costs of operating the International Peace Garden. $22,700 2010–11 Non-profit organizations
General Class Contribution Program (GCCP)

(Voted)
Ongoing Contribution Appropriated annually through Estimates Program 1.1: Heritage Places Establishment;

Program 1.2: Heritage Places Conservation;

Program 1.3: Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support;

Program 1.4: Visitor Experience;

Program 1.5 Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management; and Internal Services.
The objective of the program is to assist recipients in conducting activities and delivering projects that will support the Agency in fulfilling its mandate to preserve and protect nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage and present and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations. $3,777,924 2010–11 n/a
National Historic Sites Cost Sharing Class Contribution Program

(Voted)
Ongoing Contribution Appropriated annually through Estimates Program 1.2: Heritage Places Conservation; Sub-Program 1.2.5: Other Heritage Places Conservation To conduct activities aimed at ensuring the commemorative integrity of non-federally owned or administered national historic sites. $1,000,000 2012–13 Non-profit organizations, other levels of government and indigenous groups



Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations Over the Next Three Fiscal Years

A. Internal audits

Title of internal auditInternal audit typeStatusExpected completion date
Frameworks of Infrastructure Funding Internal controls / Financial management controls In progress June 2016
Business Continuity Internal controls In progress December 2016
Audits of Key Financial and Administrative Processes (four audit reports - Field Units to be determined) Financial management controls Planned September 2016, March 2017, September 2017, March 2018
BMO Credit Card Controls Internal controls Planned December 2016
Project Management (Infrastructure funding) Internal controls / Financial management controls Planned March 2017 and 2018
Campground Reservation system Internal controls / Financial management controls Planned March 2017
Emergency Management Internal controls/human resources Planned June 2017
Realty Governance Internal controls / Financial management controls Planned September 2017
Compliance with Organization Design Requirements Internal controls / human resources Planned September 2017
Information Management Internal controls Planned January 2018
Human Resources data integrity (PeopleSoft and paper files) Internal controls/human resources Planned March 2018
Revenue collected by third party Internal controls / Financial management controls Planned March 2018
Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Internal controls / human resources Planned March 2018
Note: Planned internal audits are based on the Agency’s 2015–16 multi-year internal audit plan and are subject to change following approval of 2016–17 plan which was still under development at the time of publishing this report.

B. Evaluations

Link to department’s Program Alignment ArchitectureTitle of the evaluationPlanned evaluation start datePlanned deputy head approval date
Program 1.2 – Heritage Places Conservation Law Enforcement December 2014 March 2016
Sub-Program 1.5.1 – Townsite Management Townsite Management January 2015 March 2016
Across all programs General Class Contribution Program April 2015 March 2016
Sub-Program 1.2.4 – National Historic Site Conservation National Historic Site Conservation September 2015 September 2016
Sub-Program 1.4.4 – National Historic Site Visitor Experience National Historic Site Visitor Experience September 2015 September 2016
Sub-Program 1.2.5 – Other Heritage Places Conservation National Historic Sites Cost-Sharing Program April 2016 September 2016
Sub-Program 1.3.1 – Heritage Places Promotion Heritage Places Promotion April 2016 March 2017
Sub-Program 1.4.5 – Heritage Canal Visitor Experience, 1.5.3 – Heritage Canal Management Heritage Canals April 2016 March 2017
Program 1.4 – Visitor Experience Visitor Safety and Prevention April 2016 March 2017
Sub-Program 1.5.2 – Highway Management Highway Management April 2016 March 2017
Sub-Program 1.4.1 – National Park Visitor Experience National Park Visitor Experience September 2016 September 2017
Sub-Program 1.1.2 – National Marine Conservation Area Establishment, 1.2.3 – National Marine Conservation Area Conservation, 1.4.3 – National Marine Conservation Area Visitor Experience National Marine Conservation Areas April 2017 March 2018
Sub-Program 1.2.2 – National Urban Park Conservation, 1.4.2 – National Urban Park Visitor Experience National Urban Park April 2017 March 2018
Sub-Program 1.3.2 – Partnering and Participation Partnering and Participation April 2017 March 2018
Sub-Program 1.1.1 – National Park Establishment National Park Establishment September 2018 March 2019
Sub-Program 1.1.3 – National Historic Site Designation National Historic Site Designation September 2018 March 2019
Sub-Program 1.1.4 – Other Heritage Places Designation, Sub-Program 1.2.5 – Other Heritage Places Conservation Other Heritage Places Designation and Conservation September 2018 March 2019
Sub-Program 1.5.1 – Townsite Management Townsite Management September 2018 March 2019
Note: Planned evaluations are based on the Agency’s 2015–16 multi-year evaluation plan and are subject to change following approval of 2016–17 plan which was still under development at the time of publishing this report.


User Fees and Regulatory Charges

Fee NameFee TypeFee-setting authorityReason for planned change of existing fee or introduction of new feeEffective date of planned changeConsultation and review process planned
Entry Fees

New and amended
Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act Part of ongoing review cycle TBD Any potential revision to the existing fee structure would be subject to a consultation process.
Camping Fees

New and amended
Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act Part of ongoing review cycle
Introduce new product offers to respond to market demand
TBD
Lockage Fees

Amend
Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act Part of ongoing review cycle TBD
Municipal Services

New and amended
Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act Part of ongoing review cycle TBD
Other Revenues

Amend
Other products and services Parks Canada Agency Act Part of ongoing review cycle TBD