Table of contents

Cover Page Parks Canada Departmental Plan 2021-22

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Parks Canada Agency, 2021

  • Catalogue No.: R61-108E-PDF
  • ISSN 2561-1526

From the Minister

The Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada

As the Minister responsible for Parks Canada, I am pleased to present the 2021–22 Departmental Plan for the Agency. This plan provides Canadians with information on Parks Canada’s priorities and the results that the Agency expects to achieve over the next fiscal year.

As the world continues to respond to the challenges of the global COVID-19 pandemic, Canadians have found comfort in the outdoors and nature. Parks Canada’s role in protecting nationally significant examples of natural and cultural heritage and facilitating the enjoyment of these treasured places by Canadians has never been more important.

Looking to 2021–22, I remain dedicated to delivering on the commitments the Government made to Canadians as set out in my Ministerial Mandate Letter and the Speech from the Throne. Through our work, we will protect and restore natural and cultural heritage in Canada, advance reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, and encourage Canadians to experience national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas. At the same time, we will continue working with partners across the country, including the tourism industry, to contribute to economic recovery following the COVID-19 pandemic.

Parks Canada will also continue to support Canada’s commitment to expand the network of protected and conserved areas and contribute to biodiversity and the recovery of species at risk by conserving 25% of Canada’s lands and oceans by 2025, and working toward 30% of each by 2030.

Ecological integrity will continue to be the first priority in all decision-making in national parks and the Agency will take concrete measures to preserve biodiversity and strengthen ecosystem resilience in response to climate change and other stressors.

Parks Canada will also play a leadership role in protecting and conserving cultural heritage, ensuring that these heritage places continue being a source of pride, knowledge and enjoyment for Canadians today and into the future.

I am committed to advancing new legislation, policies and instruments for the effective protection of federally owned cultural heritage places and the development of clearer direction on the designation and preservation of national cultural heritage places.

Parks Canada will continue to deliver on the Framework for History and Commemoration: National Historic Sites System Plan (2019) in sharing the stories of Canada – one where all perspectives are represented, as well as the difficult periods of our past. In particular, the Framework reflects our commitment to ensuring that the histories and voices of Indigenous peoples and diverse and minority communities are incorporated at heritage places administered by Parks Canada.

National historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas represent the very best Canada has to offer. Together, they tell the stories of who we are, including the histories, cultures, and contributions of Indigenous peoples and the stories of Canada in all of its diversity. The actions outlined in Parks Canada’s 2021–22 Departmental Plan reflect our ongoing commitment to ensuring that Canada’s natural and cultural treasures are protected for present and future generations.

The Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada


From the President and Chief Executive Officer

Ron Hallman, President and Chief Executive Officer, Parks Canada Agency

I am proud to present this 2021–22 Departmental Plan on behalf of the more than 5,800 dedicated Parks Canada team members whom I have the privilege of leading. The priorities and activities highlighted in this Plan are intended, in all respects, to ensure the delivery of the Agency’s mandate, support the Minister in achieving his mandate commitments, and advance horizontal, government-wide objectives on behalf of all Canadians.

Parks Canada is privileged to administer one of the finest and most extensive systems of natural and cultural heritage places in the world. It is with immense pride that we manage, on behalf of all Canadians, our nation’s vast network of protected heritage places, including 171 national historic sites, 47 national parks, five national marine conservation areas and one national urban park.

The Agency is committed to a system of national heritage places that recognizes and honours the contributions of Indigenous peoples, their histories and cultures, as well as the special relationships that Indigenous peoples have with their traditional lands and waters. In collaboration with other orders of government, Indigenous partners, and stakeholders, we are committed to strengthening the conservation of natural and cultural heritage in Canada.

Parks Canada has played an important role in delivering critical services during the COVID-19 pandemic and in providing Canadians with access to the health and wellness benefits that come from spending time outdoors and in wide open spaces. The Agency has done this while implementing measures to protect the health and safety of visitors, employees, and indeed all Canadians. The pandemic highlights, now more than ever, the importance of protected places for our collective health, well-being, and prosperity, and Parks Canada is proud to have ensured the ongoing stewardship and public accessibility of these national heritage places during this time of great challenge.

In the coming year, the Agency will continue to be a key player in providing access to nature and supporting tourism in Canada – working with nearby communities to foster economic opportunities and providing visitor experiences that attract a broad diversity of Canadians, particularly in light of the need to support economic recovery following the COVID-19 pandemic.

By delivering innovative programs and services, Parks Canada will continue to introduce children and families to a lifetime of outdoor and cultural activities and foster learning about the environment and Canada’s heritage. This includes delivery of the popular Learn-to Camp program, which introduces thousands of Canadians every year to the joy of camping and provides the tools and knowledge to help more Canadians, including new Canadians, to experience and enjoy protected places.

The Agency will continue to implement infrastructure projects to address deferred work and to improve the condition of its contemporary assets and heritage structures. We will continue to work toward securing long-term capital funding to better manage heritage, tourism, waterway, and highway assets and support program and service delivery for the long term.

In the coming year, the Agency will aspire to lead in the transition to low-carbon, sustainable and climate resilient real property, fleets, services and operations guided by the Government’s commitment to greening government operations.

In addition, Parks Canada is taking action – and we are committed to taking further action – to ensure that our recruitment and retention plans, our policies and programs, and our delivery of services to Canadians are guided by the principles of equity, diversity, inclusion and accessibility.

It is a privilege to lead the Parks Canada team, and I am extremely proud of the work of our team members in the service of Canadians. From coast to coast to coast, Parks Canada employees play an important role in protecting Canada’s nationally significant natural and cultural treasures, advancing Indigenous reconciliation, supporting local jobs and economies, and providing world class opportunities for millions of visitors to experience the best of our nation’s natural and cultural heritage across more than 450,000 km2 of protected areas, all while remaining healthy and safe. Together, we look forward to delivering on the commitments in this Plan.

Ron Hallman
President and Chief Executive Officer
Parks Canada Agency


Plans at a glance

Natural heritage protection

Parks Canada will support the Minister’s mandate to conserve 25% of Canada’s land and 25% of Canada’s oceans by 2025, working toward 30% of each by 2030.

The Agency will continue to advance the Government of Canada’s commitment to ensuring protected areas are managed to conserve biodiversity over the long term, including by working in partnership to improve the connectivity of national parks with the broader landscape, increasing the use of science and knowledge to inform conservation decision-making, and contributing to the conservation of species at risk.

Parks Canada will be a key contributor in the Government's priority to fight climate change, protect the environment and preserve Canada's natural legacy. The Agency will take concrete measures to preserve biodiversity and build ecosystem resilience in response to climate change and other stressors. Ecological integrity will continue to be the first priority in all decision-making in national parks.

In support of the Government's commitment and priority to advance reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, the Agency will continue working towards a greater recognition of Indigenous leadership and integrate Indigenous knowledge into the stewardship of natural heritage places.

Parks Canada will enhance its efforts to play a leadership role in natural heritage conservation and promotion, and will continue to work to ensure that Canada’s national parks are a source of national pride and enjoyment today and for future generations.


Cultural heritage protection

Parks Canada will implement the Framework for History and Commemoration, a new approach to history and commemoration at Parks Canada. The Agency will engage Indigenous peoples and minority communities to tell their stories to ensure that the histories communicated at Parks Canada heritage places is reflective of the diversity of Canada.

Parks Canada will advance the Minister’s commitment to work on the development of new legislation, policies and instruments for the effective protection of federally owned cultural heritage places and support the development of clearer direction on the designation and preservation of national cultural heritage places.

The Agency will implement its preventative conservation strategy to safeguard the collection under its care; understand and adapt to the impacts of climate change on cultural heritage; and advance efforts toward conserving cultural resources at heritage places.

The Agency will continue to work with Indigenous peoples to advance the cooperative management of cultural heritage places and support the Government of Canada's continued core priority of reconciliation.

Parks Canada will enhance its efforts to play a leadership role in cultural heritage conservation and promotion, and will continue to work to ensure that Canada’s national historic sites are a source of national pride and enjoyment today and for future generations.


Connecting to Canadians

Parks Canada will enhance its efforts to play a leadership role in heritage conservation and promotion, and will continue to work to ensure that Canada’s national heritage places are a source of national pride and enjoyment today and for future generations.

Parks Canada will make inclusivity and accessibility fundamental principles in the development and delivery of visitor services and experiences to ensure that national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas are accessible to all Canadians.

Parks Canada will bring nature and history to Canadians in their communities and in their homes with innovative outreach and engagement programming, digital experiences, and promotional activities.

The Agency will work with a wide variety of local and regional partners to provide visitor services and experiences, and also to introduce Canadians to the safe enjoyment of natural, cultural and historic places through popular initiatives such as Learn-to Camp.

In support of the Government of Canada's continued core priority of reconciliation, Parks Canada will facilitate Indigenous connections with traditionally used lands and waters as well as the delivery of experiences and programs which create the space for Indigenous partners to share their cultures and traditions with Canadians and the world, and facilitate a deeper understanding of this foundational part of our country.

As Canada responds to the challenges of COVID-19, Parks Canada will continue to be an integral player in supporting tourism in Canada by working with the tourism industry and participating in the sector’s recovery from the impacts of the global pandemic.


Asset sustainability

Parks Canada will continue to implement infrastructure projects to address deferred work and improve the condition of its contemporary assets and heritage structures so that Canadians can continue to safely access protected heritage places, and built heritage is safeguarded for generations to come. As infrastructure funding is sunsetting after 2021–22, the Agency is developing a long-term plan for the management and sustainability of its infrastructure with a view to securing long term capital funding to better manage heritage, tourism, waterway, and highway assets and support program and service delivery for the long term. The Agency’s investment decision making is prioritized to not only address asset condition but also to build back better by ensuring that key Government priorities including accessibility, inclusivity, reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, greenhouse gas reduction and climate change resilience are incorporated.

For instance, guided by the Government’s commitment to greening government operations, the Agency intends to make significant progress in transitioning to low-carbon, sustainable and climate resilient real property, fleets, services and operations.


Business innovation

In support of the Government’s commitment to results, transparency and accountability to Canadians, Parks Canada will review its capacity, planning, financial management, business processes, systems and tools, to ensure it has robust, effective and efficient internal services to support program delivery to Canadians.

Building on the strong foundation established since the Agency began its major capital asset investment program in 2015, the Agency will be implementing a multi-year plan to strengthen its investment readiness, This plan will position the Agency to support the Government’s priorities while reinforcing its long term asset planning with a view to securing long-term, predictable funding.

Parks Canada will also develop innovative recruitment and retention strategies.


Workforce equity, accessibility, inclusion and diversity, and well being

In an effort to foster a diverse workforce and to promote inclusion and equity, Parks Canada will implement a Diversity and Inclusion Strategy based on the following human resource pillars: culture of inclusion, diversity of the workforce, policy and program equity.

This strategy will establish new key actions and activities that will foster a culture of inclusion for all employees. Legislative obligations, such as an employment equity plan, and employment systems review will be encompassed in the strategy. Building on previous achievements, the strategy will also include some focus on supporting Indigenous learning offers and will increase representation in hiring, appointments and leadership development, as part of Canada’s Anti Racism Strategy for 2019-2022.

Parks Canada will provide opportunities for developing a stronger understanding of and training on accessibility considerations, and will equip hiring managers with the knowledge and tools needed to become accessibility-confident. The Agency will initiate the review of its processes, programs and services to identify, remove and prevent accessibility barriers. In parallel, continuous engagement and consultation with staff will be undertaken to feed into the development of an Agency-wide accessibility strategy.

Parks Canada will maintain and create vibrant and engaged employee networks, which will be leveraged to identify, mitigate, and remove barriers in the workplace.

The Agency will continue to focus on the well being and safety of its workforce in particular as a result of the challenges arising from the pandemic.

For more information on Parks Canada’s plans, priorities and planned results, see the Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks section of this report.


Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks

This section contains detailed information on the department’s planned results and resources for each of its core responsibilities. It also contains information on key risks related to achieving those results.


Protecting and presenting Canada’s natural and cultural heritage

Description

Establish national parks and national marine conservation areas; designate places, persons and events of national historic significance; protect and conserve natural and cultural heritage guided by science and Indigenous knowledge; provide opportunities to visit, experience and enjoy Canada’s natural and cultural heritage; work with the public, other federal departments, provinces, territories, Indigenous peoples, and stakeholders to carry out these responsibilities.

Departmental results

In carrying out its core responsibility, Parks Canada will advance three Departmental Results:

  • Canada’s natural heritage is protected for present and future generations
  • Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for present and future generations
  • People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them

Planning highlights

Departmental result 1: Canada’s natural heritage is protected for present and future generations
Priority: Natural heritage protection

Natural heritage establishment

Parks Canada will support the Government of Canada’s commitment to protect Canada's natural legacy and conserve 25% of Canada’s land and 25% of Canada’s oceans by 2025, working toward 30% of each by 2030. Expansion of the national park and national marine conservation area systems will continue to make a meaningful contribution towards the government’s goals of conservation, Indigenous reconciliation and rural economic development.

In support of these goals, Parks Canada, during the planning period, will:

  • Work toward the establishment of new national parks and national park reserves, including South Okanagan-Similkameen in the dry interior of British Columbia, and Pitaweikek in northeastern Prince Edward Island, as well as working with provincial, territorial and Indigenous governments to identify additional sites for protection under the Canada National Parks Act.
  • Explore opportunities to work with municipalities to expand urban parks across Canada through the assessment of feedback on urban parks received from Canadians during the 2020 Minister’s Round Table engagement and consultation.
  • Work toward the establishment of national marine conservation areas in eastern James Bay, les Iles de la Madeleine, southern Strait of Georgia, and northern Labrador; and by initiating work on additional national marine conservation area proposals in unrepresented marine regions. Parks Canada will also assess the potential for new freshwater national marine conservation areas as a contribution towards Canada's terrestrial targets.
  • Work with Indigenous governments and communities, as well as territorial governments, on the implementation of establishment agreements for newly established heritage places, including Thaidene Nene National Park Reserve and Tallurutiup Imanga National Marine Conservation Area.

Active establishment projects

Map 1: Active establishment projects
Map 1: Active establishment projects — Text version

A map of Canada showing active establishment projects for national marine conservation areas and national parks.

For national marine conservation areas, the Southern Strait of Georgia in British Columbia is labelled as being in the working boundary phase and Tuvaijuittuq in the high arctic in Nunavut, Labrador Coast in Labrador, Eastern James Bay in Quebec on Hudson Bay and Iles de la Madeleine in Quebec are labelled as being in the Area of Interest phase.

For national parks, South Okanagan Similkameen in southern British Columbia is labelled as being in the working boundary phase and Pitaweikek on the north short of Prince Edward Island is labelled as being in the area of interest phase.

National park/marine and coastal area Contribution to protected areas Partners
South Okanagan-Similkameen National Park Reserve
Southeastern British Columbia
Advance negotiation of a federal – provincial – First Nation establishment agreement that, among other things, will confirm a final boundary and governance approach for the national park reserve Government of British Columbia and Syilx First Nations
Pitaweikek National Park Reserve*
Maritime Plain region (north shore of Prince Edward Island)
*referred to in previous departmental plans and results reports as Hog Island Sandhills National Park Reserve; Pitaweikek is the Mi’kmaq word for Hog Island.
Continue work on a feasibility assessment, including public consultation, confirm a boundary and governance approach for a national park reserve, followed by negotiation of the relevant establishment agreement(s) Government of Prince Edward Island and the Epekwitk Assembly of Councils, L’nuey, Crown Indigenous Relations Canada
Proposed national marine conservation area in Arctic Basin
Ellesmere Island in Nunavut - Tuvaijuittuq
Continue work on a feasibility assessment Department of Fisheries and Oceans, the Government of Nunavut and the Qikiqtani Inuit Association
Proposed national marine conservation area reserve in the southern Strait of Georgia
Strait of Georgia in British Columbia
Continue work on a feasibility assessment Government of British Columbia, local First Nations and stakeholders
Proposed marine protected area adjacent to the Îles de la Madeleine
Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence
Continue work on a feasibility assessment Government of Quebec, First Nations and local communities
Proposed national marine conservation area in James Bay
Eastern James Bay
Continue work on a feasibility assessment Cree Nation Government, Government of Nunavut and Government of Quebec
Proposed national marine conservation area
Northern Labrador
Continue work on a feasibility assessment Nunatsiavut Government, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador and Makivik Corporation
Other national marine conservation area proposals in unrepresented marine regions Launch feasibility assessments for 2 new proposals Provincial and Territorial governments, First Nations and Inuit
Natural heritage conservation

During the planning period, Parks Canada will:

#NatureForAll

  • Personal experiences and connections with nature provide powerful benefits for individual and societal health, well-being and resilience and are also the foundation of a lifelong support for nature conservation and parks; as the current pandemic has reminded us, nature is incredibly important in our lives.
  • #NatureForAll, a growing global community of 460+ partners, is an opportunity to share Parks Canada’s leadership in connecting people with nature so that our successes can be replicated and scaled by others in Canada and internationally. It is also an opportunity for Canadians to learn about approaches being implemented around the world that can be adopted here.
  • Through innovative programming like the virtual #NatureForAll Discovery Zone, the #NatureForAll community is helping to build a culture of conservation that will inspire this generation and generations to come to experience and care for nature in their own backyards, in national parks, and in other protected and conserved areas in Canada and around the world, even when we are spending more time close to home.

International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) World Conservation Congress

  • IUCN, the world’s oldest and largest environmental organisation, plays host to the world every four years during its World Conservation Congress.
  • Originally schedule to be held in Marseille, France in June 2020, the 2020 IUCN World Conservation Congress will be held September 4-11, 2021 with some aspects of the event being held virtually.
  • As State Member representative, Parks Canada continues to lead the Government of Canada’s preparation for and participation in the IUCN World Conservation Congress, including supporting the first ever virtual IUCN One Nature, One Future Global Youth Summit which will be held in Spring 2021.
  • Continue to modernize conservation approaches and contribute to a Nature Legacy for Canada.
  • Continue to move toward an integrated, landscape-level conservation approach in collaboration with Indigenous partners and other regional stakeholders. This will improve our ability to build ecosystem resilience in response to climate change and other stressors, and improve the connectivity through ecological corridors and integration of Parks Canada-administered places with the broader landscape.
  • Continue to monitor ecosystems in national parks and focus efforts on understanding and responding to ecological integrity indicators that will improve conservation results.
  • Implement conservation and restoration projects that are designed to enhance the ecological integrity of national parks, ecological sustainability of national marine conservation areas, and recover species at risk in all Parks Canada-administered places.
  • Contribute to the protection and recovery of species at risk by implementing actions from new and existing site-based, multi-species action plans in coordination with key partners.
  • Continue to work with other federal departments, Indigenous peoples, and stakeholders to advance policy and management tools for national marine conservation areas, including monitoring and reporting standards. These actions will enable the Agency to better understand and report on the state of the national marine conservation area system and more effectively manage these areas.
  • Continue to ensure that science, research, and management of knowledge support Parks Canada’s conservation planning and action and enable effective communication to Canadians.
  • Continue to manage human/wildlife conflict and coexistence, wildlife health, hyper abundant species, alien invasive species, and wildland fire to enhance ecological integrity and ensure public safety.
  • Continue to explore the inclusion of restorative justice principles as an additional law enforcement tool for park wardens to support conservation in Parks Canada-administered places.
  • Continue to co-lead #NatureForAll, a global initiative to inspire love, support, and action for nature.
  • Collaborate with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society and other partners in the preparations for the Fifth International Marine Protected Areas Congress (IMPAC5), to be held in Vancouver in June 2022 – a major opportunity for the world and Canada to assess progress towards marine conservation, to celebrate our remarkable achievements - and to help plot a path towards new global conservation targets.
  • Undertake and fund scientific research to support evidence-based decision making for conservation planning and active management.
  • Continue to implement key conservation actions from the Wood Buffalo National Park World Heritage Site Action Plan, in collaboration with Indigenous partners, other federal departments, provincial and territorial governments and key stakeholders, to ensure that the World Heritage Outstanding Universal Value of Wood Buffalo National Park is maintained for future generations.

Wood Buffalo UNESCO World Heritage Site Action Plan

In 2021–22, Parks Canada will continue to work in close collaboration with Indigenous partners, other federal government departments, provincial and territorial governments and stakeholders to implement the Wood Buffalo National Park World Heritage Site Action Plan to ensure the Outstanding Universal Value of Wood Buffalo National Park are maintained for future generations.

Implementation of the Action Plan will continue to strengthen collaboration with Indigenous peoples in the cooperative management of the park. Parks Canada will continue to enhance scientific capacity for park management including the monitoring of ecosystems and biodiversity in Wood Buffalo National Park, particularly in the Peace Athabasca Delta, in collaboration with Indigenous and government partners.

Other actions include working with all partners to increase understanding of, and take action, to improve management of hydrology and water flow in the Peace Athabasca Delta system.

Through the measures outlined in the Action Plan, ongoing collaboration with Indigenous peoples, and by making use of the best available science and Indigenous knowledge, the Outstanding Universal Value of Wood Buffalo National Park and World Heritage Site will be maintained for future generations.

Working with Indigenous peoples

To advance the Government's priority, Walking the Road of Reconciliation, the Agency will:

Recovery and Protection of Caribou in Nunavut

  • Inuit communities in Nunavut and Parks Canada are working together for the recovery and protection of caribou at national heritage places in Nunavut
  • In collaboration with the community of Resolute, the removal of legacy waste from abandoned industrial sites located in Qausuittuq National Park will improve habitat for endangered Peary caribou.
  • The Caribou Connections project will engage many partners in seeking to identify common research and management priorities for barren-ground and Peary caribou to contribute to the conservation and recovery of these species across jurisdictional boundaries, including in Ukkusiksalik, Qausuittuq and Quttinirpaaq National Parks.
  • Continue to collaboratively advance cooperative management with Indigenous peoples at natural heritage places by establishing new cooperative management structures or by transitioning existing relationship-building structures to include Indigenous roles to support the management of heritage places, including within Recognition of Rights and Self-Determination processes and Rights Reconciliation Agreements.
  • Continue to review and renew existing standards, guidance, and tools to weave in Indigenous knowledge systems and to foster collaboration with Indigenous knowledge holders and meaningful engagement of Indigenous partners in conservation.
  • Creatively work with our Indigenous partners to build stronger relationships and co-develop and co-implement innovative conservation and visitor experience projects.
  • Develop new policy instruments and legislation to support rights implementation and facilitate Indigenous peoples’ uses of heritage places.
  • Investigate, with Indigenous partners, potential methods of fostering joint or contiguous national parks/national marine protected areas and Indigenous Conservation and Protected Areas.
  • Enhance Rights-based negotiations, prioritizing timely, implementable agreements and supported by a collaborative digital work environment and renewed information sharing tools.

Departmental result 2: Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for present and future generations

Priority: Cultural heritage protection

Cultural heritage designation and commemoration

In 2021–22, Parks Canada will:

Promoting diversity and inclusion through the National Program of Historical Commemoration

As part of the Agency's work to diversify and encourage new nominations to the National Program of Historical Commemoration, the Framework for History and Commemoration identifies four new strategic priorities for public history at Parks Canada:

  • Histories of Indigenous peoples
  • Environmental history
  • Diversity
  • Canada and the world

These priorities support the Government of Canada’s commitment to reconciliation with Indigenous peoples and recognize Canada’s changing demographics and the importance of a broad view of history in informing public dialogue and promoting diversity and inclusion.

  • Continue to implement the Framework for History and Commemoration to promote the Government of Canada’s objectives related to diversity and inclusion under the National Program of Historical Commemoration and set direction for history presentation at all Parks Canada-administered heritage places. This includes developing tools and resources for these places to emphasize a full range of voices, perspectives and experiences.
  • Begin a process to seek new designations of persons, places and events that are aligned with the Framework’s strategic priorities.
  • Initiate, through the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, the work of addressing controversy and conflict stemming from existing commemorations, in line with the annex of the Framework for History and Commemoration.
  • Continue to undertake the commemoration of national historic designations by carrying out commemorative plaque unveiling ceremonies in 2021–22, thereby increasing the number of places, persons and events of national historic significance to Canadians that are formally recognized.
  • Explore alternative approaches to commemorate national historic designations.
Cultural heritage conservation

In alignment with the Minister's mandate, the Agency will:

Old meets new: Parks Canada’s national collection gets a new home

Work continues to consolidate the collection of approximately 31 million historical and archaeological objects – representing over 11,000 years of human history! – under Parks Canada's care, bringing together the contents of six storage facilities into one and ensuring that these objects are safeguarded for present and future generations.

The new 8,200 m2 facility in Gatineau will ensure that the collection under Parks Canada’s care is conserved and cared for over the long-term in a sustainable manner for the benefit of current and future generations.

Approximately 1,350 m2 has been dedicated to workspace for researchers and staff, and spaces for reception, meeting, and ceremonial use by Indigenous peoples, facilitating access to the collection.

Construction activity is underway and completion is expected in 2023.

  • Take action toward the development of a legislative proposal related to the designation of places, persons and events of national historic significance and for the protection of federally-owned historic places.
  • Continue to undertake various actions to better protect the heritage value of cultural resources in a sustainable manner, including ensuring the collection is safeguarded and accessible for present and future generations.
  • Continue work to consolidate the collection of historical and archaeological objects―one of the largest in North America―under Parks Canada’s care to a new purpose-built collection facility in Gatineau, Quebec.
  • Continue to support efforts to implement the strategy for preventative conservation of historical and archaeological objects (a cost-effective, evidence-based and sustainable approach to identify and reduce potential hazards to cultural resources).
  • Work collaboratively across the Agency to continue to protect the heritage value of cultural resources during COVID-19 by providing critical archaeology support and advice.
  • Continue to support and/or contribute to the Cultural Resource Management Information System (CRMIS) for the archaeological and historical objects and cultural heritage sites under the administration of Parks Canada.
  • Provide financial assistance to support the protection and presentation of nationally recognized heritage places not administered by the federal government through Parks Canada’s National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places.
  • Continue undertaking research and analysis of economic, social, and environmental impacts of heritage places conservation, upon which options for enhancing heritage conservation measures can be based.
  • Continue to work with custodian departments responsible for the protection and conservation of federal heritage buildings, national historic sites and heritage lighthouses.
  • Continue investments to improve the condition of heritage properties at heritage places. As part of this work, Parks Canada’s heritage conservation professionals will continue to support the protection of cultural resources and conduct impact analyses to identify and mitigate potential threats.
  • Continue advancing Parks Canada’s global strategy to ensure Parks Canada’s leadership role within the international natural and cultural heritage community. A scalable approach has been developed to leverage partnerships, advance international priorities, enhance implementation of bilateral and multilateral agreements, and share best practices.
Working with Indigenous peoples

To advance the Government’s priority: Walking the Road of Reconciliation, the Agency will:

Indigenous engagement through negotiation

Negotiations with Indigenous nations play an important part in reaching consensus on the exercising of Aboriginal Rights and other Indigenous interests in places administered by Parks Canada, including meaningful roles in decision-making, access to land and resources, and protection and presentation of cultural heritage

Participation in rights-based negotiations at Parks Canada have approximately doubled since 2015 to participation at 63 negotiating tables.

Parks Canada is part of leading rights implementation processes in Atlantic Canada, with 9 negotiations ongoing with Mi’kmaq and Wolastoquey nations in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Quebec.

  • Promote Indigenous representation (First Nation, Métis, and Inuit) on the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada.
  • Revise the policies, criteria, and practices of the National Program of Historical Commemoration to better reflect Indigenous histories, heritage values, and memory practices into Canada’s national heritage and history.
  • Continue engagement with Indigenous organizations and governments to advance the review of cultural heritage policies with the goal of ensuring that the management and presentation of cultural resources at Parks Canada is respectful of Indigenous heritage values, approaches and practices.
  • In response to Call to Action 79, continue to work in partnership with the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, Survivors, Indigenous organizations, and other federal departments to develop and implement a national heritage plan and strategy for commemorating residential schools, the history and legacy of residential schools, and the contributions of Indigenous peoples to Canada’s history.
  • Continue to negotiate cooperative management approaches and structures within Recognition of Rights and Self Determination processes and Rights Reconciliation Agreements.
  • Continue to advance cooperative management with Indigenous peoples at cultural heritage places by establishing new cooperative management structures, or transitioning existing relationship-building structures to include roles in decisions making.
Built heritage conservation

A key anticipated achievement in 2021–22 will be the conclusion of 11 cultural heritage projects for a total investment of $53.3M. These projects and others will contribute to departmental results and the Agency’s commemorative integrity objectives by preserving and protecting sites of vital national historic significance for future generations.

Over the planning period, Parks Canada will:

  • Continue to make prioritized investments in its cultural heritage assets that will improve their condition. As part of this work, Parks Canada’s heritage conservation professionals will continue to support the protection of cultural resources in infrastructure projects and conduct impact analyses to identify and mitigate potential threats. In addition, the Agency will also incorporate improvements – where feasible and within available funding – in the priority areas of accessibility, inclusivity, reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, greenhouse gas reduction and climate change resilience. It should be noted that all of this work will occur within the COVID-19 context.
  • Complete the implementation of the Action Plan developed in response to the Auditor General’s report on the conservation of federal properties including: improving the accuracy and completeness of information in its asset management database and reviewing the approach for designating federal heritage buildings.

Investing in heritage assets

Parks Canada will continue to deliver on the most significant infrastructure program in its 110-year history.

Notable examples of investment to protect Canada’s built heritage include:

  • Carleton Martello Tower National Historic Site (Saint John, NB): Completion of Phase 1 restoration work, addressing the long-term structural stability of one of New Brunswick’s most significant cultural heritage landmarks.
  • Province House National Historic Site (Charlottetown, PEI): Phase 1 of the restoration work is complete and significant progress on Phase 2 of this multi-year project at birthplace of Confederation and the seat of Prince Edward Island's provincial legislature since 1847.
  • Fort Lennox National Historic Site (Île-aux-Noix, QC): With an investment of more than $11 million since 2015, restoration work on the site continues, involving stone by stone reconstruction of portions of the 19th century British fortification.
  • Bar U Ranch National Historic Site (Longview, AB): Investment of $4 million to refurbish and preserve four high-visitor-use historical buildings which form one of the largest classified federal heritage designations in Canada.
Build engagement and collaboration

During this reporting period Parks Canada will:

  • Develop innovative partnerships with national, regional, and local stakeholders and Indigenous governments and organisations to amplify the reach, thereby enhancing natural and cultural conservation gains.
  • Work with Indigenous communities on opportunities for experiences, interpretation and storytelling, and present Indigenous values, perspectives and contributions to Canada’s natural and cultural heritage
  • Continue to engage Indigenous communities connected to Parks Canada-administered heritage places on access to Indigenous artifacts and objects and their care and handling.

Stories of Canada Program

The Stories of Canada Program currently supports 25 multi-component capacity building projects including oral history, traditional skills workshops and traveling exhibits. These projects involve over 40 places, across six regions, including each of Parks Canada’s program areas with more than 60 Indigenous groups.

Saoyú-Ɂehdacho National Historic Site Culture Camp – in collaboration with the community of Délı̨nę an authentic Sahtú Dene cultural camp has been completed providing a space for traditional activities to take place. This cultural camp will provide opportunities for elders, knowledge keepers, youth and community to come together to share their stories, history and to celebrate their culture.

We are Kwantlen Book Project –this project at Fort Langley National Historic Site is a collaboration with the Coast Salish Arts and Cultural Society and Kwantlen First Nation, resulting in a book sharing the stories, history and culture of Kwantlen First Nation.


Departmental result 3: People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them

Priority: Connecting to Canadians

Parks Canada-administered places are a source of shared pride for all Canadians. Parks Canada is committed to ensuring that national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas reflect Canada’s diversity, are accessible, and that all Canadians can participate in their protection and enjoyment now and into the future.

Parks Canada will continue its work to ensure that national heritage places can be enjoyed by all and that more Canadians understand and appreciate Canada’s rich history, ecology and the value of cultural and natural conservation.

Visitor services, experiences and promotions

Improving digital services to Canadians

  • The Parks Canada website receives more than 14 million visits per year. Through rigorous user-testing, Parks Canada strives to provide Canadians an excellent online experience. This year, the Agency will be adopting the new Canada.ca design system to further respond to the expectations of Canadians for accessibility and usability.
  • The COVID-19 pandemic presents particular challenges in reaching audiences where face-to-face interactions are not always possible. It also presents new opportunities. To meet these, Parks Canada continues to strengthen the use of digital tools to offer virtual programs, including through live-streaming, reaching Canadians in their homes with learning and experiences to help connect with history, nature and culture.

Learn-to Camp

The Learn-to Camp program provides a new generation of Canadians with the opportunity to learn new skills to experience nature, build awareness of the health and wellness benefits of being outdoors, and help build a life-long appreciation for cultural and natural treasures in Canada.

In 2020, in response to the challenges of COVID-19, the Learn-to Camp program saw a major digital expansion, reaching over 750,000 Canadians through a variety of digital platforms to help Canadians safely enjoy the outdoors.

Parks Canada works continuously to improve its services to Canadians and to remove barriers to the use and enjoyment of national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas. The Agency strives to make inclusion and accessibility fundamental principles in the development and delivery of visitor services and experiences. During this planning period, Parks Canada will:

  • Design and deliver visitor services and experiences that welcome all Canadians as well as visitors from around the world to national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas.
  • Advance inclusive and accessible visitor services and experiences in heritage places across the country.
  • Continue to serve long-standing audiences while innovating in the services, experiences, and outreach programs offered to them.
  • Engage youth, urban Canadians, young families, Canadians with disabilities, and Canadians of diverse backgrounds in the enjoyment and appreciation of protected places.
  • Facilitate awareness, enjoyment and visitation to a wider range of national heritage places, including lesser known national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas, as well as visitation in the spring, fall and winter.
  • Manage visitation at Parks Canada’s busiest destinations to provide high quality visitor experiences while encouraging Canadians and visitors from around the world to enjoy the full range of destinations in the Parks Canada network.
  • Continuously improve digital services to Canadians, including planning tools, transaction tools, and online reservations and advance a digital first approach to better serve Parks Canada clients.
  • Plan for visitor experience and investments in visitor infrastructure to offer a diverse range of quality experiences, maximize revenues, and improve financial sustainability.
  • Provide an integrated and consistent brand experience to Parks Canada visitors and across Parks Canada’s communications channels.

Building inclusive visitor experiences

Parks Canada is committed to building inclusive visitor experiences.

Parks Canada has recently issued a new internal directive on inclusive washrooms, committing to ensure that all new and upgraded washrooms are constructed according to best practices that protect the privacy and dignity of every person and meet the diverse needs of all visitors regardless of age, gender, culture, faith and ability.

Initiatives that will take place in 2021–22 include the following:

  • The new Waterton Lakes National Park Visitor Centre will offer an accessible exhibit experience and inclusive washroom facilities.
  • Also at Waterton Lakes National Park, infrastructure destroyed by a major fire (in 2017) is being rebuilt with a focus on making accessibility and gender-inclusivity a priority. At Red Rock Canyon, several trails are being paved to enhance accessibility.
  • The new ʔapsčiik t̓ašii (ups-cheek ta-shee) multi-use trail at Pacific Rim National Park Reserve will open with over 90% of the trails accessible to wheelchair users.
  • Jeremy’s Bay campground, at Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site, will reopen with brand new inclusive washroom facilities, offering an enhanced experience for everyone.
  • An accessibility audit of all aspects of Terra Nova National Park and five nearby national historic sites is being undertaken in Eastern Newfoundland. This audit will not only include physical spaces, but also digital presence and work culture (i.e. visitor service, hiring, supporting employees), to assess their accessibility. This will inform an accessibility plan and an implementation plan with timelines.

Additional examples of Parks Canada's work to ensure that its visitor service offers are innovative and inclusive can be found in the GBA+ and Experimentation sections of this Departmental Plan.

Collaboration, engagement and outreach

Tourism recovery in a post COVID-19 world

Parks Canada will work closely with industry partners across the country to support safe and sustainable tourism recovery by:

  • Collaborating with Destination Canada to promote domestic tourism, and work to rebuild demand in international markets.
  • Working with the Indigenous Tourism Association of Canada to support Indigenous tourism product development and promotion.
  • Engaging with provincial, territorial, and community tourism marketing organizations to explore new opportunities for promotion and collaboration.

Canada’s national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas welcome millions of visitors every year at over 200 protected places across the country, delivering an extraordinary range of cultural, natural and recreational experiences. Parks Canada also brings nature and history to Canadians in their communities and in their homes with innovative outreach and engagement programming, digital experiences, and promotional activities. Parks Canada staff work with a wide variety of local and regional partners to provide visitor services and experiences, and also to introduce Canadians to the safe enjoyment of natural, cultural and historic places through popular initiatives such as Learn-to Camp. To this end, Parks Canada will:

  • Reach more Canadians with community and digital outreach programs, advancing awareness, appreciation, and enjoyment of protected places, including through the popular Learn-to Camp program and urban outreach programming. Work with partners to jointly amplify the reach of Parks Canada and other outreach and engagement programs.
  • Strengthen and better integrate Parks Canada’s digital offerings to Canadians on the Agency’s website and across communications channels.
  • Work with a wide array of local, regional and national partners to advance the enjoyment and appreciation of nature, history, culture and conservation.
  • Work independently and with partners to employ youth in the delivery of outreach programming and engagement activities to connect more Canadians to our country’s nature, culture and history.
  • Collaborate with Indigenous partners in the delivery of authentic Indigenous experiences at Parks Canada administered places and the sharing of Indigenous stories, perspectives and cultures with Canadians and visitors from around the world.
  • Work cooperatively with municipal, regional, provincial and territorial parks systems on initiatives to advance connection to nature, culture and history.
  • Work with partners in the tourism industry to help respond to the impacts and challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic and continue to advance national and regional strategies for tourism recovery and destination development.
Build engagement and collaboration

National historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas are popular destinations enjoyed by millions of Canadians and visitors from around the world. Parks Canada takes seriously the role these places play in local economies and in regional and national tourism and in this reporting period will:

  • Develop innovative partnerships with national, regional, and local stakeholders and Indigenous governments and organisations, thereby enhancing natural and cultural conservation gains.
  • Engage with Indigenous governments and organizations to seek their views on the presentation and management of cultural resources through policy.
  • Work with Indigenous communities on opportunities for experiences, interpretation and storytelling, and present Indigenous values, perspectives and contributions to Canada’s natural and cultural heritage.
  • Continue to implement the Framework for History and Commemoration to transform how history is presented at national historic sites, national marine conservation areas and national parks across Canada.
  • Further the Government of Canada's priority to strengthen the middle class by supporting Canada’s new tourism strategy, Creating Middle Class Jobs: A Federal Tourism Growth Strategy.
Working with Indigenous peoples

No relationship is more important to Parks Canada than the Agency’s relationship with Indigenous peoples. Parks Canada works collaboratively with hundreds of Indigenous communities and organizations in the management of protected places, and also in the delivery of visitor experiences, outreach and engagement. Over this planning period, Parks Canada will:

  • Advance opportunities for Indigenous people to connect meaningfully with their traditional territories.
  • Advance agreements with Indigenous peoples that support their ongoing use of traditional territories in Parks Canada administered heritage places.
  • Support implementation of the Government of Canada's commitment to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples through the development of guidance to support Indigenous stewardship at Parks Canada administered places.
  • Support existing and new Guardians programs by identifying barriers, best practices, local needs, and requests from Indigenous communities.

Decolonizing place names in national heritage places

To reinforce the connection of Indigenous communities to the park and surrounding area and ensure the voices and stories of Indigenous communities are incorporated at Parks Canada-administered places, Parks Canada is working on renaming projects at places across the country.

A few examples include the following:

  • Point Pelee National Park: the First Nation Advisory Circle recommended the renaming of the Pioneer day use area to ‘Madbin Jina’ which means “come sit awhile”. This signifies a shift and renewal in the approach to history presentation at Parks Canada-administered places to incorporate more inclusive and representative histories and cultures of Indigenous peoples.
  • Jasper National Park: A number of sites in Jasper National Park bear the name ‘Pocahontas’. Using the name Pocahontas to refer to these sites is an overt and explicit example of systemic racism. Parks Canada is actively engaging with Indigenous partners of the national park to rename inappropriately named sites, such as Pocahontas, to names that are both historically and culturally appropriate.
  • Waterton Lakes National Park: Working with Kainai and Piikani elders, panels will be added at trail heads that reveal to visitors and members of Indigenous partner communities the Blackfoot language name for the area, plus an explanation of its significance to those communities and reflect Indigenous historical and current heritage values, perspectives, and stories.
Contemporary assets

Through fiscal year 2021–22, Parks Canada will continue to address work related to its contemporary assets while working within the constraints presented by COVID-19.

A key anticipated achievement in 2021–22 will be the conclusion of 38 projects for contemporary visitor experience assets for a total investment of $350.9M.

These investments will contribute to Parks Canada’s priority of connecting Canadians to their natural and cultural heritage and will improve the quality their visitor experience by addressing asset condition, while contributing to federal greening targets and meeting or exceeding federal standards for accessibility and inclusivity.

Investing in contemporary visitor infrastructure

Parks Canada will continue to deliver on the most significant infrastructure program in its 110-year history.

Notable examples of investment to protect Canada’s contemporary infrastructure include:

  • The opening of a new visitor centre, administration building, and public-use washroom facility in Waterton Lake National Park.
  • The construction of the ʔapsčiik t̓ašii (pronounced ups-cheek ta-shee) multi-use trail, a 26km trail that traverses the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, set to open in 2022.
  • Significant progress on the rehabilitation of Whistler’s campground in Jasper, Alberta, the largest campground in Parks Canada network.

Gender-based analysis plus

Parks Canada uses Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) to assess all Treasury Board Submissions, Memoranda to Cabinet and Budget proposals for potential impacts or implications on diverse populations of Canadians. This allows the Agency to respond to potential barriers while facilitating more inclusive and equitable opportunities and outcomes.

As an operating agency of the Government of Canada, Parks Canada seeks to employ an inclusive lens in its policies and programs and to continuously improve its services to Canadians and to remove barriers to the use and enjoyment of national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas. The Agency strives to make inclusion and accessibility fundamental principles in the development and delivery of visitor services and experiences.

In 2021–22, Parks Canada will continue to improve GBA+ application through various key processes such as strategic partnering, management planning and evaluation. Evaluations will be informed using the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s Integrating Gender-Based Analysis Plus into Evaluation: A Primer.

In addition, actions to increase awareness of GBA+ and to broaden knowledge of GBA+ among team members, as well as greater collaboration on GBA+ between Parks Canada and other departments and organizations, will continue.

In providing services to Canadians, Parks Canada is committed to building inclusive visitor experiences. A number of initiatives are underway to audit and increase accessibility at Parks Canada-administered national heritage places across the country. Guidance has been created to foster the creation of accessible and inclusive facilities and spaces as part of the Agency's ongoing infrastructure program. This includes incorporating inclusive facilities in new and renovated washroom projects, ensuring that these places are designed with everyone in mind and offer greater flexibility of use to accommodate the varying needs of visitors, including spaces for families, people with disabilities, people from diverse cultural and religious backgrounds and inclusive of all gender expressions, gender identities and sexual orientations.

Specific examples of projects that are being undertaken to improve service to Canadians in this planning period can be found in the highlight boxes in the Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks section, above.

Internally, workplace equity, accessibility, inclusion and diversity has been included as a main Agency priority for this departmental plan. In an effort to foster a diverse workforce and to promote inclusion and equity, Parks Canada will implement a Diversity and Inclusion Strategy that will establish new key actions and activities that will foster a culture of inclusion for all employees. Legislative obligations, such as the employment equity plan, and employment systems review will be encompassed in the strategy. Building on previous achievements, the strategy will increase representation in hiring, appointments and leadership development, as part of Canada’s Anti-Racism Strategy for 2019-2022.

Parks Canada will provide opportunities for developing a stronger understanding of and training on accessibility considerations, and will equip hiring managers with the knowledge and tools needed to become accessibility-confident. The Agency will initiate the review of its processes, programs and services to identify, remove and prevent accessibility barriers. In parallel, continuous engagement and consultation with staff will be undertaken to feed into the development of an Agency-wide accessibility strategy.

Parks Canada will also maintain and create vibrant and engaged employee networks, which will inform the identification, mitigation, and removal of barriers in the workplace.

Specific examples of activities that are being undertaken internally with this lens can be found in the Internal Services section under the heading Human Resources Management, below.


United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Through its planned activities for 2021–22, Parks Canada Agency will contribute to Canada’s achievement of the following United Nations SDGs and targets:

  • Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable (Goal 11), and, more specifically, target 11.4 (Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world's cultural and natural heritage).
  • Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts (Goal 13), and more specifically, target 13.2 (Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning).
  • Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development (Goal 14).
  • Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss (Goal 15) and, more specifically, target 15.5 (Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species), and target 15.4 (By 2030, ensure the conservation of mountain ecosystems, including their biodiversity, in order to enhance their capacity to provide benefits that are essential for sustainable development).
  • Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development (Goal 17) and, more specifically, target 17.17 (Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships).

More information on Parks Canada’s contribution to the United Nations (SDGs and targets can be found in the Agency’s Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy 2020-2023.


Experimentation

As a direct service provider to Canadians at national heritage places across the country and with activities that span a wide variety of disciplines ranging from forest management to the care of cultural and archaeological objects to ensuring the smooth running of parking lots and campgrounds, among innumerable others, the nature of Parks Canada’s operations mean that informal experimentation in regular business is a necessity. Continuing to build upon the unprecedented innovation that occurred to respond to free admission to national heritage places during Canada’s 150th anniversary in 2017, and looking to shift the innovative culture of the Agency’s operations to its corporate functions, Parks Canada has undertaken a number of pilot projects to find ways to address persistent challenges and improve outcomes for Canadians both in its operations and in its supporting internal services and is working on building a culture of experimentation and innovation Agency-wide.

The following are some examples of innovations and pilot projects that will be undertaken in the planning period:

Innovation Competition
In 2020, as part of building a culture of experimentation and innovation, Parks Canada launched an internal crowd sourced virtual innovation fair to gather ideas for solutions to natural resource conservation challenges at Parks Canada-administered places. This competition, which ran throughout the year invited Agency employees throughout the organisation to put forward ideas to strengthen natural resource conservation. In the first phase, participants were to provide a statement of the problem that was to be addressed and a proposed approach, rationale and costing. In the second phase, all Agency employees were invited to vote on the proposals as a means of identifying which proposals be screened in and considered for funding. Successful proposals were announced in December 2020.In total, 75 proposals were put forth, with 29 being screened in; of which eight were chosen, with $140,000 invested. These eight new natural resource conservation projects, including a crowd sourced coastal monitoring program in Prince Edward Island National Park and a pilot project to digitize the Agency's grey (site specific reports, studies and histories, for example) literature, will be brought to fruition in 2021‑2022 and beyond.
Building Net-Zero Residential Units
Given the nature of its operations, Parks Canada, like other federal departments, maintains a housing stock to provide living accommodations for its employees working in remote areas where there are few private sector housing options. The Agency has been providing some of its employees with housing in a number of regions for decades. To innovate in this area, Parks Canada-administered protected heritage places located in Canada's north are working together after receiving Greening Government funding to design replicable, highly energy efficient houses that will meet the needs of the Agency's operations in this remote region. This pilot project will result in the design of a Net Zero Carbon, highly efficient residential unit that supports Parks Canada's carbon reduction targets, and could be deployed in other northern locations. Ultimately, this project will inform the Agency’s strategy for the replacement of aging and inefficient housing stock and meeting the increasing demand for staff housing. Once the pilot project is completed, the new residential units is expected to decrease annual operating costs (currently $406K annual cost for heating fuels) and reduction in GHG emissions (currently 621 tonnes).
Building off COVID-19 Innovations in Visitor Services
Given the necessity for physical distancing in Parks Canada-administered national heritage places during the COVID-19 pandemic, 2020 marked a significant year of innovation in visitor services. In 2021 and beyond, the Agency will build upon those activities piloted during the pandemic to expand its visitor service offer, such as in the following examples:
  • National heritage places in southern Manitoba implemented COVID adaptations that resulted in new visitor offers, and enhanced site accessibility. This offer will continue in future years. Development of additional innovations in the visitor offer will follow in future years. Included in these was the development of a guided driving tour highlighting the history and architecture of southern Manitoba. Visitors participated in this unique offer from their own vehicle; keeping safe, and using radio transmitter technology. Parks Canada will continue to build on this activity and lessons learned are shared internally and with partners.
  • Using new technologies made commonplace by the pandemic, the national heritage places in the southwest Northwest Territories will reach more northern school classrooms in remote areas of the Northwest Territories and in northern Alberta than ever before. Live and interactive video programming offered will centre on the geology of northern parks, unique wildlife, how guiding and interpretive programs are delivered at sites, and on-the-land survival skills using traditional bush craft. These programs aim to promote a greater connection between Parks Canada-administered places and the Indigenous cultures and peoples of the region.
  • Following enormously positive feedback regarding the COVID-related vehicle restriction of the eastern section of the Bow Valley Parkway in Banff National Park in 2020, a pilot project providing an enhanced cycling experience in Banff is planned to be offered for 2021. This pilot builds on the successes of an established well-used network of cycling opportunities in the park, and aligns with a long-term strategy for moving people sustainably throughout the park and learnings from the pilot will support assessment and planning for enhanced cycling experiences in the future.
  • In Prince Albert and Elk Island National Parks, due to COVID-19 realities and limitations on travel, the “Learn-to Camp” program was rapidly revamped to a completely virtual offer. The virtual offer was so successful that the parks will be offering that format in future years.

Additional examples of experimentation can be found in the highlight boxes in the sections in the Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks section, above.


Key risks

Parks Canada has identified six key risks in relation to its core responsibility that could impact delivery of programs and services. Associated mitigation strategies have been developed to minimize the overall likelihood and impact. These risks and associated mitigation strategies are described in the table below.

Risk Mitigation strategies
Environmental forces adaptation and response
Due to the magnitude and rapid pace of environmental changes, including climate change, there is a risk that the integrity of ecosystems, cultural resources and infrastructure cannot be maintained or improved which may lead to Parks Canada being unable to deliver its mandate.
To mitigate this risk, Parks Canada will:
  • Continue to assess climate change risks, understand impacts, and identify feasible and effective measures for adaptation at places administered by Parks Canada.
  • Develop resources and tools to support adaptation planning, and adjust policies and programs in diverse areas of work.
  • Conduct ecosystem restoration projects that address climate change impacts and achieve climate change adaptation objectives.
  • Take measures to improve the ecological connectivity of heritage places.
  • Continue to review emergency management and provide Parks Canada personnel with ongoing emergency management and response training.
  • Continue to implement measures to protect contemporary and built heritage assets, such as using more resilient designs and construction materials.
  • Nurture a strong culture of conservation in Canada through targeted communications related to science and conservation.
Relationships with Indigenous peoples
If Parks Canada does not allocate the necessary time, effort and investment to build and maintain relationships with Indigenous peoples, there is a risk that the Agency may not be able to fulfill its obligations and deliver on its programs and services, which may result in damaged reputation, increased litigation and challenges meeting conservation targets.
To mitigate this risk, Parks Canada will:
  • Advance projects, agreements and mechanisms that facilitate Indigenous connections with traditionally used lands and waters.
  • Advance policy and programs that support a comprehensive approach to Indigenous stewardship.
  • Support collaborative decision-making with Indigenous partners by increasing cooperative management and other partnership and advisory structures.
  • Work with Indigenous peoples to review existing designations and increase the number of Indigenous nominations under the National Program of Historical Commemoration.
  • Address barriers preventing meaningful Indigenous collaboration and engagement.
  • Work with Indigenous partners to bridge Indigenous and science-based knowledge in the Agency's approach to conservation and research.
  • Work with Indigenous communities to incorporate Indigenous perspectives in the way heritage places are established and presented, including developing visitor experience opportunities to help Canadians learn about and connect with Indigenous culture.
  • Host Indigenous events, support Indigenous visitor experience product development, and provide venues for Indigenous nations and people to share their stories, in their own voices, and offer unique opportunities in support of reconciliation.
  • Work with Indigenous governments to acknowledge their role in decision-making regarding the establishment process (e.g. feasibility assessment).
Built asset condition and long-term sustainability
Due to aging infrastructure, inadequate level of recapitalization and maintenance, climate change and inflationary impacts, there is a risk that Parks Canada will not be able to maintain a sustainable asset portfolio which may result in compromised public safety, loss of irreplaceable cultural heritage, and damage to the Agency’s reputation.
To mitigate this risk, Parks Canada will:
  • Complete investment of existing, time-limited capital asset funding to support improvements to the condition of the Agency’s built heritage and contemporary assets.
  • Implement a multi-year plan to strengthen investment readiness that will help the Agency shift to long-term, sustainable funding. This will include adoption of a long-term, Real Property Portfolio Strategy (RPPS) that will establish the priorities and direction for future investment throughout Parks Canada's network of assets, while ensuring alignment with Government priorities and direction, including the recommendations of the Treasury Board Secretariat-led Horizontal Fixed Asset Review. This RPPS is central to defining the long-term funding requirements for Parks Canada to be a responsible steward of its varied and complex network of assets. Implementation of the Strategy beginning in 2021-22 will coincide with the last year of approved, temporary capital asset funding. Parks Canada will work to secure additional short-term funding to supplement the Agency’s base capital allocation of $60 million per year while working towards the completion, approval and resourcing of the long-term RPPS.
  • Apply a cultural asset prioritization framework which will help guide decision-making related to future investments for all heritage properties under the administration of the Agency.
  • Continue to maintain and update Parks Canada's asset management database to ensure that it has complete information on the number and current condition of its heritage properties.
Competitive position
If the Agency does not respond to changing socio-economic conditions and other market influences, there is a risk that Parks Canada’s programs and services may not meet the expectations of Canadians which may lead to a decrease in Agency relevance as measured by a decrease in tourism market share and visitation.
To mitigate this risk, Parks Canada will:
  • Reach nationally identified markets and audiences to diversify and build visitation and to enhance public awareness and support.
  • Develop national outreach and marketing efforts in a digital first context.
  • Manage visitation levels so they are sustainable and ensure quality visitor experiences, including growth where appropriate, and redistribution of visitation geographically and temporally, as necessary.
  • Diversify and renew visitor experience opportunities to respond to public expectations for new and innovative experiences.
  • Leverage key anniversaries, and offer enhanced programming, special events and other promotions to encourage visitation.
Business innovation
If the Agency does not modernize its corporate and internal services, there is a risk that Parks Canada may not have the capacity, business processes and tools to effectively and efficiently support service delivery and meet government management accountability expectations.
Parks Canada Agency will be faced with two major changes that will modernize its financial management regime in the future:
  • Renew the Agency's Departmental Results Framework based on a longer term strategic direction that sets the foundation for evidence-based decision-making, resource allocation and reallocation.
  • Develop Agency's performance and analytics capacity, including benchmarking against like departments, to support evidence-based decision making and to demonstrate results to Canadians.
  • Develop and implement a robust data strategy to support effective planning, performance measurement, and decision-making.
  • Develop and implement a renewed approach to business planning that integrates business, finance and human resources planning, monitoring and performance to support evidence-based decision making and to demonstrate results to Canadians.
  • Implement a strengthened forecasting and budget management regime that will support better planning and decision-making by advancing targeted changes in governance, business processes, training, and change management - enabling the transition to a one-year appropriation and paving the way for seeking a long-term funding allocation for asset management through an accrual-based accounting regime.
  • Identify options and implement an IM/IT system solution to better link the diverse functions of investment management, project delivery, investment planning, and financial management to meet the needs of the Agency and the expectations of Canadians.
Workforce, equity, accessibility, inclusion and diversity, and well-being
If the Agency fails to foster an inclusive and barrier-free work environment that reflects Canada’s diverse population, there is a risk that it may no longer be an employer of choice and will lack the perspective needed to serve all Canadians, which may result in impacts on programs and services, and damage the Agency’s reputation.
To mitigate this risk, Parks Canada will:
Equity:
  • Continue to provide employees with training, information, affiliation and learning opportunities by promoting organizations groups such as Pride at Work, LiveWorkPlay and Federal Black Employee Caucus.
  • Ensure readiness to comply with the Pay Equity Act by advancing planning and implementation of a work plan.
  • Shift to a partnership model that includes continued land management in partnership with Indigenous nations.
Accessibility:
  • Work with the persons with disabilities community to implement priorities put forward in the Public Service Accessibility Strategy.
  • Offer education, training, and equip hiring managers with the knowledge and tools needed to raise awareness of the benefits of a diverse and inclusive workplace.
  • Review Agency processes, programs and services to identify, remove and prevent accessibility barriers.
  • Create a vibrant and engaged employees with disabilities network and accessibility community.
  • Produce an action plan that facilitates effective integration and continued support in the workplace.
Diversity and inclusion:
  • Implement a renewed structure for Champion and Employee networks that will support and help foster a diversity and inclusion culture.
  • Develop a Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan (plus an Action Plan for champions).
  • Increase representation in hiring, appointments and leadership development (Canada’s Anti-Racism Strategy for 2019-2022).
Workplace:
  • Provide a workplace where mental health is addressed constructively and openly while also addressing challenges, continue raising awareness and enabling positive behaviour to reduce stigma, building support capacities and fostering cultural change.
  • Implement a revised zero tolerance harassment and violence policy.
  • Develop a Workplace Wellness Strategy to promote the resources and tools available to all employees to support a psychologically healthy and safe workplace.
  • Implement the Public Service Performance Management System; commitment made by the PCEO to the Clerk of the Privy Council.

Planned results for protecting and presenting Canada’s natural and cultural heritage

Departmental results Departmental result indicators Target Date to achieve target 2019–20 Actual results 2018–19 Actual results 2017–18 Actual results
Canada’s natural heritage is protected for present and future generations Percentage of terrestrial regions represented in the national park system At least 82% March 2025 79% 77% 77%
Percentage of marine regions represented in the national marine conservation area system At least 31% March 2025 21% 17% 17%
Percentage of national park ecosystems where ecological integrity is maintained or improved At least 92% March 2023 86% 82% 88%
Number of natural heritage places managed cooperatively with Indigenous peoples1 At least 27 March 2022 n/a n/a n/a
Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for present and future generations Number of places, people and events of importance to Canadians that are formally recognized At least 3,831 March 2022 3,826 3,816 3,812
Percentage of historical and archaeological collection, cultural landscapes and archaeological sites in Parks Canada's care that are safeguarded At least 90% March 2024 68% 63% n/a
Percentage of built heritage assets in good or fair condition1 At least 49% March 2022 n/a n/a n/a
Number of cultural heritage places managed cooperatively with Indigenous peoples1 At least 6 March 2022 n/a n/a n/a
People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them Number of visitors experiencing Parks Canada places At least 23.7M March 2022 24.9M 25.1M 27.2M
Percentage of Canadians that support the protection and presentation of Parks Canada places At least 78% March 2022 83% 88% 90%
Number of places where Indigenous peoples use lands and waters according to their traditional and modern practices Between 32 and 42 March 2025 34 30 n/a1
Percentage of contemporary assets in good or fair condition1 At least 74% March 2022 n/a n/a n/a
1 This is a new or revised indicator introduced in 2020–21 and thus no previous-year results are available.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Parks Canada’s program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.


Planned budgetary financial resources for protecting and presenting Canada’s natural and cultural heritage

2021–22 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending 2023–24 planned spending
1,015,272,310 1,015,272,310 650,354,911 608,428,578

The decrease in planned spending is primarily due to the sunsetting of funding for Parks Canada’s infrastructure initiatives to rehabilitate a significant portion of its heritage, visitor, highway and waterway built asset inventory in national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas. While the infrastructure funding is sunsetting, the Agency is developing a long-term plan for the management and sustainability of its infrastructure.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Parks Canada’s program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.


Planned human resources for protecting and presenting Canada’s natural and cultural heritage

2021–22 planned full-time equivalents 2022–23 planned full-time equivalents 2023–24 planned full-time equivalents
4,378 4,191 3,985

The decrease in planned full-time equivalents is primarily due to the sunsetting of funding for Parks Canada’s infrastructure initiatives to rehabilitate a significant portion of its heritage, visitor, highway and waterway built asset inventory in national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas. While the infrastructure funding is sunsetting, the Agency is developing a long-term plan for the management and sustainability of its infrastructure.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Parks Canada’s program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.


Internal Services: planned results

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of Programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct services that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. These services are:

  • Management and Oversight Services
  • Communications Services
  • Legal Services
  • Human Resources Management Services
  • Financial Management Services
  • Information Management Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Real Property Management Services
  • Materiel Management Services
  • Acquisition Management Services

Planning highlights

Priorities: Business innovation and workforce equity, accessibility, inclusion and diversity, and well being

Management and Oversight Services

In 2021–22, Parks Canada will renew its Departmental Results Framework based on a longer term strategic direction that sets the foundation for evidence-based decision-making, resource allocation and reallocation. In addition, a renewed approach to business planning will be developed and implemented that integrates business, finance and human resources planning, monitoring and performance. The Agency will also enhance its performance and analytics capacity and will finalize and begin implementation of a data strategy.

Parks Canada will continue critical work aimed at adopting a long-term Real Property Portfolio Strategy (RPPS) that will establish the priorities and direction for future investment throughout Parks Canada's network of assets, while ensuring alignment with Government priorities and direction, including the recommendations of the Treasury Board Secretariat-led Horizontal Fixed Asset Review. The RPPS will be central to defining the long-term funding required for Parks Canada to be a responsible steward of its extremely varied and complex network of assets. Initial application of feasible elements of the RPPS in 2021–22 will coincide with the last year of approved, temporary capital asset appropriations. Parks Canada will work to secure additional short-term funding to supplement the Agency’s base capital allocation of $60 million per year while working towards the completion, approval and resourcing of the long-term RPPS.


Human Resources Management Services

Indigenous employment at Thaidene Nene National Park Reserve

Parks Canada will work closely with Indigenous partners to follow through on establishment agreement commitments for Thaidene Nene National Park Reserve for training, mentoring and job shadowing through the creation of a Learning, Employment and Engagement position. This new position will also build capacity for local and Indigenous applications on Parks Canada jobs and contracts.

Fostering a high-performing, diverse and inclusive workforce

As a highly operational organization, Parks Canada's workforce is its strength. The Agency will:

  • Create and implement a strategy to achieve greater diversity and inclusion and develop an employment equity plan.
  • Contribute to an important step in gender equality by undertaking work to create a pay equity plan in 2021, an exercise that will roll out over three years.
  • Create, in consultation with employees with disabilities, the Agency's 2022-2025 Accessibility Strategy, in order to identify, eliminate and prevent accessibility barriers for current and future Agency employees.
  • Continue to modernize its human resources management practices, including in the recruitment and training of Indigenous employees, the hiring of youth, and the continuation of the implementation of a new Agency-wide system for performance management.
Optimizing a safe, healthy and respectful workplace

Parks Canada remains committed to building a safe, healthy and respectful work environment for all employees. As such, many initiatives will be undertaken by the Agency in support of achieving this objective across the organization.

  • Continue to endeavour to protect the physical and psychological health and safety of Parks Canada employees, including all legislative requirements under Part II of the Canada Labour Code), recognizing that COVID-19 has resulted in unique challenges related to both physical and psychological well-being of Parks Canada team members.
  • Actively continue to raise employee understanding of the importance of mental health, through the use of a wide variety of services and support, notably the Employee and Family Assistance Program and the Government of Canada's online mental health resource centre.
  • Implement recommendations in 2021–22 from an internal occupational health and safety audit completed in 2019–20.
  • In 2021–22, complete a cyclical review of its human resources regime and start the implementation of recommendations on a prioritized basis.
  • Put into place the requirements deriving from the implementation of Bill C-65 which aims at increasing the prevention aspects associated with creating a harassment–free workplace. In 2021–22, the Agency will also continue to promote its internal Policy and provide guidance towards the prevention of workplace harassment and violence of any type; respond to situations in which harassment and violence have occurred; and support victims of harassment and violence.
Compensation

Parks Canada is committed to improving timeliness and data accuracy of pay transactions in support of pay stabilization, by providing the tools, training and resources required to maximize efficiencies. In the planning period, Parks Canada will:

  • Continue to collaborate with Public Services and Procurement Canada and to work on various corporate initiatives, such as the review of the timekeeping function, in order to stabilize pay administration, reduce the occurrence of pay issues and improve on the timeliness of their resolution.
  • Implement recommendations from an internal controls assessment on the timekeeping function, completed in 2019.
  • Modernize and streamline our staffing policies and practices, supporting and enabling innovation and excellence in hiring.
  • In the spirit of continuous improvement, continue to introduce business process changes and leverage electronic ticketing technology to provide better service to employees. As well, the Agency will foster the use of data and tools, such as dashboards and other reports, to support human resources planning and informed, evidenced-based decision-making.
  • Continue efforts to negotiate a new collective agreement with unionized employees as a reflection of the importance the Agency places on harmonious labour-management relationships.

Financial Management Services

Parks Canada Agency is advancing improvements in financial management to better align its resources with its program needs and be in a stronger position to respond to evolving changes in its operating environment. Improvements include better financial planning and information to support decision-making as well as targeted change in business processes, tools, and systems, enabling the transition to a one-year appropriation and paving the way for seeking long-term funding allocation for asset management through an accrual-based budgeting regime.


Information Management and Information Technology Services

Collaborate openly and digitally with partners and Canadians
In 2021–22, Parks Canada will continue its phased roll-out of new collaboration tools to support productivity and teamwork internally and with partners.
Enabling Parks Canada with a mobile workforce
Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, much of Parks Canada's work occurred outside of traditional offices. In 2021–22, the Agency will support this work by continuing to deploy mobile-enabled solutions and cloud applications, including its mobile reporting pilot with the Agency's Visitor Safety and Human-Wildlife Conflict teams.
Connect with Canadians using Open Data
Parks Canada supports the Government of Canada's priority for Open Data. In 2021–22, the Agency will apply its framework to make Open Data a part of operations at all levels and will continue to make more datasets publicly available.
Using technology to continuously improve
Parks Canada continues to improve its network connectivity and telecommunications to help ensure that its employees can offer Canadians the standard of service they expect.
Enabling a virtual work environment during the global pandemic
In response to continued public health measures related to the global pandemic, Parks Canada continues to adapt and improve Information Management and Information Technology tools and services required by employees to deliver on their mandates and to collaborate virtually with colleagues regardless of where they may be working from.

Acquisition Management Services

Parks Canada’s local presence from coast to coast to coast enables the Agency to support Canada’s economy across multiple sectors. Through its acquisition management services, the Agency is working to increase business opportunities to Indigenous peoples towards the Government of Canada's objective of 5% of total procurement spend through its multi-year performance objectives. Further, the Agency endeavours to support other federal government social procurement objectives through its acquisition management services.


Planned budgetary financial resources for Internal Services

2021–22 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending 2023–24 planned spending
113,836,418 113,836,418 92,998,565 92,102,013

Planned human resources for Internal Services

2021–22 planned full-time equivalents 2022–23 planned full-time equivalents 2023–24 planned full-time equivalents
915 743 716

Spending and human resources

This section provides an overview of the department’s planned spending and human resources for the next three consecutive fiscal years and compares planned spending for the upcoming year with the current and previous years’ actual spending.


Planned spending

Agency spending 2018–19 to 2023–24

Agency spending 2018–19 to 2023–24 — Text version

A chart detailing Parks Canada Agency departmental spending 2018–19 to 2023–24

2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022 2022-2023 2023-2024
Statutory 234,165 234,869 204,153 204,836 201,567 198,765
Voted 1,226,159 1,245,406 1,134,821 924,272 541,787 501,765
Total 1,460,324 1,480,275 1,338,974 1,129,109 743,353 700,531

The above graph depicts the Agency’s spending trend over a six-year period. From 2015 to 2022, the Agency has received $4.2 billion to invest in its national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas to rehabilitate a significant portion of its heritage, visitor, highway and waterway built asset inventory. This time-limited funding gradually decreased starting in 2020–21, which explains the significant reduction in planned spending for the future years. While the infrastructure funding is sunsetting, the Agency is developing a long-term plan for the management and sustainability of its infrastructure.


Budgetary planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned spending for each of Parks Canada’s core responsibilities and for Internal Services, as appropriate, for the years identified below.

Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2018–19 expenditures 2019–20expenditures 2020–21 forecast spending 2021–22 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending 2023–24 planned spending
Protecting and presenting Canada’s natural and cultural heritage 1,331,557,979 1,358,136,356 1,225,313,521 1,015,272,310 1,015,272,310 650,354,911 608,428,578
Subtotal 1,331,557,979 1,358,136,356 1,225,313,521 1,015,272,310 1,015,272,310 650,354,911 608,428,578
Internal Services 128,766,185 122,138,301 113,660,718 113,836,418 113,836,418 92,998,565 92,102,013
Total 1,460,324,164 1,480,274,657 1,338,974,239 1,129,108,729 1,129,108,729 743,353,476 700,530,591

For fiscal years 2018–19 and 2019–20, the amounts represent the actual expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts. For fiscal year 2020–21, the amounts represent the forecast spending which include planned budgetary and statutory expenditures as presented in the Main and Supplementary Estimates.

For fiscal years 2021–22 to 2023–24, planned spending reflects approved funding by Treasury Board to support the Agency’s programs.

The trend of capital spending of approximately $4.2 billion is primarily due to time-limited investments, reaching a peak in 2019–20 and decreasing thereafter, in national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas to rehabilitate a significant portion of its heritage, visitor, highway and waterway built asset inventory. While the infrastructure funding is sunsetting, the Agency is developing a long-term plan for the management and sustainability of its infrastructure.


Planned human resources

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned full-time equivalents (FTEs) for each core responsibility in Parks Canada’s departmental results framework and to Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Human resources planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services

Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2018–19 actual full time equivalents 2019–20 actual full time equivalents 2020–21 forecast full time equivalents 2021–22 planned full time equivalents 2022–23 planned full time equivalents 2023–24 planned full time equivalents
Protecting and presenting Canada’s natural and cultural heritage 4,356 4,656 4,371 4,378 4,191 3,985
Subtotal 4,356 4,656 4,371 4,378 4,191 3,985
Internal Services 1,226 935 946 915 743 716
Total 5,582 5,591 5,316 5,293 4,933 4,701

The trend of decreasing full-time equivalents starting in 2020–21 is primarily due to the sunsetting of infrastructure investments in national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas to rehabilitate a significant portion of its heritage, visitor, highway and waterway built asset inventory. While the funding is sunsetting, the Agency is developing a long-term plan for the management and sustainability of its infrastructure.


Estimates by vote

Information on Parks Canada’s organizational appropriations is available in the 2021–22 Main Estimates.


Future-oriented condensed statement of operations

The future‑oriented condensed statement of operations provides an overview of Parks Canada’s operations for 2020–21 to 2021–22.

The amounts for forecast and planned results in this statement of operations were prepared on an accrual basis. The amounts for forecast and planned spending presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan were prepared on an expenditure basis. Amounts may therefore differ.

A more detailed future‑oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on Parks Canada’s website.

Future oriented condensed statement of operations for the year ending March 31, 2022 (dollars)

Financial information 2020–21 forecast results 2021–22 planned results Difference (2021–22 planned results minus 2020–21 forecast results)
Total expenses 1,016,932,000 976,517,000 (40,415,000)
Total revenues 150,000,000 150,000,000 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 866,932,000 826,517,000 (40,415,000)

Net cost of operations is planned to decrease by $40.4 million in 2021–22 from $866.9 to $826.5 million. This is primarily due to the sunsetting of the time-limited infrastructure funding, offset by higher amortization expenses following investments in capital assets put into service.


Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson, P.C., M.P.

Institutional head: Ron Hallman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Ministerial portfolio: Environment and Climate Change Canada

Enabling instrument(s):

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1998


Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

“Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on Parks Canada’s website.

For more information on the department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister’s mandate letter.


Operating context

Information on the operating context is available on Parks Canada’s website.


Reporting framework

Parks Canada’s approved departmental results framework and program inventory for 2021–22 are as follows.

Departmental results framework 2021-22

Graphical presentation of departmental results framework and program inventory - Text Version

The graphical illustration shows Parks Canada Agency’s Departmental Results Framework which includes: one Core Responsibility, three Departmental Results, twelve Departmental Results Indicators, and five supporting programs in its program inventory. The Agency’s Departmental Results Framework also includes the standardized Government of Canada Internal Services element at the Core Responsibility level.

Parks Canada Agency’s Core Responsibility is: Protecting and Presenting Canada’s Natural and Cultural Heritage.

The Core Responsibility Description is: Establish national parks and national marine conservation areas; designate places, persons and events of national historic significance; protect and conserve natural and cultural heritage guided by science and Indigenous knowledge; provide opportunities to visit, experience and enjoy Canada’s natural and cultural heritage; work with the public, other federal departments, provinces, territories, Indigenous Peoples, and stakeholders to carry out these responsibilities.

There are three departmental results:

  1. Canada’s natural heritage is protected for present and future generations
  2. Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for present and future generations
  3. People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them.

The first result, Canada’s natural heritage is protected for present and future generations, is supported by four indicators:

  • Percentage of terrestrial regions represented in the national park system
  • Percentage of marine regions represented in the national marine conservation area system
  • Percentage of national park ecosystems where ecological integrity is maintained or improved
  • Number of natural heritage plances managed cooperatively with Indigenous peoples

The second result, Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for present and future generations, is supported by four indicators:

  • Number of places, people and events of importance to Canadians that are formally recognized
  • Percentage of historical and archaeological collection, cultural landscapes and archaeological sites in Parks Canada's care that are safeguarded
  • Number of cultural heritage places managed cooperatively with Indigenous peoples
  • Percentage of built heritage assets in good or fair condition

The third result, People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them, is supported by four indicators:

  • Number of visitors experienceing Parks Canada places
  • Percentage of Canadians that support the protection and presentation of Parks Canada places
  • Number of places where Indigenous peoples use lands and waters according to their traditional and modern practices
  • Percentage of contemporary assets in good or fair condition

Parks Canada Agency’s Program Inventory consists of the following five programs:

  • Heritage Places Establishment Program
  • Heritage Places Conservation Program
  • Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support Program
  • Visitor Experience Program
  • Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management Program

Supporting information on the program inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to Parks Canada’s program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.


Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on Parks Canada’s website:


Federal tax expenditures

Parks Canada’s Departmental Plan does not include information on tax expenditures that relate to its planned results for 2021–22.

Tax expenditures are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance, and the Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for government-wide tax expenditures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report provides detailed information on tax expenditures, including objectives, historical background and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis. The tax measures presented in this report are solely the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.


Organizational contact information

Parks Canada National Office
 30 Victoria Street
    Gatineau, Quebec
    Canada
    J8X 0B3
General inquiries
 888-773-8888
General inquiries (international)
 819-420-9486
Teletypewriter (TTY)
 866-787-6221
Website
 www.parkscanada.gc.ca
Email:
 pc.information.pc@canada.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of a department over a 3 year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
departmental priority (priorité ministérielle)
A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Departmental priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.
departmental result (résultat ministériel)
A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a departmental result.
departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
A framework that consists of the department’s core responsibilities, departmental results and departmental result indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on a department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation (expérimentation)
The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare, the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works and what doesn’t. Experimentation is related to, but distinct form innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.
full time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2021–22 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2020 Speech from the Throne, namely: Protecting Canadians from COVID-19; Helping Canadians through the pandemic; Building back better – a resiliency agenda for the middle class; The Canada we’re fighting for.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative in which two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision-making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
program inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all of the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s core responsibilities and results.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
strategic outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.