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Table of contents

Parks Canada Departmental Plan 2020-21

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by The President and Chief Executive Officer of the Parks Canada Agency, 2019

  • Catalogue No.: R61-108E-PDF
  • ISSN 2561-1526

From the Minister

The Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada

As the Minister responsible for Parks Canada, I am pleased to present the 2020–21 Departmental Plan for the Agency. This plan provides Canadians with information on Parks Canada’s priorities and the results that the Agency expects to achieve over the next fiscal year. I am looking forward to delivering on the commitments that the Government made to Canadians as set out in my Ministerial Mandate Letter and those from Budget 2019. In delivering on these commitments, we will protect and restore Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, connect Canadians with Parks Canada places, continue important infrastructure projects, and advance reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

The Government of Canada is committed to expanding the network of protected and conserved areas and contributing to the recovery of species at risk, while advancing reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. To accomplish this, I will work with the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard to introduce a new ambitious plan to protect and conserve 25 percent of Canada’s land and 25 percent of Canada’s oceans by 2025, working toward the goal of protecting 30 percent of Canada’s lands and oceans by 2030. Working in collaboration with Indigenous partners, stakeholders and other levels of government, this plan will be grounded in science, Indigenous knowledge, and local perspectives.

I am committed to strengthening the role that Parks Canada plays in protecting and conserving cultural heritage to ensure that our nation’s heritage places continue being a source of pride, knowledge and enjoyment for Canadians today and into the future. In 2019, the Government of Canada announced a new Framework for History and Commemoration that provides direction to Parks Canada for telling more diverse and inclusive stories at our country’s heritage places and to the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada for designating people, places and events of historic significance. Importantly, the Framework will also ensure that the history and voices of Indigenous peoples are better-incorporated at Parks Canada’s heritage places.

The Government of Canada is committed to preserving our country’s heritage. As Minister responsible for Parks Canada, I will work closely with the Minister of Canadian Heritage to provide direction on how national heritage places should be designated and preserved and to develop comprehensive legislation for the protection of federally-owned heritage places.

Parks Canada places provide opportunities for Canadians to experience the outdoors and learn about our environment and history. As outlined in my Ministerial Mandate Letter, the Government of Canada will expand Parks Canada’s successful Learn-to Camp program so that 400 000 people each year will have the opportunity to learn basic camping skills. The Government of Canada will also continue offering free admission for youth 17 and under to all Parks Canada’s places and free admission to new Canadian citizens for one year through the Institute for Canadian Citizenship’s Canoo mobile app. Through these measures, we will enable more youth to discover and connect with nature and history and help inspire the next generation of stewards for our national treasures.

Through Budget 2019, the Government of Canada invested $368 million over two years in capital projects at Parks Canada places to support safe, high-quality and meaningful experiences for visitors. Over the last several years, Parks Canada has been advancing infrastructure projects at national parks and historic sites across the country, and this funding will allow the Agency to continue this important work. In addition, Parks Canada is developing a long-term plan for the effective management and ongoing sustainability of its significant infrastructure portfolio consisting of heritage, tourism, waterway and highway assets.

The Government of Canada is committed to reconciliation and renewed relationships with Indigenous peoples, based on a recognition of rights, respect, co-operation, and partnership. I am proud of the many achievements that Parks Canada has realized in collaboration with Indigenous partners, such as the signing of an agreement to co-manage the Obadjiwan–Fort Témiscamingue National Historic Site with the Timiskaming First Nation, as well as the Land Sea People Management Plan, developed collaboratively with the Haida Nation to co operatively steward Gwaii Haanas. However, more can and will be done to advance relationships with Indigenous peoples and strengthen their traditional connections to our national parks, historic sites and marine conservation areas. This includes working together with Indigenous peoples as partners in conserving Canada’s natural and cultural heritage and sharing the stories of Parks Canada places from Indigenous perspectives.

Canada’s national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas belong to all Canadians and offer truly unique experiences. The actions outlined in Parks Canada’s 2020–21 Departmental Plan will help ensure that Canada’s natural and cultural treasures are protected for present and future generations.

The Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada

From the President & Chief Executive Officer

Ron Hallman, President & Chief Executive Officer, Parks Canada Agency

As the President & CEO of Parks Canada, I am extremely proud of the work of our team members every day. Parks Canada manages one of the finest and most extensive systems of natural and cultural heritage places in the world. We are the world’s first national parks service, established in May 1911, and we are responsible for 171 national historic sites, 47 national parks, one national urban park and five national marine conservation areas.

At Parks Canada, we are privileged to be the stewards of these national treasures on behalf of all Canadians. In managing Parks Canada places, we will ensure that ecological and commemorative integrity are the first priority in decision-making as we deliver on the Agency’s mandate to protect the environment, preserve our heritage and provide meaningful and high-quality visitor experiences.

In support of the Government of Canada’s ambitious plan to protect Canada’s land and oceans, Parks Canada will continue to advance the establishment new national parks and marine conservation areas in the South Okanagan–Similkameen, Eastern James Bay, Îles de la Madeleine and the Hog Island Sandhills in Prince Edward Island, among others. Recent accomplishments also contribute to this goal, including the establishment of Canada’s 47th national park, Thaidene Nene National Park Reserve, and of Tallurutiup Imanga National Marine Conservation Area, Canada’s largest protected area.

The Agency will take concrete measures to conserve biodiversity, contribute to the recovery of species at risk and build ecosystem resilience in response to climate change, based on the best available science and Indigenous knowledge.

The Agency will continue to play a leadership role in the Canadian heritage community through the delivery of a number of programs that commemorate and protect natural and cultural heritage. We will strive to give Indigenous peoples and Indigenous knowledge a stronger voice in the stewardship of our heritage places. Parks Canada will support the Government of Canada in the development of new legislation, policies and instruments for the protection of nationally recognized heritage places.

Together, with provincial, territorial, and municipal governments, Indigenous partners, and heritage stakeholders, we will strengthen the conservation of natural and cultural heritage in Canada.

Parks Canada is the largest federal administrator of Crown lands and second largest federal asset manager with over 17 500 built assets, the total replacement value of which is more than $25.5 billion, including over 1 000 km of highways that run through national parks. The Government of Canada has invested an unprecedented $3.7 billion to support infrastructure work to heritage, visitor, waterway and highway assets within national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas across Canada. These investments represent the largest federal infrastructure plan in the history of Parks Canada. Going forward, the Agency will continue to work toward securing long term capital funding to better manage heritage, tourism, waterway, and highway assets and support program and service delivery for the long term.

Over the next year, Parks Canada will continue to deliver important infrastructure projects to improve the condition of both contemporary assets and heritage structures. Through these infrastructure investments, Parks Canada is protecting and conserving our national treasures, while supporting local economies and contributing to growth in the tourism sector.

By working to reduce emissions for its fleets and buildings, Parks Canada will demonstrate leadership in implementing the Government of Canada’s commitment to the achievement of net zero emissions by 2050.

In support of the Government of Canada’s commitment to results, transparency and accountability to Canadians, Parks Canada will review its capacity, planning, financial management, business processes, systems and tools, to ensure it has robust, effective and efficient internal services to support program delivery to Canadians.

Parks Canada is committed to a system of national heritage places that recognizes and honours the contributions of Indigenous peoples, their histories and cultures, as well as the special relationships Indigenous peoples have with traditional lands and waters. Over 30 Parks Canada places are currently managed co-operatively with Indigenous people. Moving forward, Parks Canada will continue developing approaches together with Indigenous peoples that will strengthen their roles as traditional stewards of lands and waters within heritage places. This includes collaborating with Indigenous communities in on-the-ground conservation activities, such as species recovery and habitat restoration, and working together with Indigenous peoples to develop interpretive materials at national parks, historic sites, and marine conservation areas to foster a better understanding of Indigenous peoples’ cultures and traditions.

I am proud to lead the Parks Canada team in the delivery of its important mandate and to support the Minister in the achievement of his commitments to Canadians.

Ron Hallman
President & Chief Executive Officer
Parks Canada Agency

Plans at a glance

Priority: Natural Heritage Protection

Parks Canada will support the Minister’s mandate to conserve 25 percent of Canada’s land and 25 percent of Canada’s oceans by 2025, working toward 30 percent of each by 2030.

Parks Canada will continue to advance the Government of Canada’s commitment to Canada’s Nature Legacy, including improving the connectivity of national parks with the broader landscape, increasing the use of science and knowledge to inform conservation decision-making, and contributing to the conservation of species at risk.

Parks Canada will be a key contributor in the Government's priority to fight climate change, protect the environment and preserve Canada's natural legacy. The Agency will take concrete measures to preserve biodiversity and build ecosystem resilience in response to climate change and other stressors. Ecological integrity will continue to be the first priority in all decision-making in national parks.

In support of the Government's continued core priority of reconciliation, the Agency will strive to give Indigenous peoples and Indigenous knowledge a stronger voice in the stewardship of natural heritage places.

Pursuant to the Minister’s mandate letter, Parks Canada will enhance its efforts to play a leadership role in natural heritage conservation and promotion, and will continue to work to ensure that Canada’s national parks are a source of national pride and enjoyment today and for future generations.

Priority: Cultural Heritage Protection

Parks Canada will implement the Framework for History and Commemoration, a new approach to history and commemoration at Parks Canada.

Parks Canada will advance the Minister’s commitment to work on the development of new legislation, policies and instruments for the effective protection of federally owned cultural heritage places and support the development of clearer direction on the designation and preservation of national cultural heritage places.

The Agency will implement its preventative conservation strategy to safeguard the collection under its care; understand and adapt to the impacts of climate change on cultural heritage; and advance efforts toward conserving cultural resources at heritage places.

The Agency will continue to work with Indigenous peoples to advance the cooperative management of cultural heritage places and support the Government's continued core priority of reconciliation.

Pursuant to the Minister’s mandate letter, Parks Canada will enhance its efforts to play a leadership role in cultural heritage conservation and promotion, and will continue to work to ensure that Canada’s national historic sites are a source of national pride and enjoyment today and for future generations.

Priority: Connecting to Canadians

Pursuant to the Minister’s mandate letter, Parks Canada will enhance its efforts to play a leadership role in heritage conservation and promotion, and will continue to work to ensure that Canada’s national heritage places are a source of national pride and enjoyment today and for future generations.

Parks Canada will use outreach, promotion and partnerships to encourage Canadians to experience national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas.

Parks Canada will provide visitor experiences that attract a broad diversity of Canadians. By delivering innovative programs and services, Parks Canada will introduce children and families to a lifetime of outdoor and cultural activities and foster learning about the environment and Canada's heritage, including by expanding the Learn-to Camp program to increase the number of people each year that learn basic camping skills and by seeking to remove barriers to visiting national heritage places.

The Agency will continue to be a key player in supporting tourism in Canada and work with nearby communities to foster economic opportunities.

Parks Canada will contribute to the continued Government of Canada priority of reconciliation by enhancing opportunities for Indigenous communities’ for interpretive and storytelling programs rooted in traditional activities and knowledge, and to present Indigenous values, perspectives and contributions to Canada's history.

Priority: Asset Sustainability

Parks Canada will continue to implement infrastructure projects to address deferred work and improve the condition of its contemporary assets and heritage structures. The Agency will continue to work toward securing long term capital funding to better manage heritage, tourism, waterway, and highway assets and support program and service delivery for the long term.

Guided by the Government’s commitment to greening government operations, the Agency will aspire to lead in the transition to low-carbon, sustainable and climate resilient real property, fleets, services and operations.

Priority: Business Modernization

In support of the Government’s commitment to results, transparency and accountability to Canadians, Parks Canada will review its capacity, planning, financial management, business processes, systems and tools, to ensure it has robust, effective and efficient internal services to support program delivery to Canadians. The Agency will continue to strengthen its long term asset planning and associated management framework with a view to securing long term predictable funding.

Parks Canada will continue focus on the well-being and safety of its workforce and will also develop innovative recruitment and retention strategies.

For more information on the Parks Canada Agency’s plans, priorities and planned results, see the “Planned results and resources” section of this report.

Core responsibility: planned results and resources, and key risks

This section contains detailed information on the department’s planned results and resources for each of its core responsibilities. It also contains information on key risks related to achieving those results.

Core Responsibility: Protecting and presenting Canada’s natural and cultural heritage

Description

Establish national parks and national marine conservation areas; designate places, persons and events of national historic significance; protect and conserve natural and cultural heritage guided by science and Indigenous knowledge; provide opportunities to visit, experience and enjoy Canada’s natural and cultural heritage; work with the public, other federal departments, provinces, territories, Indigenous Peoples, and stakeholders to carry out these responsibilities.

Departmental results

In carrying out its core responsibility, Parks Canada will advance three Departmental Results:

  • Canada’s natural heritage is protected for present and future generations
  • Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for present and future generations
  • People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them

Planning highlights

Departmental Result 1: Canada’s natural heritage is protected for present and future generations

Priority: Natural Heritage Protection

Natural Heritage Establishment

Parks Canada will support the Government of Canada’s priority to preserve Canada's natural legacy and advance the Minister’s mandate to conserve 25% of Canada’s land and 25% of Canada’s oceans by 2025, working toward 30% of each by 2030. During the planning period, Parks Canada will:

  • Support achievement of the Government's target to protect 25% of Canada’s land through ongoing work toward the establishment of new national parks, including South Okanagan-Similkameen and Hog Island Sandhills, and developing a strategy for new protected places.
  • Contribute to the Government of Canada’s target to protect 25% of oceans by continuing work toward the establishment of national marine conservation areas in eastern James Bay, Iles de la Madeleine, southern Strait of Georgia, northern Labrador, and Arctic Basin; and by initiating work on national marine conservation area proposals in unrepresented marine regions.
  • Work with Indigenous peoples on the implementation of establishment agreements for newly established heritage places, including Thaidene Nene National Park Reserve and Tallurutiup Imanga National Marine Conservation Area.
National park/marine and coastal area Contribution to Protected Areas Partners
South Okanagan-Similkameen National Park Reserve
Southeastern British Columbia
Confirm a final boundary and governance approach for a national park reserve, followed by negotiation of the relevant establishment agreement(s) the Government of British Columbia and local First Nations
Hog Island Sandhills National Park Reserve
Maritime Plain region (north shore of Prince Edward Island)
Continue work on a feasibility assessment the Government of Prince Edward Island and the Mi’kmag Confederacy of PEI
Proposed national marine conservation area in Arctic Basin
Ellesmere Island in Nunavut - Tuvaijuittuq
Continue work on a feasibility assessment Department of Fisheries and Oceans, the Government of Nunavut and the Qikiqtani Inuit Association
Proposed national marine conservation area reserve in the southern Strait of Georgia
Strait of Georgia in British Columbia
Continue work on feasibility assessment the Government of British Columbia, local First Nations and stakeholders
Proposed marine protected area adjacent to the Îles de la Madeleine
Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence
Continue work on a feasibility assessment the Government of Quebec and local communities
Proposed national marine conservation area in James Bay
Eastern James Bay
Continue work on a feasibility assessment the Cree Nation Government, Government of Nunavut and Government of Quebec
Proposed national marine conservation area
Northern Labrador
Continue work on a feasibility assessment Nunatsiavut Government, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador and Makivik Corporation
Other national marine conservation area proposals in unrepresented marine regions Advance a feasibility assessment for a new proposal for a site in western Hudson Bay the Government of Manitoba, the Government of Nunavut, First Nations and Inuit
Natural Heritage Conservation

In support of the Minister's mandate, during the planning period, Parks Canada will:

Fighting Climate Change: Supporting the Government’s priority

Parks Canada’s protected areas are nature-based solutions to climate change. The Agency is advancing climate change adaptation both Agency-wide and at the site level. The Agency has a center of expertise on climate change, a Climate Change Adaptation Framework to guide decisions and actions, and is growing climate change capacity across the country though knowledge-sharing and partnerships.

Undertaking conservation and restoration projects

Examples include:

  • Stopping the decline of Limber Pine and White-bark Pine in Banff, Jasper, Kootenay, Yoho, Mount Revelstoke, Glacier, and Waterton Lakes National Parks by collaborating with federal and provincial partners to restore populations across the landscape.
  • Conserving an endemic thistle in Mingan Archipelago National Park Reserve by collecting and germinating seeds, then planting seedlings to boost population viability, in collaboration with the University of Guelph and the Montreal Biodome.
  • Helping humans and wolves coexist in and around Pacific Rim National Park Reserve by collaborating with seven First Nations and local municipalities on a shared vision and campaign to raise awareness and understanding to change problematic human behavior.

Parks Canada and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) World Conservation Congress

  • IUCN, the world’s oldest and largest environmental organisation, plays host to the world every four years during its World Conservation Congress.
  • Held in Marseille, France in June, the 2020 IUCN World Conservation Congress will bring together 8,000-10,000 experts, leaders, and decision-makers to celebrate, debate, and influence the direction of global conservation efforts.
  • As State Member, Parks Canada will lead the Government of Canada’s preparation for and participation in the IUCN World Conservation Congress.

Innovation and conservation

In 2020–21, Parks Canada will conduct an internal crowdsourcing campaign to design and implement innovative conservation projects as a means to accelerate ecological gains in Parks Canada places.

  • Continue to modernize conservation approaches and contribute to a Nature Legacy for Canada.
  • Move toward an integrated, landscape-level conservation approach in collaboration with Indigenous partners and other regional stakeholders. This will improve our ability to build ecosystem resilience in response to climate change and other stressors, and improve the connectivity and integration of Parks Canada places with the broader landscape.
  • Monitor ecosystems in national parks and focus efforts on understanding and responding to ecological integrity indicators that will improve conservation results.
  • Implement conservation and restoration projects that are designed to enhance the ecological integrity of national parks, ecological sustainability of national marine conservation areas, and recover species at risk in all Parks Canada places.
  • Contribute to the protection and recovery of species at risk by implementing actions from new and existing site-based, multi-species action plans in coordination with key partners.
  • Continue to work with other federal departments, Indigenous peoples, and stakeholders to advance policy and management tools for national marine conservation areas, including monitoring and reporting standards. These actions will enable the Agency to better understand and report on the state of the national marine conservation area system and more effectively manage these areas.
  • Continue to ensure that science, research, and management of knowledge support Parks Canada’s conservation planning and action and enable effective communication to Canadians.
  • Continue to manage human/wildlife conflict, wildlife health, hyper abundant species, alien invasive species, and wildland fire to enhance ecological integrity and ensure public safety.
  • Continue to explore the inclusion of restorative justice principles as an additional law enforcement tool for park wardens to support conservation in Parks Canada places.
  • As state member for Canada, coordinate the Government of Canada’s preparations for, and participation in, the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s World Conservation Congress.
  • Continue to co-lead #NatureForAll, a global initiative to inspire love, support, and action for nature.
  • Continue implementing the recommendations of the Minister’s Round Table independent working group to more fully incorporate ecological and commemorative integrity into decision making.
  • Continue implementation of key conservation actions from the Action Plan for the Wood Buffalo National Park, in collaboration with Indigenous partners, other federal departments, provincial and territorial governments and key stakeholders, to ensure that the Outstanding Universal Value of Wood Buffalo National Park is maintained for future generations.
Working with Indigenous peoples

To advance the Government's priority: Walking the Road of Reconciliation, the Agency will:

  • Continue to advance cooperative management with Indigenous peoples at natural heritage places by establishing new cooperative management structures or by transitioning existing relationship-building structures to include roles to support the management of heritage places.
  • Continue reviewing and renewing existing standards, guidance, and tools to foster collaboration with Indigenous knowledge holders and meaningful engagement of Indigenous partners in conservation.
  • Develop new policy instruments to support rights implementation and facilitate Indigenous peoples’ uses of heritage places.
  • Participate in the review and consideration of proposals related to the Indigenous Guardians Pilot Program.

Departmental Result 2: Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for present and future generations

Priority: Cultural Heritage Protection

Cultural Heritage Designation and Commemoration

In 2020–21, Parks Canada will:

Advancing World Heritage in Canada

Writing-on-Stone / Áísínai’pi provincial park, in southeastern Alberta, became Canada’s 20th World Heritage Site in July 2019. The successful nomination to the UNESCO World Heritage Committee was developed in partnership with the Government of Alberta and Blackfoot Confederacy.

  • Continue to implement the Framework for History and Commemoration to set direction for history presentation at all heritage places. This includes strategic priorities for designating places, persons, and events of national historic significance, emphasizing a full range of voices, perspectives, and experiences, and taking into account principles developed by the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada to address conflict and controversy stemming from existing commemorations.
  • Continue to undertake the commemoration of national historic designations by carrying out commemorative plaque unveiling ceremonies in 2020–21, thereby increasing the number of places, people and events of importance to Canadians that are formally recognized. In addition, Parks Canada will explore new approaches to commemorate national historic designations.
Cultural Heritage Conservation

In alignment with the Minister's mandate letter, the Agency will:

Reflecting Indigenous Cultures

Twenty-five projects impacting approximately forty Parks Canada heritage places will receive funding to implement the Framework for History and Commemoration under the Stories of Canada initiative. This includes seeking opportunities for Indigenous peoples to share and communicate their histories on their own terms.

  • Take action toward the development of comprehensive legislation for the protection and conservation of federally-owned cultural heritage places.
  • Continue to undertake various actions to better protect the heritage value of cultural resources in a sustainable manner, including ensuring the collection is safeguarded and accessible for present and future generations:
    • Continue work to consolidate the collection of historical and archaeological objects―one of the largest in North America―under Parks Canada’s care to a new purpose-built collection facility in Gatineau, Quebec.
    • Continue to engage Indigenous groups connected to Parks Canada’s heritage places on the conservation of Indigenous artifacts and objects.
  • Provide financial assistance to support the protection and presentation of nationally recognized heritage places not administered by the federal government through Parks Canada’s National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places.
  • Undertake research and analysis of economic, social, and environmental impacts of heritage places conservation, upon which options for enhancing heritage conservation measures can be based.
  • Continue to work with custodian departments responsible for the protection and conservation of federal heritage buildings, national historic sites and heritage lighthouses.
  • Continue investments to improve the condition of heritage properties at heritage places. As part of this work, Parks Canada’s heritage conservation professionals will continue to support the protection of cultural resources and conduct impact analyses to identify and mitigate potential threats.
  • Continue implementing the Action Plan developed in response to the Auditor General’s report on the conservation of federal properties including improving the accuracy and completeness of information in its asset management database and reviewing the approach for designating federal heritage buildings.
  • Continue the implementation of Parks Canada’s international strategy to ensure Parks Canada’s leadership role within the international natural and cultural heritage community. A scalable approach has been developed to leverage partnerships, advance international priorities, enhance implementation of bilateral and multilateral agreements, and share best practices.
Working with Indigenous peoples

To advance the Government’s priority: Walking the Road of Reconciliation, the Agency will:

Indigenous Languages

Parks Canada is working with Indigenous peoples to bring Indigenous languages back into the national heritage places administered by the Agency:

  • Renaming of a day use area in Point Pelee National Park, Ontario to Madbin Jina (Anishinaabemowin for “come sit a while”) in partnership with local First Nation communities.
  • Developing plans for Indigenous interpretation in Jasper National Park through personal and non-personal interpretation programs and products in collaboration with the Indigenous Interpretation Advisory Group.
  • Bringing Michif (the Métis language) to the forefront of all signage in Batoche National Historic Site, in partnership with Saskatchewan Métis Cultural organizations.
  • Plan the process to add Indigenous representation (First Nation, Métis, and Inuit) to the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada.
  • Revise the policies, criteria, and practices of the National Program of Historical Commemoration to better reflect Indigenous history, heritage values, and memory practices into Canada’s national heritage and history.
  • In response to Call to Action 79, continue to work in partnership with the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, survivors, the arts communities, Indigenous organizations, and other federal departments and agencies to develop and implement a national heritage plan and strategy for commemorating residential school sites, the history and legacy of residential schools, and the contributions of Indigenous peoples to Canada’s history.
  • Continue to advance cooperative management with Indigenous peoples at cultural heritage places by establishing new cooperative management structures, or transitioning existing relationship-building structures to include roles to support the management of heritage places.
Built Heritage Conservation

Investing in Canada's cultural heritage assets

Examples of planned work include:

  • Ensuring the structural stabilization of several recognized heritage structures in the Dawson Historical Complex.
  • Continuing restoration work at the Maison Papineau at Louis-Joseph Papineau National Historic Site.
  • Rehabilitating masonry and stabilizing Province House in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island.

Over the planning period, Parks Canada will:

  • Continue investments to improve the condition of built heritage assets at heritage places. As part of this work, Parks Canada’s heritage conservation professionals will continue to support the protection of cultural resources in infrastructure projects and conduct impact analyses to identify and mitigate potential threats.
  • Continue implementing the Action Plan developed in response to the Auditor General’s report on the conservation of federal properties including: improving the accuracy and completeness of information in its asset management database and reviewing the approach for designating federal heritage buildings.

Departmental Result 3: People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them

Priority: Connecting to Canadians

In keeping with the Minister's mandate letter, Parks Canada will enhance its efforts to play a leadership role in heritage conservation and promotion, and will continue to work to ensure that Canada’s national heritage places are a source of national pride and enjoyment today and for future generations. Over the planning period, Parks Canada will:

Design visitor experiences and target communications and promotions for key audiences and markets:
  • Maintain and grow existing markets characteristic of each Parks Canada place’s current visitor and public support bases.
  • Reach key audiences and markets to diversify Parks Canada’s current visitor and public support base.
  • Pursue marketing efforts to promote visitation, conservation of natural and cultural treasures and authentic Indigenous experiences.
Apply Parks Canada’s brand experience to everything we do:

Digital First at Parks Canada

In line with the Government of Canada's digital government vision, Parks Canada will start exploring the development of a more convenient and user-friendly online experience that will provide seamless touch points for visitors to get information, plan their visit, and experience Parks Canada places.

  • Integrate promotion, communication, outreach, education, social media, and web content in a Digital First approach.
  • Share stories and personal experiences that incorporate science, history and Indigenous peoples’ perspectives within and beyond Parks Canada places.
  • Offer equitable access to our sites, products and experiences to all our visitors, no matter their ability, identity or socio-demographic background.
  • Build on the success of Parks Canada’s brand by continuing to implement the brand in everything we do.
Provide seamless touch points for visitors to get information, plan their visit, and experience Parks Canada places:
  • Improve online planning tools and reservation capabilities to support trip planning, including adding new features to the Parks Canada mobile app.
  • Renew Parks Canada’s reservation system for 2022 by increasing the types and number of experiences that can be reserved and purchased, along with improving the links to the online sales system to provide a more seamless and convenient user experience and to allow for the effective collection of business intelligence.

Learn-to Camp

The Learn-to Camp program provides a new generation of Canadians with the opportunity to learn the skills to experience nature, builds awareness of the health and wellness benefits of time outdoors, and helps build a life-long appreciation for Canada’s cultural and natural treasures. Since 2011, the Learn-to Camp program has introduced over 100,000 young Canadians to the skills needed to enjoy the great outdoors and helped them learn about Canada’s cultural and natural heritage.

The Minister's mandate letter seeks to expand the Learn-to Camp program to meet the target that 400,000 people each year learn basic camping skills.

External relations and visitor experience activities are designed to raise awareness and connection to culture and nature to ensure that Parks Canada places are in the hearts and minds of Canadians:
  • Manage visitation levels and ensure quality visitor experiences, including growth where appropriate, and geographical or temporal redistribution of visitation as necessary.
  • Diversify experiences and renew interpretive and outreach programming, to encourage exploration and learning, with a focus on fostering meaningful connections to nature and history.
  • In support of the Minister's mandate letter, develop a strategy for expanding the Learn-to Camp program to increase the number of children each year that learn basic camping skills and remove barriers to visiting national heritage places.
  • Plan for visitor experience and investments in visitor infrastructure to offer a diverse range of quality experiences, maximize revenues, and improve financial sustainability.

Visitor Infrastructure Improvements

Parks Canada is committed to improving visitor experiences at its national heritage places. Work that will take place in 2020–21 includes:

  • Rehabilitating and improving the campground and day use areas at Gros Morne National Park.
  • Repairing and addressing the primary access road into Point Pelee National Park.
  • Refurbishing building and key operational structures within Forillon National Park.
  • Continuing rehabilitation and reconstruction of major visitor infrastructure following the Kenow fire in Waterton National Park.
Build engagement and collaboration:

Celebrating Key Milestones with Canadians

Leverage Government of Canada milestone anniversaries such as the 350th anniversary of the Hudson Bay Company, the 150th anniversary of the Creation of Manitoba, commemorations of the World Wars, and the annual Canada Historic Places Day, as a means to enhance Canadians’ connections to, and understanding of, Canada’s heritage.

  • Develop innovative partnerships with national, regional, and local stakeholders and Indigenous peoples to amplify the reach, thereby enhancing natural and cultural conservation gains.
  • Work with Indigenous communities on opportunities for experiences, interpretation and storytelling, and present Indigenous values, perspectives and contributions to Canada’s natural and cultural heritage.
  • Further the Government of Canada's priority to strengthen the middle class by supporting Canada’s new tourism strategy, Creating Middle Class Jobs: A Federal Tourism Growth Strategy.

Gender-based analysis plus

In 2020–21, Parks Canada will continue to implement its GBA+ Action Plan and will undertake an evaluation of its Learn-to Camp program with a GBA+ lens. The evaluation will be informed by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s Integrating Gender-Based Analysis Plus into Evaluation: A Primer Footnote i.

In addition, actions to increase awareness of GBA+ tools and broader knowledge of GBA+ among team members, as well as greater collaboration on GBA+ between Parks Canada and other departments and organizations, will continue.

United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Through its planned activities for 2020–21, Parks Canada Agency will contribute to Canada’s achievement of the following United Nations SDGs and targets:

  • Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable (Goal 11), and, more specifically, target 11.4 (Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world's cultural and natural heritage).
  • Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts (Goal 13), and more specifically, target 13.2 (Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning).
  • Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development (Goal 14).
  • Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss (Goal 15) and, more specifically, target 15.5 (Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species), and target 15.4 (By 2030, ensure the conservation of mountain ecosystems, including their biodiversity, in order to enhance their capacity to provide benefits that are essential for sustainable development).
  • Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development (Goal 17) and, more specifically, target 17.17 (Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships).

Experimentation

Parks Canada’s Innovation Lab operates as the hub for training and sharing lessons-learned for innovation and experimentation within the Agency. The Innovation Lab has developed an Innovation Kit, workshop modules, and organizes an innovation community for Parks Canada team members to foster a work environment that is conductive to experimentation, innovation, and intelligent risk-taking.

Key risks

Parks Canada has identified five risks in relation to its core responsibility that could impact delivery of programs and services. Associated mitigation strategies have been developed to minimize the overall likelihood and impact. These risks and associated mitigation strategies are described in the tables below.

Risk Description Mitigation Strategies
Environmental Forces Adaptation and Response Due to the magnitude and rapid pace of environmental changes, including climate change, there is a risk that the integrity of ecosystems, cultural resources and infrastructure cannot be maintained or improved which may lead to Parks Canada being unable to deliver its mandate.

To mitigate this risk, Parks Canada will:

  • Apply Parks Canada’s climate change adaptation framework to understand climate change impacts, assess risks, and identify feasible and effective measures for adaptation.
  • Integrate climate change into diverse areas of work by adjusting policies and programs.
  • Undertake ecological restoration projects focused on ecosystem resilience in the context of environmental change.
  • Continue to review emergency management and provide Parks Canada personnel with ongoing emergency management and response training.
  • Continue to implement measures to protect contemporary and built heritage assets, such as using more resilient designs and construction materials.
  • Nurture a strong culture of conservation in Canada through targeted communications related to science and conservation.
  • Take measures to improve the ecological connectivity of heritage places.
Relationships with Indigenous Peoples If Parks Canada does not allocate the necessary time, effort and investment to build and maintain relationships with Indigenous peoples, there is a risk that the Agency may not be able to fulfill its obligations and deliver on its programs and services, which may result in damaged reputation, increased litigation and challenges meeting conservation targets.

To mitigate this risk, Parks Canada will:

  • Advance projects and mechanisms that facilitate Indigenous connections with traditionally used lands and waters.
  • Advance policy and programs that support a comprehensive approach to Indigenous stewardship.
  • Support collaborative decision-making with Indigenous partners by increasing cooperative management structures.
  • Work with Indigenous peoples to review existing designations and increase the number of Indigenous designations under the National Program of Historical Commemoration.
  • Address barriers preventing meaningful Indigenous collaboration and engagement.
  • Work with Indigenous partners to bridge Indigenous and science-based knowledge in the Agency's approach to conservation and research.
  • Work with Indigenous communities to incorporate Indigenous perspectives in the way heritage places are presented, including developing visitor experience opportunities to help Canadians learn about and connect with Indigenous culture.
  • Host Indigenous events, support Indigenous-themed product development, and provide venues for Indigenous groups and people to share their stories, in their own voice, and offer unique opportunities in support of reconciliation.
Built Asset Condition and Long-Term Sustainability Due to aging infrastructure, inadequate level of recapitalization and maintenance, climate change and inflationary impacts, there is a risk that Parks Canada will not be able to maintain a sustainable asset portfolio which may result in compromised public safety, loss of irreplaceable cultural heritage, and damage to the Agency’s reputation.

To mitigate this risk, Parks Canada will:

  • Develop long term portfolio strategies that will align with the anticipated recommendations of the Treasury Board Secretariat-led Horizontal Fixed Asset Review and thereby establish the priorities and direction for future investment throughout Parks Canada's network of assets.
  • Implement a cultural fixed asset prioritization framework which will help guide decision-making related to investments for all heritage properties under the administration of the Agency.
  • Continue to update Parks Canada's asset management database to ensure that it has complete information on the number and current condition of its heritage properties.
  • Develop long term portfolio visions and strategies throughout Parks Canada’s network of assets and continue to seek long term asset funding.
Competitive Position If the Agency does not respond to changing socio-economic conditions and other market influences, there is a risk that Parks Canada’s programs and services may not meet the expectations of Canadians which may lead to a decrease in Agency relevance as measured by a decrease in tourism market share and visitation.

To mitigate this risk, Parks Canada will:

  • Reach nationally identified markets and audiences to diversify and build visitation and to enhance public awareness and support.
  • Develop national outreach and marketing efforts in a digital first context.
  • Manage visitation levels so they are sustainable and ensure quality visitor experiences, including growth where appropriate, and redistribution of visitation geographically and temporally, as necessary.
  • Diversify and renew visitor experience opportunities to respond to public expectations for new and innovative experiences.
  • Leverage key anniversaries, and offer enhanced programming, special events and other promotions to encourage visitation.
Business Modernization If the Agency does not modernize its corporate and internal services, there is a risk that Parks Canada may not have the capacity, business processes and tools to effectively and efficiently support service delivery and meet government management accountability expectations.

To mitigate this risk, Parks Canada will:

  • Renew the Agency's Departmental Results Framework based on a longer term strategic direction that sets the foundation for evidence-based decision-making, resource allocation and reallocation.
  • Develop Agency's performance and analytics capacity, including benchmarking against like departments, to support evidence-based decision making and to demonstrate results to Canadians.
  • Develop and implement a robust data strategy to support effective planning, performance measurement, and decision-making.
  • Develop and implement a renewed approach to business planning that integrates business, finance and human resources planning, monitoring and performance to support evidence-based decision making and to demonstrate results to Canadians.
  • Implement a strengthened budget management and forecasting regime that will support better financial planning and decision making and ensure the appropriate tools, systems, training and change management support is provided across the organization to build capacity.
  • Partner with other federal organizations to develop and modernize IT systems, investment planning, management practices and reporting mechanisms to meet the needs of the Agency and the expectations of Canadians.
  • Make progress in developing a proposal to the Government for permanent, sustainable funding for the Agency’s capital asset base, including the dedicated workforce that enables the support to, and delivery of, major projects and asset maintenance.

Planned results for Protecting and presenting Canada’s natural and cultural heritage

Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018–19 Actual results 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results
Canada’s natural heritage is protected for present and future generations Percentage of terrestrial regions represented in the national park system At least 82% March 2025 77% 77% 77%
Percentage of marine regions represented in the national marine conservation area system At least 31% March 2025 17% 17% 17%
Percentage of national park ecosystems where ecological integrity is maintained or improved At least 92% March 2023 82% 88% 88%
Number of natural heritage places managed cooperatively with Indigenous peoples1 Between 27 and 30 March 2021 n/a n/a n/a
Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for present and future generations Number of places, people and events of importance to Canadians that are formally recognized At least 3,778 March 2021 3,816 3,812 3,758
Percentage of historical and archaeological collection, cultural landscapes and archaeological sites in Parks Canada's care that are safeguarded At least 90% March 2024 63% n/a n/a
Percentage of built heritage assets in good or fair condition1 At least 49% March 2022 n/a n/a n/a
Number of cultural heritage places managed cooperatively with Indigenous peoples1 Between 6 and 10 March 2021 n/a n/a n/a
People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them Number of visitors experiencing Parks Canada places At least 23.7M March 2021 25.1M 27.2M 24.7M
Percentage of Canadians that support the protection and presentation of Parks Canada places Between 78% and 82% March 2021 88% 90% Not measured
Number of places where Indigenous peoples use lands and waters according to their traditional and modern practices Between 32 and 42 March 2025 30 n/a1 n/a1
Percentage of contemporary assets in good or fair condition1 At least 74% March 2022 n/a n/a n/a

1 This is a new or revised indicator for 2020–21 and thus no previous-year results are available.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Parks Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase. Footnote i

Planned budgetary financial resources for Protecting and Presenting Canada’s Natural and Cultural Heritage

2020–21 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2020–21 planned spending 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending
1,022,207,842 1,022,207,842 798,196,082 632,574,844

The decrease in planned spending is primarily due to the sunsetting of funding for Parks Canada’s infrastructure initiatives to rehabilitate a significant portion of its heritage, visitor, highway and waterway built asset inventory in national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas. While the infrastructure funding is sunsetting, the Agency is continuing its effort to secure additional funding in 2020–21 and 2021–22 to address the forecasted decrease.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Parks Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase. Footnote ii

Planned human resources for Protecting and Presenting Canada’s Natural and Cultural Heritage

2020–21 planned full-time equivalents 2021–22 planned full-time equivalents 2022–23 planned full-time equivalents
4,417 4,295 4,240

The decrease in planned full-time equivalents is primarily due to the sunsetting of funding for Parks Canada’s infrastructure initiatives to rehabilitate a significant portion of its heritage, visitor, highway and waterway built asset inventory in national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas. While the infrastructure funding is sunsetting, the Agency is continuing its effort to secure additional funding in 2020–21 and 2021–22 to address the forecasted decrease.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Parks Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase. Footnote ii

Internal Services: planned results

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of Programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct services that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. These services are:

  • Management and Oversight Services
  • Communications Services
  • Legal Services
  • Human Resources Management Services
  • Financial Management Services
  • Information Management Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Real Property Management Services
  • Materiel Management Services
  • Acquisition Management Services

Planning highlights

Management and Oversight Services

Business Modernization

In 2021–22, Parks Canada will review its capacity, planning, financial management, business and performance measurement processes, systems and tools, to ensure it has robust, effective and efficient internal services to support program delivery and results for Canadians. The Agency will continue to strengthen its long term asset planning and associated management framework with a view to securing long term predictable funding. In addition, the Agency will finalize and begin implementation of a data strategy.

Human Resources Management Services

Fostering a high-performing, diverse and inclusive workforce

As a highly operational organization, Parks Canada's workforce is its strength. The Agency will develop and implement a Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan as well as introduce a new performance management system for use across the organization. The Agency will also modernize its staffing practices to support key goals, such as indigenous workforce recruitment and development as well youth employment programming. In 2020–21, Parks Canada will complete a cyclical review of its human resources regime and start the implementation of recommendations on a prioritized basis.

Optimizing a safe, healthy and respectful workplace

Parks Canada remains committed to building a safe and harassment-free work environment, supportive of workplace health, wellness and the promotion of civility and respect. The Agency will contribute to fostering this environment through the development of specific policies and guidelines and by carrying out workplace risk assessments and leveraging results from the Public Service Employee Survey to guide related action. Moreover, in 2020–21, Parks Canada will implement recommendations from an internal organizational health and safety audit completed in 2019–20.

Parks Canada will also continue its efforts to negotiate a new collective agreement with unionized employees as a reflection of the importance the Agency places on harmonious labour-management relationships.

Providing tools that support and adapt to changing operational needs

In 2020–21, Parks Canada will continue to collaborate with Public Services and Procurement Canada to stabilize pay administration, to reduce the occurrence of pay issues and to improve the timeliness of their resolution.

In the spirit of continuous improvement, Parks Canada will also continue to introduce business process changes and leverage electronic ticketing technology to provide better service to employees. As well, the Agency will foster the use of data and tools, such as dashboards and other reports, to support human resources planning and informed, evidenced-based decision-making.

Financial Management Services

Modernization of financial management

Parks Canada will work to strengthen the Agency’s budget management and forecasting regime in order to support better planning and decision making and ensure the appropriate tools, systems, training and change management support is provided across the organization to build capacity.

Information Management and Information Technology Services

Collaborate openly and digitally with partners and Canadians

Parks Canada will continue its phased roll-out of new collaboration tools to support productivity and teamwork internally and with partners.

Enabling Parks Canada with a mobile workforce

Much of Parks Canada's work happens outside of traditional offices. In 2020–21, the Agency will support this work by deploying more mobile-enabled and cloud applications, including its mobile reporting pilot with the Agency's Visitor Safety, Human-Wildlife Conflict and Law Enforcement teams.

Connect with Canadians using Open Data
Parks Canada supports the Government of Canada's priority for OpenData

In 2020–21, the Agency will develop a framework to help make OpenData a part of operations at all levels and make more datasets publicly available.

Using technology to continuously improve

Parks Canada continues to improve its network connectivity and telecommunications to help ensure that its employees can offer Canadians the standard of service they expect.

Planned budgetary financial resources for Internal Services

2020–21 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2020–21 planned spending 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending
85,324,009 85,324,009 84,905,300 84,930,133

Planned human resources for Internal Services

2020–21 planned full-time equivalents 2021–22 planned full-time equivalents 2022–23 planned full-time equivalents
762 762 762

Spending and human resources

This section provides an overview of the department’s planned spending and human resources for the next three consecutive fiscal years, and compares planned spending for the upcoming year with the current and previous years’ actual spending.

Planned spending

Departmental spending 2017–18 to 2022–23

Departmental spending 2017–18 to 2022–23 - Text version

A chart detailing Parks Canada Agency departmental spending 2017-2018 to 2022-2023

2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022 2022-2023
Statutory 151 411 234 1645 204 478 198 887 198 316 198 412
Voted 1 165 622 1 226 159 1 478 797 908 645 684 785 519 093
Total 1 317 033 1 460 324 1 682 876 1 107 532 883 101 717 505

The above graph depicts the Agency’s spending trend over a six-year period. The increase in expenditures over the three years (2017–18 to 2019–20) is primarily due to the Government of Canada’s investments of approximately $3.7 billion in national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas to rehabilitate a significant portion of its heritage, visitor, highway and waterway built asset inventory. This time-limited funding gradually decreases starting in 2020–21, which explains the significant reduction in planned spending for the future years. While the infrastructure funding is sunsetting, the Agency is continuing its effort to secure additional funding in 2020–21 and 2021–22 to address the forecasted decrease.

Statutory expenditures were significantly lower in 2017–18 due to a decrease in the Agency’s revenues as a result of free entry for all visitors to national parks, national marine conservation areas and national historic sites in celebration of Canada 150. The reduction was offset by a corresponding increase in voted authorities in 2017–18.

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned spending for each Parks Canada’s core responsibilities and to Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Budgetary planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)

Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2017–18 expenditures 2018–19 expenditures 2019–20 forecast spending 2020–21 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2020–21 planned spending 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending
Protecting and presenting Canada’s natural and cultural heritage 1,144,729,565 1,331,557,979 1,540,657,895 1,022,207,842 1,022,207,842 798,196,082 632,574,844
Subtotal 1,144,729,565 1,331,557,979 1,540,657,895 1,022,207,842 1,022,207,842 798,196,082 632,574,844
Internal Services 172,303,245 128,766,185 142,217,686 85,324,009 85,324,009 84,905,300 84,930,133
Total 1,317,032,810 1,460,324,164 1,682,875,581 1,107,531,851 1,107,531,851 883,101,382 717,504,977

For fiscal years 2017–18 and 2018–19, the amounts represent the actual expenditures as reported in the Public Accounts. For fiscal year 2019–20, the amounts represent the forecast spending which include planned budgetary and statutory expenditures as presented in the Main and Supplementary Estimates.

For fiscal years 2020–21 to 2022–23, planned spending reflects approved funding by Treasury Board to support the Agency’s programs.

The trend of increasing spending until 2019–20 is primarily due to investments of approximately $3.7 billion in national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas to rehabilitate a significant portion of its heritage, visitor, highway and waterway built asset inventory. This time-limited funding gradually decreases starting in 2020–21, which explains the significant reduction in planned spending for the future years. While the infrastructure funding is sunsetting, the Agency is continuing its effort to secure additional funding in 2020–21 and 2021–22 to address the forecasted decrease.

Planned human resources

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned full-time equivalents (FTEs) for each core responsibility in Parks Canada’s departmental results framework and to Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Human resources planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services

Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2017–18 actual full time equivalents 2018–19 actual full time equivalents 2019–20 forecast full time equivalents 2020–21 planned full time equivalents 2021–22 planned full time equivalents 2022–23 planned full time equivalents
Protecting and presenting Canada’s natural and cultural heritage 4,356 4,638 4,618 4,417 4,295 4,240
Subtotal 4,356 4,638 4,618 4,417 4,295 4,240
Internal Services 1,226 928 929 762 761 761
Total 5,582 5,566 5,547 5,179 5,056 5,001

The trend of decreasing full-time equivalents starting in 2020–21 is primarily due to the sunsetting of infrastructure investments in national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas to rehabilitate a significant portion of its heritage, visitor, highway and waterway built asset inventory. Another factor in the decrease in full-time equivalents from 2019–20 to future years is a decrease in the number of planned students as a result of the sunset of additional funding received for the expansion of the Agency’s Youth Employment Strategy.

While the funding is sunsetting, the Agency is continuing its effort to secure additional funding in 2020–21 and 2021–22 to address the forecasted decrease.

Estimates by vote

Information on Parks Canada’s organizational appropriations is available in the 2020–21 Main Estimates. Footnote ii

Condensed future-oriented statement of operations

The Condensed Future Oriented Statement of Operations provides a general overview of the Parks Canada Agency’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management. The forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis; as a result, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on Parks Canada’s website.

Condensed future oriented statement of operations for the year ending March 31, 2021 (dollars)

Financial information 2019–20 forecast results 2020–21 planned results Difference (2020–21 planned results minus 2019–20 forecast results)
Total expenses 905,074,000 909,801,000 4,727,000
Total revenues 150,000,000 150,000,000 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 755,074,000 759,801,000 4,727,000

The net cost of operations is planned to increase by $4.7 million in 2020–21 from $755.1 to $759.8 million. The planned increase is primarily due to higher amortization expense following investments in capital assets, offset by the wind down of funding to support the infrastructure investments program.

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson, P.C., M.P.

Institutional head: Ron Hallman, President & Chief Executive Officer

Ministerial portfolio: Environment and Climate Change Canada

Enabling instrument(s):

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1998

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

“Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on Parks Canada’s website.

For more information on the department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister’s mandate letter.

Operating context

Information on the operating context is available on Parks Canada’s website.

Reporting framework

The Parks Canada Agency approved Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory for 2020–21 are as follows.

Departmental results framework

Graphical presentation of departmental results framework and program inventory - Text Version

The graphical illustration shows Parks Canada Agency’s Departmental Results Framework which includes: one Core Responsibility, three Departmental Results, twelve Departmental Results Indicators, and five supporting programs in its program inventory. The Agency’s Departmental Results Framework also includes the standardized Government of Canada Internal Services element at the Core Responsibility level.

Parks Canada Agency’s Core Responsibility is: Protecting and Presenting Canada’s Natural and Cultural Heritage.

The Core Responsibility Description is: Establish national parks and national marine conservation areas; designate places, persons and events of national historic significance; protect and conserve natural and cultural heritage guided by science and Indigenous knowledge; provide opportunities to visit, experience and enjoy Canada’s natural and cultural heritage; work with the public, other federal departments, provinces, territories, Indigenous Peoples, and stakeholders to carry out these responsibilities.

There are three departmental results:

  1. Canada’s natural heritage is protected for present and future generations
  2. Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for present and future generations
  3. People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them.

The first result, Canada’s natural heritage is protected for present and future generations, is supported by four indicators:

  • Percentage of terrestrial regions represented in the national park system
  • Percentage of marine regions represented in the national marine conservation area system
  • Percentage of national park ecosystems where ecological integrity is maintained or improved
  • Number of natural heritage plances managed cooperatively with Indigenous peoples

The second result, Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for present and future generations, is supported by four indicators:

  • Number of places, people and events of importance to Canadians that are formally recognized
  • Percentage of historical and archaeological collection, cultural landscapes and archaeological sites in Parks Canada's care that are safeguarded
  • Number of cultural heritage places managed cooperatively with Indigenous peoples
  • Percentage of built heritage assets in good or fair condition

The third result, People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them, is supported by four indicators:

  • Number of visitors experienceing Parks Canada places
  • Percentage of Canadians that support the protection and presentation of Parks Canada places
  • Number of places where Indigenous peoples use lands and waters according to their traditional and modern practices
  • Percentage of contemporary assets in good or fair condition

Parks Canada Agency’s Program Inventory consists of the following five programs:

  • Heritage Places Establishment Program
  • Heritage Places Conservation Program
  • Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support Program
  • Visitor Experience Program
  • Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management Program

Supporting information on the program inventory

The following supplementary information tables are available on Parks Canada’s website:

  • Details on transfer payment programs
  • Gender-based analysis plus

Supplementary information tables

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to the Parks Canada Agency’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase Footnote iii.

Federal tax expenditures

Parks Canada’s Departmental Plan does not include information on tax expenditures that relate to its planned results for 2020–21.

Tax expenditures are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance, and the Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for government wide tax expenditures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures Footnote iv. This report provides detailed information on tax expenditures, including objectives, historical background and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis. The tax measures presented in this report are solely the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Parks Canada National Office

30 Victoria Street
Gatineau, Quebec
Canada
J8X 0B3

General Inquiries

888-773-8888

General Inquiries (International)

819-420-9486

Teletypewriter (TTY)

866-787-6221

Website: www.parkscanada.gc.ca

Email: pc.information.pc@canada.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of a department over a 3 year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
departmental priority (priorité ministérielle)
A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Departmental priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.
departmental result (résultat ministériel)
A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a departmental result.
departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
A framework that consists of the department’s core responsibilities, departmental results and departmental result indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on a department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation (expérimentation)
The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare, the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works and what doesn’t. Experimentation is related to, but distinct form innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.
full time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2020–21 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Fight climate change; Strengthening the middle class; Walking the road of reconciliation; Keeping Canadians safe and healthy; and Positioning Canada for success in an uncertain world.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative in which two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision-making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
program inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all of the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s core responsibilities and results.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
strategic outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.