Table of contents

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être

The Minister of Environment and Climate Change is responsible for the Parks Canada Agency. Parks Canada protects and presents nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and fosters public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations. Canada’s national urban park, national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas, of which Parks Canada is the proud steward, offer Canadians opportunities to visit, experience and personally connect with these heritage places in ways that are meaningful to them. In carrying out its responsibilities, Parks Canada works in collaboration with the public, other federal departments, provinces, territories, Indigenous peoples and stakeholders.

Mandate and role

On behalf of the people of Canada, we protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations.

Vision

Canada’s treasured natural and historic places will be a living legacy, connecting hearts and minds to a stronger, deeper understanding of the very essence of Canada.

Responsibilities

Parks Canada is considered to be the first national park service in the world. It is responsible for protecting representative examples of Canada’s natural regions in a system of national parks. The system, which is 77% complete, represents the diversity of landscapes in Canada. Forty-six national parks represent 30 of Canada’s 39 terrestrial natural regions and protects 328,198 km2 of Canada’s terrestrial ecosystems. In managing national parks, Parks Canada is mandated to maintain or restore ecological integrity as a first priority, and to provide Canadians with opportunities to discover, appreciate and enjoy their natural and cultural heritage.

Parks Canada is also responsible for representing Canada’s marine and Great Lakes environments in a system of national marine conservation areas. The system is 17% complete and protects approximately 15,740 km2 of Canada’s marine and Great Lakes ecosystems. The country’s four national marine conservation areas represent five of Canada’s 29 marine regions. The Agency works to ensure the ecological sustainability of national marine conservation areas which includes protecting its key features for the benefit and enjoyment of Canadians, visitors and coastal communities. Parks Canada is currently protecting Tallurutiup Imanga in Lancaster Sound, Nunavut on an interim basis, while it works to establish it as a national marine conservation area.

The Rouge National Urban Park—the only one of its kind in Canada—provides an exceptional opportunity to connect urban Canadians to the heritage of the park and its diverse landscapes. In managing this park, Parks Canada is mandated to maintain or restore ecological integrity as a first priority, present the park’s natural and cultural heritage, promote a vibrant farming community, and encourage Canadians to discover and connect with their national protected heritage areas.

Parks Canada manages the National Program of Historical Commemoration, through which the Government of Canada has designated 981 national historic sites (171 of which are administered by Parks Canada), 696 persons of national historic significance and 482 events of national historic significance. These designations are essential to present our stories and significant places, and they reflect who we are as Canadians. Parks Canada brings to life the key moments of Canada’s history at the national historic sites it administers providing unique opportunities for visitors to personally connect with and experience these places.

Parks Canada’s nine heritage canals support commercial and recreational boating, and the Agency’s role includes water management as well as the management of canal infrastructure.

Parks Canada manages an additional eight heritage designation and protection programs in support of other federal departments, provincial and territorial governments, Indigenous groups and Canadian communities. These programs reflect the Government of Canada’s commitment to the commemoration and conservation of heritage railway stations, heritage lighthouses, gravesites of Canadian Prime Ministers, federal heritage buildings, federal archaeology, Canadian heritage rivers, and UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The Parks Canada National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places is a contribution program to encourage and support the protection and presentation of non-federally-owned national historic sites, heritage railway stations and heritage lighthouses.

Internationally, the Agency represents Canada as State Party to UNESCO’s World Heritage Convention and the International Union for Conservation of Nature, and through participation in other international organizations, conventions and agreements.

Nearly all of the heritage places administered by Parks Canada have been traditionally used by First Nations, Inuit or Métis. Parks Canada’s unique mandate and responsibility for administering over 90% of federally-owned lands positions the Agency well to advance reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

Supplementary Information Tables

Annex 1: Update to the 2017–2020 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Section 3: Commitments for Parks Canada Agency (updated March 2019)

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Low-Carbon Government: The Government of Canada leads by example by making its operations low-carbon

Responsible Minister: All ministers

 
Low-Carbon Government
FSDS target(s)
FSDS Contributing Action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)  /  Performance indicator(s) Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur

Reduce GHG emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve this reduction by 2025

Improve the energy efficiency of our buildings/operations

Reduce GHG emissions from its facilities and fleet by 2% below 2005 levels, with facilities contributing 1.4%.

Validate its facilities portfolios for GHG reporting with regards to fuel, electricity and non-energy sources.

Promote Energy Performance Contracts (EPC) for its facilities to include high-performance green building standards for new constructions or major renovations.

By 2030, Parks Canada actions are intended to reduce GHG emissions in facilities by 28% relative to total Agency 2005 levels.

Starting point(s):
Total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year): [41.2] ktCO2e

Total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet in fiscal year 2016–17: [35.1] ktCO2e

GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year): [29.8] ktCO2e

GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2016–17: [22.6] ktCO2e

Starting points updated to reflect changes made to GHG reporting scope.

Performance indicator(s):
Percentage change in total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet since 2005 levels.

Percentage change in GHG emissions from facilities relative to combined total (facilities and fleet) Agency 2005 levels.

  • Internal Services
  • Heritage Places Establishment
  • Heritage Places Conservation
  • Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
  • Visitor Experience
  • Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

Modernize our fleet

Reduce GHG emissions from its facilities and fleet by 2% below 2005 levels, with the fleet contributing to a 0.6% reduction.

Purchase 75% of its light fleet vehicles from more energy efficient vehicles on the Agency’s Preauthorized Vehicle List (PVL).

Promote the development of 5-year replacement plans for heavy-duty fleet vehicles by moving to vehicles with greater efficiency and lower emissions.

Promote right-size and low-carbon intensity fleet-vehicles.

By 2030, Parks Canada actions will contribute a reduction in fleet GHG emissions of 12% reduction relative to total Agency 2005 levels.

Starting point(s):
Total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year): [41.2] ktCO2e

Total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet in fiscal year 2016–17: [35.1] ktCO2e

Starting points updated to reflect changes made to GHG reporting scope.

GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year): [11.4] ktCO2e

GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2016–17: [12.4] ktCO2e

Performance indicator(s):
Percentage change in total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet relative to 2005 levels.

Percentage change in GHG emissions from fleet relative to combined total (facilities and fleet) Agency 2005 levels.

  • Internal Services
  • Heritage Places Establishment
  • Heritage Places Conservation
  • Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
  • Visitor Experience
  • Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

Support the transition to a low-carbon economy through green procurement

Integrate sustainability into common-use procurement instruments, processes and controls.

Require key procurement officials to support and promote green procurement.

Provide green procurement awareness and training for staff involved in procurement.

Set Agency targets to reduce the environmental impact of specific goods and services (e.g. IM/IT equipment, light fleet, heavy fleet).

Green procurement incorporates environmental considerations into purchasing decisions and is expected to motivate suppliers to green their goods, services and supply chain. GHG emission reductions, recyclable content and packaging are all areas of consideration in green procurement.

Starting point(s):
Number of key procurement officials that have facilitated green procurement through various activities and/or tools in 2016–17 (base year): [7]

Number of procurement decision makers that have completed training on green procurement in 2016–17 (base year): [35]

Number of goods and services categories with specific green procurement targets in 2016–17 (base year): [3]

Performance indicator(s):
Percentage of key procurement officials that have facilitated green procurement through various activities and/or tools.

Percentage of procurement decision makers that have completed training on green procurement.

Percentage change in the number of goods and services with specific green procurement targets.

  • Internal Services
  • Heritage Places Establishment
  • Heritage Places Conservation
  • Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
  • Visitor Experience
  • Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

Demonstrate innovative technologies

Partner with Canadian environmental businesses to test on the Agency’s sites new clean technology developments through the Build in Canada Innovation Program (BCIP). For example, the Agency will use innovative technology to analyse in real time the amount of petroleum contamination in soil samples.

Actions that incent, support, or procure state-of-the-art clean environmental innovative technologies lower the environmental footprint of government operations while contributing to the success of clean-tech businesses in Canada.

Starting point(s):
Number of BCIP-funded clean environmental technologies tested across Agency facilities in 2016–17 (base year): [2]

Performance indicator(s):
Percentage change in the number of BCIP-sponsored clean environmental technologies tested.

  • Internal Services
  • Heritage Places Establishment
  • Heritage Places Conservation
  • Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
  • Visitor Experience
  • Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

Promote sustainable travel practices

Continue to apply its Travel Directive and related policies to ensure the most efficient travel practices are pursued.

Promote green meeting practices by increasing videoconferencing facilities by 15% by March 2019 relative to March 2016 level.

Promote the creation of voluntary workplace Green Teams that will steward sustainable commuting and resource use.

Actions taken to reduce the amount of business travel or switch to less GHG intensive modes of transportation, for both business travels and commuting, will reduce GHG emissions.

Starting point(s):
Number of videoconferencing facilities in fiscal year 2016–17 (base year): [72]

Number of voluntary workplace Green Teams in fiscal year 2016–17 (base year): [2]

Performance indicator(s):
Percentage change in videoconferencing facilities.

Percentage change in the number of voluntary workplace Green Teams.

  • Internal Services
  • Heritage Places Establishment
  • Heritage Places Conservation
  • Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
  • Visitor Experience
  • Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

Understand climate change impacts and build resilience

Continue to identify, assess, prioritize and take action to address climate change risks across the Agency’s areas of responsibility.

Work with partner organizations and specialists to refine tools and approaches, including an adaptation framework, regional reports and workshops, to better understand and support climate change adaptation in parks and protected areas in Canada.

Parks Canada will integrate climate change considerations into policy, programs, and operations to adapt to a changing climate, enhance the protection of public, assets and resources, and strengthen planning and decision-making.

Starting point(s):
A draft Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for the Agency has been developed to identify climate change risks.

Number of PCA heritage sites that have been subject to PCA’s site-specific climate change adaptation planning exercise.

Performance indicator(s):
Percent completion of a comprehensive assessment of climate change risks and mitigation measures (target of 100% completion by Fall 2019).

Percentage of targeted PCA heritage sites which developed climate change adaptation plans (Target: 75% by 2020).

This action will be coordinated by Heritage Places Conservation, in collaboration with all other implicated Programs

Improve transparency and accountability

Share annual energy and GHG emissions data with the Centre for Greening Government (CGG).

N/A

N/A

Internal Services

Develop policy for low-carbon government

Align its greening operations policy suite with the federal Greening Government Framework (GGF).

N/A

N/A

Internal Services

 
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Healthy Coasts and Oceans: Coasts and oceans support healthy, resilient and productive ecosystems

Responsible Minister: Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

 
Healthy Coasts and Oceans
FSDS target(s)
FSDS Contributing Action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)  /   Performance indicator(s) Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
By 2020, 10% of coastal and marine areas are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures

Protect and manage marine and coastal areas

Conclude an Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreement and complete an interim management plan for the area, Tallurutiup Imanga National Marine Conservation Area (in Lancaster Sound in Nunavut).

Launch a feasibility assessment, proposed national marine conservation area in Arctic Basin, Ellesmere Island in Nunavut - “Last Ice Area”.

Conclude ongoing feasibility assessment, proposed national marine conservation area reserve in the southern Strait of Georgia, Strait of Georgia in British Columbia.

Launch a feasibility assessment, proposed national marine conservation area adjacent to the Îles de la Madeleine, Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence.

Launch a feasibility assessment, proposed national marine conservation area in James Bay, eastern James Bay.

Advance a feasibility assessment for a new proposal for a site in western Hudson Bay.

Work on the national Imappivut (Our Water) initiative regarding oceans management in northern Labrador within the Labrador Inuit Settlement Area. This work may offer a possibility to initiate a proposal for a marine conservation area offshore of Torngat Mountains National Park.

Actions updated in accordance with 2019–20 Departmental Plan.

Parks Canada will work to protect marine and coastal areas in national marine conservation areas as a contribution to the government’s commitment to protect 5% of the marine environment by 2017, and 10% by 2020.

Starting point(s):
As of March 31, 2016, the national marine conservation area system was 17%    complete. The system includes four areas representing five of the 29 marine regions.

Performance indicator(s):
Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national marine conservation areas. [Target: 2 (annually)]

Heritage Places Establishment

Build our knowledge of coastal ecosystems, MPAs and fisheries

Continue to work with other federal departments, Indigenous peoples and stakeholders to advance policy and management tools to ensure the effective conservation and management of national marine conservation areas.

Continue to implement a pilot monitoring program enabling the Agency to better understand the state of the national marine conservation area system and more effectively manage these areas.

Parks Canada will continue efforts to maintain national marine conservation areas and contribute to effective area-based conservation measures by advancing knowledge of coastal and marine areas.

Starting point(s):
National marine conservation area monitoring plans are being implemented to help operating sites inform decision making and contribute condition assessments to future State of Canada’s Natural and Historic Places Reports.

Performance indicator(s):
Number of operating sites that contribute condition assessments to the State of Canada’s Natural and Historic Places Report. [Target: 4 by March 2021]

Heritage Places Conservation

 
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Sustainable Managed Lands and Forests: Lands and forests support biodiversity and provide a variety of ecosystem services for generations to come

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change; Minister of Natural Resources

 
Sustainably Managed Lands and Forests
FSDS target(s)
FSDS Contributing Action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)  /  Performance indicator(s) Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur

By 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures

Conserve natural spaces

Conclude negotiation of land transfer agreement with the Government of the Northwest Territories, establishment agreement with Łutsël K’e Dene First Nation, and an Impact and Benefit Agreement with the Northwest Territories Métis Nation, and formally protect the Thaidene Nëné National Park Reserve (located in the East Arm of the Great Slave Lake of the Northwest Territories) area under the Canada National Parks Act.

Updated to correct typographical error from previous year’s document.

Confirm a final boundary and governance approach for a national park reserve in the South Okanagan Similkameen (Interior Dry Plateau natural region) in collaboration with the British Columbia government and local First Nations, followed by negotiation of the relevant establishment agreement(s).

Continue to play an important role in advancing the Programme of Work on Protected Areas under the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Pathway to Canada Target 1 initiative.

Support the recognition and implementation of a spectrum of Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas.

Actions updated in accordance with 2019–20 Departmental Plan.

Parks Canada’s will work to expand the national parks system which contributes to the conservations of lands and inland waters.

Starting point(s):
Currently, 30 of 39 of Canada’s natural regions are represented by 46 national parks and national park reserves.  

Performance indicator(s):
Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks. [Target: 2 annually]

Heritage Places Establishment

By March 31, 2023, ecological integrity will be maintained or improved in 92% of national park ecosystems

Target and date revised in accordance with 2019–20 Departmental Plan.

Conserve natural spaces

Reprioritize the Conservation and Restoration Program to fund projects that will achieve objectives of the Nature Legacy including enhanced integration of the conservation of species and spaces, incorporation of Indigenous knowledge, incorporation of ecological connectivity, and planning for climate change adaptation. A science-based ecological integrity monitoring program is used to prioritize ecosystems to restore.

Begin implementation of an action plan for Wood Buffalo National Park in collaboration with Indigenous partners, other federal departments, provincial and territorial governments and key stakeholders. This unified approach makes use of the best available science and Indigenous traditional knowledge―ensuring that Wood Buffalo National Park World Heritage Site remains a treasured place with Outstanding Universal Value for generations to come.

Actions updated in accordance with 2019–20 Departmental Plan.

Parks Canada will support the maintenance and improvement of the ecological integrity in national parks through protection, conservation, restoration or mitigation activities.

Starting point(s):
As of March 2016, the condition of 90% of national park ecosystems was maintained or improved from 2011.

Performance indicator(s):
Percentage of national park ecosystems where ecological integrity is maintained or improved. [Target: 92% by March 31, 2023]

Target and date revised in accordance with 2019–20 Departmental Plan.

Heritage Places Conservation

 
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Healthy Wildlife Populations: All species have healthy and viable populations

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change

 
Healthy Wildlife Populations FSDS target(s) FSDS Contributing Action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)  /  Performance indicator(s) Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur

By 2020, species that are secure remain secure, and populations of species at risk listed under federal law exhibit trends that are consistent with recovery strategies and management plans

Use legislation and regulations to protect species at risk and migratory birds

Recover species at risk on a priority basis through the Conservation and Restoration Program.

Support the development of site-based action plans for species at risk in compliance with the Species at Risk Act and demonstrate federal leadership for land use management and species recovery through an active program of implementation and restoration.

Parks Canada works to protect species at risk found in heritage places, along with their residences and habitat, and also supports and undertakes recovery activities to maintain or improve their conservation status.

Starting point(s):
As of 2016, Parks Canada had completed seven multi-species action plans for parks with five or more species at risk. With the completion of that target, the current focus is on parks with three or more species at risk.

Performance indicator(s):
Number of action plans for Parks Canada places with 3 or more species at risk. [Target: 24 by March 2020]

Heritage Places Conservation

 
Logo with twig in hand

Connecting Canadians with Nature: Canadians are informed about the value of nature, experiencing nature first hand, and actively engaged in its stewardship

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change

 
Connecting Canadians with Nature
FSDS target(s)
FSDS Contributing Action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)  /  Performance indicator(s) Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
By 2020, maintain or increase the number of Canadians that get out into nature – for example, by visiting parks and green space – and increase participation in biodiversity conservation activities relative to a 2010 baseline

Promote public participation

Reach nationally-identified markets and audiences to diversify and build visitation, and to increase public awareness and support including: youth 17 and under, young adults, young families, and urban Canadians, as well as various niche markets and select international markets.

Building on the 2018 awareness and pride campaign (450 000 km2 of memories), launch a national advertising campaign to promote visitation, conservation and authentic Indigenous experiences that showcases activities rooted in Indigenous knowledge.

Enhance public understanding and appreciation of Parks Canada’s work in science and conservation and highlight the importance of working with Indigenous knowledge holders and partnerships through strategic and targeted communications, promotion and outreach activities such as media events, social media interactions, media relations, website updates, advertising and promotional activities.

Integrate promotion, communication, outreach, education, social media and web content with a focus on content marketing in a digital first context.

Introduce a renewed brand in time for the 2020 operating season and develop accompanying tools to guide its implementation.

Renew Parks Canada’s reservation system for 2022, increasing the types and number of experiences that can be reserved and purchased and optimizing their availability across a wider variety of channels and devices.

Renew Parks Canada’s point of sales system so the Agency continues to have an effective and efficient system to serve visitors.

Improve the links between the reservation and point of sales systems, the Parks Canada web site and other systems, to create a more seamless and convenient user experience, and to allow for the effective collection of business intelligence.

Building on the success of 2018 and visitor feedback, improve online planning tools and reservation capabilities to support trip planning, including adding new features to the Parks Canada’s mobile app.

Actions updated in accordance with 2019–20 Departmental Plan.

In 2017 and beyond, the Agency will implement strategies to ensure targeted audiences, such as youth, newcomers and urban audiences are inspired to visit and connect.

Starting point(s):
628,203 visits by new Canadians and young adults (2016–17) (10%).

Performance indicator(s):
Percentage of visitors to Parks Canada places that are new Canadians and young adults. [Target: 14% annually]

Count of personal and non-personal contacts obtained through multimedia and outreach initiatives. [Target: 100 million contacts between April 2019 and March 2020]

Date revised in accordance with 2019–20 national advertising campaign.

Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support

Enhance programs and services for visitors

Renew interpretive and outreach programming with a focus on fostering meaningful connections to nature and history.

Continue to deliver and enhance Learn-to Camp programming and events in urban centres to better equip Canadians with the tools to connect to and explore the outdoors and to help low-and middle-income families visit and enjoy Parks Canada places.

Manage visitation levels so they are sustainable and ensure quality visitor experiences, including growth where appropriate, and redistribution of visitation geographically and temporally as necessary.

Continue to diversify experiences and interpretive offers to encourage exploration and learning at heritage places.

Implement the Service Fees Act including a national consultation with Canadians on value-added experiences and services.

Plan for visitor experience and making investments in visitor infrastructure, to maintain access to high quality experiences, maximize revenues and improve financial sustainability.

Continue to improve the Agency’s ability to work within the broad spectrum of engagement and collaborative activities with renewed policy, directives, guidance, tools and instruments.

Develop innovative partnerships with tourism partners, national and local stakeholders and Indigenous peoples to target key audiences and develop visitor experiences.

Implement the Stories of Canada program by working with Indigenous communities on opportunities for experiences, interpretation and storytelling, and present Indigenous values, perspectives and contributions to Canada’s natural and cultural heritage.

Leverage Government of Canada milestone anniversaries and special events, such as the commemorations of the World Wars, and the third annual Canada Historic Places Day, as a means to attract new audiences and to enhance Canadians’ connections to and understanding of Canada’s heritage.

Support Canada’s new Tourism Vision to grow Canada’s revenue through international tourism.

Actions updated in accordance with 2019–20 Departmental Plan.

To fulfill the Government of Canada’s priority to have more Canadians experience and learn about the environment and their heritage places, Parks Canada will develop and innovate its programs and services.

Starting point(s):
In 2016, there were 24.7 million visits to Parks Canada administered places.

Performance indicator(s):
Maintain or increase the number of people that connect with nature at Parks Canada places. [Target: => 24.7 million annually]

Visitor Experience

 
Logo with three people under roof

Safe and Healthy Communities: All Canadians live in clean, sustainable communities that contribute to their health and well-being

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change; Minister of Health

 
Safe and Healthy Communities
FSDS target(s)
FSDS Contributing Action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)  /  Performance indicator(s) Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur

By 2020, address the 4,300 substances identified as priorities for action under the Chemicals Management Plan

Demonstrate leadership on assessing and remediating contaminated sites

Contribute to the delivery of Phase III of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) to reduce potential environmental and human health risks and related financial liabilities.

Assess 38 FCSAP-funded federal contaminated sites.

Remediate or risk-manage 49 high-priority federal contaminated sites.

Assessment at federal contaminated sites reduces uncertainty associated with the risk from these sites. Subsequent remedial or risk management actions reduce the associated risk and financial liabilities. It is anticipated that up to 95% of FCSAP remediation expenditures contribute to reducing financial liability.

Starting point(s):

Number of FCSAP-funded sites where assessment activities have been completed by 2016–17 (base year): [4]

Number of FCSAP-funded high-priority sites where FCSAP-funded risk reduction activities have been completed by 2016–17 (base year): [2]

Performance indicator(s):

Number of FCSAP-funded sites where assessment activities have been completed in 2019–20

Number of FCSAP-funded high-priority sites where FCSAP-funded risk reduction activities have been completed in 2019–20.

Revised to correct typographical error in previous year’s performance indicator.

  • Internal Services
  • Heritage Places Conservation
 

Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

Name of transfer payment program: General Class Contribution Program (GCCP) - voted

Start date: 1995–96

End date: ongoing

Type of transfer payment: contribution

Type of appropriation: appropriated annually through estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2017–18

Link to department’s Program Inventory:

  • Program: Heritage Places Establishment
  • Program: Heritage Places Conservation
  • Program: Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
  • Program: Visitor Experience
  • Program: Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

Description: The objective of the program is to assist recipients in conducting activities and delivering projects that will support the Agency in fulfilling its mandate to preserve and protect nationally significant examples of Canada's natural and cultural heritage and present and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations.

Expected results:

  • Canadians recognize, appreciate and are engaged in the values of natural and cultural conservation.
  • Stakeholders are engaged in terms of interest and involvement of common objectives towards ecological or cultural integrity.
  • Parks Canada managers and stakeholders have access to a better knowledge base for informed decision-making and dialogue on commercial, ecological or aboriginal issues of mutual interest.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: 2016–17

Decision following the results of last evaluation: continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation: 2021–22

General targeted recipient groups: First Nations communities; other Aboriginal recipients and organizations; industry-related; international organizations and foreign countries; municipalities and local organizations; non-profit organizations; provinces and territories

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients: not applicable

Type of transfer payment 2018–19 Forecast spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending 2021–22 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 9,607,357 7,664,324 7,803,324 6,027,924
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 9,607,357 7,664,324 7,803,324 6,027,924

Name of transfer payment program: Support to The Great Trail - voted

Start date: 2018–19

End date: ongoing

Type of transfer payment: contribution

Type of appropriation: appropriated annually through estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2018–19

Link to department’s Program Inventory: Program: Visitor Experience

Description: The contribution is to enhance, maintain and improve the Great Trail, a national network of multi-use recreational trails that links 15,000 communities and spans 24,400 kilometres. The emphasis will be on optimizing user experience and accessibility, and ensuring long-term sustainability.

Expected results:

Short/Medium Term Results:

  1. The Great Trail is safe and accessible for trail users;
  2. The Great Trail is enhanced through linkages with Indigenous communities and other trail networks; and
  3. Canadians are aware of The Great Trail and are inspired to discover their natural heritage.

Long-Term Results: People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: not applicable, new program

Decision following the results of last evaluation: not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation: 2022–23

General targeted recipient groups: non-profit organizations

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients: not applicable

Type of transfer payment 2018–19 Forecast spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 7,500,000 7,500,000 7,500,000 7,500,000
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 7,500,000 7,500,000 7,500,000 7,500,000

Disclosure of transfer payment programs under $5 million

Name of transfer payment program: National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places - voted

End date: ongoing

Type of transfer payment: contribution

Type of appropriation: appropriated annually through Estimates

Link to department’s Program Inventory: Program: Heritage Places Conservation

Main objective: The Program assists recipients in conducting activities aimed at ensuring the heritage value of non-federally owned or administered heritage places that have been formally recognized by the Government of Canada. It provides financial contributions to eligible recipients to share the costs of work necessary to ensure the physical health of a heritage place and to ensure Canadians understand the importance of the site and its role in the history of Canada.

Planned spending in 2019–20: $1,000,000

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: 2012–13

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation (if applicable): not applicable

General targeted recipient groups: First Nations communities, other Aboriginal recipients and organizations, municipalities and local organizations, non-profit organizations, provinces and territories


Name of transfer payment program: Grant to the International Peace Garden - voted

End date: ongoing

Type of transfer payment: grant

Type of appropriation: appropriated annually through Estimates

Link to department’s Program Inventory: Program: Heritage Places Conservation

Main objective: To help defray the costs of operating the International Peace Garden.

Planned spending in 2019–20: $22,700

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: 2016–17

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation (if applicable): not applicable

General targeted recipient groups: non-profit organizations


Gender-based analysis plus

General information

Governance structures

A GBA+ Task Force comprised of managers from across the Agency was tasked with reviewing the current state of GBA+ in the Agency and bringing forth recommendations to the Executive Management Committee.

The GBA+ Task Force has put forward recommendations for a GBA+ Champion at the VP level and the establishment of a GBA+ Responsibility Centre to develop a GBA+ Action Plan and coordinate GBA+ across the Agency in 2019–20.

 

Human resources

For 2019–20:
  • The GBA+ Task Force has made recommendations for FTEs to be assigned to the Responsibility Centre.
  • These recommendations will be brought to the Executive Management Committee in early 2019–20.

Planned initiatives

In 2019–20, pending Executive Management Committee approval, Parks Canada’s GBA+ Responsibility Centre is tasked with:
  • Crafting a GBA+ Statement of Intent for the Agency
  • Creating a GBA+ Action Plan, which identifies roles and processes for conducting and approving all GBA+
  • Developing a training plan and identify necessary tools
  • Confirming the long-term resource requirements for the GBA+ Responsibility Centre
  • Establishing an ongoing monitoring plan for the GBA+ Action Plan; and
  • Maintaining a network of experts to assist programs/operations with incorporating GBA+ considerations across the Agency.