Table of contents

Corporate information

Raison d’être

The Minister of Environment and Climate Change is responsible for the Parks Canada Agency. Parks Canada protects and presents nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and fosters public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations. Canada’s national urban park, national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas, of which Parks Canada is the proud steward, offer Canadians opportunities to visit, experience and personally connect with these heritage places in ways that are meaningful to them. In carrying out its responsibilities, Parks Canada works in collaboration with the public, other federal departments, provinces, territories, Indigenous peoples and stakeholders.

Mandate and role

On behalf of the people of Canada, we protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations.

Vision

Canada’s treasured natural and historic places will be a living legacy, connecting hearts and minds to a stronger, deeper understanding of the very essence of Canada.

Responsibilities

As the first national park service in the world, Parks Canada is responsible for protecting representative examples of Canada’s natural regions in a system of national parks. The system, which is 77 percent complete, represents the diversity of landscapes in Canada. Forty-six national parks represent 30 of Canada’s 39 terrestrial natural regions and protects 328,198 square kilometres of Canada’s terrestrial ecosystems. In managing national parks, Parks Canada is mandated to maintain or restore ecological integrity, and to provide Canadians with opportunities to discover, appreciate and enjoy their natural heritage.

Parks Canada is also responsible for representing Canada’s marine and Great Lakes environments in a system of national marine conservation areas. The system is 17 percent complete and protects approximately 15,740 square kilometres of Canada’s marine and Great Lakes ecosystems. The country’s four national marine conservation areas represent five of Canada’s 29 marine regions. The Agency works to ensure the ecological sustainability of national marine conservation areas which includes protecting its key features for the benefit and enjoyment of Canadians, visitors and coastal communities.

The Rouge National Urban Park —the only one of its kind in Canada—provides an exceptional opportunity to connect urban Canadians to the heritage of the park and its diverse landscapes. In managing this park, Parks Canada is mandated to protect and present the park’s natural and cultural heritage, promote a vibrant farming community, and to encourage Canadians to discover and connect with their national protected heritage areas.

Through the National Program of Historical Commemoration, the Government of Canada has designated 981 national historic sites, of which 171 are administered by Parks Canada as well as 696 persons of national historic significance and 482 events of national historic significance. These designations are essential to present our stories and significant places, and they reflect who we are as Canadians. Parks Canada brings to life the key moments of Canada’s history at the national historic sites it administers through special programming that offers unique opportunities for visitors to personally connect with and experience these places.

Parks Canada’s nine heritage canals support commercial and recreational boating, and the Agency’s role includes water management as well as the management of bridge and dam infrastructure.

In 2016-17, Parks Canada welcomed more than 24.7 million people to the heritage places it administers with a focus on enabling visitors to enjoy these places and learn about Parks Canada’s unique mandate of conserving Canada’s natural and cultural heritage. 

Parks Canada manages an additional eight heritage designation and protection programs in support of other federal departments, provincial and territorial governments, Indigenous groups and Canadian communities. These programs reflect the Government of Canada’s commitment to the commemoration and conservation of heritage railway stations, heritage lighthouses, gravesites of Canadian Prime Ministers, federal heritage buildings, federal archaeology, Canadian heritage rivers, and UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The Parks Canada National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places is a contribution program to encourage and support the protection and presentation of non-federally-owned national historic sites, heritage railway stations and heritage lighthouses.

Internationally, the Agency represents Canada as State Party to UNESCO’s World Heritage Convention and the International Union for Conservation of Nature, and through participation in other international organizations, conventions and agreements.

Parks Canada’s unique mandate and responsibility for administering over 90 percent of federally-owned lands positions it to demonstrate leadership in advancing reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. Nearly all of the heritage places the Agency administers have been traditionally used by First Nations, Inuit and Métis. The Agency’s network of heritage places are places of connection to Canada’s rich history and natural legacy and, in partnership with Indigenous peoples, are well-placed to foster reconciliation dialogue and facilitate cultural learning amongst Canadians. The Agency will leverage its mandate for the protection and presentation of the country’s national and cultural heritage to support reconciliation in the coming years.

For more information on the Agency’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister’s mandate letter.

Operating context

National parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas represent the very best of Canada, including the history, culture and living legacy of Indigenous peoples. The Government of Canada is committed to achieving reconciliation with Indigenous peoples through a renewed, nation-to-nation, Inuit-Crown and government-to-government relationship based on recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership. Parks Canada demonstrates leadership both nationally and internationally in its relations with Indigenous partners, working with over 300 Indigenous communities across the country in the management of Parks Canada’s heritage places. Twenty-nine heritage places are currently managed cooperatively with Indigenous groups and 20 of those places have cooperative management arrangements where Indigenous partners play a decision-making role. The Agency is committed to reconciliation and will continue to engage and consult with Indigenous partners to ensure a greater number of places have arrangements where Indigenous partners play a decision-making role.

Parks Canada has operations across Canada. With responsibility for the management and administration of 46 national parks, Rouge National Urban Park, four national marine conservation areas and 171 national historic sites, including nine historic canals, Parks Canada employees and resources are active in hundreds of communities and remote locations from coast to coast to coast. In addition, there are seven townsite communities in national parks, all located in western Canada. These townsites represent unique opportunities to demonstrate the overriding values of ecological integrity, environmental citizenship and sustainable development. They provide visitors with opportunities to learn and develop personal connections to natural and cultural heritage from the comfort of a community, and a launching pad for deeper ventures into national parks. They support ecological integrity by consolidating use and development to relatively small areas. National park townsite communities will continue to manage development in accordance with community plans and legislation, respecting their cultural and historical aspects and the ecological integrity of the surrounding park. In Banff and Jasper, commercial development limits are also used to manage growth along with eligible residency and fixed boundaries.

The support and collaboration of Indigenous governments, organizations and communities, as well as provincial and territorial governments, are essential to Parks Canada’s ability to create or expand national parks and establish new national marine conservation areas. In addition, the requirement for national marine conservation areas to balance protection and ecologically sustainable use, brings in a greater range of stakeholders to consider and work with. Bringing all of these elements together and moving forward in a harmonious and positive way requires time and respectful discourse.

Climate change and other environmental forces challenge the integrity of ecosystems and the condition of Parks Canada’s cultural resources and contemporary infrastructure. Shoreline erosion at national historic sites, the arrival of invasive species at national parks, impacts on biodiversity and the shrinking populations of species unable to adapt to variations in the ecosystems are a few examples of the effects of climate change. The increasing severity and frequency of disturbances such as storms, floods and avalanches also impact Parks Canada infrastructure, such as highways and bridges.

Parks Canada must protect its natural and cultural heritage places while encouraging visitation to ensure that these special places remain relevant in the hearts and minds of Canadians.

From 2003 to 2012, Parks Canada experienced nearly a decade of declining visitation when fewer Canadians felt connected to their heritage places. The Agency has invested significant effort in reversing this trend by encouraging Canadians to experience and engage with Parks Canada places. As a result, visitation has been steadily increasing in recent years.

Our country is changing. We are more diverse than ever before, and one in five Canadians was born outside of Canada. We are more urban than ever before, and 80 percent of Canadians now live in urban areas. Our population is growing older and, for the first time in our history, seniors outnumber youth under the age of 15. While Parks Canada has a committed base of visitors who are over the age of 50 and live in rural areas, the generation following has a weaker connection to our country’s heritage places. They also have different expectations for their vacation and recreational experiences, and they use media and telecommunications in different ways. To engage the next generation of Canadians in their natural and cultural heritage, Parks Canada must use modern market analysis and social science to design and offer new and innovative visitor experiences. As well, it must use new approaches for promotion to reach new audiences. These efforts will help to establish a new generation of stewards for these special places and contribute to tourism economies in communities across the country.

Overcrowding at popular heritage places could have impacts on natural and cultural resources.  As a world leader in conservation and in preserving the ecological integrity and cultural resources of its places for future generations, Parks Canada works to better manage visitation at locations that experience higher visitation rates, while continuing to ensure high quality visitor experiences. To lessen the impact, Parks Canada encourages visitors to seek out lesser-known parks and historic sites, enjoy little known hidden gems and explore shoulder season experiences in spring and fall.

Parks Canada manages a complex portfolio of built assets valued at approximately $18 billion. Highways maintained by Parks Canada serve as critical socio-economic corridors enabling the flow of people and commercial goods. Along with heritage canals, highways additionally serve as vital links connecting Canadian communities.

The overall condition of Parks Canada’s portfolio of built assets has improved over the past three years as a result of an infrastructure investment of approximately $3.6 billion by the Government of Canada enabling Parks Canada to rehabilitate a significant portion of its built asset inventory. However, the Agency’s ability to maintain its built asset portfolio in accordance with industry standards, enabling program and service delivery for the long-term, remains an issue. Budget 2017 announced the development of medium- and long-term plans for the ongoing support and sustainability of Parks Canada’s assets to ensure that visitors are able to enjoy Canada’s national parks, national marine conservation areas and national historic sites for years to come.

Key risks

Relevance
There is a risk that Parks Canada’s programs and services may not be relevant to the needs or expectations of Canadians.

Risk response strategy

The Agency is responding to this risk by:

  • implementing a national outreach and marketing plan in select urban areas, featuring traditional and social media, supported by proactive media relations
  • ensuring the quality and reliability of visitor offers by developing experiences that meet the needs of visitors such as offering unique camping experiences and developing programs for targeted markets
  • investing resources in renewing visitor infrastructure to ensure the quality and reliability of visitor offers, and adding more capability to reserve these experiences
  • targeting investments in visitor experience opportunities driven by market demand

Link to the department’s Core Responsibility

  • Protecting and Presenting Canada’s Natural and Cultural Heritage

Link to mandate letter commitments or to government wide and departmental priorities

  • Through an expanded Learn to Camp Program, ensure that more low- and middle-income families have an opportunity to experience Canada’s outdoors (lead)
  • Develop Parks Canada programs and services so that more Canadians can experience our National Parks and learn more about our environment and heritage (lead)
  • Work with nearby communities to help grow local eco-tourism industries and create jobs (support)
  • Connecting to Canadians (Agency priority)

Relationships
There is a risk that Parks Canada will not succeed in aligning the interests of third parties with those of the Agency to achieve results.

Risk response strategy

The Agency is responding to this risk by:

  • developing a policy framework and tools to support the full spectrum of relationships, including engagement, collaboration and co-creation
  • developing national strategies for partner and stakeholder engagement
  • continuing to support the engagement of an Indigenous Circle of Experts to support the implementation of Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas in Canada
  • supporting a committee representing perspectives from industries, non-governmental organizations, Indigenous peoples, municipalities, private sectors and industries to ensure that Canada’s conservation efforts are informed by those who have interest and a stake in this process

Link to the department’s Core Responsibility

  • Protecting and Presenting Canada’s Natural and Cultural Heritage

Link to mandate letter commitments or to government-wide and departmental priorities

  • Pathway to Canada Target 1
  • Commitment to a renewed, nation-to-nation, government-to-government and Inuit-Crown relationship with Indigenous peoples (support)
  • Nature Heritage Protection (Agency priority)
  • Cultural Heritage Protection (Agency priority)
  • Connecting to Canadians (Agency priority)

Environmental forces adaptation and response
The magnitude and rapid pace of environmental changes, including climate change may affect Parks Canada's ability to maintain the integrity of its ecosystems, cultural resources and infrastructure.

Risk response strategy

The Agency is responding to this risk by:

  • undertaking applicable assessments, planning and monitoring to identify potential threats to or at heritage places, and taking action to mitigate those impacts, where possible
  • undertaking ecological restoration projects focused on improving ecological integrity or advancing towards recovery targets for priority species at risk
  • developing and sharing of best practices for monitoring the condition of heritage resources in all protected heritage places
  • continuing to implement measures to protect contemporary and built heritage assets such as using resilient designs and construction materials
  • continuing to review emergency and business continuity plans, and providing Parks Canada personnel with ongoing emergency management and response training.

Link to the department’s Core Responsibility

  • Protecting and Presenting Canada’s Natural and Cultural Heritage

Link to mandate letter commitments or to government-wide and departmental priorities

  • Government of Canada priority for a clean environment and a strong economy (support)
  • Enhance protection of Canada’s endangered species by responding quickly to the advice of scientists and completing robust species-at-risk recovery plans in a timely way (support)
  • Help restore Canada’s reputation for environmental stewardship (support)
  • Natural Heritage Protection (Agency priority)
  • Cultural Heritage Protection (Agency priority)

Built asset condition and long-term sustainability
There is a risk that a sustainable asset portfolio will not be maintained to support the delivery of Parks Canada's mandate.

Risk response strategy

The Agency is responding to this risk by:

  • developing an agency-wide, long-term sustainability plan based on current asset portfolio information and valuations
  • advancing Parks Canada’s Strategic Asset Management Plan and associated priority initiatives that aim to optimize life cycle costs associated with the ongoing operation, maintenance and renewal of the Agency’s asset portfolio
  • continuing to improve the corporate asset information system to ensure that comprehensive, accurate, and timely information on assets is available to support decision making at all levels of the organization

Link to the department’s Core Responsibility

  • Protecting and Presenting Canada’s Natural and Cultural Heritage

Link to mandate letter commitments or to government-wide and departmental priorities

  • Develop Parks Canada programs and services so that more Canadians can experience our National Parks and learn more about our environment and heritage (lead)
  • Asset Sustainability (Agency priority)

Reconciliation with Indigenous peoples
There is a risk that Parks Canada's actions towards reconciliation may not fully satisfy both the rights and interests of Indigenous peoples and other Canadians.

Risk response strategy

The Agency is responding to this risk by:

  • advancing programs and mechanisms that facilitate Indigenous connections with traditionally used lands and waters
  • supporting co-decision making by increasing cooperative management structures that provide decision-making roles for Indigenous partners
  • expanding presentation and commemoration of Indigenous histories and cultures in Parks Canada’s heritage places and programs, including responding to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report, Call to Action #79 (e.g. Indigenous Guardian program)
  • increasing economic opportunities related to Indigenous tourism in heritage places and raising the profile of Indigenous tourism products across the network of heritage places

Link to the department’s Core Responsibility

  • Protecting and Presenting Canada’s Natural and Cultural Heritage

Link to mandate letter commitments or to government-wide and departmental priorities

  • Commitment to a renewed, nation-to-nation, Inuit-Crown and government-to-government relationship with Indigenous peoples (support)

Relevance

Parks Canada is faced with the challenge of remaining relevant to Canadians, particularly in some of Canada’s largest cities. Changing demographics, which contribute to shifting leisure and tourism patterns, have had an impact on visitation to Parks Canada heritage places. One in five Canadians are foreign-born and most new immigrants settle in urban areas. Urban and new Canadians and youth are currently under-represented in Parks Canada’s visitor base. Other outdoor tourism organizations are adapting more quickly than the Agency to the changing needs and expectations of visitors (e.g., offering more diverse accommodations, amenities such as Wi-Fi and new activities, and integrating sales systems).

In order to maintain its relevance and appeal to Canadians, the Agency is working to attract new audiences and influence them to visit its places by undertaking outreach, engagement and promotional activities in urban centres. To further raise its profile, the Agency will leverage key anniversaries, offer enhanced programming, special events and other promotions that will encourage Canadians to visit and experience their heritage places. Targeted investments are being made to diversify and renew visitor experience opportunities and related infrastructure to keep pace with new technologies and public expectations of new, innovative experiences. These ongoing efforts to connect Canadians with their natural and cultural heritage will also enable the Agency to continue fulfilling its role in the tourism industry and as an economic contributor to local communities.

Relationships

Much of Parks Canada’s work cannot be accomplished in isolation – we must establish, develop and maintain effective relationships with external parties to achieve common goals and objectives. Parks Canada works with the public, other federal departments, provinces, territories, Indigenous peoples and stakeholders to carry out its responsibilities.

Parks Canada is also playing a lead role in Canada’s effort toward meeting its international commitment under the Convention of Biological Diversity to protect 17 percent of Canada’s land and inland water, and 10 percent of marine areas by 2020.  The federal government and most provinces and territories have their own well-developed protected areas systems and yet only 10.5 percent of terrestrial and fresh water areas of Canada and 5 percent of marine waters are currently protected by the provinces, territories, and the federal government. The expansion of protected and conservation area networks and the solutions associated with achieving Canada’s international commitment will require collective action involving new partners such as Indigenous groups, communities, municipalities, private and non-profit sectors. The formal recognition of existing and the creation of new Indigenous Conservation Areas could contribute significantly to increasing the amount of conserved lands and waters in addition to supporting a renewed, nation-to-nation, Inuit-Crown and government-to-government relationship with Indigenous peoples, based on recognition of rights, respect, cooperation, and partnership.

Parks Canada Agency is developing a framework to support the full spectrum of engagement activities (from communications to outreach to consultations), collaborative business activities, and co-creation work, including consistent and coordinated policies, robust tools and processes to help staff develop and manage a broad range of relationships with external parties to attain common goals and objectives based on a risk-informed approach. A proactive national partner and stakeholder relations strategy will also support local management units to develop their own unique strategies.

Environmental forces adaptation and response

Parks Canada’s heritage places may be vulnerable to environmental forces including changes to climate (global warming, increased sea levels), physical environment (air quality, water quality, ocean acidification and connectivity), biodiversity (ecosystem processes, increased number of species at risk, hyperabundant species and invasive species) and habitat loss. Environmental forces also impact the timing and frequency of naturally occurring phenomena such as wildfires, floods, avalanches, landslides, hurricanes, storm surges, blizzards and hail. Such events have been demonstrated to affect Parks Canada’s operations and Canadians in communities within and around parks and sites and cause serious harm to the safety, health, welfare, property or environment of people.

Due to the rapid change in climate experienced in many parts of the world, but particularly noticeable in the extreme northern regions of Canada, Parks Canada may not be able to ensure the conservation of all cultural resources under its responsibility. The commemorative integrity of certain national historic sites may also be impacted as cultural resources and related heritage value are threatened by rapid and unpredictable environmental changes.

To help mitigate this risk, Parks Canada is undertaking applicable assessments, planning and monitoring to identify potential threats to or at heritage places, and taking action to mitigate those impacts, where possible; undertaking ecological restoration projects focused on improving ecological integrity or advancing towards recovery targets for priority species at risk; and developing and sharing of best practices for monitoring the condition of heritage resources in all protected heritage places.

Built Asset condition and long-term sustainability

The overall condition of Parks Canada’s asset portfolio has been in decline for years. This deterioration has slowed since 2014 as a result of an unprecedented investment by the Government of Canada. The Agency’s Investment Plan 2015-16 to 2019-20 summarizes these planned investments and the concrete actions the Agency is taking to deliver this substantial infrastructure rehabilitation program. Parks Canada’s 2017 Asset Report Card reports that 46 percent of the Agency’s built assets are in poor to very poor condition.

However, the Agency’s ability to maintain its built asset portfolio in accordance with industry standards, enabling program and service delivery for the long term, remains a key risk for the Agency. The lack of funding required to maintain its more than 15,000 built assets puts the Agency at risk of not being able to fulfill its mandate. For example, this could inhibit the Agency’s ability to maintain all of its built heritage assets thereby risking the disappearance of significant and irreplaceable examples of Canada’s cultural heritage. Furthermore, Parks Canada’s commitment to addressing government priorities for ensuring the accessibility of its places for visitors, and for supporting the resiliency of its built asset portfolio against the effects of climate change, places additional strain on existing resources and the Agency`s capacity to deliver on its requirements. Similarly, Parks Canada’s limited means to invest in aging visitor facilities puts at risk the Agency’s ability to deliver and evolve Parks Canada programs and services so that more Canadians are able to experience their national parks and learn more about the environment and their heritage, for today and for the future. To mitigate this risk, Parks Canada is developing an agency-wide, long-term sustainability plan based on current asset portfolio information and valuations.

Reconciliation with Indigenous peoples

Parks Canada’s actions towards reconciliation may not fully satisfy the rights and interests of Indigenous peoples and other Canadians. Identified actions must be implemented in consultation and collaboration with Indigenous peoples and be respectful of the findings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report and specifically Call to Action 79. Furthermore, in anticipation of the significant efforts of the government to address reconciliation, Indigenous groups and communities may not possess sufficient resources to respond to the increase in requests for engagement and consultation. Parks Canada will be required to work with other federal departments to ensure that engagement and consultation is undertaken in a coordinated manner. To mitigate this risk, Parks Canada is working to advance programs and mechanisms that will facilitate Indigenous connections with traditionally used lands and waters, and to increase cooperative management structures that provide decision-making roles for Indigenous partners.

Supplementary Information Tables

Annex 1: Update to the 2017-2020 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Section 3: Commitments for Parks Canada Agency (updated February 2018)

Logo with building and leaf

Low-Carbon Government: The Government of Canada leads by example by making its operations low-carbon

Responsible Minister: All ministers

 
Low-Carbon Government
FSDS target(s)
FSDS Contributing Action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)  /  Performance indicator(s) Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur

Reduce GHG emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve this reduction by 2025

Improve the energy efficiency of our buildings/operations

Reduce GHG emissions from its facilities and fleet by 2% below 2005 levels, with facilities contributing 1.4%.

Validate its facilities portfolios for GHG reporting with regards to fuel, electricity and non-energy sources.

Promote Energy Performance Contracts (EPC) for its facilities to include high-performance green building standards for new constructions or major renovations.

Year removed to reflect ongoing nature of actions.

By 2030, Parks Canada actions are intended to reduce GHG emissions in facilities by 28% relative to total Agency 2005 levels.

Starting point(s):
Total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet in fiscal year 2005-06 (base year): [38.8] ktCO2e

Total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet in fiscal year 2016-17: [33.3] ktCO2e

GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2005-06 (base year): = [27.4] ktCO2e

GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2016-17 = [20.8] ktCO2e

Performance indicator(s):
Percentage change in total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet since 2005 levels.
Percentage change in GHG emissions from facilities relative to combined total (facilities and fleet) Agency 2005 levels.

  • Internal Services
  • Heritage Places Establishment
  • Heritage Places Conservation
  • Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
  • Visitor Experience
  • Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

Modernize our fleet

Reduce GHG emissions from its facilities and fleet by 2% below 2005 levels, with the fleet contributing to a 0.6% reduction.

Purchase 75% of its light fleet vehicles from more energy efficient vehicles on the Agency’s Preauthorized Vehicle List (PVL).

Promote the development of 5-year replacement plans for heavy-duty fleet vehicles by moving to vehicles with greater efficiency and lower emissions.

Promote right-size and low-carbon intensity fleet-vehicles.

Year removed to reflect ongoing nature of actions.

By 2030, Parks Canada actions will contribute a reduction in fleet GHG emissions of 12% reduction relative to total Agency 2005 levels.

Starting point(s):
Total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet in fiscal year 2005-06 (base year): [38.8] ktCO2e

Total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet in fiscal year 2016-17: [33.3] ktCO2e

GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2005-06 (base year): = [11.4] ktCO2e

GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2016-17 = [12.4] ktCO2e

Performance indicator(s):
Percentage change in total Agency GHG emissions from facilities and fleet relative to 2005 levels.

Percentage change in GHG emissions from fleet relative to combined total (facilities and fleet) Agency 2005 levels.

  • Internal Services
  • Heritage Places Establishment
  • Heritage Places Conservation
  • Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
  • Visitor Experience
  • Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

Support the transition to a low-carbon economy through green procurement

Integrate sustainability into common-use procurement instruments, processes and controls.

Require key procurement officials to support and promote green procurement.

Provide green procurement awareness and training for staff involved in procurement.

Set Agency targets to reduce the environmental impact of specific goods and services (e.g. IM/IT equipment, light fleet, heavy fleet).

Year removed to reflect ongoing nature of actions.

Green procurement incorporates environmental considerations into purchasing decisions and is expected to motivate suppliers to green their goods, services and supply chain. GHG emission reductions, recyclable content and packaging are all areas of consideration in green procurement.

Starting point(s):
Number of key procurement officials that have facilitated green procurement through various activities and/or tools. in 2016-17 (base year): [7]

Number of procurement decision makers that have completed training on green procurement in 2016-17 (base year): [35]

Number of goods and services categories with specific green procurement targets in 2016-17 (base year): [3]

Performance indicator(s):
Percentage of key procurement officials that have facilitated green procurement through various activities and/or tools.

Percentage of procurement decision makers that have completed training on green procurement.

Percentage change in the number of goods and services with specific green procurement targets.

  • Internal Services
  • Heritage Places Establishment
  • Heritage Places Conservation
  • Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
  • Visitor Experience
  • Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

Demonstrate innovative technologies

Partner with Canadian environmental businesses to test on the Agency’s sites new clean technology developments through the Build in Canada Innovation Program (BCIP). For example, the Agency will use innovative technology to analyse in real time the amount of petroleum contamination in soil samples.

Year removed to reflect ongoing nature of actions.

Actions that incent, support, or procure state-of-the-art clean environmental innovative technologies lower the environmental footprint of government operations while contributing to the success of clean-tech businesses in Canada.

Starting point(s):
Number of BCIP-funded clean environmental technologies tested across Agency facilities in 2016-17 (base year): [2]

Performance indicator(s):
Percentage change in the number of BCIP-sponsored clean environmental technologies tested.

  • Internal Services
  • Heritage Places Establishment
  • Heritage Places Conservation
  • Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
  • Visitor Experience
  • Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

Promote sustainable travel practices

Continue to apply its Travel Directive and related policies to ensure the most efficient travel practices are pursued.

Promote green meeting practices by increasing videoconferencing facilities by 15% by March 2019 relative to March 2016 level.

Promote the creation of voluntary workplace Green Teams that will steward sustainable commuting and resource use.

Year removed to reflect ongoing nature of actions.

Actions taken to reduce the amount of business travel or switch to less GHG intensive modes of transportation, for both business travels and commuting, will reduce GHG emissions.

Starting point(s):
Number of videoconferencing facilities in fiscal year 2016-17 (base year): [72]

Number of voluntary workplace Green Teams in fiscal year 2016-17 (base year): [2]

Performance indicator(s):
Percentage change in videoconferencing facilities.

Percentage change in the number of voluntary workplace Green Teams.

  • Internal Services
  • Heritage Places Establishment
  • Heritage Places Conservation
  • Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
  • Visitor Experience
  • Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

Understand climate change impacts and build resilience

Continue to identify, assess, prioritize and take action to address climate change risks across the Agency’s areas of responsibility.

Work with partner organizations and specialists to refine tools and approaches, including an adaptation framework, regional reports and workshops, to better understand and support climate change adaptation in parks and protected areas in Canada.

Actions updated in accordance with 2018-19 Departmental Plan.

Parks Canada will integrate climate change considerations into policy, programs, and operations to adapt to a changing climate, enhance the protection of public, assets and resources, and strengthen planning and decision–making.

Starting point(s):
A draft Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment for the Agency has been developed to identify climate change risks.

Number of PCA heritage sites that have been subject to PCA’s site-specific climate change adaptation planning exercise.

Performance indicator(s):
Percent completion of a comprehensive assessment of climate change risks and mitigation measures (target of 100% completion by Fall 2019).

Percentage of targeted PCA heritage sites which developed climate change adaptation plans (Target: 75% by 2020).

This action will be coordinated by Heritage Places Conservation, in collaboration with all other implicated Programs

Improve transparency and accountability

Share annual energy and GHG emissions data with the Centre for Greening Government (CGG).

Year removed to reflect ongoing nature of actions.

N/A

N/A

Internal Services

Develop policy for low-carbon government

Align its greening operations policy suite with the federal Greening Government Framework (GGF).

Year removed to reflect ongoing nature of actions.

N/A

N/A

Internal Services

 
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Healthy Coasts and Oceans: Coasts and oceans support healthy, resilient and productive ecosystems

Responsible Minister: Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

 
Healthy Coasts and Oceans
FSDS target(s)
FSDS Contributing Action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)  /   Performance indicator(s) Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
By 2020,10%of coastal and marine areas are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures

Protect and manage marine and coastal areas

Conclude negotiations of an Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreement with the Qikiqtani Inuit Association for Tallurutiup Imanga National Marine Conservation Area (in Lancaster Sound in Nunavut).

Launch a feasibility assessment for a national marine conservation area in Arctic Basin in Nunavut (Last Ice).

Conclude existing and ongoing feasibility assessments for proposed national marine conservation areas in the Southern Strait of Georgia area of British Columbia and the Îles de la Madeleine located in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

Conclude feasibility assessments and determine final boundaries for new proposals of national marine conservation areas in unrepresented marine regions including a site in eastern James Bay, that both Parks Canada and the Cree Nation Government agree would represent this region and form the basis of a cooperative management arrangement, and for a site in western Hudson Bay. Work with the Nunatsiavut Government and the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador on the Imappivut (Our Water) initiative regarding oceans management in northern Labrador within the Labrador Inuit Settlement Area. As Parks Canada and the Nunatsiavut Government have identified a potential national marine conservation area offshore of Torngat Mountains National Park, working on Imappivut may offer a means to initiate work on this marine proposal.

Actions updated in accordance with 2018-19 Departmental Plan.

Parks Canada will work to protect marine and coastal areas in national marine conservation areas as a contribution to the government’s commitment to protect 5 percent of the marine environment by 2017, and 10 percent by 2020.

Starting point(s):
As of March 31, 2016, the national marine conservation area system was 17 percent complete. The system includes four areas representing five of the 29 marine regions.

Performance indicator(s):
Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national marine conservation areas. [Target: 2 (annually)]

Heritage Places Establishment

Build our knowledge of coastal ecosystems, MPAs and fisheries

Continue to work with other federal departments, Indigenous peoples and stakeholders to advance policy and management tools to ensure the effective conservation and management of national marine conservation areas.

Continue to implement a pilot monitoring program enabling the Agency to better understand the state of the national marine conservation area system and more effectively manage these areas.

Actions updated in accordance with 2018-19 Departmental Plan.

Parks Canada will continue efforts to maintain national marine conservation areas and contribute to effective area-based conservation measures by advancing knowledge of coastal and marine areas.

Starting point(s):
National marine conservation area monitoring plans are being implemented to help operating sites inform decision making and contribute condition assessments to future State of Canada’s Natural and Historic Places Reports.

Performance indicator(s):
Number of operating sites that contribute condition assessments to the State of Canada’s Natural and Historic Places Report. [Target: 4 by March 2021]

Heritage Places Conservation

 
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Sustainable Managed Lands and Forests: Lands and forests support biodiversity and provide a variety of ecosystem services for generations to come

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change; Minister of Natural Resources

 
Sustainably Managed Lands and Forests
FSDS target(s)
FSDS Contributing Action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)  /  Performance indicator(s) Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur

By 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures

Conserve natural spaces

Confirm a final boundary, conclude negotiation of establishment agreements with the Government of the Northwest Territories and Łutsël K’e Dene First Nation, and an Impact and Benefit Agreement with the Northwest Territories Métis Nation, and draft legislation to formally protect the Thaidene Nëné National Park Reserve (located in the East Arm of the Great Slave Lake of the Northwest Territories) area under the Canada National Parks Act.

Confirm a final boundary and governance approach for a national park reserve in the South Okanagan Similkameen (Interior Dry Plateau natural region) in collaboration with the British Columbia government and local First Nations, followed by negotiation of the relevant establishment agreement(s).

Conclude the ongoing feasibility assessment for a proposed national park in the Interlake region of the Manitoba Lowlands

Continue to play an important role as the national lead for the Programme of Work on Protected Areas under the Convention on Biological Diversity in the Pathway to Canada Target 1 initiative.

Support the recognition and implementation of a spectrum of Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas.

Actions updated in accordance with 2018-19 Departmental Plan.

Parks Canada’s will work to expand the national parks system which contributes to the conservations of lands and inland waters.

Starting point(s):
Currently, 30 of 39 of Canada’s natural regions are represented by 46 national parks and national park reserves.  

Performance indicator(s):
Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks. [Target: 2 annually]

Heritage Places Establishment

By 2019, the condition of 90% of ecological integrity indicators in national parks is maintained or improved

Conserve natural spaces

Reprioritize the Conservation and Restoration Program to fund projects that focus on ecosystems that can be restored or stabilized as early as 2018-19. This program funds prescribed fire, species recovery and other types of restoration initiatives to make park ecosystems healthier. A science-based ecological integrity monitoring program is used to prioritize ecosystems to restore.

Develop an action plan for Wood Buffalo National Park guided by the World Heritage Committee’s recommendations in collaboration with Indigenous partners, other federal departments, provincial and territorial governments and key stakeholders. This unified approach will make use of the best available science and Indigenous traditional knowledge―ensuring the future of Wood Buffalo National Park remains a treasured place with Outstanding Universal Value for generations to come.

Actions updated in accordance with 2018-19 Departmental Plan.

Parks Canada’s will support the maintenance and improvement of the ecological integrity in national parks through protection, conservation, restoration or mitigation activities.

Starting point(s):
As of March 2016, the condition of 90% of national park ecosystems was maintained or improved from 2011.

Performance indicator(s):
Percentage of national park ecosystems where ecological integrity is maintained or improved. [Target: 90% annually]

Wording updated to match Departmental Results indicator.

Heritage Places Conservation

 
Logo with bird

Healthy Wildlife Populations: All species have healthy and viable populations

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change

 
Healthy Wildlife Populations FSDS target(s) FSDS Contributing Action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)  /  Performance indicator(s) Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur

By 2020, species that are secure remain secure, and populations of species at risk listed under federal law exhibit trends that are consistent with recovery strategies and management plans

Use legislation and regulations to protect species at risk and migratory birds

Recover species at risk on a priority basis through the Conservation and Restoration Program.

Support the development of site-based action plans for species at risk in compliance with the Species at Risk Act and demonstrate federal leadership for land use management and species recovery through an active program of implementation and restoration.

Actions updated in accordance with 2018-19 Departmental Plan.

Parks Canada works to protect species at risk found in heritage places, along with their residences and habitat, and also supports and undertakes recovery activities to maintain or improve their conservation status.

Starting point(s):
As of 2016, Parks Canada had completed seven multi-species action plans for parks with five or more species at risk. With the completion of that target, the current focus is on parks with three or more species at risk.

Performance indicator(s):
Number of action plans for Parks Canada places with 3 or more species at risk. [Target: 24 by March 2020]

Updated target and date.

Heritage Places Conservation

 
Logo with twig in hand

Connecting Canadians with Nature: Canadians are informed about the value of nature, experiencing nature first hand, and actively engaged in its stewardship

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change

 
Connecting Canadians with Nature
FSDS target(s)
FSDS Contributing Action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)  /  Performance indicator(s) Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
By 2020, maintain or increase the number of Canadians that get out into nature – for example, by visiting parks and green space – and increase participation in biodiversity conservation activities relative to a 2010 baseline

Promote public participation

Reach more Canadians through digital channels (web, social media) to foster public understanding and encourage support for the Agency’s role in protecting and presenting Canada’s natural and cultural heritage.

Continuously improve and enhance web presence to make it easier for visitors to interact with online content, plan their visit and learn about Canada’s natural and cultural heritage.

Launch a national advertising campaign to diversify and maintain visitation and stimulate national pride in and protection of Canada’s heritage places.

Working with partners, leverage the Government of Canada milestone anniversaries, such as the commemorations of the World Wars, the centennial anniversary of women’s federal suffrage, and the second annual Canada Historic Places Day, as a means to attract new audiences and to enhance Canadians connection to and understanding of Canada’s heritage.

Starting in 2018 and beyond, provide free admission for children under 18 to Parks Canada places―helping to create a future generation of stewards for Canada’s natural and cultural heritage.

Work with Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada and the Institute for Canadian Citizenship to raise awareness of Parks Canada’s places to better connect new citizens with Canada’s natural and cultural heritage. In 2018, the Agency will host more than 20 citizenship ceremonies in national parks and national historic sites and continue to offer free admission for one year to new Canadians citizens through the Cultural Access Pass program.

Actions updated in accordance with 2018-19 Departmental Plan.

In 2017 and beyond, the Agency will implement strategies to ensure targeted audiences, such as youth, newcomers and urban audiences are inspired to visit and connect.

Starting point(s):
628,203 visits by new Canadians and young adults (2016-17) (10%).

Performance indicator(s):
Percentage of visitors to Parks Canada places that are new Canadians and young adults. [Target: >10%]

Updated to match Departmental Results indicator.

Count of personal and non-personal contacts obtained through multimedia and outreach initiatives. [Target: 100 million contacts by March 2019]

Updated target and date.

Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support

Enhance programs and services for visitors

Continue to innovate, expand and diversify the range of programs and services available at Parks Canada heritage places to encourage more Canadians to experience the outdoors and learn about our history.

Expand the popular Learn to Camp program. The Agency will host 30 learn-to camp events as well as outreach events in urban centres to better equip Canadians with the tools to connect and explore the outdoors.

Diversify accommodation and interpretive offer to encourage exploration and learning at heritage places. Building on the success of 2017 and visitor feedback, online planning tools and reservation capabilities to support trip planning will be improved.

Work with Indigenous partners on a national and local scale to advance Indigenous tourism in Canada. This will both increase visitor knowledge and appreciation of Indigenous cultures and contribute to economic prosperity.

Continue to share the compelling stories of the Franklin expedition with Canadians and the world. As one of the most important underwater archeological undertakings in Canadian history, there are many stories to be told including encounters between Inuit and European explorers and the important role the Inuit played in the discovery of HMS Erebus and HMS Terror.

Continue to implement a new approach to history presentation at Parks Canada places under the new historical commemoration framework. This approach is audience focused and multi-vocal, ensuring Indigenous perspectives and contributions to Canada's history are present and acknowledged.

Continue to renew contemporary infrastructure that facilitates visitor access and use of heritage places to ensure quality and reliability of visitor offers and respond to changing demand and needs of Canadians. Projects include improvements to camping facilities in Pacific Rim National Park and Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site, improvements to visitor facilities in Lachine Canal National Historic Site and Nahanni National Park Reserve, and improvements to infrastructure that support visitor access in Jasper and Gros Morne national parks.

Actions updated in accordance with 2018-19 Departmental Plan.

To fulfill the Government of Canada’s priority to have more Canadians experience and learn about the environment and their heritage places, Parks Canada will develop and innovate its programs and services.

Starting point(s):
In 2016, there were 24.7 million visits to Parks Canada administered places.

Performance indicator(s):
Maintain or increase the number of people that connect with nature at Parks Canada places. [Target: => 24.7 million annually]

Updated to match Departmental Results indicator.

Visitor Experience

 
Logo with three people under roof

Safe and Healthy Communities: All Canadians live in clean, sustainable communities that contribute to their health and well-being

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change; Minister of Health

 
Safe and Healthy Communities
FSDS target(s)
FSDS Contributing Action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contributionby each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)  /  Performance indicator(s) Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur

By 2020, address the 4,300 substances identified as priorities for action under the Chemicals Management Plan

Demonstrate leadership on assessing and remediating contaminated sites

Contribute to the delivery of Phase III of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) to reduce potential environmental and human health risks and related financial liabilities.

Assess 38 FCSAP-funded federal contaminated sites.

Remediate or risk-manage 49 high-priority federal contaminated sites.

Actions updated to reflect the complete timeline of the strategy from 2017-18 to 2019-20.

Assessment at federal contaminated sites reduces uncertainty associated with the risk from these sites. Subsequent remedial or risk management actions reduce the associated risk and financial liabilities. It is anticipated that up to 95% of FCSAP remediation expenditures contribute to reducing financial liability.

Starting point(s):
Number of FCSAP-funded sites where assessment activities have been completed by 2016-17 (base year): [4]

Number of FCSAP-funded high-priority sites where FCSAP-funded risk reduction activities have been completed by 2016-17 (base year): [2]

Performance indicator(s):
Change in the number of FCSAP-funded sites where assessment activities have been completed.

Change in the number of Total number of FCSAP-funded high-priority sites where FCSAP-funded risk reduction activities have been completed.

  • Internal Services
  • Heritage Places Conservation
 

Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

Name of transfer payment program

General Class Contribution Program (GCCP) Voted

Start date

1995-96

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Appropriated annually through estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to department’s Program Inventory

  • Heritage Places Establishment
  • Heritage Places Conservation
  • Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
  • Visitor Experience
  • Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

Description

The objective of the program is to assist recipients in conducting activities and delivering projects that will support the Agency in fulfilling its mandate to preserve and protect nationally significant examples of Canada's natural and cultural heritage and present and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations.

Expected results

  • Canadians recognize, appreciate and are engaged in the values of natural and cultural conservation.
  • Stakeholders are engaged in terms of interest and involvement of common objectives towards ecological or cultural integrity.
  • Parks Canada managers and stakeholders have access to a better knowledge base for informed decision-making and dialogue on commercial, ecological or aboriginal issues of mutual interest.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2016-17

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Continuation

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2021-22

General targeted recipient groups

First Nations communities, Other Aboriginal recipients and organizations, Industry-related, International organizations and foreign countries, Municipalities and local organizations, Non-profit organizations, Provinces and territories

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Not applicable

 
Type of transfer payment 2017-18 Forecast spending 2018-19 Planned spending 2019-20 Planned spending 2020-21 Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 6,309,324 5,639,324 5,694,324 5,319,324
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 6,309,324 5,639,324 5,694,324 5,319,324
 

Name of transfer payment program

Grant to the Łutsël K’e Dene First Nation Voted

Start date

2018-19

End date

2018-19

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Appropriated annually through estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017-18

Link to department’s Program Inventory

  • Heritage Places Establishment

Description

The purpose of this grant is to contribute significantly to reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples by giving control to the Łutsël K’e Dene First Nation (LKDFN) to deliver a service that is of cultural importance to them. The objective is to provide one-time funding to the Thaidene Nëné Trust Fund in order for LKDFN to support and manage the obligations negotiated in the Thaidene Nëné National Park Reserve Establishment Agreement, including an on-the-land program to monitor and interpret important cultural sites in the park, and make a significant contribution to the visitor experience, participation in the co-operative management board with Parks Canada, and develop scholarship and employment and training opportunities for their membership.

Expected results

  • The grant will allow the LKDFN to establish the Trust, putting the First Nation in a position of responsibility, including for any future liability, to deliver their programs in perpetuity.

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

Not applicable

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Not applicable

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

Not applicable

General targeted recipient groups

First Nations communities

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

Not applicable

 
Type of transfer payment 2017-18 Forecast spending 2018-19  Planned spending 2019-20  Planned spending 2020-21  Planned spending
Total grants 0 15,000,000 0 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 0 15,000,000 0 0
 

Disclosure of transfer payment programs under $5 million

Name of transfer payment program

National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places Voted

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Appropriated annually through estimates

Link to department’s Program Inventory

  • Heritage Places Establishment

Main objective

The Program assists recipients in conducting activities aimed at ensuring the heritage value of non-federally owned or administered heritage places that have been formally recognized by the Government of Canada. It provides financial contributions to eligible recipients to share the costs of work necessary to ensure the physical health of a heritage place and to ensure Canadians understand the importance of the site and its role in the history of Canada.

Planned spending in 2018–19

$1,000,000

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2012-13

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
(if applicable)

2018-19

General targeted recipient groups

Non-profit organizations; Provinces and territories; Municipalities and local organizations; Indigenous groups

 

Name of transfer payment program

Grant to the International Peace Garden Voted

End date

Ongoing

Type of transfer payment

Grant

Type of appropriation

Appropriated annually through estimates

Link to department’s Program Inventory

  • Heritage Places Conservation

Main objective

To help defray the costs of operating the International Peace Garden.

Planned spending in 2018–19

$22,700

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

2016-17

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation
(if applicable)

Not applicable

General targeted recipient groups

Non-profit organizations

 

Gender-based analysis plus

General information

Governance structures

Not applicable

Parks Canada has employed the concepts of GBA+ in the development and implementation of Parks Canada programs and in the preparation of Cabinet documents.

In 2018-19, the Agency will develop a GBA+ Framework and subsequently formally integrate GBA+ into decision making.

Human resources

Not applicable

Parks Canada is in the early stages of identifying a responsibility centre (or group) for GBA+ and will determine the full-time equivalent(s) (FTEs) required to move this process forward.

Planned initiatives

Not applicable

Parks Canada will be in a position to provide planned initiatives once it develops a GBA+ Framework and formally integrates GBA+ into decision making processes. This work is scheduled to be undertaken in 2018-19.

 

Planned evaluation coverage, 2018–19 to 2022–23

Program Last evaluation Evaluations planned in the next 5 years Fiscal year of approval 2018-19
Program spending covered by the planned evaluation (dollars)
2018-19
Program spending covered by all planned evaluations (dollars)
2018-19
Total program spending (dollars)
Rationale for not evaluating Program or spending
Heritage Places Establishment Evaluation of National Historic Site Designations, 2015-16 Evaluation of Establishment of Protected Areas for Nature 2020-21 23,734,690 23,734,690 27,146,888 Evaluation recently conducted. Some program elements not covered are also likely to undergo major changes in the short-term.
Heritage Places Conservation Evaluation of Other Heritage Places Programs, 2015-16 Evaluation of National Historic Site Conservation 2018-19 97,600,000 187,255,910 217,349,087 There is a low materiality associated with program elements not covered by evaluation. No senior management or program need for evaluation was identified.
Horizontal Evaluation of Species at Risk table 2 note 1 2018-19 Not applicable
Horizontal Evaluation of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan table 2 note 2 2018-19 2,155,910
Evaluation of Ecosystem Condition Monitoring 2020-21 18,500,000
Evaluation of Active Management of Natural Resources 2022-23 69,000,000
Horizontal Evaluation of Species at Risktable 2 note 1 2022-23 Not applicable
Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support Not applicable Evaluation of Learn to Camp Program 2019-20 957,860 32,628,629 47,847,685 There is a low materiality associated with program elements not covered by evaluation. No senior management or program need for evaluation was identified.
Evaluation of Promotion and Outreach 2021-22 31,670,769
Visitor Experience Evaluation of the Visitor Service Offer, 2011-12 Evaluation of National Historic Site Visitor Experience 2018-19 54,600,000 156,900,000 587,849,852 An evaluation of program elements not covered by evaluation will have been initiated but not completed by the end of the five year period. Some elements will also be partially addressed through other planned evaluation work (e.g., Evaluation of Asset Sustainability).
Evaluation of Visitor Safety 2018-19 11,000,000
Evaluation of Roadway Management table 2 note 3 2019-20 To be determined
Evaluation of Interpretation 2022-23 26,400,000
Evaluation of Heritage Canal Management 2020-21 64,900,000
Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management Evaluation of Townsite Management, 2017-18 Evaluation of Roadway Management table 2 note 3 2018-19 159,674,179 416,994,219 437,624,536 Evaluation of program elements not covered by evaluation was recently completed.
Evaluation of Heritage Canal Management 2020-21 257,320,040
Internal Services Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable To be determined 154,709,044 Evaluation not required under the TB Policy on Results. No senior management or program need for evaluation was identified.
Not applicable Evaluation of Law Enforcement, 2016-17 Formative Evaluation of the Compliance Planning Process 2018-19 Not applicable 18,000,000 Not applicable Not applicable
Horizontal Evaluation of the Youth Employment Strategytable 2 note 4 2019-20 9,000,000
Evaluation of the Law Enforcement Program 2021-22 9,000,000
Evaluation of the General Class Contribution Program 2021-22 Not applicable
Evaluation of Asset Sustainability 2021-22 Not applicable
Total Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable 835,513,448 1,472,527,092 Not applicable
Note: All references to program spending refer to planned spending for the 2018–19 fiscal year only and not cumulative spending over 5 years.
Table 2 Notes
Table 2 Note 1

The Horizontal Evaluation of Species at Risk is led by Environment and Climate Change Canada, with partners Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Parks Canada.

Return to table 2 note 1 referrer

Table 2 Note 2

The Horizontal Evaluation of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan is led by Environment and Climate Change Canada, with 17 federal partners including Parks Canada.

Return to table 2 note 2 referrer

Table 2 Note 3

The Evaluation of Roadway Management involves both the Visitor Experience Program and the Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management Program.

Return to first footnote 3 referrer

Table 2 Note 4

The Horizontal Evaluation of the Youth Employment Strategy is led by Economic and Social Development Canada, with 11 federal partners including Parks Canada.

Return to table 2 note 4 referrer

 

Upcoming internal audits for the coming fiscal year

Title of internal audit Area being audited Status Expected completion date
Occupational health and safety program Internal controls / Human resources In Progress December 2018
Information Management Internal Controls Planned June 2019
Coordination of legal services in the Agency Internal Controls Planned October 2019
Finance & Administration audits of business units Financial management controls / Internal controls Planned October 2019
Audit of costing Financial management controls / Internal controls Planned December 2019
Maximo (asset) data quality Internal controls Planned December 2019
Revenue controls on canals Financial management controls / Internal controls Planned March 2020
Financial monitoring Financial management controls Planned March 2020

Note: The planned internal audits are based on the Agency's multi-annual internal audit plan 2017-18 to 2019-20 and are subject to change as per the priorities of the Agency.