This report on progress supports the commitment in the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA) to make sustainable development decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament. It also contributes to an integrated, whole of government view of activities supporting environmental sustainability.

The departmental information reported accounts for information previously prepared in accordance with Parks Canada’s 2020 to 2023 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy.


Introduction to the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2019 to 2022 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada’s sustainable development goals and targets, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the purpose of the Act, to provide the legal framework for developing and implementing a Federal Sustainable Development Strategy that will make sustainable development decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Parks Canada has developed this report to demonstrate progress in implementing its Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy.


Sustainable development at Parks Canada

Parks Canada’s 2020 to 2023 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy describes the department’s actions in support of achieving eight of the thirteen goals of Canada’s 2019 to 2022 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS):

  • Greening Government
  • Effective Action on Climate Change
  • Healthy coasts and oceans
  • Pristine lakes and rivers
  • Sustainably managed lands and forests
  • Healthy wildlife populations
  • Connecting Canadians with nature
  • Safe and healthy communities

This report presents available results for the departmental actions relevant to this these goals. Previous years’ reports are posted on Parks Canada’s website.


Departmental performance by FSDS goal

The following tables provide performance information on departmental actions in support of the FSDS goals listed in section 2.


Logo with building and leaf

Context: Greening government

As part of the Pan-Canadian framework on clean growth and climate change, Parks Canada has developed this Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy 2020-2023 and is in the process of developing procedures and tools to provide strategic direction to ensure sustainable workplace operations that contribute to a low-carbon government.

Greening government: The Government of Canada (GoC) will transition to low-carbon, climate-resilient and green operations

FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Starting point(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Results achieved Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal and target
Reduce GHG emissions from federal government facilities and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030 (with an aspiration to achieve this target by 2025) and 80% below 2005 levels by 2050 (with an aspiration to be carbon neutral) All new buildings and major building retrofits will prioritize low-carbon investments based on integrated design principles, and life-cycle and total-cost-of ownership assessments which incorporate shadow carbon pricing From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • incorporate GHG reduction actions for buildings into business unit plans; Footnote1
  • establish a Parks Canada building inventory in terms of energy sources;
  • design and subsequently construct, all new buildings, and where feasible Footnote2 major retrofits Footnote3, to be net-zero ready and metered by 2020;
  • pilot, where feasible, Energy Performance Contracts (EPC);
  • investigate net zero carbon opportunities.
Starting points:
GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2005–06: 28.8 ktCO2e. Footnote4 GHG emissions from fleets in fiscal year 2005–06: 11.4 ktCO2e.



Performance Indicators:

Facilities
GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year): = [X] 24.4 ktCO2e.

GHG emissions from facilities in current reporting fiscal year = [Y] ktCO2e.

Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from facilities from fiscal year 2005–06 to current reporting fiscal year = [1-Y/X] %.



Fleets:
GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year): = 11.4 ktCO2e [X].

GHG emissions from fleet in current reporting fiscal year 2020–21 = [Y] ktCO2e.

Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleet from fiscal year 2005–06 to current reporting fiscal year = [1-Y/X] %.



Targets:
Reduce GHG emissions from PCA facilities and fleets by 10.5% below 2005–06 levels by March 2023.

Provide guidance and training to support the achievement of net zero ready performance for new buildings and major retrofits by 2021.

Report on designed energy performance for all new buildings and major retrofits.
In 2020-21 Parks Canada reduced GHG emissions by 30% from facilities and fleets relative to 2005-06 levels.

Facilities
GHG emissions from facilities in current reporting fiscal year = 16.8 ktCO2e.

Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from facilities from fiscal year 2005–06 to current reporting fiscal year = Reduction of 42%.

Fleets
GHG emissions from fleet in current reporting fiscal year 2020–21 = 11.5 ktCO2e.

Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleet from fiscal year 2005–06 to current reporting fiscal year = Increase of 1%.
FSDS:
Actions that reduce the demand for energy or switch to lower carbon sources of energy will lead to reductions in GHGs from building operations and fleets.

UN SDG:
Responsible Consumption and Production – Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.
Departments will adopt and deploy clean technologies and implement procedures to manage building operations and take advantage of programs to improve the environmental performance of their buildings From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • develop guidance to support the adoption of clean technologies;
  • bulk purchase clean technologies where feasible and practical to achieve economies of scale.
Starting point:
Guidance currently comes from the GoC Greening Government Strategy targets.

Performance indicators:
Parks Canada has internal guidance to support the adoption of clean technologies.

Parks Canada has internal training in the adoption of clean technologies.

Targets:
The Parks Canada Asset Sustainability and Resiliency Standard is published by March 2022.

Training in the Parks Canada Asset Sustainability and Resiliency Standard is available by March 2022.
Development of the standard and guidelines is delayed pending a reassessment of timelines in fall 2021.

Training on GoC Greening Targets is currently being offered via information sessions and consultation with Field Units and Capital Project Teams. In 2020-21 Parks Canada delivered one information session for executives in the Alberta Region and one information session for Field Unit Management Teams.
FSDS:
Understanding the range of applications for clean technology in building operations, and identifying what clean technology is purchased by Departments for what purposes, will raise awareness about clean technology opportunities in the built environment, and ultimately reduce greenhouse gas emissions and support more efficient production and consumption.

UN SDG:
Responsible Consumption and Production – Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.
Fleet management will be optimized including by applying telematics to collect and analyze vehicle usage data on vehicles scheduled to be replaced From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • define targets for the Agency for number and types of vehicles that align with Greening Government targets, and embed in each business unit’s 5-year fleet replacement plan;
  • undertake analyses and apply techniques such as telematics to advance fleet right-sizing and the replacement of vehicles with low-carbon intensity vehicles;
  • purchase only zero-emission vehicles or hybrids for executive vehicles;
  • publish Annual Parks Canada Fleet Report.
Starting points:
54% of new light-duty administrative fleet vehicle purchases within eligible categories were zero-emission vehicles or hybrids between April 1, 2019 and March 20, 2020; 0% of business units have approved 5-year fleet replacement plans as of March 2020.

Performance indicators:
Percentage of light-duty administrative fleet vehicle purchases within eligible categories that are zero-emission vehicles or hybrids in a fiscal year.

Percentage of business units that have approved 5-year fleet replacement plans.

Targets:
75% of light-duty administrative fleet vehicle purchases are zero emission vehicles or hybrid (3-year average; 2020/21 through 2022/23).

100% of business units have approved 5-year fleet replacement plans by 2023.
68% of new light-duty administrative fleet vehicle purchases within eligible categories were zero-emission vehicles or hybrids between April 1, 2020 and March 31, 2021; the percentage of business units that have an approved 5-year fleet replacement plan as of March 31 2021 is unknown.

Regular communications among senior management regarding the expectation that priority be given to replacing conventional light-duty vehicles by zero-emission vehicles has directly contributed to almost meeting target pertaining to new light-duty administrative vehicle purchases. The annual Parks Canada Fleet Report and GHG Report were distributed as part of these communications.

Analyses from telematics reports are pointing to the growing need for electric vehicle supply equipment and the need to conduct Electric Vehicle Readiness Assessments (EVRAs) for a number of Parks Canada facilities and determine their potential to accommodate electric vehicle chargers. In 2021-22, Parks Canada will participate in a pilot project with Natural Resources Canada to conduct EVRAs at two sites.
FSDS:
Rationalization of fleets via retirement of emitting vehicles can reduce GHG emissions.

UN SDG:
Responsible Consumption and Production - Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.
Publicly disclose detailed environmental performance information on government operations—in particular, a complete inventory of federal greenhouse gas emissions and energy use—on the Greening Government website each year From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • track and report annual energy and GHG emissions data to the Centre for Greening Government.
Starting point:
The Agency tracks and reports energy and GHG emissions data to the Centre for Greening Government annually, as of March 2020.

Performance indicator:
Frequency of tracking and reporting of energy and GHG emissions data to the Centre for Greening Government.

Target:
Annual tracking and reporting of energy and GHG emissions data to the Centre for Greening Government until March 2023.
In 2020-21, Parks Canada completed annual tracking and reporting of energy and GHG emissions data to the Centre for Greening Government. FSDS:
Through tracking and reporting annual energy and greenhouse gas emissions data to the Centre for Greening Government, Parks Canada demonstrates its progress towards meeting the FSDS targets and transparency requirements.
Divert at least 75% (by weight) of non-hazardous operational waste from landfills by 2030 Other From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • develop guidance to support the diversion of non-hazardous operational waste from landfills;
  • implement procedures to track and disclose waste diversion rates by 2023;
  • reduce the generation of non-hazardous waste;
  • incorporate the 75% diversion target for non-hazardous operational waste into business unit plans.
Starting points:
0% of business units have fully adopted non-hazardous operational waste diversion practices as of March 2020.

0% of business units are accurately tracking/reporting diversion rates as of March 2020.

Performance indicators:
Percentage of business units, where applicable and feasible, adopting non-hazardous operational waste diversion practices.

Percentage of business units, where applicable and feasible, accurately tracking and reporting non-hazardous operational waste diversion rates.

Targets:
100% of business units have adopted, where applicable and feasible, non-hazardous operational waste diversion practices by March 2023.

100% of business units are accurately tracking and reporting, where applicable and feasible, non-hazardous operational waste diversion rates by March 2023.
In 2020-21:
0% of business units have adopted, where applicable and feasible, non-hazardous operational waste diversion practices.

0% of business units are accurately tracking and reporting, where applicable and feasible, non-hazardous operational waste diversion rates.

Based on the solid waste reporting requirements, Footnote5 five of Parks Canada’s 36 business units will be required to report on non-hazardous waste. Parks Canada is currently developing and validating a model, based on representative pilot business units, to scale up the overall non-hazardous waste generation and diversion.
FSDS:
Actions that reduce the generation of non-hazardous operational waste will help to reduce Scope 3 emissions for the production, transport and disposal of material. Diverting waste from landfill reduces landfill gas and transport hauling emissions. Material recovery via recycling reduces emissions for the extraction and production of virgin materials.

UN SDG:
Responsible Consumption and Production – Target 12.5
By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse.
Divert at least 75% (by weight) of plastic waste from landfills by 2030 Other From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • develop guidance to support the diversion of plastic waste from landfills;
  • implement procedures to track and disclose plastic waste diversion rates by 2023;
  • reduce or eliminate unnecessary use of plastics;
  • incorporate the 75% diversion target for plastic waste into business unit plans.
Starting point:
0% of business units have fully adopted plastic waste diversion practices as of March 2020.

0% of business units are accurately tracking/reporting diversion rates as of March 2020.

Performance indicators:
Percentage of business units that have adopted, where applicable and feasible, plastic waste diversion practices.

Percentage of business units that are accurately tracking/reporting diversion rates.

Targets:
100% of business units have adopted, where applicable and feasible, plastic waste diversion practices by March 2023.

100% of business units are accurately tracking and reporting, where applicable and feasible, plastic waste diversion rates by March 2023.
In 2020-21:
0% of business units have adopted, where applicable and feasible, plastic waste diversion practices.

0% of business units are accurately tracking and reporting, where applicable and feasible, plastic waste diversion rates.

Based on the solid waste reporting requirements Footnote6, five out of 36 business units will be required to report on plastic waste. Parks Canada is currently developing and validating a model, based on representative pilot business units, to scale up the overall plastic waste generation and diversion.
FSDS:
Actions that reduce the generation of plastic waste will help to reduce Scope 3 emissions for the production, transport and disposal of material. Diverting waste from landfill reduces landfill gas and transport waste hauling emissions. Material recovery via recycling reduces emissions for the extraction and production of virgin materials.

UN SDG:
Responsible Consumption and Production – Target 12.5
By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse.
Divert at least 90% (by weight) of all construction and demolition waste from landfills (striving to achieve 100% by 2030) Other From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • develop guidance to support the reduction and the diversion of all construction and demolition waste from landfills;
  • incorporate the 90% target for construction and demolition waste diversion into business unit plans;
  • update procedures to track and disclose the diversion rates for construction and demolition waste by 2022.
Starting points:
0% of business units have fully adopted construction and demolition waste diversion practices as of March 2020.

0% of business units are accurately tracking/reporting diversion rates as of March 2020.

Performance Indicators:
Percentage of business units that have adopted, where applicable and feasible, construction and demolition waste diversion practices.

Percentage of business units that are accurately tracking and reporting, where applicable and feasible, waste diversion rates.

Targets:
100% of business units have adopted, where applicable and feasible, construction and demolition waste diversion practices by March 2023.

100% of business units are accurately tracking and reporting, where applicable and feasible, construction and demolition waste diversion rates by March 2023.
In 2020-21: 0% of business units have adopted, where applicable and feasible, construction and demolition waste diversion practices.

0% of business units are accurately tracking and reporting, where applicable and feasible, construction and demolition waste diversion rates.

Based on the solid waste reporting requirements, Footnote7 five out of 36 business units will be required to report on construction and demolition waste. Parks Canada is currently developing and validating a model, based on representative pilot business units, to scale up the overall construction and demolition waste generation and diversion.
FSDS:
Actions that reduce the generation of construction and demolition waste will help to reduce Scope 3 emissions for the production, transport and disposal of material. Diverting waste from landfill reduces landfill gas and transport waste hauling emissions. Material recovery via recycling reduces emissions for the extraction and production of virgin materials.

For construction at historic sites “minimal interventions” as recommended in the Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada will continue to reduce the amount of waste produced and conserve the amount of original fabric in historic buildings.

UN SDG:
Responsible Consumption and Production – Target 12.5
By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse.
Our administrative fleet will be comprised of at least 80% zero-emission vehicles by 2030 Fleet management will be optimized including by applying telematics to collect and analyze vehicle usage data on vehicles scheduled to be replaced From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • define targets for the Agency for number and types of vehicles that align with Greening Government targets, and embed in each business unit’s 5-year fleet replacement plan;
  • undertake analyses and apply techniques such as telematics to advance fleet right-sizing and the replacement of vehicles with low-carbon intensity vehicles;
  • purchase only zero-emission vehicles or hybrids for executive vehicles;
  • publish Annual PCA Fleet Report.
Starting point:
54% of new light-duty administrative fleet vehicle purchases within eligible categories were zero-emission vehicles or hybrids between April 1, 2019 and March 20, 2020.

Performance Indicator:
Percentage of light-duty administrative fleet vehicle purchases within eligible categories that are zero-emission vehicles or hybrids in a fiscal year.

Target:
75% of light-duty administrative fleet vehicle purchases are zero emission vehicles or hybrid (3-year average; 2020/21 through 2022/23).
68% of new light-duty administrative fleet vehicle purchases within eligible categories were zero-emission vehicles or hybrids between April 1, 2020 and March 31, 2021 Our administrative fleet was comprised of 5% zero-emission vehicles by March 31, 2021.

Regular communications among senior management regarding the expectation that priority be given to replacing conventional light-duty vehicles by zero-emission vehicles has directly contributed to almost meeting target pertaining to new light-duty administrative vehicle purchases. The annual Parks Canada Fleet Report and GHG Report were distributed as part of these communications.

Analyses from telematics reports are pointing to the growing need for electric vehicle supply equipment and the need to conduct Electric Vehicle Readiness Assessments (EVRAs) for a number of Parks Canada facilities and determine their potential to accommodate electric vehicle chargers. In 2021-22, Parks Canada will participate in a pilot project with Natural Resources Canada to conduct EVRAs at two (2) sites.
FSDS:
Actions that reduce the demand for energy or switch to lower carbon sources of energy will lead to reductions in GHGs from fleets.

UN SDG:
Responsible Consumption and Production - Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.
By 2022, departments have developed measures to reduce climate change risks to assets, services and operations Increase training and support on assessing climate change impacts, undertaking climate change risk assessments and developing adaptation actions to public service employees, and facilitate sharing of best practices and lessons learned Parks Canada has identified Environmental Forces Adaptation and Response as a key risk. The following mitigation strategies have been identified to address this risk.

From 2020 to 2023 (as outlined in Parks Canada’s 2020-21 Departmental Plan) the Agency will:
  • apply Parks Canada’s climate change adaptation framework to understand climate change impacts, assess risks, and identify feasible and effective measures for adaptation;
  • integrate climate change into diverse areas of work by adjusting policies and programs;
  • continue to review emergency management and provide Parks Canada personnel with ongoing emergency management and response training;
  • continue to implement measures to minimize the impact of climate change on contemporary and built heritage assets, such as using more resilient designs and construction materials;
  • undertake a climate change impact assessment as part of all new building and major retrofit designs; and,
  • continue to deliver and report on results from climate change adaptation workshops at the site or regional level, ensuring that findings are shared in a useful format for sites with similar climate change challenges.
    • From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will also undertake the following actions:
      • address gaps in a number of new or critical research areas identified in the GoC’s Blueprint for Wildland Fire Science in Canada (2019-2029) and to ensure that Parks Canada aims to become resilient to wildland fires; and,
      • steward behavior change including championing environment week and bike to work month, anti-idling campaigns, and car sharing initiatives.
Starting point:
Parks Canada does not currently track the percentage of operational business units that have incorporated SMART actions related to climate change risks into their business plans.

Parks Canada does not currently track the percentage of park/site management plan updates that incorporate actions to address identified climate change risks.

20 regional and site-based summary reports of climate change trends and projection completed.

12 site- or region-level climate change adaptation workshops held.

Parks Canada does not currently track the percentage of SEAs of proposed policies, plans or programs consider climate change adaptation and/or mitigation needs by 2023.

Performance Indicators:
Percentage of operational business units that have incorporated SMART actions related to climate change risks into their business plans.

Percentage of park/site management plan updates that incorporate actions to address climate change risks.

Number of site-based summary reports or updates of climate change trends and projections.

Number of new site- or regional-level climate change adaptation workshops.

Percentage of Strategic Environmental Assessments of proposed policies, plans or programs consider climate change adaptation and/or mitigation needs.

Targets:
100% of operational business units have incorporated SMART SMART related to climate change risks into their business plans by 2022.

100% of park/site management plan updates incorporate actions to address identified climate change risks.

Undertake 10 additional site based summary reports of climate change trends and projections by 2023; update existing reports, as required.

Undertake 20 additional site or region-level climate change adaptation workshops by 2023.

100% of SEAs of proposed policies, plans or programs consider climate change adaptation and/or mitigation needs by 2023.
In 2020-21:
3% of business units incorporated SMART actions related to climate change risks into their business plans.

Efforts were underway to define an approach for tracking the percentage of park/site management plan updates in support of this target.

Two additional site-based summary reports were completed. No site or regional-level climate change adaptation workshops were completed, due to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions.

Efforts were underway to track the percentage of Strategic Environmental Assessments completed in support of this target.

27 wildfire risk reduction projects, in 17 national parks or national park reserves and two national historic sites. 12 prescribed fire projects, which usually help meet both ecological integrity and wildfire risk reduction objectives, were also implemented in 6 national parks, with the COVID-19 pandemic putting projects on hold for a large part of the year.

Parks Canada promoted FireSmart Canada programs that further reduced risk to visitors and neighboring communities.

Parks Canada delivered Incident Command System training to over 500 employees, improving the Agency’s ability to respond to wildfire emergencies.
FSDS:
Advancing understanding of current and projected climate impacts to Parks Canada’s operations, over time, contributes to the development of adaptation measures and supports timely, informed decision making. This understanding and informed decision making reduces climate change risks to and helps build resilience of Parks Canada assets, services and operations.

UN SDGs:
Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure – Target 9.1
Develop quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure, including regional and trans-border infrastructure, to support economic development and human well-being, with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all.

Life Under Water – Target 14.5
By 2020, conserve at least 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas, consistent with national and international law and based on the best available scientific information.

Life on Land – Target 15.1
By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements.
By 2021, adopt climate-resilient building codes being developed by National Research Council Canada From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • develop guidance to support adoption of climate-resilient building codes in Parks Canada places.
Starting point:
0% of new buildings meet the NRC climate-resilient building codes (yet to be published).

Performance Indicator:
Percentage of new building designs that conform to the NRC climate-resilient building codes, once published.

Target:
100% of new building designs conform to the NRC climate-resilient building codes within six (6) months of publication of guidance to support adoption of climate-resilient building codes in Parks Canada places.
Parks Canada is awaiting the publication of NRC climate-resilient building codes and thus no results to be reported at this time. FSDS:
Early adoption of the code in the construction of buildings demonstrates federal leadership in climate resilient buildings.

UN SDG:
Responsible Consumption and Production - Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities
Use 100% clean electricity by 2025 Other From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will: Footnote8
  • make marked progress increasing the percentage of electricity usage from clean energy sources and/or through the purchase of renewable energy certificates; and,
  • participate in a clean Power Purchase Agreement for operations in Alberta.
Starting point:
76% of annual grid electricity consumption is from clean energy sources as of March 2020.

Performance Indicator:
Percentage of annual grid electricity consumption from clean energy.

Target:
100% of annual grid electricity consumption is from clean energy sources by December 2025.
In 2020-21:
80% of Parks Canada’s annual grid electricity consumption came from clean energy sources.

Through a renewable energy agreement (applicable to two operational business units) and ongoing greening of provincial and territorial electrical grids, Parks Canada has made progress towards increasing the percentage of grid-electricity usage from clean sources and meeting the target.
FSDS:
The use of clean electricity reduces GHG emissions in jurisdictions with high-carbon intensity grids and fosters the further development of clean electricity in Canada.

UN SDG:
Responsible Consumption and Production - Target 12.2
By 2030, achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources.
Actions supporting the Goal: Greening Government [This section is for actions that support the Greening Government Goal but do not directly support a FSDS target] Minimize embodied carbon and the use of harmful materials in construction and renovation From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will, where feasible, apply the following for the construction of new or major reconstruction of existing assets:
  • restrict the use of building materials which are harmful to people and the environment through the adoption of the material restrictions identified in the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) Living Building Challenge 4.0 (Red List); and,
  • use sustainably-sourced wood in construction, moving away from petro-chemical and high-embodied carbon products.
Starting points:
No guidance currently exists. No training currently exists.

Performance indicators:
Parks Canada has internal guidance to support adoption of the material restrictions identified in the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) Living Building Challenge 4.0 (Red List).

Parks Canada has internal training to support adoption of the material restrictions identified in the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) Living Building Challenge 4.0 (Red List).

Targets:
Parks Canada has internal guidance to support adoption of the material restrictions identified in the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) Living Building Challenge 4.0 (Red List) by March 2022.

Parks Canada has internal training to support adoption of the material restrictions identified in the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) Living Building Challenge 4.0 (Red List) by March 2022.
Development of the standard and guidelines is on hold. Timelines will be reassessed in 2021-22.

Training on GoC Greening Targets is currently being delivered via information sessions and consultations with Field Units and Capital Project Teams. In FY 2020/2021 Parks Canada delivered one information session for executives in the Alberta Region and one information sessions for Field Unit Management Teams.
FSDS:
The use of low embodied carbon materials expands the market of products and encourages industry to adopt low carbon extraction, production and disposal practices. This will reduce Scope 3 emissions and other harmful environmental impacts.

For construction and conservation projects at historic sites “minimal interventions” as recommended in the Standard and Guidelines, will ensure that the amount of original/existing material is. This protects the heritage places and reduces embodied carbon by reducing the use of new material.

UN SDG:
Responsible Consumption and Production – Target 12.5
By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse.

Responsible Consumption and Production - Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.
Departments will use environmental criteria to reduce the environmental impact and ensure best value in government procurement decisions From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • include criteria that address carbon reduction, sustainable plastics reuse and recycling of materials and broader environmental benefits into procurements for goods and services that have a high environmental impact; and,
  • incorporate environmental considerations into the development of any centrally solicited procurement instruments.
Starting points:
12.3% of call-ups associated with Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements include environmental criteria as of March 2020.

3.37% of dollar value of expenditures associated with Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements include environmental criteria as of March 2020.

The Agency does not currently track the percentage of centrally solicited procurement instruments that include environmental considerations in evaluation.

Performance Indicators:
Percentage of call-ups associated with Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements that include environmental criteria.

Percentage of dollar value of expenditures associated with Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements that include environmental criteria.

Percentage of new centrally-solicited procurement instruments over $100,000 that include environmental considerations in their evaluation.

Targets:
20% of call-ups associated with Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements will include environmental criteria by March 2023.

5% of expenditures (dollar value) associated with Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements will include environmental criteria by March 2023.

20% of new centrally solicited procurement instruments over $100,000 will include environmental considerations (e.g. reduce, reuse, or include environmental criteria) in the evaluation criteria by March 2023.
In 2020-21:
13.85% of call-ups associated with Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements included environmental criteria.

10.19% of dollar value of expenditures associated with Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements include environmental criteria as of March 2020.

Systems are being developed to report the percentage of centrally solicited procurement instruments over $100,000 that include environmental considerations in evaluation with anticipated implementation by early 2021-22.
FSDS:
Green procurement incorporates environmental considerations into purchasing decisions and is expected to motivate suppliers to reduce the environmental impact of the goods and services they deliver, and their supply chains.

UN SDG:
Responsible Consumption and Production - Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.
Departments will adopt clean technology and undertake clean technology demonstration projects From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • address specific Agency needs or increase operational efficiency by testing, and implementing where beneficial, state-of-the-art innovations; and,
  • develop innovative proposals for the Greening Government Fund.
Starting points:
Two Footnote9 clean technology Footnote10 innovations are currently being tested through the Innovative Solutions Canada Program.

One proposal funded through the Greening Government Fund as of March 2020. Footnote11

Performance Indicators:
Number of applicable innovations through the Innovative Solutions Canada Program.

Percentage of innovative proposals funded under the Greening Government fund scheduled for completion are completed on time.

Targets:
Test six (6) applicable innovations through the Innovative Solutions Canada Program by 2023.

100% of innovative proposals funded under the Greening Government Fund that are scheduled for completion by 2023 are completed by that date.
In 2020-21, Parks Canada:
Tested one applicable innovation (Gradek Energy Inc.) through the Innovative Solutions Canada Program.

0% of three innovative proposals funded under the Greening Government Fund that are scheduled for completion by 2023 are completed by that date.
FSDS:
Actions by individual departments that incent, support, or procure state-of-the-art innovative clean technologies that lower the environmental footprint of government operations while contributing to the success of clean-tech businesses in Canada.

UN SDG:
Responsible Consumption and Production - Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.
Support for green procurement will be strengthened, including guidance, tools and training for public service employees From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • provide training to executives, cost centre managers and specialists in procurement and materiel management functions to ensure awareness and inclusion of green procurement considerations in requirements. This training is key to increasing support for green procurement in requirements development for contracts and purchases by acquisition cards; and,
  • supplement training with guidance and tools developed specifically for appropriate high volume services and commodities.
Starting point:
100% of functional specialists in procurement have taken green procurement training as of March 2020.

Training taken by executives and cost centre managers who are not procurement specialists is unknown.

No Agency specific green procurement training, guidance, and templates are in use.

Performance Indicators:
Percentage of executives, cost centre managers and functional specialists in procurement and materiel management that have completed training on green procurement.

Availability of Parks Canada specific green procurement guidance and templates for goods and services that are commonly acquired

Targets:
100% of executives, cost centre managers and functional specialists in procurement and materiel management will have completed training on green procurement by March 2023.

Development and delivery of Parks Canada specific green procurement guidance and templates for goods and services that are commonly acquired are available by March 2023.
In 2020–21, 100% of functional specialists in procurement and materiel management have completed training on green procurement.

Systems are being developed to report the percentage of executives and cost centre managers that have completed training on green procurement by the end of 2021–22.

The Agency’s training and guidance templates are in the process of being revised and/or developed to provide Parks Canada-specific green procurement guidance. The implementation is planned to be complete by end of 2021–22.
FSDS:
Through training procurement specialists, executives and cost centre managers become more aware of green procurement principles so they can make more informed procurement decisions that incorporate environmental considerations.

UN SDG: Responsible Consumption and Production – Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.

Logo with cloud

Context: Effective action on climate change

Parks Canada as a conservation organization supports the Government of Canada’s Federal Sustainable Development Goal of effective action on climate change by developing and implementing clear policy and procedures to integrate climate change monitoring, research, adaptation and resilience into the Agency’s works on natural and cultural protection, connecting to Canadians and asset sustainability.

Effective Action on Climate Change: A low-carbon economy contributes to limiting global average temperature rise to well below two degrees Celsius and supports efforts to limit the increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius

FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Starting point(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Results achieved Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal and target
Actions supporting the goal: Effective action on climate change. This section is for actions that support the Effective action on climate change goal but do not directly support a FSDS target. Provide support and funding for climate resilience. From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • work with partner organizations and specialists to develop and consistently use tools and approaches, policies and tools to better understand and support climate change adaptation across the Agency’s protected heritage sites;
  • administer internal funding programs to support conservation & restoration, conservation planning, asset protection and adaptation efforts that address climate resiliency at protected heritage places; and,
  • secure capital funding to support the Agency’s conservation strategy for cultural heritage resources, and asset recapitalization and replacement efforts for built assets and infrastructure to address climate resiliency at protected heritage sites.
Starting points:
Departmental climate risk assessment completed.

Growing number of internally funded natural heritage conservation projects that: identify climate adaptation objectives; address climate risks; and/or support nature-based climate solutions. Existing capital funds secured through the Greening Government Fund, Transport Canada's Transportation Assets Risk Assessment Program and other sources to invest in cultural heritage resources, built assets and infrastructure at protected heritage sites.

Performance indicators:
Percentage of new internally funded natural heritage conservation projects that identify climate adaptation objectives, and/or address climate change impacts.

Targets:
35% of new internally funded natural heritage conservation projects identify climate adaptation objectives, and/or address climate change impacts, by 2023.
Parks Canada will be developing a process to track internally funded natural heritage conservation projects that identify climate adaptation objectives, and/or address climate change impacts by 2023.

In 2020–21, 60% of projects supported through Parks Canada’s Applied Science Fund identified objectives and targeted key knowledge gaps to address climate change. Further, all projects funded under Parks Canada’s Conservation and Restoration program are required to establish performance objectives that are climate-SMART (i.e., enduring despite climate change).

In 2021–22, Parks Canada will develop a process to track projects supported under other funding envelopes that identify climate adaptation objectives, and/or address climate change impacts.
FSDS:
Parks Canada continues to integrate climate change considerations into policy, programs, and operations to adapt to a changing climate, enhance the protection of public, assets and resources, and strengthen planning and decision-making which directly contributes to effective action on climate change.

UN SDGs:
Responsible Consumption and Production – Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.

Climate Action – Target 13.2
Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning.

Climate Action – Target 13.3
Improve education, awareness raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning.

Safe and Healthy Communities – Target 11.4
Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage.

Logo with fish tail

Context: Healthy coasts and oceans

The Parks Canada Agency Act and the Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act mandate that Parks Canada establish a system of national marine conservation areas (NMCAs) representative of the diversity of Canada’s marine regions including the Great Lakes. To achieve this, Parks Canada has a plan to establish NMCAs in 29 marine regions. Once an NMCA is established, Parks Canada’s role is to ensure the protection and conservation of these NMCAs, facilitate unique experiences and an appreciation of marine heritage, and engage Canadians in the management of NMCAs.

Healthy coasts and oceans: Coasts and oceans support healthy, resilient and productive ecosystems

FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Starting point(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Results achieved Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal and target
By 2020, 10% of coastal and marine areas are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures. Protect and manage marine and coastal areas. From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • continue work with provincial, territorial and Indigenous governments towards the establishment of national marine conservation areas in eastern James Bay, southern Strait of Georgia, and Imappivut (Northern Labrador), and marine protected areas in Iles de la Madeleine and Tuvaijuittuq (Arctic Basin); and
  • work on additional national marine conservation area proposals in unrepresented marine regions.
Starting point:
As of March 31, 2020, the national marine conservation area system is 21% complete with 6 of 29 marine regions representative by 5 NMCAs.

Performance indicators:
Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national marine conservation areas.

Percentage of marine regions represented in the national marine conservation area system.

Targets:
2 unrepresented regions have demonstrable progress towards establishing national marine conservation areas. (annually)

At least 31% of marine regions are represented in the national marine conservation area system by March 2025.
Although the COVID-19 pandemic had an impact on progress made in establishing new national marine conservation areas, in 2020-21 work continued on the feasibility assessment stage as part of the establishment process for the proposed national marine conservation areas located in eastern James Bay, Îles de la Madeleine, southern Strait of Georgia, Tuvaijuittuq and the northern Labrador Coast⸺all within unrepresented marine regions. Tuvaijuittuq could represent two marine regions if the proposed NMCA was to proceed to establishment.

As of March 31, 2021, the national marine conservation area system was 21% complete.

Preliminary discussions have taken place with key partners to add national marine conservation area proposals in unrepresented marine regions, including assessment of potential new freshwater national marine conservation areas that would contribute towards Canada’s targets.
FSDS:
Parks Canada’s establishment work to protect marine and coastal areas in national marine conservation areas, which includes collaboration with Indigenous peoples and provincial and territorial governments, makes a significant contribution to the government’s commitment to protect 5% of the marine environment by 2017, and 10% by 2020.

Parks Canada’s State of Protected Heritage Areas Report, published every five years (to be published in 2021) presents a big-picture snapshot of the Agency’s work on protected areas establishment and on conservation within established and operational protected heritage areas. By contributing condition assessments to this report, operating national marine conservation areas in coastal regions contribute to effective area-based conservation measures by advancing knowledge of coastal and marine areas.

UN SDGs:
Life Under Water – Target 14.5
By 2020, conserve at least 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas, consistent with national and international law and based on the best available scientific information. Parks Canada is actively working to support this target through establishment of NMCAs.
Build our knowledge of coastal ecosystems, marine protected areas and fisheries. From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • continue efforts to protect and conserve national marine conservation areas and contribute to effective area-based conservation measures by advancing knowledge of coastal and marine areas.

Starting point: 34% of ecological sustainability measures had data is collected and assessed, as of March 2020.

Performance indicator:
Percentage of ecological sustainability measures for which data is collected and assessed.

Target:
65% of ecological sustainability measures have data that is collected and assessed by March 2021.
As of March 2021, data have been collected and assessed for 45% of ecological sustainability measures for NMCAs. This is an increase from the 2020 result of 34%. In 2020–21, COVID 19 contributed to delays in program implementation.

Parks Canada is on track to achieve its target of four operating NMCAs to contribute condition assessments to the State of Canada’s Natural and Historic Places Report, which is scheduled to be released by the end of 2021.
  • National marine conservation area monitoring programs are being developed and implemented.
  • Data has been collected and assessed that will contribute to monitoring species and habitat, environmental quality, and marine use.
All sites will report on some indicators in the 2021 State of Canada’s Natural and Historic Places Report.


FSDS:
Ecological sustainability monitoring is an essential element of effective management for the protected coastal and marine areas. It will enhance our understanding and inform management actions to support sustainability.

UN SDGs:
Life Under Water Target 14.2
By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans.

Logo with river

Context: Pristine lakes and rivers

Parks Canada plays an important role in protecting Canada’s lakes and rivers. The Agency uses a number of different tools to protect these ecosystems including National Parks, National Marine Conservation Areas (which include the Great lakes) and heritage rivers. Once established, Parks Canada protects and presents these heritage places for future generations.

Pristine lakes and rivers: Clean and healthy lakes and rivers support economic prosperity and the well-being of Canadians

FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Starting point(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Results achieved Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal and target
Actions supporting the goal: Pristine lakes and rivers. This section is for actions that support the Pristine lakes and rivers goal but do not directly support a FSDS target. Better understand lake and river ecosystems. Many National Parks and freshwater NMCAs contain lakes and rivers, and Parks Canada’s conservation work contributes to their protection and conservation. Parks Canada ecological integrity monitoring includes monitoring lakes and rivers. The starting points, indicators and targets from Sustainably Managed Lands and Forests, as follows, also provide outcomes related to this FSDS target:

Starting points:
Ecological integrity is maintained or improved in 82% of national park ecosystems, as of March 2019.

Performance indicators:
Percentage of national park ecosystems that are maintained or improved.

Targets:
Ecological integrity is maintained or improved in at least 92% of national park ecosystems March 2023.
As of March 2021, the ecological integrity of 82% of national park ecosystems has been maintained or improved. Parks Canada continues to prioritize investments in restoration projects based on the results of science-based ecological integrity monitoring. FSDS:
By supporting the maintenance and improvement of the ecological integrity in national parks through protection, conservation, restoration or mitigation activities, Parks Canada contributes to the conservation of lakes and rivers, and to better understanding lake and river ecosystems.

UN SDGs:
Life on Land – Target 15.1
By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements.

Life on Land – Target: 15.5
Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species.

Logo with tree

Context: Sustainably managed lands and forests

The Parks Canada Agency Act mandates that Parks Canada establish a system of national parks representative of diversity of Canada’s terrestrial natural regions. To achieve this Parks Canada has a plan to establish national parks in 39 terrestrial natural regions. Once established, Parks Canada’s role is to manage these national parks and national park reserves in a manner that ensures their ecological integrity while ensuring their use, benefit and enjoyment for present and future generations.

Sustainably managed lands and forests: Lands and forests support biodiversity and provide a variety of ecosystem services for generations to come

FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Starting point(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Results achieved Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal and target
By 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures. Conserve natural spaces. From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • complete negotiations with provincial and Indigenous governments for the establishment of two new national park reserves in the South Okanagan – Similkameen (B.C.) and in the coastal barrier islands of the Sandhills – Hog Island area (P.E.I.);
  • continue to work with provinces and territories and Indigenous organizations to identify and assess additional national parks with an emphasis on unrepresented and poorly represented regions, and natural areas of importance to Indigenous communities; and
  • update the National Park System Plan.
Starting point:
0 unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress at the beginning of each fiscal year.

79% or 31 of 39 of terrestrial regions are represented by the 47 national parks in the national park system, as of March 2020.

Performance indicator:
Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks.

Percentage of terrestrial regions represented in the national park system.

Target:
2 unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks, annually.

At least 85% of terrestrial regions represented in the national park system, by March 2025.
As of March 2021, 79% or 31 of 39 natural regions are represented by 47 national parks and national park reserves.

COVID-19 posed significant challenges over the reporting period to Parks Canada’s work to establish new national parks due to restrictions on travel and delays in being able to connect with partners; however, Parks Canada was still able to continue work on many important establishment initiatives in unrepresented terrestrial regions in Canada through collaboration with Indigenous peoples and provincial and territorial governments.

In September 2020, Parks Canada concluded the suite of federal establishment agreements for Thaidene Nene National Park Reserve by signing an agreement with the Yellowknives Dene First Nation.

Demonstrable progress has also been made to further the work on the national park reserve proposal for Pituamkek National Park Reserve (formerly Hog-Island Sandhills in P.E.I.) in the Maritime Plain region, on the north shore of Prince Edward Island (P.E.I.), including work to inform public consultations.

Parks Canada also continued negotiations with the Sylix People of the Okanagan Nation as represented by the Osoyoos Indian Band and the Lower Similkameen Indian Band, toward the establishment of a national park reserve in the south Okanagan-Similkameen region.
FSDS:
Parks Canada’s work to expand the national parks system contributes to the goal of conserving lands and inland water and to the Government of Canada’s goal to conserve, by 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland waters through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.

UN SDGs:
Life on Land – Target 15.1
By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements.
Work with Indigenous peoples. From 2020 to 2023, Parks Canada will:
  • collaborate with Indigenous governments, organizations and communities to identify candidate national parks, to undertake feasibility assessments including consultations, and to negotiate agreements to establish new national parks that include a collaborative governance structure and, maintain traditional use of natural and sacred areas;
  • contribute to the Government of Canada’s priority on reconciliation; and,
  • continue to participate in the Indigenous Guardians Program.
Starting point: 2 agreements signed in 2019-20.

Performance indicator:
Number of negotiated agreements signed.

Target:
5 negotiated agreements are signed by August 2023 Footnote12
Parks Canada works with Indigenous governments and communities, other federal departments, provincial, territorial and municipal governments, conservation organizations, industries and all Canadians to support feasibility assessment processes.

Work continued on negotiations for the Impact and Benefit Agreement for Nahanni National Park Reserve and Parks Canada hopes to conclude these negotiations by the end of 2021.

Parks Canada’s continued participation on the Indigenous Guardians Interdepartmental Director General Committee, Interdepartmental Guardians Managers Working Group, First Nations-Federal Pilot Joint Working Group on Guardians, and the Joint Working Group Evaluation Sub-Committee aims to actively support advancing the Indigenous Guardian Pilot Program led by Environment and Climate Change Canada.
FSDS:
As part of Parks Canada’s reconciliation goals, Parks continues to develop contribution agreements to improve the capacity of Indigenous communities to be fully engaged in consultations, aspects of feasibility assessments and allow the integration of Indigenous science, share their traditional knowledge and continue traditional cultural practices.

UN SDGs:
Partnerships for the Goals – Target 17.17
Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships.
By March 31 2023, ecological integrity will be maintained or improved in 92% of national park ecosystems. Conserve natural spaces. From 2020 to 2023, Parks Canada will:
  • collaborate with Indigenous governments, organizations and communities to identify candidate national parks, to undertake feasibility assessments including consultations, and to negotiate agreements to establish new national parks that include a collaborative governance structure and, maintain traditional use of natural and sacred areas;
  • contribute to the Government of Canada’s priority on reconciliation; and,
  • continue to participate in the Indigenous Guardians Program.
Starting point:
Ecological integrity was maintained or improved in 86% of national park ecosystems, as of March 2020.

Performance indicator:
Percentage of National Park ecosystems where ecological integrity is maintained or improved.

Target:
92% of national park ecosystems have ecological integrity maintained or improved by March 2023.
As of March 2021, the ecological integrity of 82% of national park ecosystems has been maintained or improved. Parks Canada continues to prioritize investments in restoration projects based on the results of science-based ecological integrity monitoring. FSDS:
By supporting the maintenance and improvement of the ecological integrity in national parks through protection, conservation, restoration or mitigation activities, Parks Canada contributes to the conservation of lands and forests to support biodiversity and provide a variety of ecosystem services for generations to come.

UN SDGs:
Life on Land –Target: 15.5
Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species.

Logo with bird

Context: Healthy wildlife populations

Parks Canada has an obligation to ensure ecological integrity is the first priority in managing national parks. Parks Canada works to maintain or improve ecological integrity of national park ecosystems, while providing benefit and enjoyment to Canadians and international visitors. The Agency uses indicators to summarize and assess the ecological condition of the main ecosystems in each national park, i.e. forests, tundra, wetlands or freshwater. Using this information, Parks Canada identifies and conducts priority restoration and management initiatives for impaired ecosystems. Parks Canada is committed to the protection and recovery of species at risk, many of which can be found within Parks Canada lands and waters. Parks Canada works to protect species at risk, along with their residences and habitat, and also supports and undertakes recovery activities to maintain or improve their conservation status.

Healthy wildlife populations: All species have healthy and viable populations

FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Starting point(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Results achieved Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal and target
By 2020, species that are secure remain secure and populations of species at risk listed under federal law exhibit trends that are consistent with recovery strategies and management plans. Implement, innovate and modernize the regulatory and policy framework and tools to protect species at risk and migratory birds. From 2020 to 2023, Parks Canada will:
  • contribute to the protection and recovery of species at risk by implementing actions from new and existing site-based, multi-species action plans (and species-specific plans) in coordination with key partners.
Starting points:
25.7% of actions identified in Parks Canada led Species at Risk Act action plans that are fully implemented as of March 2019.

0% of actions in Parks Canada conservation plans that are implemented (for Southern Resident Killer Whales) as of March 2019.

Performance indicators:
Percentage of actions identified in Parks Canada led Species at Risk Act action plans that are implemented.

Percentage of actions in Parks Canada conservation plans that are implemented (for Southern Resident Killer Whales).

Target:
50% actions identified in Parks Canada led Species at Risk Act action plans are fully implemented by March 2023.

100% of actions in Parks Canada conservation plans that are implemented (for Southern Resident Killer Whales) by March 2024.
Parks Canada added 2 more site-based, multi-species action plans for a total of 23 plans that identify recovery measures for more than 254 species of conservation concern, (including over 213 SARA-listed species.

Parks Canada is on track to achieve the Nature Legacy target of implementing 50% of recovery measures in SARA action plans by 2023. As of March 2021, 44% are complete.

Additionally, in 2020–21, Parks Canada has legally protected critical habitat for 11 species at risk in 17 Parks Canada-administered places. In total, completing 9 critical habitat descriptions in the Canada Gazette, 1 protection statement, and 2 Ministerial Orders. Some species can have more than one legal instrument used to protect its critical habitat.

Parks Canada has achieved demonstrable progress in the recovery of species at risk, including:
  • Mormon Metalmark was down-listed from Threatened to Special Concern, thanks to recovery efforts, research, and inventories conducted in Grasslands National Park.
  • Pitcher’s Thistle was down-listed from endangered to Special Concern due in part to restoration efforts in Pukaskwa National Park.
  • Common Hoptree was down-listed from Threatened to Special Concern due in part to survey efforts in Point Pelee National Park.
As of March 2021, 82% of actions in Parks Canada conservation plans for Southern Resident Killer Whales have been implemented. Parks Canada continues to engage with Indigenous partners and work to identify opportunities to enable Indigenous-led stewardship and conservation actions.
FSDS:
Parks Canada’s action plans are a key component of the implementation of SARA, and Parks Canada’s actions to protect species, their residences and critical habitat, and implement action plans are designed to maintain or improve their conservation status.

UN SDGs:
Life on Land – Target: 15.5
Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species.
Work with partners to enhance foundational knowledge of species, habitats and ecosystems. From 2020 to 2023, Parks Canada will:
  • advance protection and recovery action for priority species at risk including through the co-application of western science and Indigenous Knowledge in Conservation and Restoration projects, based on methodology developed in February 2020 with Indigenous partners.
Starting point:
Parks Canada does not currently track the number of Conservation and Restoration (CoRe) projects that incorporate Indigenous Knowledge.

Performance indicator:
Percentage of Conservation and Restoration (CoRe

Target:
35% of Conservation and Restoration (CoRe) projects that incorporate Indigenous Knowledge by March 2021.
In February of 2020, Parks Canada held a precedent-setting collaborative workshop with Indigenous partners to co-develop the methodology by which success could be measured. However, due to continued disruptions resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, the Agency was unable to implement the methodology and report on the target.

While the target was unable to be measured due to the impacts of COVID the relationship built through the workshop has led to the establishment of an Indigenous Advisory Group for the CoRe program. This is an additional avenue that will contribute to working with partners to enhance foundational knowledge of species, habitats and ecosystems.
FSDS:
Parks Canada collaboration with Indigenous partners to weave Indigenous Knowledge into the planning and implementation of Conservation and Restoration projects supports increasing conservation successes.

UN SDGs:
Life on Land – Target 15.5
Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species.

Partnerships for the Goals – Target 17.17
Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships.

Logo with twig in hand

Context: Connecting Canadians with nature

Parks Canada builds public awareness of and connection to the protected heritage places that it administers, as well as the natural and cultural resources in them. Through relevant and effective promotion and engagement initiatives, Parks Canada is working to strengthen Canadians’ awareness and appreciation of their national protected heritage places and Parks Canada’s important mandate to protect and present these places. By encouraging Canadians to visit these places, and in providing them with the information and means to enjoy them, Parks Canada allows more Canadians to experience the outdoors and learn about our heritage. These experiences can also lead to learning, personal growth and mental and physical health benefits. By strengthening the connection Canadians feel to their national heritage places, Parks Canada is helping to foster enthusiasm for Canada’s natural and cultural heritage and create a culture of stewardship and care for these places and the environment more broadly.

Connecting Canadians with nature: Canadians are informed about the value of nature, experience nature first hand, and actively engage in its stewardship

FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Starting point(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Results achieved Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal and target
By 2020, maintain or increase the number of Canadians that get out into nature – for example, by visiting parks and green space – and increase participation in biodiversity conservation activities relative to a 2010 baseline. Build capacity for conservation activities. From 2020 to 2023, Parks Canada will:
  • continue working collaboratively with Indigenous peoples on a wide range of Indigenous protected and conserved areas;
  • recovering species at risk on a priority basis, including through Parks Canada's Conservation and Restoration Program;
  • develop strategic partnerships for collaborative activities such as scientific and academic research, conservation efforts, promotional campaigns and outreach activities; and,
  • support national programming aimed at educating and engaging children aged 6 to 12 in Canadian wildlife conservation.
Starting point:
Parks Canada does not currently track the number of Conservation and Restoration (CoRe) projects that incorporate Indigenous Knowledge.

Performance indicator:
Percentage of Conservation and Restoration (CoRe) projects that incorporate Indigenous Knowledge.

Target:
35% of Conservation and Restoration (CoRe) projects that incorporate Indigenous Knowledge by March 2021.

Additional performance indicators and targets that support this FSDS goal can be seen in:
  • Healthy coasts and oceans
  • Sustainably managed lands and forests; and
  • Healthy wildlife populations
Due to ongoing impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and as noted in other FSDS goals, Parks Canada was unable to implement the methodology developed in collaboration with Indigenous partners to measure success.

Parks Canada conducted additional activities to support this target in 2020-2021:
  • Co-led the IUCN #NatureForAll initiative, a global initiative to inspire love, support and action for nature, collaborating with more than 80 Canadian organisations and almost 500 partners worldwide in inspiring love of nature with the knowledge that the more people experience and care for nature, the more they will want to work to conserve it.
  • Through Parks Life and IUCN #NatureForAll, promoted Parks Canada staff’s commitment and love of nature through the People of Parks Campaign.
  • Led the development of the #NatureForAll Discovery Zone with others, a searchable database of resources from various #NatureForAll partners to help people connect with and learn about nature.
  • Collaborated on the development of the #NatureForAll Sounds of Your Park initiative, a collection of sounds intended to celebrate the acoustical beauty and diversity of the world’s national parks and other protected areas. Already 9 Parks Canada field units have shared their sounds.
  • Facilitated the creation of the #NatureForAll Trivia Game. Celebrating the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) World Commission of Protected Areas 60th anniversary, this online game targeting youth focuses on parks and protected areas around the world and highlights their unique characteristics, inhabitants, cultures and contributions to local communities as well as the planet.
FSDS:
The results achieved directly support Canadians engaging in nature and increase participation in biodiversity conservation through active engagement of all ages to inspire positive action for nature. UN SDGs:
Sustainable Cities and Communities – Target 11.4
Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage.

Life below Water – Target 14.2
By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans.
Promote public participation. From 2020 to 2023, Parks Canada will:
  • provide opportunities for Canadians to connect with nature through learning, outreach and multi-media initiatives in their communities, and by offering free admission to Parks Canada places for children 17 and under; and,
  • work with partners to facilitate specific opportunities for youth, young adults and new Canadians to learn about, experience, and share their encounters with Parks Canada and its network of places.
Starting point:
100,000,000 contacts, as of March 2019.

Performance indicator:
Count of contacts obtained through digital and outreach initiatives.

Target:
At least 100,000,000 contacts obtained through digital and outreach initiatives.
Count of contacts obtained through digital and outreach initiatives: 4,878,031

Many engagement activities were suspended in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, including in person outreach activities, national advertising, and a national travel-based contest. This resulted in significantly lower contacts.

Parks Canada did continue to engage with Canadians. It maintained a strong presence across its digital channels. Where it could, some in-person outreach initiatives shifted to on-line and digital platforms to continue to reach and connect with Canadians. Youth under the age of 17 continued to have free admission to national parks/ historic sites in 2020.

Parks Canada maintained core youth programs in 2020 including a network of university-based campus clubs and its youth ambassador program. Although onsite visits to parks/sites may have been scaled back for health and safety reasons in 2020, young adults still engaged with their peers on nature and history through digital platforms and outdoor experiences.
FSDS:
Canadians will experience and connect with Parks Canada places through digital and outreach initiatives.

UN SDG:
Sustainable Cities and Communities – Target 11.7
By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities.
Enhance programs and services for visitors. From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • diversify accommodation and interpretation programming to encourage exploration and learning;
  • continue to innovate, expand and diversify available programs and services and expand the Learn-to Camp Program;
  • work with Indigenous communities to provide interpretive and storytelling programs rooted in traditional activities and knowledge; and,
  • continue to renew infrastructure that facilitates visitor access to and use of heritage places.
Starting point:
71% of contemporary assets in good or fair condition, as of March 2019.

Performance indicator:
Percentage of contemporary assets in good or fair condition.

Target:
74% of contemporary assets in good or fair condition, by March 2022.
75% of contemporary assets were in good or fair condition as of March 2021.

In 2020–21, 50 heritage assets, with a replacement value of $770M, were improved from very poor or poor to fair or good, bringing the results to date to 54%. Given the sunset of temporary funding for assets, continued progress on improving the condition of Parks Canada’s built heritage assets will be dependent upon confirming additional funds.
FSDS:
The condition of Parks Canada’s assets is important for visitor experience and safety.

UN SDG:
Sustainable Cities and Communities – Target 11.7
By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities.
Between 2019 and 2022, maintain or increase visitation to federal protected areas such as selected national wildlife areas, national parks and national marine conservation areas while maintaining the ecological values, integrity and benefits to biodiversity conservation of these places. Between 2019 and 2022, continue to increase visitation to national historic sites. From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • Maintain or increase visitation to national parks and national marine conservation areas while maintaining the ecological values, integrity and benefits to biodiversity conservation of these places; and,
  • Continue to increase visitation to national historic sites.
Starting points:
There were 15.9 million visitors to national parks and national marine conservation areas in 2018-19.

There were 9.2 million visitors to national historic sites in 2018-19.

Performance indicator:
Number of visitors experiencing national parks and national marine conservation areas.

Number of visitors experiencing national historic sites.

Target:
At least 15.9 million annually, until March 2023 Footnote13 More than 9.2 million annually, until March 2023.
Visitation in 2020-21 was 17 million, down 32% from the 2018-19 baseline. Visitation to national parks was 11.7 million, down 24% from the 2016–17 baseline of 15.4 million; visitation to national historic sites was 5.3 million in 2020–21, down 42% from the 2016–17 baseline of 9.3 million, compared to the 2018-19 starting point.

Visitation was down in 2020 due to the global COVID-19 health pandemic. There were closures of parks/sites, modified offers, and access limitations, all aligned with public health and safety measures to keep visitors and employees safe.

Although visitation was lower overall, green spaces across Canada, including national parks and historic sites, became safe settings for people to connect with family and friends, and to support their well being during uncertainty. Eight in 10 Canadian visitors to parks/sites in 2020 indicated that access to these places provided a sense of normalcy and was important to their mental and physical wellbeing.
FSDS:
Connecting with nature benefits Canadians, their communities and the environment. Spending time in nature, such as national historic sites, national parks and national marine conservation areas, can improve physical and mental health and support children’s development, while nature-based tourism provides economic benefits for Canada. Getting out and experiencing nature also inspires Canadians to help protect it.

Parks Canada supports Canadians by expanding opportunities to experience nature and get involved in conservation and by enabling children to connect with nature from a young age to lay the foundation for a life-long practice.

UN SDG:
Sustainable Cities and Communities – Target 11.7
By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities.

Logo with three people under roof

Context: Safe and healthy communities

Parks Canada is responsible for 481 sites registered in the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory as of March 31, 2020. Of these, 250 sites require no further action. With funding from the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, the Agency undertakes risk reduction activities (through remediation and/or risk management) at federal contaminated sites under its responsibility. Efforts at remediating contaminated sites serves to protect the health of Canadians as well as the environment.

Safe and healthy communities: All Canadians live in clean, sustainable communities that contribute to their health and well-being

FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Starting point(s) Performance indicator(s) Target(s) Results achieved Contribution by each departmental result to the FSDS goal and target
Actions supporting the goal: Safe and healthy communities. This section is for actions that support the Safe and healthy communities goal but do not directly support a FSDS target. Prevent environmental emergencies or mitigate their impacts. From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • Develop an Environmental Emergency Response Planning Standard and Procedures; and,
  • Incorporate disaster preparedness and emergency response procedures into business unit planning.
Starting point:
Parks Canada has Draft Environmental Emergency Management Standard and Procedures, as of April 2020.

Parks Canada does not have training for Environmental Emergency Management Standard and Procedures, as of April 2020.

Performance indicators:
Parks Canada has approved environmental emergency management standards and procedures.

Parks Canada has training in environmental emergency management standards and procedures.

Target:
Parks Canada’s Environmental Emergency Management Standards and Procedures are implemented, by March 2023.

Parks Canada’s training for Environmental Emergency Management Standards and Procedures is available, by March 2023.
An Environmental Emergency Management Planning and Response (E2M) Standard and related procedures have been drafted and will undergo internal consultation and approval in upcoming years. FSDS & UN SDG:
Developing policy and tools will provide a framework for supporting environmental emergency management at Parks Canada. Establishing this framework will ultimately support the goal of ensuring safe and healthy communities.
Demonstrate leadership on assessing and remediating contaminated sites. From 2020 to 2023, Parks Canada will:
  • Contribute to the delivery of Phase IV of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP); and,
  • Ensure accurate annual Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory (FCSI) update and attestation.
Starting points:
Zero FCSAP-funded sites where assessment activities have been completed as of March 2020.

Zero FCSAP-funded high-priority sites where FCSAP-funded risk reduction activities have been completed as of March 2020.

Performance Indicators:
Number of FCSAP-funded sites where assessment activities have been completed.

Number of FCSAP-funded high-priority sites where FCSAP-funded risk reduction activities have been completed.

Target:
8 FCSAP-funded contaminated sites assessed by March 2023.

10 FCSAP-funded high-priority sites where FCSAP-funded risk reduction activities have been completed, by March 2023.
In 2020-21 Parks Canada:
  • Completed assessment activities at four FCSAP-funded sites.
  • Completed remediation and risk reduction activities at three FCSAP-funded sites. These sites are now closed in the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory.
FSDS:
Through the assessment and remediation of FCSAP-funded projects, Parks Canada continues to reduce uncertainties and risks that contaminated sites could pose to human health and the environment.

Report on integrating sustainable development

During the 2020–21 reporting cycle, Parks Canada had no proposals that required a strategic environmental assessment (SEA) and no public statements were produced.


Organizational contact information

Parks Canada National Office
30 Victoria Street
Gatineau, Quebec
Canada
J8X 0B3

Email:information@pc.gc.ca

Telephone:888-773-8888 (General inquiries)

Telephone — international:819-420-9486 (General inquiries — international)

Teletypewriter:866-787-6221 (TTY)

Parks Canada Agency

Related links

Publication information

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by The President and Chief Executive Officer of the Parks Canada Agency, 2021
Catalogue No.: R61-113E-PDF
ISSN 2564-2898