Achieving a Sustainable Future — Parks Canada Agency Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy 2020 to 2023

  • © Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Parks Canada Agency, 2020
  • Catalogue No.: R61-109E-PDF
  • ISSN 2561-2409

Executive summary

As a contributing federal department for a wide range of environmental issues, Parks Canada Agency will contribute directly and significantly through its Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) to eight of the thirteen goals of Canada’s 2019 to 2022 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS):

  • Greening government
  • Effective action on climate change
  • Healthy coasts and oceans
  • Pristine lakes and rivers
  • Sustainably managed lands and forests
  • Healthy wildlife populations
  • Connecting Canadians with nature
  • Safe and healthy communities

The sustainable development priorities set out in this DSDS reflect broader FSDS priorities and align with Parks Canada’s core responsibility to protect and present Canada’s Natural and Cultural Heritage.

To achieve Parks Canada’s commitments and carry out planned actions under all eight goals, the Agency will establish national parks and national marine conservation areas and protect and conserve natural and cultural heritage guided by science and Indigenous knowledge. Parks Canada will also provide opportunities to visit, experience and enjoy Canada’s natural and cultural heritage and work with the public, other federal departments, provinces, territories, Indigenous Peoples, and stakeholders to carry out these responsibilities.


Section 1: Introduction to the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2019 to 2022 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada’s sustainable development goals and targets, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the purpose of this Act to provide the legal framework for developing and implementing a Federal Sustainable Development Strategy that will make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, the Parks Canada Agency supports the goals laid out in the FSDS through the activities described in this Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS).


Section 2: Sustainable development vision and context at Parks Canada Agency

FSDS goal: Greening government

As part of the Pan-Canadian framework on clean growth and climate change, Parks Canada has developed this Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy 2020-2023 and is in the process of developing procedures and tools to provide strategic direction to ensure sustainable workplace operations that contribute to a low-carbon government.

FSDS goal: Effective action on climate change

Parks Canada as a conservation organization supports the Government of Canada’s Federal Sustainable Development Goal of effective action on climate change by developing and implementing clear policy and procedures to integrate climate change monitoring, research, adaptation and resilience into the Agency's works on natural and cultural protection, connecting to Canadians and asset sustainability.

FSDS goal: Healthy coasts and oceans

The Parks Canada Agency Act and the Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act mandate that Parks Canada establish a system of national marine conservation areas (NMCAs) representative of the diversity of Canada's marine regions including the Great Lakes. To achieve this Parks Canada has a plan to establish NMCAs in 29 marine regions. Once an NMCA is established, Parks Canada's role is to ensure the protection and conservation of these NMCAs, facilitate unique experiences and an appreciation of marine heritage, and engage Canadians in the management of NMCAs.

FSDS goal: Pristine lakes and rivers

Parks Canada plays an important role in protecting Canada’s lakes and rivers. The Agency uses a number of different tools to protect these ecosystems including National Parks, National Marine Conservation Areas (which include the Great lakes) and heritage rivers. Once established, Parks Canada protects and presents these heritage places for future generations.

FSDS goal: Sustainably managed lands and forests

The Parks Canada Agency Act mandates that Parks Canada establish a system of national parks representative of diversity of Canada’s terrestrial natural regions. To achieve this Parks Canada has a plan to establish national parks in 39 terrestrial natural regions. Once established, Parks Canada's role is to manage these national parks and national park reserves in a manner that ensures their ecological integrity while ensuring their use, benefit and enjoyment for present and future generations.

FSDS goal: Healthy wildlife populations

Parks Canada has an obligation to ensure ecological integrity is the first priority in managing national parks. Parks Canada works to maintain or improve ecological integrity of national park ecosystems, while providing benefit and enjoyment to Canadians and international visitors. The Agency uses indicators to summarize and assess the ecological condition of the main ecosystems in each national park, i.e. forests, tundra, wetlands or freshwater. Using this information, Parks Canada identifies and conducts priority restoration and management initiatives for impaired ecosystems. Parks Canada is committed to the protection and recovery of species at risk, many of which can be found within Parks Canada lands and waters. Parks Canada works to protect species at risk, along with their residences and habitat, and also supports and undertakes recovery activities to maintain or improve their conservation status.

FSDS goal: Connecting Canadians with nature

Parks Canada builds public awareness of and connection to the protected heritage places that it administers, as well as the natural and cultural resources in them. Through relevant and effective promotion and engagement initiatives, Parks Canada is working to strengthen Canadians' awareness and appreciation of their national protected heritage places and Parks Canada's important mandate to protect and present these places. By encouraging Canadians to visit these places, and in providing them with the information and means to enjoy them, Parks Canada allows more Canadians to experience the outdoors and learn about our heritage. These experiences can also lead to learning, personal growth and mental and physical health benefits. By strengthening the connection Canadians feel to their national heritage places, Parks Canada is helping to foster enthusiasm for Canada's natural and cultural heritage and create a culture of stewardship and care for these places and the environment more broadly.

FSDS goal: Safe and healthy communities

Parks Canada is responsible for 481 sites registered in the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory as of March 31, 2020. Of these, 250 sites require no further action. With funding from the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, the Agency undertakes risk reduction activities (through remediation and/or risk management) at federal contaminated sites under its responsibility. Efforts at remediating contaminated sites serves to protect the health of Canadians as well as the environment.


Section 3: Commitments for Parks Canada Agency

Logo with building and leaf

Greening government: The Government of Canada will transition to low-carbon, climate resilient, and green operations

Responsible Minister: All ministers

This goal captures commitments from the Greening Government Strategy, as well as reporting requirements under the Policy on Green Procurement.

Greening government communities
FSDS target(s)
FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)
Performance indicator(s)
Target(s)
Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
Reduce GHG emissions from federal government facilities and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030 (with an aspiration to achieve this target by 2025) and 80% below 2005 levels by 2050 (with an aspiration to be carbon neutral). All new buildings and major building retrofits will prioritize low-carbon investments based on integrated design principles, and life-cycle and total-cost-of ownership assessments which incorporate shadow carbon pricing.

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:

  • incorporate GHG reduction actions for buildings into business unit plansFootnote1.
  • establish a Parks Canada building inventory in terms of energy sources.
  • design and subsequently construct, all new buildings, and where feasibleFootnote2 major retrofitsFootnote3, to be net-zero ready and metered by 2020.
  • pilot, where feasible, Energy Performance Contracts (EPC).
  • investigate net zero carbon opportunities.

FSDS: Actions that reduce the demand for energy or switch to lower carbon sources of energy will lead to reductions in GHGs from building operations.

UN SDG Goal:
Responsible Consumption and Production – Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.

Starting points:
GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2005–06: 24.4 ktCO2e.

GHG emissions from fleets in fiscal year 2005–06: 11.4 ktCO2e.

Performance indicators:
Facilities:

  • GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year): = [X] 24.4 ktCO2e.
  • GHG emissions from facilities in current reporting fiscal year = [Y] ktCO2e.
  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from facilities from fiscal year 2005-06 to current reporting fiscal year = [1-Y/X] %.

Fleets:

  • GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year): = 11.4 ktCO2e [X].
  • GHG emissions from fleet in current reporting fiscal year 2020-21 = [Y] ktCO2e.
  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleet from fiscal year 2005-06 to current reporting fiscal year = [1-Y/X] %.

Targets:
Reduce GHG emissions from PCA facilities and fleets by 10.5% below 2005-06 levels by March 2023.

Provide guidance and training to support the achievement of net-zero ready performance for new buildings and major retrofits by 2021.

Report on designed energy performance for all new buildings and major retrofits.

Internal Services

Operations

P1 – Heritage Places Establishment

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation

P3 – Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support

P4 – Visitor Experience

P5 – Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management

Departments will adopt and deploy clean technologies and implement procedures to manage building operations and take advantage of programs to improve the environmental performance of their buildings.

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:

  • develop guidance to support the adoption of clean technologies.
  • bulk purchase clean technologies where feasible and practical to achieve economies of scale.

FSDS: Understanding the range of applications for clean technology in building operations, and identifying what clean technology is purchased by Departments for what purposes will raise awareness about clean technology opportunities in the built environment and ultimately reduce greenhouse gas emissions and support more efficient production and consumption.

UN SDG Goal:
Responsible Consumption and Production – Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.

Starting point:
Guidance currently comes from the GoC Greening Government Strategy targets.

Performance indicators:
Parks Canada has internal guidance to support the adoption of clean technologies.

Parks Canada has internal training in the adoption of clean technologies.

Targets:
The Parks Canada Asset Sustainability and Resiliency Standard is published by March 2022.

Training in the Parks Canada Asset Sustainability and Resiliency Standard is available by March 2022.

Internal Services

Operations

P1 – Heritage Places Establishment

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation

P3 – Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support

P4 – Visitor Experience

P5 – Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management

Fleet management will be optimized including by applying telematics to collect and analyze vehicle usage data on vehicles scheduled to be replaced.

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:

  • define targets for the Agency for number and types of vehicles that align with Greening Government targets, and embed in each business unit’s 5-year fleet replacement plan.
  • undertake analyses and apply techniques such as telematics to advance fleet right-sizing and the replacement of vehicles with low-carbon intensity vehicles.
  • purchase only zero-emission vehicles or hybrids for executive vehicles.
  • publish Annual Parks Canada Fleet Report.

FSDS: Rationalization of fleets via retirement of emitting vehicles can reduce GHG emissions.

UN SDG Goal:
Responsible Consumption and Production - Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.

Starting points:
54% of new light-duty administrative fleet vehicle purchases within eligible categories were zero-emission vehicles or hybrids between April 1, 2019 and March 20, 2020; 0% of business units have approved 5-year fleet replacement plans as of March 2020.

Performance indicators:
Percentage of light-duty administrative fleet vehicle purchases within eligible categories that are zero-emission vehicles or hybrids in a fiscal year.

Percentage of business units that have approved 5-year fleet replacement plans.

Targets:
75% of light-duty administrative fleet vehicle purchases are zero emission vehicles or hybrid (3-year average; 2020/21 through 2022/23).

100% of business units have approved 5-year fleet replacement plans by 2023.

Internal Services

Operations

P1 – Heritage Places Establishment

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation

P3 – Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support

P4 – Visitor Experience

P5 – Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management

Publicly disclose detailed environmental performance information on government operations—in particular, a complete inventory of federal greenhouse gas emissions and energy use—on the Greening Government website each year.

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:

  • track and report annual energy and GHG emissions data to the Centre for Greening Government.
Not applicable

Starting point:
The Agency tracks and reports energy and GHG emissions data to the Centre for Greening Government annually, as of March 2020.

Performance indicator:
Frequency of tracking and reporting of energy and GHG emissions data to the Centre for Greening Government.

Target:
Annual tracking and reporting of energy and GHG emissions data to the Centre for Greening Government until March 2023.

Not applicable

Divert at least 75% (by weight) of non-hazardous operational waste from landfills by 2030. Other From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:
  • develop guidance to support the diversion of non-hazardous operational waste from landfills.
  • implement procedures to track and disclose waste diversion rates by 2023.
  • reduce the generation of non-hazardous waste.
  • incorporate the 75% diversion target for non-hazardous operational waste into business unit plans.

FSDS: Actions that reduce the generation of non-hazardous operational waste will help to reduce Scope 3 emissions for the production, transport and disposal of material. Diverting waste from landfill reduces landfill gas and transport hauling emissions. Material recovery via recycling reduces emissions for the extraction and production of virgin materials.

UN SDG Goal:
Responsible Consumption and Production – Target 12.5
By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse.

Starting points:
0% of business units have fully adopted non-hazardous operational waste diversion practices as of March 2020.

0% of business units are accurately tracking/reporting diversion rates as of March 2020.

Performance indicators:
Percentage of business units, where applicable and feasible, adopting non-hazardous operational waste diversion practices.

Percentage of business units, where applicable and feasible, accurately tracking and reporting non-hazardous operational waste diversion rates.

Targets:
100% of business units have adopted, where applicable and feasible, non-hazardous operational waste diversion practices by March 2023.

100% of business units are accurately tracking and reporting, where applicable and feasible, non-hazardous operational waste diversion rates by March 2023.

Internal Services

Operations

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation

P3 – Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support

P4 – Visitor Experience

P5 – Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management

Divert at least 75% (by weight) of plastic waste from landfills by 2030. Other

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:

  • develop guidance to support the diversion of plastic waste from landfills.
  • implement procedures to track and disclose plastic waste diversion rates by 2023.
  • reduce or eliminate unnecessary use of plastics.
  • incorporate the 75% diversion target for plastic waste into business unit plans.

FSDS: Actions that reduce the generation of plastic waste will help to reduce Scope 3 emissions for the production, transport and disposal of material. Diverting waste from landfill reduces landfill gas and transport waste hauling emissions. Material recovery via recycling reduces emissions for the extraction and production of virgin materials.

UN SDG Goal:
Responsible Consumption and Production – Target 12.5
By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse.

Starting point:
0% of business units have fully adopted plastic waste diversion practices as of March 2020.

0% of business units are accurately tracking/reporting diversion rates as of March 2020.

Performance indicators:
Percentage of business units that have adopted, where applicable and feasible, plastic waste diversion practices.

Percentage of business units that are accurately tracking/reporting diversion rates.

Targets:
100% of business units have adopted, where applicable and feasible, plastic waste diversion practices by March 2023.

100% of business units are accurately tracking and reporting, where applicable and feasible, plastic waste diversion rates by March 2023.

Internal Services

Operations

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation

P3 – Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support

P4 – Visitor Experience

P5 – Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management

Divert at least 90% (by weight) of all construction and demolition waste from landfills (striving to achieve 100% by 2030). Other

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:

  • develop guidance to support the reduction and the diversion of all construction and demolition waste from landfills.
  • incorporate the 90% target for construction and demolition waste diversion into business unit plans.
  • update procedures to track and disclose the diversion rates for construction and demolition waste by 2022.

FSDS: Actions that reduce the generation of construction and demolition waste will help to reduce Scope 3 emissions for the production, transport and disposal of material. Diverting waste from landfill reduces landfill gas and transport waste hauling emissions. Material recovery via recycling reduces emissions for the extraction and production of virgin materials.

For construction at historic sites “minimal interventions” as recommended in the Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada will continue to reduce the amount of waste produced and conserve the amount of original fabric in historic buildings.

UN SDG Goal:
Responsible Consumption and Production – Target 12.5
By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse.

Starting points:
0% of business units have fully adopted construction and demolition waste diversion practices as of March 2020.

0% of business units are accurately tracking/reporting diversion rates as of March 2020.

Performance Indicators:
Percentage of business units that have adopted, where applicable and feasible, construction and demolition waste diversion practices.

Percentage of business units that are accurately tracking and reporting, where applicable and feasible, waste diversion rates.

Targets:
100% of business units have adopted, where applicable and feasible, construction and demolition waste diversion practices by March 2023.

100% of business units are accurately tracking and reporting, where applicable and feasible, construction and demolition waste diversion rates by March 2023.

Internal Services

Operations

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation

P3 – Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support

P4 – Visitor Experience

P5 – Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management

Our administrative fleet will be comprised of at least 80% zero-emission vehicles by 2030. Fleet management will be optimized including by applying telematics to collect and analyze vehicle usage data on vehicles scheduled to be replaced.

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:

  • define targets for the Agency for number and types of vehicles that align with Greening Government targets, and embed in each business unit’s 5-year fleet replacement plan.
  • undertake analyses and apply techniques such as telematics to advance fleet right-sizing and the replacement of vehicles with low-carbon intensity vehicles.
  • purchase only zero-emission vehicles or hybrids for executive vehicles.
  • publish Annual PCA Fleet Report.

FSDS: Actions that reduce the demand for energy or switch to lower carbon sources of energy will lead to reductions in GHGs from fleets.

UN SDG Goal:
Responsible Consumption and Production - Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.

Starting point:
54% of new light-duty administrative fleet vehicle purchases within eligible categories were zero-emission vehicles or hybrids between April 1, 2019 and March 20, 2020.

Performance Indicator:
Percentage of light-duty administrative fleet vehicle purchases within eligible categories that are zero-emission vehicles or hybrids in a fiscal year.

Target:
75% of light-duty administrative fleet vehicle purchases are zero emission vehicles or hybrid (3-year average; 2020/21 through 2022/23).

Internal Services

Operations

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation

P3 – Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support

P4 – Visitor Experience

P5 – Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management

By 2022, departments have developed measures to reduce climate change risks to assets, services and operations. Increase training and support on assessing climate change impacts, undertaking climate change risk assessments and developing adaptation actions to public service employees, and facilitate sharing of best practices and lessons learned.

Parks Canada has identified Environmental Forces Adaptation and Response as a key risk. The following mitigation strategies have been identified to address this risk.

From 2020 to 2023 (as outlined in Parks Canada’s 2020-21 Departmental Plan) the Agency will:

  • apply Parks Canada’s climate change adaptation framework to understand climate change impacts, assess risks, and identify feasible and effective measures for adaptation.
  • integrate climate change into diverse areas of work by adjusting policies and programs.
  • continue to review emergency management and provide Parks Canada personnel with ongoing emergency management and response training.
  • continue to implement measures to minimize the impact of climate change on contemporary and built heritage assets, such as using more resilient designs and construction materials.
  • undertake a climate change impact assessment as part of all new building and major retrofit designs.
  • continue to deliver and report on results from climate change adaptation workshops at the site or regional level, ensuring that findings are shared in a useful format for sites with similar climate change challenges.

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will also undertake the following actions:

  • address gaps in a number of new or critical research areas identified in the GoC’s Blueprint for Wildland Fire Science in Canada (2019-2029) and to ensure that Parks Canada aims to become resilient to wildland fires.
  • steward behavior change including championing environment week and bike to work month, anti-idling campaigns, and car sharing initiatives.

FSDS: Advancing understanding of current and projected climate impacts to Parks Canada’s operations over time contributes to the development of adaptation measures and supports timely, informed decision making. This reduces climate change risks to, and helps build resilience of Parks Canada assets, services and operations.

UN SDG Goal:
Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure – Target 9.1
Develop quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure, including regional and transborder infrastructure, to support economic development and human well-being, with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all.

Life Under Water – Target 14.5
By 2020, conserve at least 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas, consistent with national and international law and based on the best available scientific information.

Life on Land – Target 15.1
By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements.

Starting point:
Parks Canada does not currently track the percentage of operational business units that have incorporated SMART actions related to climate change risks into their business plans.

Parks Canada does not currently track the percentage of park/site management plan updates that incorporate actions to address identified climate change risks.

20 regional and site-based summary reports of climate change trends and projection completed.

12 site- or region-level climate change adaptation workshops held.

Parks Canada does not currently track the percentage of SEAs of proposed policies, plans or programs consider climate change adaptation and/or mitigation needs by 2023.

Performance Indicators:
Percentage of operational business units that have incorporated SMART actions related to climate change risks into their business plans.

Percentage of park/site management plan updates that incorporate actions to address climate change risks.

Number of site-based summary reports or updates of climate change trends and projections.

Number of new site- or regional-level climate change adaptation workshops.

Percentage of Strategic Environmental Assessments of proposed policies, plans or programs consider climate change adaptation and/or mitigation needs.

Targets:
100% of operational business units have incorporated SMART SMART related to climate change risks into their business plans by 2022.

100% of park/site management plan updates incorporate actions to address identified climate change risks.

Undertake 10 additional site based summary reports of climate change trends and projections by 2023; update existing reports, as required.

Undertake 20 additional site or region-level climate change adaptation workshops by 2023.

100% of SEAs of proposed policies, plans or programs consider climate change adaptation and/or mitigation needs by 2023.

Internal Services

Operations

P1 – Heritage Places Establishment

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation

P3 – Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support

P4 – Visitor Experience

P5 – Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management

By 2021, adopt climate-resilient building codes being developed by National Research Council Canada.

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:

  • develop guidance to support adoption of climate-resilient building codes in Parks Canada places.

FSDS: Early adoption of the code in the construction of buildings demonstrates federal leadership in climate resilient buildings.

UN SDG Goal:
Responsible Consumption and Production - Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities

Starting point:
0% of new buildings meet the NRC climate-resilient building codes (yet to be published).

Performance Indicator:
Percentage of new building designs that conform to the NRC climate-resilient building codes, once published.

Target:
100% of new building designs conform to the NRC climate-resilient building codes within six (6) months of publication of guidance to support adoption of climate-resilient building codes in Parks Canada places.

Internal Services

Operations

P1 – Heritage Places Establishment

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation

P4 – Visitor Experience

P5 – Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management

Use 100% clean electricity by 2025. Other

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will: Footnote4

  • make marked progress increasing the percentage of electricity usage from clean energy sources and/or through the purchase of renewable energy certificates.
  • participate in a clean Power Purchase Agreement for operations in Alberta.

FSDS: The use of clean electricity reduces GHG emissions in jurisdictions with high-carbon intensity grids and fosters the further development of clean electricity in Canada.

UN SDG Goal:
Responsible Consumption and Production - Target 12.2
By 2030, achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources.

Starting point:
76% of annual grid electricity consumption is from clean energy sources as of March 2020.

Performance Indicator:
Percentage of annual grid electricity consumption from clean energy.

Target:
100% of annual grid electricity consumption is from clean energy sources by December 2025.

Internal Services

Operations

P1 – Heritage Places Establishment

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation

P3 – Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support

P4 – Visitor Experience

P5 – Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management

Actions supporting the goal: Greening government. Minimize embodied carbon and the use of harmful materials in construction and renovation.

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will, where feasible, apply the following for the construction of new or major reconstruction of existing assets:

  • restrict the use of building materials which are harmful to people and the environment through the adoption of the material restrictions identified in the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) Living Building Challenge 4.0 (Red List).
  • use sustainably-sourced wood in construction, moving away from petro-chemical and high-embodied carbon products.

FSDS: The use of low embodied carbon materials expands the market of products and encourages industry to adopt low carbon extraction, production and disposal practices. This will reduce Scope 3 emissions and other harmful environmental impacts.

For construction and conservation projects at historic sites “minimal interventions” as recommended in the Standard and Guidelines, will ensure that the amount of original/existing material is. This protects the heritage places and reduces embodied carbon by reducing the use of new material.

UN SDG Goal:
Responsible Consumption and Production – Target 12.5
By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse.

Responsible Consumption and Production - Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.

Starting points:
No guidance currently exists.

No training currently exists.

Performance indicators:
Parks Canada has internal guidance to support adoption of the material restrictions identified in the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) Living Building Challenge 4.0 (Red List).

Parks Canada has internal training to support adoption of the material restrictions identified in the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) Living Building Challenge 4.0 (Red List).

Targets:
Parks Canada has internal guidance to support adoption of the material restrictions identified in the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) Living Building Challenge 4.0 (Red List) by March 2022.

Parks Canada has internal training to support adoption of the material restrictions identified in the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) Living Building Challenge 4.0 (Red List) by March 2022.

Internal Services

Operations

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation

P4 - Visitor Experience

P5 - Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management

Departments will use environmental criteria to reduce the environmental impact and ensure best value in government procurement decisions.

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:

  • include criteria that address carbon reduction, sustainable plastics reuse and recycling of materials and broader environmental benefits into procurements for goods and services that have a high environmental impact.
  • incorporate environmental considerations into the development of any centrally solicited procurement instruments.

FSDS: Green procurement incorporates environmental considerations into purchasing decisions and is expected to motivate suppliers to reduce the environmental impact of the goods and services they deliver, and their supply chains.

UN SDG Goal:
Responsible Consumption and Production - Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.

Starting points:
12.3% of call-ups associated with Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements include environmental criteria as of March 2020.

3.37% of dollar value of expenditures associated with Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements include environmental criteria as of March 2020.

The Agency does not currently track the percentage of centrally solicited procurement instruments that include environmental considerations in evaluation.

Performance Indicators:
Percentage of call-ups associated with Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements that include environmental criteria.

Percentage of dollar value of expenditures associated with Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements that include environmental criteria.

Percentage of new centrally-solicited procurement instruments over $100,000 that include environmental considerations in their evaluation.

Targets:
20% of call-ups associated with Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements will include environmental criteria by March 2023.

5% of expenditures (dollar value) associated with Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements will include environmental criteria by March 2023.

20% of new centrally solicited procurement instruments over $100,000 will include environmental considerations (e.g. reduce, reuse, or include environmental criteria) in the evaluation criteria by March 2023.

Internal Services

Operations

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation

P4 - Visitor Experience

P5 - Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management

Departments will adopt clean technology and undertake clean technology demonstration projects.

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:

    address specific Agency needs or increase operational efficiency by testing, and implementing where beneficial, state-of-the-art innovations.
  • develop innovative proposals for the Greening Government Fund.

FSDS: Actions by individual departments that incent, support, or procure state-of-the-art innovative clean technologies that lower the environmental footprint of government operations while contributing to the success of clean-tech businesses in Canada.

UN SDG Goal:
Responsible Consumption and Production - Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.

Starting points:
TwoFootnote5 clean technologyFootnote6 innovations are currently being tested through the Innovative Solutions Canada Program.

One proposal funded through the Greening Government Fund as of March 2020. Footnote7

Performance Indicators:
Number of applicable innovations through the Innovative Solutions Canada Program.

Percentage of innovative proposals funded under the Greening Government fund scheduled for completion are completed on time.

Targets:
Test six (6) applicable innovations through the Innovative Solutions Canada Program by 2023.

100% of innovative proposals funded under the Greening Government Fund that are scheduled for completion by 2023 are completed by that date.

Support for green procurement will be strengthened, including guidance, tools and training for public service employees.

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:

  • provide training to executives, cost centre managers and specialists in procurement and materiel management functions to ensure awareness and inclusion of green procurement considerations in requirements. This training is key to increasing support for green procurement in requirements development for contracts and purchases by acquisition cards.
  • supplement training with guidance and tools developed specifically for appropriate high volume services and commodities.

FSDS: Green procurement incorporates environmental considerations into purchasing decisions and is expected to motivate suppliers to green their goods, services and supply chain.

UN SDG Goal:
Responsible Consumption and Production - Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.

Starting point:
100% of functional specialists in procurement have taken green procurement training as of March 2020.

Training taken by executives and cost centre managers who are not procurement specialists is unknown.

No Agency specific green procurement training, guidance, and templates are in use.

Performance Indicators:
Percentage of executives, cost centre managers and functional specialists in procurement and materiel management that have completed training on green procurement.

Availability of Parks Canada specific green procurement guidance and templates for goods and services that are commonly acquired

Targets:
100% of executives, cost centre managers and functional specialists in procurement and materiel management will have completed training on green procurement by March 2023.

Development and delivery of Parks Canada specific green procurement guidance and templates for goods and services that are commonly acquired are available by March 2023.

Internal Services

Operations

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation

P4 – Visitor Experience

P5 – Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management

Logo with cloud

Effective action on climate change: A low-carbon economy contributes to limiting global average temperature rise to well below two degrees Celsius and supports efforts to limit the increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change; supported by a whole-of-government approach to implementation

Effective action on climate change
FSDS target(s)
FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)
Performance indicator(s)
Target(s)
Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
Actions supporting the goal: Effective action on climate change.

This section is for actions that support the Effective action on climate change goal but do not directly support a FSDS target.

Provide support and funding for climate resilience.

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:

  • work with partner organizations and specialists to develop and consistently use tools and approaches, policies and tools to better understand and support climate change adaptation across the Agency’s protected heritage sites.
  • administer internal funding programs to support conservation & restoration, conservation planning, asset protection and adaptation efforts that address climate resiliency at protected heritage places.
  • secure capital funding to support the Agency’s conservation strategy for cultural heritage resources, and asset recapitalization and replacement efforts for built assets and infrastructure to address climate resiliency at protected heritage sites.

FSDS: Parks Canada will integrate climate change considerations into policies and processes, including internal funding programs, to adapt to a changing climate, enhance the protection of natural and cultural heritage resources, and strengthen adaptation planning and decision-making to support climate resilience across the Agency’s operations.

UN SDG Goal:
Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure – Target 9.1
Develop quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure, including regional and trans-border infrastructure, to support economic development and human well-being, with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all.

Responsible Consumption and Production - Target 12.7
Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities.

Climate Action – Target 13.2
Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning.

Climate Action – Target 13.3
Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning.

Safe and Healthy Communities – Target 11.4
Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage.

Partnerships for the Goals – Target 17.17
Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships.

Starting points:
Departmental climate risk assessment completed.

Growing number of internally funded natural heritage conservation projects that: identify climate adaptation objectives; address climate risks; and/or support nature-based climate solutions.

Existing capital funds secured through the Greening Government Fund, Transport Canada's Transportation Assets Risk Assessment Program and other sources to invest in cultural heritage resources, built assets and infrastructure at protected heritage sites.

Performance indicators:
Percentage of new internally funded natural heritage conservation projects that identify climate adaptation objectives, and/or address climate change impacts.

Targets:
35% of new internally funded natural heritage conservation projects identify climate adaptation objectives, and/or address climate change impacts, by 2023.

Logo with fish tail

Healthy coasts and oceans: Coasts and oceans support healthy, resilient and productive ecosystems

Responsible Minister: Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

Healthy coasts and oceans
FSDS target(s)
FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)
Performance indicator(s)
Target(s)
Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
By 2020, 10% of coastal and marine areas are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures. Protect and manage marine and coastal areas.

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:

  • continue work with provincial, territorial and Indigenous governments towards the establishment of national marine conservation areas in eastern James Bay, southern Strait of Georgia, and Imappivut (Northern Labrador), and marine protected areas in Iles de la Madeleine and Tuvaijuittuq (Arctic Basin); and
  • initiate work on additional national marine conservation area proposals in unrepresented marine regions.

FSDS: Parks Canada actions will support the Government of Canada’s priority to protect and conserve 10% of coastal and marine areas by 2020 and advance the Minister’s mandate to work with the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and Canadian Coast Guard to conserve 25% of Canada’s coastal and marine areas by 2025, working towards 30% by 2030.

UN SDG Goal:
Life below Water - Target 14.5
By 2020, conserve at least 10% of coastal and marine areas, consistent with national and international law and based on the best available scientific information.

Starting point:
As of March 31, 2020, the national marine conservation area system is 21 percent complete with 6 of 29 marine regions representative by 5 NMCAs.

Performance indicators:
Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national marine conservation areas.

Percentage of marine regions represented in the national marine conservation area system.

Targets:
2 unrepresented regions have demonstrable progress towards establishing national marine conservation areas. (annually)

At least 31% of marine regions are represented in the national marine conservation area system by March 2025.

P1 - Heritage Places Establishment
Build our knowledge of coastal ecosystems, marine protected areas and fisheries.

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:

  • continue efforts to protect and conserve national marine conservation areas and contribute to effective area-based conservation measures by advancing knowledge of coastal and marine areas.

FSDS: Parks Canada is contributing by developing and implementing monitoring protocols for marine protected areas.

UN SDG Goal:
Life below Water - Target 14.2
By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans.

Starting point:
34% of ecological sustainability measures had data is collected and assessed, as of March 2020.

Performance indicator:
Percentage of ecological sustainability measures for which data is collected and assessed.

Target:
65% of ecological sustainability measures have data that is collected and assessed by March 2021.

P2 - Heritage Places Conservation
Logo with river

Pristine lakes and rivers: Clean and healthy lakes and rivers support economic prosperity and the well-being of Canadians

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Pristine lakes and rivers
FSDS target(s)
FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)
Performance indicator(s)
Target(s)
Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
Actions supporting the goal: Pristine lakes and rivers.

This section is for actions that support the Pristine lakes and rivers goal but do not directly support a FSDS target.

Better understand lake and river ecosystems. Many National Parks and freshwater NMCAs contain lakes and rivers, and Parks Canada’s conservation work contributes to their protection and conservation.

FSDS: Continue to monitor the ecological integrity of park ecosystems, to restore impaired ecosystems and to recover species at risk on a priority basis through the national Conservation and Restoration program and other park-based initiatives.

UN SDG Goal:
Life on Land – Target 15.1
By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements.

Life on Land – Target: 15.5
Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species.

"Parks Canada ecological integrity monitoring includes monitoring lakes and rivers. The starting points, indicators and targets from Sustainably Managed Lands and Forests, as follows, also provide outcomes related to this FSDS target:

Starting points:
Ecological integrity is maintained or improved in 82% of national park ecosystems, as of March 2019.

Performance indicators:
Percentage of national park ecosystems that are maintained or improved.

Targets:
Ecological integrity is maintained or improved in at least 92% of national park ecosystems March 2023.

P2 - Heritage Places Conservation
Logo with tree

Sustainably managed lands and forests: Lands and forests support biodiversity and provide a variety of ecosystem services for generations to come

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change; Minister of Natural Resources

Sustainably managed lands and forests FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)
Performance indicator(s)
Target(s)
Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
By 2020, at least 17% of terrestrial areas and inland water are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures. Conserve natural spaces.

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:

  • complete negotiations with provincial and Indigenous governments for the establishment of two new national park reserves in the South Okanagan – Similkameen (B.C.) and in the coastal barrier islands of the Sandhills – Hog Island area (P.E.I.).
  • continue to work with provinces and territories and Indigenous organizations to identify and assess additional national parks with an emphasis on unrepresented and poorly represented regions, and natural areas of importance to Indigenous communities; and
  • update the National Park System Plan.

FSDS: Parks Canada actions will continue to support the Government of Canada’s mandate to conserve at least 17 percent of terrestrial areas and inland water by 2020 and advance the Minister’s mandate to conserve 25% of Canada’s land and freshwaters by 2025, working toward 30% by 2030.

UN SDG Goal:
Life on Land - Target 15.1
By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements.

Starting point:
0 unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress at the beginning of each fiscal year.

79% or 31 of 39 of terrestrial regions are represented by the 47 national parks in the national park system, as of March 2020.

Performance indicator:
Number of unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks.

Percentage of terrestrial regions represented in the national park system.

Target:
2 unrepresented regions with demonstrable progress towards establishing national parks, annually.

At least 85% of terrestrial regions represented in the national park system, by March 2025.

P1 - Heritage Places Establishment
Work with Indigenous peoples.

From 2020 to 2023, Parks Canada will:

  • collaborate with Indigenous governments, organizations and communities to identify candidate national parks, to undertake feasibility assessments including consultations, and to negotiate agreements to establish new national parks that include a collaborative governance structure and, maintain traditional use of natural and sacred areas; andFootnote*
  • contribute to the Government of Canada’s priority on reconciliation;
  • and continue to participate in the Indigenous Guardians Program.

FSDS: Parks Canada actions supports working with Indigenous peoples to protect and conserve lands and waters, including through the pilot Indigenous Guardians Program.

UN SDG Goal:

Partnerships for the Goals – Target 17.17
Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships.

Starting point:
2 agreements signed in 2019-20.

Performance indicator:
Number of negotiated agreements signed.

Target:
5 negotiated agreements are signed by August 2023Footnote8

P1 – Heritage Places Establishment
By March 31 2023, ecological integrity will be maintained or improved in 92% of national park ecosystems. Conserve natural spaces.

From 2020 to 2023, Parks Canada will:

  • continue to monitor the ecological integrity of park ecosystems, to restore impaired ecosystems and to recover species at risk on a priority basis through the national Conservation and Restoration program and other park-based initiatives.

FSDS: Parks Canada actions will support terrestrial ecosystem conservation, biodiversity and health by monitoring Ecosystems in national parks, and focus efforts on understanding and responding to ecological integrity indicators that will improve conservation results.

UN SDG Goal:
Life on Land –Target: 15.5
Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species.

Starting point:
Ecological integrity is maintained or improved in 82% of national park ecosystems, as of March 2019.

Performance indicator:
Percentage of National Park ecosystems where ecological integrity is maintained or improved.

Target:
92% of national park ecosystems have ecological integrity maintained or improved by March 2023.

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation
Logo with bird

Healthy wildlife populations: All species have healthy and viable populations

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Healthy wildlife FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)
Performance indicator(s)
Target(s)
Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
By 2020, species that are secure remain secure and populations of species at risk listed under federal law exhibit trends that are consistent with recovery strategies and management plans. Implement, innovate and modernize the regulatory and policy framework and tools to protect species at risk and migratory birds.

From 2020 to 2023, Parks Canada will:

  • contribute to the protection and recovery of species at risk by implementing actions from new and existing site-based, multi-species action plans (and species-specific plans) in coordination with key partners.

FSDS: Parks Canada actions work to protect species at risk found in heritage places, along with their residences and habitat, and also supports and undertakes recovery activities to maintain or improve their conservation status.

UN SDG Goal:
Life on Land – Target 15.5
Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species.

Starting points:
25.7% of actions identified in Parks Canada led Species at Risk Act action plans that are fully implemented as of March 2019.

0% of actions in Parks Canada conservation plans that are implemented (for Southern Resident Killer Whales) as of March 2019.

Performance indicators:
Percentage of actions identified in Parks Canada led Species at Risk Act action plans that are implemented.

Percentage of actions in Parks Canada conservation plans that are implemented (for Southern Resident Killer Whales).

Target:
50% actions identified in Parks Canada led Species at Risk Act action plans are fully implemented by March 2023.

100% of actions in Parks Canada conservation plans that are implemented (for Southern Resident Killer Whales) by March 2024.

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation
Work with partners to enhance foundational knowledge of species, habitats and ecosystems.

From 2020 to 2023, Parks Canada will:

  • advance protection and recovery action for priority species at risk including through the co-application of western science and Indigenous Knowledge in Conservation and Restoration projects, based on methodology developed in February 2020 with Indigenous partners.

FSDS: Parks Canada collaboration with Indigenous partners to weave Indigenous Knowledge into the planning and implementation of Conservation and Restoration projects supports increasing conservation successes.

UN SDG Goal:
Life on Land – Target 15.5
Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species.

Partnerships for the Goals – Target 17.17
Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships

Starting point:
Parks Canada does not currently track the number of Conservation and Restoration (CoRe) projects that incorporate Indigenous Knowledge.

Performance indicator:
Percentage of Conservation and Restoration (CoRe

Target:
35% of Conservation and Restoration (CoRe) projects that incorporate Indigenous Knowledge by March 2021.

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation
Logo with twig in hand

Connecting Canadians with nature: Canadians are informed about the value of nature, experience nature first hand, and actively engage in its stewardship

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Connecting Canadians with nature FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)
Performance indicator(s)
Target(s)
Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
By 2020, maintain or increase the number of Canadians that get out into nature – for example, by visiting parks and green space – and increase participation in biodiversity conservation activities relative to a 2010 baseline. Build capacity for conservation activities.

From 2020 to 2023, Parks Canada will:

  • continue working collaboratively with Indigenous peoples on a wide range of Indigenous protected and conserved areas.
  • recovering species at risk on a priority basis, including through Parks Canada's Conservation and Restoration Program.
  • develop strategic partnerships for collaborative activities such as scientific and academic research, conservation efforts, promotional campaigns and outreach activities.
  • support national programming aimed at educating and engaging children aged 6 to 12 in Canadian wildlife conservation.

FSDS: Parks Canada actions indicated in Sustainably Managed Lands and Forest and Healthy Wildlife Population also support this FSDS goal concerning activities related to working with collaboratively Indigenous peoples on conservation and recovering species at risk.

UN SDG Goal:
Sustainable Cities and Communities – Target 11.4
Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage.

Life below Water – Target 14.2
By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans.

Life Below Water – Target 14.5
By 2020, conserve at least 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas, consistent with national and international law and based on the best available scientific information.

Life on Land – Target 15.1
By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements.

Life on Land – Target 15.5
Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species.

Starting point:
Parks Canada does not currently track the number of Conservation and Restoration (CoRe) projects that incorporate Indigenous Knowledge.

Performance indicator:
Percentage of Conservation and Restoration (CoRe) projects that incorporate Indigenous Knowledge.

Target:
35% of Conservation and Restoration (CoRe) projects that incorporate Indigenous Knowledge by March 2021.

Additional performance indicators and targets that support this FSDS goal can be seen in:

  • Healthy coasts and oceans
  • Sustainably managed lands and forests; and
  • Healthy wildlife populations

P1 – Heritage Places Establishment

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation

Promote public participation.

From 2020 to 2023, Parks Canada will:

  • provide opportunities for Canadians to connect with nature through learning, outreach and multi-media initiatives in their communities, and by offering free admission to Parks Canada places for children 17 and under.
  • work with partners to facilitate specific opportunities for youth, young adults and new Canadians to learn about, experience, and share their encounters with Parks Canada and its network of places.

FSDS: Canadians will experience and connect with Parks Canada places through digital and outreach initiatives.

UN SDG Goal:
Sustainable Cities and Communities – Target 11.7
By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities.

Starting point:
100,000,000 contacts, as of March 2019.

Performance indicator:
Count of contacts obtained through digital and outreach initiatives.

Target:
At least 100,000,000 contacts obtained through digital and outreach initiatives.

P3 – Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
Enhance programs and services for visitors.

From 2020 to 2023 Parks Canada will:

  • diversify accommodation and interpretation programming to encourage exploration and learning.
  • continue to innovate, expand and diversify available programs and services and expand the Learn-to Camp Program.
  • work with Indigenous communities to provide interpretive and storytelling programs rooted in traditional activities and knowledge.
  • continue to renew infrastructure that facilitates visitor access to and use of heritage places.

FSDS: The condition of Parks Canada's assets is important for visitor experience and safety.

UN SDG Goal:
Sustainable Cities and Communities – Target 11.7
By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities.

Starting points:
71% of contemporary assets in good or fair condition, as of March 2019.

Performance indicator:
Percentage of contemporary assets in good or fair condition.

Target:
74% of contemporary assets in good or fair condition, by March 2022.

P4 – Visitor Experience

Between 2019 and 2022, maintain or increase visitation to federal protected areas such as selected national wildlife areas, national parks and national marine conservation areas while maintaining the ecological values, integrity and benefits to biodiversity conservation of these places.

Between 2019 and 2022, continue to increase visitation to national historic sites.

  • Maintain or increase visitation to national parks and national marine conservation areas while maintaining the ecological values, integrity and benefits to biodiversity conservation of these places.
  • Continue to increase visitation to national historic sites.

FSDS: The condition of Parks Canada's assets is important for visitor experience and safety.

UN SDG Goal:
Sustainable Cities and Communities – Target 11.7
By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities.

Starting points:
There were 15.9 million visitors to national parks and national marine conservation areas in 2018-19.

There were 9.2 million visitors to national historic sites in 2018-19.

Performance indicator:
Number of visitors experiencing national parks and national marine conservation areas.

Number of visitors experiencing national historic sites.

Target:
At least 15.9 million annually, until March 2023. Footnote9

More than 9.2 million annually, until March 2023.

P4 – Visitor Experience
Logo with three people under roof

Safe and healthy communities: All Canadians live in clean, sustainable communities that contribute to their health and well-being

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change; Minister of Health

Safe and healthy communities FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target Starting point(s)
Performance indicator(s)
Target(s)
Program(s) in which the departmental actions will occur
Actions supporting the goal: Safe and healthy communities

This section is for actions that support the Safe and healthy communities goal but do not directly support a FSDS target.

Prevent environmental emergencies or mitigate their impacts.
  • Develop an Environmental Emergency Response Planning Standard and Procedures.
  • Incorporate disaster preparedness and emergency response procedures into business unit planning.
FSDS & UN SDG: Developing policy and tools will provide a framework for supporting environmental emergency management at Parks Canada. Establishing this framework will ultimately support the goal of ensuring safe and healthy communities.

Starting point:
Parks Canada has Draft Environmental Emergency Management Standard and Procedures, as of April 2020.

Parks Canada does not have training for Environmental Emergency Management Standard and Procedures, as of April 2020.

Performance indicators:
Parks Canada has approved environmental emergency management standards and procedures.

Parks Canada has training in environmental emergency management standards and procedures.

Target:
Parks Canada’s Environmental Emergency Management Standards and Procedures are implemented, by March 2023.

Parks Canada’s training for Environmental Emergency Management Standards and Procedures is available, by March 2023.

Internal Services

Operations

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation

P5 – Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management

Demonstrate leadership on assessing and remediating contaminated sites.
  • Contribute to the delivery of Phase IV of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP).
  • Ensure accurate annual Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory (FCSI) update and attestation.

FSDS: Assessment at federal contaminated sites reduces uncertainty associated with the risk from these sites. Subsequent remedial or risk management actions reduce the associated risk and financial liabilities. It is anticipated that up to 95% of FCSAP remediation expenditures contribute to reducing financial liability.

Starting points:
Zero FCSAP-funded sites where assessment activities have been completed as of March 2020.

Zero FCSAP-funded high-priority sites where FCSAP-funded risk reduction activities have been completed as of March 2020.

Performance Indicators:
Number of FCSAP-funded sites where assessment activities have been completed.

Number of FCSAP-funded high-priority sites where FCSAP-funded risk reduction activities have been completed.

Target:
8 FCSAP-funded contaminated sites assessed by March 2023.

10 FCSAP-funded high-priority sites where FCSAP-funded risk reduction activities have been completed, by March 2023.

Internal Services

Operations

P2 – Heritage Places Conservation

P5 – Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management


Section 4: Integrating sustainable development

Parks Canada takes an integrated approach in managing its protected heritage places, including national parks, national historic sites, national marine conservation areas, and national urban parks. For example, Parks Canada carries out conservation and restoration projects in all of these places. These projects are designed in a manner that ensures the conservation of natural and cultural resources, while enhancing visitor experiences and engaging key audiences with a view to connecting Canadians to their heritage places. This integrated approach to the delivery of Parks Canada’s mandate has strengthened the Agency’s contribution to all aspects of sustainable development - environmental, social and economic.

Parks Canada’s decision making and sustainable development practices include collaborating with groups that share its values and have an interest in its work. The establishment of national parks and national marine conservation areas, for example, requires early and ongoing engagement and consultation with provincial/territorial governments and Indigenous Peoples. The designation and commemoration of persons, places and events of national historic significance demand the active participation of stakeholders, partners and community groups. The Agency recognizes that building and maintaining these collaborative relationships is essential to achieving its mandate of protecting and presenting Canada’s natural and cultural heritage and broader goals of sustainable development.

Parks Canada is custodian on behalf of Canadians of many historic structures and sites. Through sustainable maintenance and conservation actions, the Agency upholds mandated heritage conservation policy objectives and helps to achieve various environmental objectives including reducing waste and limiting greenhouse gas emissions throughout the life-cycle of its assets; continuing to use existing buildings is an inherently sustainable approach to reducing the amount of embedded energy required for new construction.

Moreover, Parks Canada promotes sustainable development practices by encouraging the use of analytical techniques that compare and integrate environmental, social, and economic objectives and that address multi-year or long-term concerns. For example, the Agency uses social science analytical and performance measurement tools to understand and engage Canadians, particularly certain segments of the population (e.g. urban, youth, new Canadians), in meaningful ways to ensure that its heritage places remain relevant for present and future generations.

Strategic environmental assessment (SEA)

Parks Canada will continue to ensure that its decision-making process includes consideration of FSDS goals and targets through its SEA process. An SEA for a policy, plan or program proposal includes an analysis of the impacts of the given proposal on the environment, including on relevant FSDS goals and targets.

Statements on the results of Parks Canada’s assessments are made public when an initiative that has undergone a detailed SEA (see the strategic environmental assessment website). The purpose of the public statement is to demonstrate that the environmental effects, including the impacts on achieving the FSDS goals and targets, of the approved policy, plan or program have been considered during proposal development and decision making.