Belle Vue National Historic Site of Canada

Amherstburg, Ontario
General view of Belle Vue, showing the decorative portico above the main entrance supported by pilasters, 2009. © Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 2009.
General view
© Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 2009.
General view of Belle Vue, showing the decorative portico above the main entrance supported by pilasters, 2009. © Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 2009.General view of Belle Vue, showing the Palladian design of the central block, which consists of two flanking wings connected by a long corridor in the interior of the building, 2009. © Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 2009.Detail view of Belle Vue, showing the building’s white-painted brick construction. © Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada.
Address : 525 Dalhousie Street, Amherstburg, Ontario

Recognition Statute: Historic Sites and Monuments Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. H-4)
Designation Date: 1959-05-25
Dates:
  • 1816 to 1819 (Construction)

Event, Person, Organization:
  • Robert Reynolds  (Person)
  • Catherine Reynolds  (Person)
Other Name(s):
  • Belle Vue  (Designation Name)
Research Report Number: 2008-SDC-CED-049

Plaque(s)


Existing plaque: Mounted on post in front of house 525 Dalhousie Street, Amherstburg, Ontario

Built between 1816 and 1819 for Robert Reynolds, Deputy Assistant Commissary General of the garrison at Fort Malden, Belle Vue consists of a central core flanked, in keeping with the Palladian architectural style, by a wing on each side. The hipped roof and symmetrical front of the main part of this brick dwelling are evidence of the British classical style. The imposing chimneys integrated into the roof, the moulded panels of the front door and the wide multi-paned windows are decorative features characteristic of the classical look in this type of structure.

Description of Historic Place

Belle Vue National Historic Site of Canada is a two-storey, white painted, brick house constructed between 1816 and 1819 in the Palladian style. The house consists of a central rectangular block that is flanked by two wings, and features a small portico above the main entrance. Official recognition refers to the building on its footprint.

Heritage Value

Belle Vue was designated a national historic site of Canada in 1959 because: it is of outstanding architectural importance in that it ranks among the very finest pieces of Palladian architecture in Canada.

Built between 1816 and 1819 for Robert Reynolds, the Deputy Assistant Commissary General of the garrison at Fort Malden, Belle Vue exhibits the use of Palladian design in a residential building. The house consists of a central two-storey rectangular block that features five bays and a small portico surmounting the main entrance that is supported by pilasters. Two wings flank the central block creating strong horizontality and symmetry that is in keeping with the Palladian style. A long corridor that passes through the interior of the residence joins both components.

Source: Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, Minutes, May 1959, June 1984, December 2008.

Character-Defining Elements

Key elements that contribute to the heritage character of the site include: its siting on a large lot set back from Dalhousie Street; the rectangular two-storey massing of the central block, with a hipped roof; the Palladian design of the central block, which consists of two flanking wings connected by a long corridor in the interior of the building; the symmetrical façade; the building’s white-painted brick construction; the imposing chimneys integrated into the roof; the wide multi-paned sash windows; the decorative portico above the main entrance supported by pilasters; the front door with moulded panels framed by sidelights.