Macdonald, Sir John A. National Historic Person

Kingston, Ontario
Portrait of Sir John A. Macdonald © None; Credit: Wikipedia
Portrait
© None; Credit: Wikipedia
Portrait of Sir John A. Macdonald © None; Credit: WikipediaView of the HSMBC plaque and cairn in Adolphustown Park © Parks Canada / Parcs Canada, 1989View of the HSMBC plaque and statue in City Park, Kingston, ON © Parks Canada / Parcs Canada, 1989Detailed view of HSMBC plaque at 110 Rideau Street, Kingston, ON © Parks Canada / Parcs Canada, 1989Detailed view of original HSMBC plaque (1927) at 110 Rideau Street, Kingston, ON © Parks Canada / Parcs Canada, 1989
Address : 110 Rideau Street, Kingston, Ontario

Recognition Statute: Historic Sites and Monuments Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. H-4)
Designation Date: 1939-05-29
Life Date: 1815 to 1891

Other Name(s):
  • Macdonald, Sir John A.  (Designation Name)

Importance: Father of Confederation, Prime Minister of Canada (1867-73, 1878-91)

Plaque(s)


Existing plaque:  110 Rideau Street, Kingston, Ontario

Born in Scotland, Macdonald's formative years were spent here in the historic old town of Kingston. His superb skills kept him at the centre of public life for fifty years. The political genius of Confederation, he became Canada's first prime minister in 1867, held that office for nineteen years (1867-73 and 1878-91), and presided over the expansion of Canada to its present boundaries excluding Newfoundland. His National Policy and the building of the CPR were equally indicative of his determination to resist the north-south pull of geography and to create and preserve a strong country politically free and commercially autonomous.

Original Plaque:  110 Rideau Street, Kingston, Ontario

Statesman and Patriot, his boyhood days those critical years that decide the character of the man were spent here in the Old Town which has seen more than a Century of Canadian History.

Existing plaque: Statue of Sir John A. MacDonald, City Park King Street East, Kingston, Ontario

First elected from Kingston to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada in 1844, he was for forty-seven years a leading figure in the public life of his country. One of the Fathers of Confederation, he became the first Prime Minister of Canada and held the office 1867-73; 1878-91. Under his leadership the new Dominion was extended from sea to sea by incorporation of the territories of the Hudson's Bay Company, British Columbia and Prince Edward Island; and linked together by construction of the Intercolonial and Canadian Pacific Railways.

Existing plaque: Adolphustown Park Adolphustown, Ontario

Born in Scotland, the young Macdonald returned frequently during his formative years to his parents' home here on the Bay of Quinte. His superb skills kept him at the centre of public life for fifty years. The policical genius of Confederation, he became Canada's first prime minister i 1867, held that office for nineteen years (1867-73 and 1878-91), and presided over the expansion of Canada to its present boundaries excluding Newfoundland. His National Policy and the building of the CPR were equally indicative of his determination to resist the north-south pull of geography and to create and preserve a strong country politically free and commercially autonomous.

Original Plaque:  Adolphustown, Ontario

From this soil, home of the Loyalists, he drew inspiration to weld together the weak and scattered colonies of his day into a strong and ambitious Dominion, equal partner in the far-flung British Commonwealth.

Original Plaque:  Saint-Patrick (Rivière-du-Loup), Quebec

The first Prime Minister of Canada spent many summers here between 1873 and 1890.