Explorations of Sir Alexander MacKenzie National Historic Event

Prince George, British Columbia
Image of plaque commemorating the reaching of the Pacific Oceam overland in 1793 © Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 1989
Image of plaque
© Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 1989
View of original HSMBC plaque © Parks Canada / Parcs Canada, 1924Image of plaque commemorating the reaching of the Pacific Oceam overland in 1793 © Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 1989
Address : Prince George, British Columbia

Recognition Statute: Historic Sites and Monuments Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. H-4)
Designation Date: 1923-05-25

Other Name(s):
  • Explorations of Sir Alexander MacKenzie  (Designation Name)
  • Prince George Sir Alexander Mackenzie  (Plaque name)

Importance: Discovered Mackenzie River (1789), reached Pacific overland (1793)

Plaque(s)


Existing plaque: North-east corner of Fort George Park near 17th Ave. and Taylor Dr., Prince George, British Columbia

A native of the Hebrides, Mackenzie was obsessed by Peter Pond's idea a practical water route existed between Lake Athabasca and the Pacific. His first attempt to find the route in 1789 led him down the river that bears his name to the Arctic Ocean. A second attempt, via the Peace and Fraser Rivers, brought him to the sea near Bella Coola in July 1793. This first crossing of the continent north of Mexico suggested an alternative to the elusive North-West Passage that had defeated the skill and courage of explorers through three centuries.

Original Plaque: Near Railway Station 1.5 km south of the corner of George Street and First Avenue, Prince George, British Columbia

The first white man to cross the Rocky Mountains and reach the Pacific Coast, passed this spot, westward bound, in his canoe, with his nine companions on the 19th of June, 1793.