Douglas, Thomas Clement “Tommy” National Historic Person

Regina, Saskatchewan
Historic photograph showing Mr. T.C. Douglas addressing New Democrat Party convention, July 1961 © Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, Duncan Cameron, C-036222
Douglas addresses NDP convention, 1961
© Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, Duncan Cameron, C-036222
Historic photograph showing Mr. T.C. Douglas addressing New Democrat Party convention, July 1961 © Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, Duncan Cameron, C-036222Historic photograph showing Thomas Clement Douglas, ca. 1942 - 1948 © Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, Arthur Roy, PA-046989Provided by field unit © Parks Canada | Parcs Canada
Address : 3475 Albert Street, Regina, Saskatchewan

Recognition Statute: Historic Sites and Monuments Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. H-4)
Designation Date: 2016-06-06
Life Date: 1904 to 1986

Event, Person, Organization:
  • Nouveau Parti démocratique  (Organization)
Other Name(s):
  • Thomas Clement “Tommy” Douglas (1904-1986)  (Designation Name)
  • Thomas Clement Douglas  (Other Name)
  • Thomas Douglas  (Other Name)
Research Report Number: 2014-19

Importance: This designation has been identified for review

Plaque(s)


Existing plaque:  3475 Albert Street, Regina, Saskatchewan

Trained as a Baptist preacher, Tommy Douglas became a skilled politician, witty orator, and advocate for social justice, believing political action was the best way to improve the lives of Canadians. Douglas was Premier of Saskatchewan from 1944 to 1961, leading the only Co-operative Commonwealth Federation government in Canada. Under his direction, the province pioneered publicly funded hospital insurance, which laid the foundations for a national medicare program. As the first leader of the federal New Democratic Party, he wielded significant influence defending human rights and strengthening Canada’s social welfare programs. *Note: This designation has been identified for review. A review can be triggered for one of the following reasons - outdated language or terminology, absence of a significant layer of history, factual errors, controversial beliefs and behaviour, or significant new knowledge.