The Komagata Maru Incident of 1914 National Historic Event

Vancouver, British Columbia
Sikhs on board the "Komagata Maru" in English Bay, Vancouver, British Columbia. 1914. © Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, PA-034014.
Historic Photograph
© Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, PA-034014.
Plaque of the Historic Site and Monument Board of Canada commemorating The Komagata Maru Incident of 1914 © Parks Canada Agency | Agence Parcs Canada, 2016.Sikhs on board the "Komagata Maru" in English Bay, Vancouver, British Columbia. 1914 © Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, PA-034015.Sikhs on board the "Komagata Maru" in English Bay, Vancouver, British Columbia. 1914. © Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, PA-034014.
Address : Vancouver, British Columbia

Recognition Statute: Historic Sites and Monuments Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. H-4)
Designation Date: 2014-07-07
Dates:
  • 1914 to 1914 (Significant)

Other Name(s):
  • The Komagata Maru Incident of 1914  (Designation Name)
Research Report Number: 2011-49, 2011-49-A

Importance: 300 South Asian immigrants aboard Komagata Maru were deported back to India after arriving in Vancouver.

Plaque(s)


Existing plaque:  Harbour Green Park, Vancouver, British Columbia

In May 1914, the Komagata Maru reached Vancouver via Hong Kong and Japan carrying 376 prospective Punjabi immigrants in contravention of racially restrictive Canadian immigration law that included the “continuous journey regulation.” Its arrival provoked a strong anti-Asian backlash. The travellers were forced to remain on board for what would become two months. The local South Asian community united to fight their deportation, but eventually lost the legal battle, and the ship and most of its passengers were sent back to India. This incident continues to resonate in our history and is a symbol of the early struggle of South Asian Canadians for justice and equality.