Arvida National Historic Site of Canada

Saguenay, Quebec
Example of a house in the city built in 135 days © Parks Canada | Parcs Canada
Example of a house in the city built in 135 days
© Parks Canada | Parcs Canada
Example of houses in the city built in 135 days © Parks Canada | Parcs CanadaThe Britanny Row apartment building, made of stone © Parks Canada | Parcs CanadaExample of a house in the city built in 135 days © Parks Canada | Parcs Canada
Address : Arvida, Jonquière, Saguenay, Quebec

Recognition Statute: Historic Sites and Monuments Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. H-4)
Designation Date: 2012-06-05
Dates:
  • 1926 to 1935 (Construction)
  • 1926 to 1926 (Significant)
  • 1926 to 1927 (Significant)
  • 1942 to 1942 (Significant)
  • 1942 to 1950 (Significant)
  • 1945 to 1945 (Significant)
  • 1939 to 1940 (Additional alteration)
  • 1936 to 1940 (Addition)
  • 1927 to 1927 (Other addition)
  • 1925 to 1925 (Acquired)

Research Report Number: 2011-042

Plaque(s)


Founded in 1926 as a community for employees of Canada’s first complex for aluminum production, Arvida is an outstanding example of a planned, single-industry town. Its name was derived from the first two letters of the three names of Arthur Vining Davis, president of the Aluminum Company of America. Architect H. B. Brainerd and engineer H. E. Skougor were commissioned to prepare plans for a city that would reflect the company’s standards of excellence. The urban plan constitutes an original synthesis of a variety of town planning theories and contemporary principles of urbanism, which earned Arvida an enviable reputation as a model city. The organic layout incorporates an ordered network of tree-lined streets enhanced by green spaces. Surrounding Oersted Park is the town’s original nucleus, known as “The City Built in 135 Days,” which speaks to the first of three construction phases extending from 1926 to 1950. The diversity of housing styles, some of which are successful examples of regionally inspired architecture, adds to the richness of the built environment. This well-preserved community illustrates the growth and importance of Canada’s aluminum industry during the 20th century.