Migration of Doukhobors to British Columbia National Historic Event

Castlegar, British Columbia
Doukhobors at outdoor meeting, Thrums, British Columbia, Sept. 1951 © Expired
Doukhobors at outdoor meeting
© Expired
In what has become a legendary feat, some Doukhobor women broke the land in Saskatchewan by hitching themselves to ploughs. Besides the land, the buildings and the established communities, the cancellation of the Doukhobor homesteads in
Saskatchewan also © Tarasoff, Plakun Trava, page 53Doukhobors at outdoor meeting, Thrums, British Columbia, Sept. 1951 © Expired
Address : 112 Heritage Way, Castlegar, British Columbia

Recognition Statute: Historic Sites and Monuments Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. H-4)
Designation Date: 2008-01-28

Other Name(s):
  • Migration of Doukhobors to British Columbia  (Designation Name)
Research Report Number: 2007-049, 2009-035

Importance: Largest organized internal migration in Canadian history undertaken by a cultural community

Plaque(s)


No plaque in place, recommended location: Doukhobor Discovery Centre 112 Heritage Way, Castlegar, British Columbia

When their Saskatchewan homesteads were cancelled by the federal government, 5,000 Doukhobors led by Peter V. Verigin undertook one of the largest organized internal migrations in Canadian history. Between 1908 and 1913, they trekked to the interior of British Columbia where they operated sawmills, farms, brickworks, and jam factories that provided sustenance and income. Incorporated as the Christian Community of Universal Brotherhood in 1917, they formed one of North America's most successful communal enterprises, helping to keep alive the values elegantly expressed in their motto "toil and peaceful life."