Women Workers in Canada's Military Munitions Industry National Historic Event

Québec, Quebec
Women munitions workers solder fuse boxes at a long table in a munitions factory. © National Film Board of Canada | Office national du film du Canada. Photothèque / Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives Canada
workers solder fuse boxes, 1943
© National Film Board of Canada | Office national du film du Canada. Photothèque / Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives Canada
Woman tool grinder adjusts a machine manufacturing bomb throwers at the Canadian Elevator Equipment Co. © National Film Board of Canada | Office national du film du Canada. Photothèque / Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives CanadaWomen munitions workers solder fuse boxes at a long table in a munitions factory. © National Film Board of Canada | Office national du film du Canada. Photothèque / Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives CanadaFemale worker watches powder-mixing machine at work behind a two-foot wall at the Cherrier and Bouchard plants of the Defense Industries Limited munitions factory. © Harry Rowed / National Film Board of Canada | Office national du film du Canada. Photothèque / Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives CanadaWoman surrounded by 25-pounder field gun cases writes on a notebook in a munitions factory (prob. Robert Mitchell Co.) © Nicholas Morant / National Film Board | Office national du film. Photothèque / Library and Archives Canada | Bibliothèque et Archives Canada
Address : 2 d'Auteuil Street, Québec, Quebec

Recognition Statute: Historic Sites and Monuments Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. H-4)
Designation Date: 2008-04-11

Other Name(s):
  • Women Workers in Canada's Military Munitions Industry  (Designation Name)
Research Report Number: 2007-007

Importance: Provided exemplary assistance in the defence of the country and in the war effort

Plaque(s)


Existing plaque:  2 d'Auteuil Street, Quebec, Quebec

Thousands of women made a significant contribution to the military munitions industry, notably here at the Dominion Arsenal where they began working in 1882. In keeping with contemporary beliefs about women’s innate abilities, they were assigned tasks requiring meticulous and patient work. They skilfully performed the dangerous operations of filling, assembling, and inspecting munitions in privately-owned and state-run plants across the country. During the Second World War, over 7,000 women worked at the Arsenal alone, testifying to the indispensable labour women provided in the defence of Canada.