Abolition Movement in British North America National Historic Event

Chatham, Ontario
St. Lawrence Hall National Historic Site of Canada (Toronto) was the site of many anti-slavery activities. (© Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 1989)
Site of many anti-slavery activities
(© Parks Canada Agency / Agence Parcs Canada, 1989)
Address : 135 King Street East, Chatham, Ontario

Recognition Statute: Historic Sites and Monuments Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. H-4)
Designation Date: 2004-10-12

Other Name(s):
  • Abolition Movement in British North America  (Designation Name)
  • Anti-Slavery Movement, Abolitionist Movement  (Other Name)
Research Report Number: 2003-008, 2003-051, 2003-066

Importance: Struggle to abolish slavery in British North America between 1783 and 1860

Plaque(s)


Existing plaque: First Baptist Church 135 King Street East, Chatham, Ontario

From 1783 until the 1860s, abolitionists in British North America took part in the fight to end slavery both at home and in the United States. Thanks to the determination of colonial officials, anti-slavery organizations, and the thousands of African Americans who took refuge in Upper and Lower Canada and the Maritimes during this period, the colonies became a centre of abolitionist activity, as evidenced by the convention held here by John Brown in 1858. This struggle for human rights had a defining influence on African Canadian culture and helped shape Canada's values and institutions.